reportviewer c# windows forms pdf : Paste picture pdf SDK control API wpf web page asp.net sharepoint PoythressVernInTheBeginningWasTheWord31-part32

311
A
P
P
E
N
D I
 
B
-
Doubt within Postmodernism
But the path of the righteous is like the light of dawn,
which shines brighter and brighter until full day.
—Proverbs 4:18
O
nce we believe that God exists and that we are made in his image, we can eas-
ily come to see that language reflects the character of God. But in a skeptical 
environment the question inevitably arises as to whether we are simply projecting our 
ideas about man, and manufacturing a god in our image.
Is “God” Merely a Human Projection?
One interpretation of Sigmund Freud argues that God is a production of the human 
mind. A human extrapolates the figure of his father, and God is the father figure 
projected to infinite size. According to this view, “God” is an illusory copy of the 
human father. But is this really the way it is? Or is the human father a copy of God 
the original Father? If God created man in his own image (Gen. 1:26–27), we should 
expect exactly this type of relationship, except that God is the original rather than 
the copy.
周e Presence of Language
In fact it is not easy to eliminate God from the situation. Consider first the presence of 
language and the omnipresence of God. Language is clearly present within the “world” 
of my own consciousness and the world of my experience. Can we simply stop at that 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   311
5/14/09   4:46:48 PM
Paste picture pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
preview paste image into pdf; how to copy pictures from a pdf document
Paste picture pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy pdf image into powerpoint; copy image from pdf to pdf
312
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
point? But then do we stop only with our li瑴le subjective world of consciousness? Is 
there an external world?
One of the discussions within postmodernism concerns our access to the larger world. 
In describing postmodernism within my children’s school in the previous appendix, I 
concentrated on cultures. Postmodernism may appeal to the diversity of cultures, and 
the influences of our own culture, to raise questions about our access to moral truth. 
But a similar point can be made by focusing on languages rather than cultures, because 
language is closely related to culture.
English is my native tongue, and I did not create it. I inherited it in the context of 
socialization into American culture. It is a part of that culture. It sits in my mind without 
my having invited it in.
But now a postmodernist reasons: if this is so, how can my knowledge extend beyond 
the scope of my language? I know only within the bounds of the sphere of language, 
which means only within the bounds of my consciousness, my personal “world.” 周e 
external world, the world that is out there, is actually inaccessible to knowledge. I know 
only what has already undergone the transformation of entering into the inner, subjective 
world of English. Maybe English is actually not matched to the external world. How do 
I know? I can never “climb out” from within the encasements of my language, in order 
to observe the external world as it really is.
Postmodernist reasoning continues: even if I climb into the world of French, by 
learning French as a second language, I may retain doubts as to whether I have really 
understood French, because I have learned it only through the prior overlay of my En-
glish. Maybe English has interfered with my grasp of French.
1
And even if I come to 
be comfortable in French, how do I know whether French has difficulties analogous to 
English when it comes to my knowledge of the external world? I can never climb out 
from under all human languages simultaneously, in order to inspect in an unprejudiced 
manner the relation between the world as it really is and the world as I receive it within 
my encasement within English.
2
On the other hand, if I know that language was a gi晴 from God, I can still be confident. 
周e omnipresence of God guarantees that God himself extends the presence of language 
beyond my personal world. All the world conforms to God’s language, because God 
created it. By contrast, if I have ceased to believe in God or to rely on him, the situation 
1. Without ge瑴ing into technicalities, I may mention that expert study of language learning 
shows that this interference from a prior language is o晴en subtle, but nonetheless real. On the level 
of sound pa瑴erns, it shows itself in the fact that the English-speaking person who learns French 
later in life typically retains an English accent, betraying the overlay of English on his French. But 
the effects also occur on the level of meanings, because English meanings are overlaid on French 
expressions in the learning process.
2. Some postmodernists may see our description as still using the “old terminology” about an 
external world, rather than just giving up that allegedly unhelpful terminology. But we are talking 
about how postmodernism looks to those who are still looking from outside at its offerings. People 
are capable of mentally standing back from their situation, and asking what the world would look 
like if they could transcend their limitations. For a postmodernist to claim that such “standing 
back” is unhelpful presupposes godlike insight.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   312
5/14/09   4:46:48 PM
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy images from pdf; how to copy pictures from a pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
how to cut image from pdf file; copy and paste images from pdf
313
Appendix  B: Doubt within Postmodernism
becomes ominous. 周e very presence of language in all my experience can be seen as 
something sinister. Maybe it is keeping me from the world as it really is, rather than being 
a tool for revealing the world as it really is. Skepticism threatens to take hold.
周e Power of Language
Similar observations hold with respect to the power and the meanings of language. First, 
consider the power of language. When we use it, language gives us power to assimilate 
new experience. We classify, analyze, and compare that experience to our past grasp of 
experience, accumulated in the context of language. But does language have this power 
because it forces the new experience into its own preconceived mold?
We have heard about stubborn people who insist on fi瑴ing everything into their own 
mold. 周ey hold to a conspiracy theory about the assassination of John F. Kennedy, or 
a paranoid fear that people are “out to get them,” or a feeling of hopelessness, in which 
they feel that they are chronically unlucky and that therefore they will never succeed in 
life. But could these extreme cases show us, by their striking extremity, what is true more 
subtly with all of us? Does our own language force our experience into its mold?
周e difficulties increase when we consider the ties between language and culture. 
Within a particular culture, leaders use language to encourage the loyalty of those under 
them. Language can become a channel for propaganda, to manipulate people with lies. 
周rough propaganda, Nazism in Germany succeeded in drawing many of the German 
people into delusions about themselves and their enemies. Militant Islam has succeeded 
in drawing its adherents into its delusions. Language has helped to captivate people so 
that they see the world and their own duties in a distorted way.
Immanuel Kant thought that, because human reasoning was uniform, we might be able 
to show how people everywhere have the same practical, moral use for their ideas about 
God, morality, and human personality. Kant thought that practical morality might there-
fore be stable, even though he thought that human beings could never find God himself 
and have personal communion with him.
3
But if we lose confidence in the uniformity 
of the human mind, the plausible assumptions about God and morality break up into a 
diversity of cultures and a diversity of languages and a diversity of cultural opinions. At 
that point religion and morality become merely subjective opinions.
4
And, according to 
postmodernism, they become potentially dangerous opinions, because they cause fights 
between the people whose opinions differ.
Some postmodernists continue to press forward to the conclusions: since no one 
can really know, the only solution is to propagate postmodernism as the new “gospel,” 
3. For a critique of Kant, see Vern S. Poythress, “周e Quest for Wisdom,” in Resurrection 
and Eschatology: 周eology in Service of the Church, ed. Lane G. Tipton and Jeffrey C. Waddington 
(Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian & Reformed, 2008), 100–102.
4. Some sophisticated postmodernists try to go beyond the allegedly unhelpful dichotomy 
between objective and subjective. Some try to commend and implement their own moral opinions 
with conviction and vigor, while maintaining at the same time that those convictions are socially 
constructed. Will they be able to reproduce their morals in society at large, or will the larger society 
simply fall back on hedonism, consumerism, and selfishness?
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   313
5/14/09   4:46:48 PM
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned remove a specific image from PDF document page. Able to cut and paste image into another
how to copy and paste a pdf image; how to copy an image from a pdf to word
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
how to copy image from pdf to word; how to copy an image from a pdf file
314
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
the gospel that will redefine and tame the role of traditional religions and show us all 
how to live together in tolerance. We tolerate one another because, having received the 
enlightenment of postmodernism, we now know that our earlier fanatical adherence to 
our religious and moral preferences was an unwarranted dogmatism. Now we know that 
it is all a mere ma瑴er of subjective personal and cultural preferences. You like chocolate 
ice cream, and I like vanilla. You have one moral opinion and I have another. 周ere is no 
ultimate moral right or wrong. And we are at peace. So goes man’s new gospel of peace on 
earth among men (see chart B.1 for the relation of postmodernism to other religions).
Topic
Conventional Religions The Bible’s Message
Postmodernism
ultimate 
allegiance:
worship a culturally spec-
ified “divine” source
follow Jesus Christ as God 
in the flesh
serve humanity and the 
principle of tolerance
fundamental 
human problem:
humans are confused and 
weak
humans are in radical, 
desperate rebellion and 
sin
humans absolutize their 
own perspective
solution (way of 
salvation):
be good; or be 
enlightened
believe in Jesus Christ
reduce religious beliefs to 
subjective preferences
savior:
self
Jesus Christ
postmodernist insight
C
hart
B.1
Postmodernists’ new “gospel” may sound like good news to some, but it includes a 
profound skepticism about our ability to find ultimate truth.
But if we believe in the God presented in the Bible, we can be confident. God om-
nipotently determines both the structure of the external world and the structure of the 
language that we inherit. So our language is not designed by God for manhandling the 
external world in the process of perceiving it. It is designed to lead to the world rather 
than to distort it.
And yet there is another part to the story. A晴er man’s rebellion against God, wicked-
ness multiplied, and at one point God judged human wickedness by confusing human 
languages (the account is found in Gen. 11:1–9). Human language broke apart into 
many languages. And because this is a curse from God, there is no guarantee that any 
one human language, or any one human culture, has the unique key to access the truth. 
In fact, none of them do. To be cursed by God is also to be alienated from God, and to 
be alienated from God is to lose access to the source of all truth. We are wandering in 
profound darkness, unless God himself mercifully undertakes to cross the barrier that 
our alienation has erected. We ought to be pleasantly surprised that we have as much 
insight here and there as we do. So postmodernist suspicion about our access to truth is 
in part justified, when we focus on human beings who are alienated from God.
And, given our fallen human condition, how do we detect propaganda? How do we 
detect it if we happen to inhabit a culture filled with it? And how do we decide among 
multiple cultures, multiple religions, and multiple moral judgments? If God has not 
spoken, how are human beings on their own able to adjudicate between competing views? 
Postmodernists want us to discuss our views with one another. But what if two people 
make no progress, but continue to disagree? What if they disagree even more violently 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   314
5/14/09   4:46:48 PM
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
Open Global asax.cs, you can find the functions shown below. Creating a Home folder under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
paste picture into pdf preview; how to copy an image from a pdf in preview
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on IIS
Copy according dll files listed below under RasterEdge.DocImagSDK/Bin directory and paste to Xdoc.HTML5 RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. (see picture).
paste image into pdf form; how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word
315
Appendix  B: Doubt within Postmodernism
than before? And if they make “progress,” do they make progress under the influence of 
some hidden propaganda? Do they merely progress toward a corporate delusion?
And is the postmodernist idea of relativizing religions to their cultures yet one more 
delusion? Yes, it is. Postmodernism has simply assumed that God cannot reveal himself 
to human beings in the way that he does, in his work in Christ, in the Bible, and in general 
revelation as well (Rom. 1:18–23).
周e Meanings in Language
Finally, consider the meanings in language. Meanings, we observed, give access to knowl-
edge and truth, and point to the omniscience of God. But the growth of structural linguis-
tics in the twentieth century confirmed in massive detail what students of literature had 
long sensed, that meanings within language are not perfectly stable, in and of themselves. 
周e meaning of a particular word or a particular grammatical construction depends partly 
on relations to other meanings within language.
5
Language exists in relation to human culture. And human cultures are multiple. 周is 
multiplicity can threaten all stability in meaning. We are “in the soup,” with the threat of 
a total collapse of the stability of meaning. Some cultures may perhaps radically differ 
from the one in which we ourselves have grown up. And will meanings look the same 
within another culture?
If we are in communion with God, we can still be confident. God governs all the 
contexts. God is himself the final context for meaning. He is himself the fullness of mean-
ing, and he knows all things. His knowledge is the final context for the possibility of my 
knowledge. God created man in his own image, so that there remains a commonality to 
mankind. 周e languages and customs and pa瑴erns of life in other cultures of the world 
will retain a certain commonality based on the image of God. See chart B.2.
Postmodernist Doubts 
about Language
Possible 
Long-range 
Implication
Positive Role 
of Language
God as Original
language is a prison keeping 
us from reality
loneliness
presence
divine presence bringing 
language everywhere
language “constructs” a 
world
arbitrariness; 
or passivity, 
enslavement
control
divine control of language 
and world
language differences relativ-
ize meanings
meaninglessness meaning
divine impartation of mean-
ing to the world and to our 
language
C
hart
B.2
But if we are alienated from God, we will indeed make difficulties for ourselves. Alien-
ation from God produces in us distortions in our view of God, who is the final context 
for meaning. And distortions in the context produce distortions in the meanings that we 
5. See chapter 3.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   315
5/14/09   4:46:49 PM
C# Raster - Modify Image Palette in C#.NET
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB is used to reduce the size of the picture, especially in
how to copy pdf image; how to copy and paste an image from a pdf
C# Word - Document Processing in C#.NET
Open(docFilePath); //Get the main ducument IDocument doc = document.GetDocument(); //Document clone IDocument doc0 = doc.Clone(); //Get all picture in document
how to cut a picture from a pdf document; how to copy images from pdf file
316
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
started with. If we cease to have a stable context at all, the meanings may shi晴 around. 
But the solution is at hand: to come to God and find communion with him.
Language about God
Postmodernists have a ready reply to this Christian answer. Some of them might want 
to ask whether such an answer has really learned anything from the field perspective on 
language. 周ey would say that all our use of language about God takes place within the 
sphere of language and meaning. And these meanings shi晴 around, depending on the 
context, and depending on the perspective that we choose. Since meanings function only 
within the system of language, they cannot coherently and stably function to delimit 
the character of God, who is beyond the system. Postmodernist understanding of the 
character of language relativizes and destabilizes meaning, and so destroys the naïve as-
sumption that we possess stable affirmations about God within language.
Yes, we can understand this reasoning. But we do not need to live within it. 周e Chris-
tian answer has a different view of the world, and does not agree with the assumptions 
behind this kind of postmodernist reasoning. In particular, postmodernist contextualism 
has inherited from its modernist cultural ancestors the mistaken assumption that God 
is irrelevant to the function and character of language. And if it makes that assumption, 
it will indeed artificially produce a radical destabilizing of the meanings of any language 
that tries to talk about God.
Difficulties with a Postmodernist Approach to Language
So postmodernists have unconsciously absorbed at the beginning the conclusion that 
they reach at the end.
But there are some other difficulties for them. Postmodernists have arrived at their 
present view of things by a variety of routes and a variety of arguments, including the 
unconscious effects of education in “tolerance.” 周ough there may be a lot of variety, 
much of it goes back to ideas flowing out of the social sciences.
Anthropology has revealed not only the variety of cultures but also their internal 
coherence and self-sustaining powers. Sociology and political study have revealed the 
power of propaganda. Historical studies have revealed deep differences between the 
modern era and past centuries. Structural linguistics has played a role in the genera-
tion of Lévi-Strauss’s structural anthropology, as well as structuralism in the analysis of 
culture, and from there we have received poststructuralism. In addition, the sociology 
of knowledge has played a role. Post-Freudian psychology has played a role in raising 
the awareness of the degree to which our actions are not merely products of rational, 
intellectual decision making but are influenced by many forces of which we may not be 
aware. Marxism has shown us ways in which money and power and economic structures 
influence ideologies.
周e first difficulty for postmodernism is that the social sciences are founded on mod-
ernism. 周ey grew up largely from the a瑴empt to extend the methods of the natural 
sciences into the study of human beings and their cultures. 周ey assumed, as did the 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   316
5/14/09   4:46:49 PM
317
Appendix  B: Doubt within Postmodernism
natural sciences, that the human mind was competent and that the human language used 
by the social scientist was adequate and stable. Humans were capable of analyzing and 
understanding the pa瑴erns and laws of nature, whether it was subhuman nature or—for 
the social sciences—human nature itself.
And now postmodernism, building on the insights of the social sciences, has led to the 
conclusion that knowledge concerning human beings is suspect, because of the distortions 
of language and culture within which we are immersed. Postmodernism destabilizes not 
only conventional confidence about religion and morality but confidence in the social 
sciences as well. And if that confidence is unwarranted, the conclusions of the social 
sciences are unwarranted, the foundations for postmodernist argument disappear, and 
the whole edifice collapses.
周ere are several possible rescue operations that postmodernists can use. One is 
to say that, though there are personal biases here and there, the social sciences are still 
sound (more or less), because of their scientific character. 周ey rely on the Kantian 
distinction between the phenomenal and the noumenal. 周e phenomenal is what the 
scientist can observe. 周e noumenal is what we can conceive of as “really there” behind 
the phenomena. According to this viewpoint, we can confidently study the phenomenal, 
through scientific methodology, but the noumenal is inaccessible.
周e difficulty that remains here is that the bounds of what is phenomenal seem to shi晴 
around for the convenience of the argument. Within this viewpoint students might certainly 
study external human behavior, insofar as it is visible and audible and reducible to pointer 
readings on scientific instruments. 周at is a narrow boundary for what is phenomenal. But 
could they study meanings, either linguistic meanings or the human meanings that belong 
to cognition and to human social action? 周at would be a wide boundary. For example, 
human speech acts, like asserting, promising, commanding, and inquiring, are not merely 
sound waves in the air produced by human vocal chords, but are intelligible only when 
we are willing to think about their purposes. And that is a ma瑴er of meaning.
When we use language to describe meaningful human actions, we bring along in its trail 
all the accretions of the fabric of meanings, as well as the trail of our memories and our 
enculturation.
6
Postmodernism has to talk about these areas of meaning to make its point. 
And these areas are not pointer readings on scientific instruments. So either postmodern-
ism has made a hidden leap from pointer readings to human meanings, or it should admit 
that the social sciences need critical revision of their modernist foundations.
周e second rescue operation admits that the social sciences are based on unsound 
foundations. According to this viewpoint, once someone has arrived at the postmodernist 
conclusion, he looks back at the social sciences and sees that, in the end, there is no well-
grounded, objective social science, but only opinions backed up by data that have already 
been selected according to a cultural mind-set. 周e social sciences are relativized.
How then does postmodernism credibly establish itself, without the conclusions 
from the social sciences? How can we have confidence in a position at which we have 
arrived by untrustworthy means? 周e reply might be that we are supposed to have 
confidence because there is no real alternative. We must “muddle through” with a kind 
6. In fact, these meanings come in the trail even of investigations in natural science.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   317
5/14/09   4:46:49 PM
318
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
of pragmatic mind-set, because everything else has been destroyed. In addition, accord-
ing to this viewpoint, pragmatism or skepticism offers the best means for protecting 
minorities against oppression. But a question still haunts this worldview: why bother? 
Concern for the oppressed becomes, according to a sociological account, one more 
moral value that has been “constructed” into us by enculturation. Why even bother 
about minorities or about humanity, since we all die in the end? “Let us eat and drink, 
for tomorrow we die.”
7
Finally, we can look at postmodernist contextualism from outside. 周e idea that there 
is no real alternative to postmodernism is an illusory product of cultural conditioning. 
It is one more culturally authoritative pronouncement that the postmodernist would 
do well to distrust.
Dealing with Doubt
Postmodernist questioning concerning language and culture has succeeded in producing 
uneasiness and doubt and sometimes full-blown pragmatism in people’s lives. But such 
doubt need not be the endpoint. Rather, it can become a starting point for Christians 
to engage in discussion with postmodernists.
Has everything become doubtful? Not really. Ludwig Wi瑴genstein observed, “If you 
tried to doubt everything you would not get as far as doubting anything. 周e game of 
doubting itself presupposes certainty.”
8
Wi瑴genstein makes this statement in the context of his thinking about “language 
games.” Just as ordinary games are played in accordance with rules, so language usage 
takes place against the background of certain rules, even if, for a particular language, the 
rules have never been spelled out in an official rule book.
9
周ere are grammatical rules 
and rules for pronunciation. 周ere are specific ways in which we ask questions, receive 
answers, ask counterquestions, and make requests. Use of language involves sharing rules 
of language with conversation partners.
Doubting is one kind of language game. It presupposes rules, if it is to be a game at 
all. 周e game-player cannot doubt the rules themselves. Oh, yes, he could say out loud, 
“I doubt whether English has any rules, and whether the processes involved in doubting 
have any rules.” But when he says that, he simultaneously relies on the rules. Otherwise, 
7. First Corinthians 15:32, cited from Isaiah 22:13.
8. Ludwig Wi瑴genstein, On Certainty, ed. G. E. M. Anscombe and G. H. von Wright (New 
York: Harper & Row, 1969), 18e, proposition 115.
9. 周e analogy with games is imperfect, because the rules of a game are typically invented and 
codified in an explicit way, and a person who is teaching a game to someone else may frequently 
appeal to an explicit rule. Natural languages, by contrast, are learned primarily by examples and by 
intuition. Only later, in a grammar class, do we hear about rules. 周e explicit rules in the grammar 
class are secondary summaries concerning the regularities that are already there in language before 
the “rules” were explicitly formulated. If the word “rule” suggests an arbitrary rule that human beings 
consciously invent, the word “regularity” might be be瑴er for describing language. Or the word “norm” 
might serve, to emphasize that we can choose if we want to deviate from a particular regularity. But 
such deviations stand out as deviations, showing that people are still aware of the norm.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   318
5/14/09   4:46:49 PM
319
Appendix  B: Doubt within Postmodernism
within his own u瑴erance the word “doubt” would have no meaning. And for similar rea-
sons the other words in the same sentence, and the sentence as a complete grammatical 
construction, would have no meaning.
Without social rules for speech acts, the speech act of doubting that a person per-
forms with the sentence would also no longer be identifiable as a coherent speech act.
10
Moreover, without rules the sentence would no longer be identifiable as English, rather 
than French or Arabic. It would therefore become no be瑴er than nonsense syllables: 
“waheli forshamee paykomah lah.” In practice, everyone shows that he does not in fact 
doubt the rules. Even if his own assertions and his own theories are at variance with his 
practice, he shows that he knows be瑴er.
A person could a瑴empt to perform the game of doubting in the mind alone, without 
the use of words. But such an a瑴empt would be difficult at best. First, mental contempla-
tions are far from independent of language, even if we do not mentally whisper specific 
words to ourselves. 周ere is always a background of enculturation and language learning 
that we do not make conscious to ourselves, but that nevertheless molds the pa瑴erns of 
our thinking. 周e pa瑴ern of doubting is itself a pa瑴ern that we have learned from our 
culture. Second, how does the one who performs the game of doubting assure himself 
that he is engaged in the game of doubting, rather than some other game, and rather than 
some other activity that is not a game at all in the normal sense (e.g., sleeping or eating)? 
He must make reference to the word “doubt” or the rules associated with that word.
And then, even if our hypothetical doubter has succeeded and returned to tell us the 
tale, he cannot report it without once again submi瑴ing to the rules of a language. 周e 
ability to doubt is socially and culturally useless unless it can be transmi瑴ed. In particular, 
the postmodernist needs transmission, or else postmodernism would come to life and 
then also die, all within the bounds of the mind of a single individual.
It has become fashionable among some postmodernists to say that nothing is certain. 
But saying this is self-defeating. Even in the act of making their claim these people do 
have certainty concerning the rules of language, the game of doubt, and the meaning of 
the word “certain.” What is actually happening is closer to a proposal for displacing some 
previous alleged “certainties” of modernism with other, hidden certainties that lie in back 
of postmodernism. For example, they may be certain about the insights that they have 
obtained about the molding forces of culture, and about the moral commendability of 
tolerance. Only such certainty gives them the zeal to promote multicultural tolerance. 
People live on the basis of certainties, not merely on the basis of an unmotivated program 
to unmask the difficulties in others’ claims to certainty.
Whatever may be the certainties by which people live, they depend on the rules of 
language. And in doing so they depend on God, even if it is in spite of themselves.
11
10. In a somewhat different context, John R. Searle observes: “But the retreat from the commit-
ted use of words ultimately must involve a retreat from language itself, for speaking a language—as 
has been the main theme of this book—consists of performing speech acts according to rules, 
and there is no separating those speech acts from the commitments which form essential parts of 
them” (John R. Searle, Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language [Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press, 1969], 198). For a discussion of speech acts, see appendix H.
11. See chapters 8–9.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   319
5/14/09   4:46:49 PM
320
A
P
P
E
N
D
I
X
C
-
Non-Christian 周inking
I have seen a limit to all perfection,
but your commandment is exceedingly broad.
—Psalm 119:96
W
e need to look more closely at the difference between the truth of God and the 
counterfeits of Satan, in order to apply this difference to the study of language.
Satan’s alternative to serving God involves both antithesis to God and counterfeit-
ing. We can conveniently summarize both aspects in a diagram, the same diagram that 
John M. Frame has used to summarize Christian and non-Christian views of divine 
transcendence and immanence. 周e diagram (fig. C.1), originally labeled “周e Square 
of Religious Opposition,” is reproduced here just as it is found in Frame’s book on the 
knowledge of God.
1
Understanding Frame’s Square
周e le晴-hand side of the square, which includes the corners 1 and 2, represents the 
Christian position; more precisely, it represents the biblical teaching about the transcen-
dence of God (corner 1) and his immanence (corner 2). In the Bible, God expresses his 
1. John M. Frame, 周e Doctrine of the Knowledge of God (Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian & 
Reformed, 1987), 14. As far as I know, John Frame originated this diagrammatic representation, 
and subsequently it has been called “Frame’s square.” But many of the ideas represented in the 
diagram (though not the diagram itself) can also be found in Cornelius Van Til’s presuppositional 
apologetics. See, e.g., Cornelius Van Til, 周e Defense of the Faith, 2nd ed. (Philadelphia: Presbyterian 
& Reformed, 1963); Van Til, A Survey of Christian Epistemology, vol. 2 of In Defense of Biblical 
Christianity (n.p.: den Dulk Foundation, 1969).
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   320
5/14/09   4:46:49 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested