reportviewer c# windows forms pdf : How to cut a picture from a pdf document control application platform web page azure asp.net web browser PoythressVernInTheBeginningWasTheWord32-part33

321
Appendix  C: Non-Christian 周inking
transcendence through his authority and control; he expresses his immanence in presence. 
Frame relates the traditional categories of transcendence and immanence to his three-
fold description of the a瑴ributes of lordship, namely, authority, control, and presence.
2
In this book we have chosen to re-express these three aspects as meaning, control, and 
presence.
3
In fact, meaning can suggest transcendence, because all meaning ultimately 
originates in God; human thoughts about meanings imitate God’s thoughts. And meaning 
can suggest immanence, because creatures display God’s meanings, and because he can 
make his meanings known to us. So let us for the moment concentrate on control and 
presence. Control expresses transcendence, and presence expresses immanence. God’s 
word controls what he creates, and thereby expresses God’s transcendence. God’s word 
also impinges on the world, and so expresses his presence and his immanence. When 
God addresses Adam, we see his control in assigning Adam his tasks, and his presence in 
manifesting his goodness (and other a瑴ributes) in his speech. As Frame demonstrates at 
length, control and presence are not in tension with one another but are two harmonious 
aspects of God’s character. Precisely because God controls the entire universe, he can be 
present in it, in all its parts. Precisely by being present, he exerts his control.
According to Frame, non-Christian thought has frequently made transcendence and 
immanence into a problem, by misconstruing them. Transcendence supposedly means 
that God is far off and unknowable. (周is is represented by corner 3 in the square.) Im-
manence, on the other hand (according to this non-Christian view), means that God 
becomes immersed in creation and is virtually identical with it (corner 4).4 Taken together, 
these two corners are in deep tension. How can God be identical with creation and also 
be far off? 周e right-hand side of the square, which includes corners 3 and 4, represents 
the non-Christian position.
2. Frame, Doctrine of the Knowledge of God, 15–18.
3. See chapter 3.
4. Frame, Doctrine of the Knowledge of God, 15.
F
igure
C.1
Christian 
Position
Non-Christian 
Position
Transcendence
Immanence
1
2
4
3
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   321
5/14/09   4:46:50 PM
How to cut a picture from a pdf document - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy image from pdf to word document; copy images from pdf to powerpoint
How to cut a picture from a pdf document - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy image from pdf to word; how to copy images from pdf file
322
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
We cannot consider all the various kinds of non-Christian positions. Several religious 
systems, including atheism, Buddhism, and Vedantic Hinduism, deny that there is a 
personal God at all. But then “God” is replaced by whatever is ontologically ultimate; 
and that turns out to be inaccessible.
周e same diagram can be applied not only to questions of ontology (what exists?) 
but also to questions of epistemology (what do we know?). In a biblical, Christian view, 
God’s transcendence is expressed by the fact that he controls what we know about him, 
and that he is the final standard for knowledge about him (meaning and authority). 
God’s immanence is expressed by the fact that he actually makes himself known, both 
in the creation (Rom. 1:18–23) and by addressing human beings in language (as in 
Gen. 1:28–30).
By contrast, non-Christian thought tends to say that God is unknowable (non-Christian 
transcendence, corner 3), and also that when we nevertheless do think about him, we can 
use ourselves and our own rational powers or our own experience as the final arbiter (non-
Christian immanence, corner 4). 周e view that God or ultimate reality is unknowable has 
been dubbed non-Christian “irrationalism.” 周e view that our own rationality is the final 
judge has been dubbed non-Christian “rationalism.”
5
Again these two are in tension. How 
can we confidently use our powers (corner 4) if God is unknowable (corner 3)?
Antithesis
Now let us relate this square to what we have observed about Satanic deceit. Satan is 
antithetical to God, and that antithesis is represented by the contrast between the le晴-
hand and the right-hand sides of the square. Satan’s speeches to Eve put forward an 
alternative view of God, and an alternative view concerning knowing God and God’s 
will. 周e alternative view is represented in the right-hand side of the square.
周is alternative view contradicts God’s speech in all three aspects: control, meaning, and 
presence. 周at is to say, it contradicts God’s speech with respect to its view of transcendence 
(control), and its view of immanence (presence). Satan presents God as someone you 
cannot trust, which makes God far off and virtually unknowable. 周is is the non-Christian 
view of transcendence (corner 3). At the same time, Satan invites man to “play god,” to be 
autonomous, to make up his own mind. He thus implies that human powers should take 
control of the entire situation. 周is is the non-Christian view of immanence (corner 4). 
Both contradict the Christian view, the view on the le晴-hand side of the square.
We need to add another detail. 周e diagonal lines that cross the square signify the 
contradictions. Non-Christian immanence (corner 4) contradicts Christian transcen-
dence (corner 1), while non-Christian transcendence (corner 3) contradicts Christian 
immanence (corner 2). For man to play god is non-Christian immanence, corner 4, which 
contradicts God’s claim to authority and control (corner 1). For Satan to imply that God 
cannot be trusted makes God far off or unknowable, which is corner 3. 周at contradicts 
the trustworthiness, clarity, and accessibility of God’s word in corner 2.
5. 周e terms come from Cornelius Van Til. See, e.g., Van Til, Defense of the Faith, 123–128.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   322
5/14/09   4:46:50 PM
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; library SDK allows developers to cut out certain com is professional provider of document, content and
how to copy pdf image to word document; how to paste picture on pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
NET image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF document file page
copy picture from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy pdf image to powerpoint
323
Appendix  C: Non-Christian 周inking
Counterfeiting
In addition, we have observed that Satan is a counterfeiter. In Genesis 3 his distortions 
of the truth are close to the truth. 周e counterfeiting is represented by the horizontal 
lines in the square. Satan may use language that seems to be close to the true view of 
transcendence (corner 1) in order to represent a false view of transcendence (corner 3). 
Cornelius Van Til describes this similarity as “formal” similarity. 周at is, the expressions 
and formulations on the non-Christian side sound similar to those used on the Christian 
side. In some cases the expressions may even be exactly the same. But in the end they 
mean something different.
周e formal similarity is represented by the horizontal line joining corner 1 to corner 3. 
Similarly, the horizontal line joining corner 2 to corner 4 represents a formal similarity. 周e 
language used in corner 4 to describe non-Christian immanence is a counterfeit of the lan-
guage used in corner 2 to describe Christian immanence. Even the word “immanence” itself 
illustrates this process. “Immanence” means one thing to a non-Christian and another thing 
to a Christian. Or consider the word “exalted,” which is another word for expressing God’s 
transcendence. Does it mean that God is exalted over human beings and the world in his 
complete control and authority? Or does it mean that he is far off and unknowable? It could 
mean different things, depending on whether the context is Christian or non-Christian.
We can see the differences in meaning between the two sides when we look at Satan’s 
expression “you will be like God.” Adam and Eve were already like God, because they 
were made in the image of God and expressed the presence of God in their own persons 
(corner 2). But Satan intended to put into his words the meaning of autonomy, and of 
being a self-sufficient judge, which is corner 4.
Now we can apply Frame’s square to the area of language. 周e Christian view says that 
God can speak clearly (corner 2). When he speaks, his word has authority over us (corner 
1). Satan’s counterfeiting endeavors to obscure or contradict both aspects. He claims that 
God does not speak or that his meaning is not clear (corner 3). And he invites human 
beings to make their own independent judgments about what is said (corner 4).
周e Universality of the Pa瑴ern of Deceit
Satan’s pa瑴ern of opposition is depicted in the book of Revelation, and this pa瑴ern is 
always fundamentally the same. Hence, the pa瑴ern depicted in Frame’s square is always 
the same. It will reproduce itself, in one form or another, in all human thought that re-
mains in rebellion against God. 周e pa瑴ern describes not only “Christian atheists” and 
Barth and Bultmann, whom Frame mentions,
6
but non-Christian world religions, Greek 
philosophers, and modern atheists.
In particular, the pa瑴ern appears in our human use of language and in our a瑴itudes 
toward language. 周e rules of language manifest the presence of God. But non-Christians 
are rebelling against God, and the rebellion will express itself in an altered view with 
6. Referring to the “God-is-dead” movement, Frame says that “周e ‘Christian atheists’ used 
to say that God abandoned His divinity and no longer exists as God” (Frame, Doctrine of the 
Knowledge of God, 13–14).
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   323
5/14/09   4:46:50 PM
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
VB.NET image cropping application to cut out an VB.NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
paste picture into pdf; paste jpg into pdf preview
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo to remove a specific image from PDF document page. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF
copy images from pdf file; how to paste a picture into a pdf document
324
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
respect to the rules of language. On the one hand, according to a non-Christian view 
of immanence, the rules of language will become rules to be controlled by man in his 
would-be autonomy. On the other hand, according to a non-Christian view of transcen-
dence, the source of the rules becomes unknown. 周e non-Christian will want to conceal 
from himself how God presents his a瑴ributes and his presence in the rules. 周ough the 
details may vary, we can expect that rebellion against God, and the a瑴empt to suppress 
the knowledge of God (Rom. 1:18–23), will always have some effect.
But the non-Christian pa瑴ern is not always obvious, because counterfeiting under-
takes to conceal the pa瑴ern. And people are inconsistent. Every user of language secretly 
depends on God, the real God described by the le晴-hand side of the square. At the same 
time, people are in flight from God, trying to make the right-hand side work. 周ey are 
relying on the le晴-hand side while they try to live on the right-hand side.
Traveling between the two sides is a recipe for frustration. In fact, it would be a recipe 
for complete failure were it not that God shows mercy in some ways even to rebels, and 
o晴en holds them back from the worst consequences of their rebellion (Gen. 11:6–7; 
Acts 14:17).
周e pa瑴ern of counterfeiting also shows itself in our very use of language. Human 
communication can take the form of half-truths—half-truths about God, or half-truths 
about other things that we want to manipulate for our own selfish benefit. 周e mixture 
of truth and error shows how serious are the difficulties in which we find ourselves.
Modernism and Postmodernism
周e pa瑴ern of non-Christian thinking also appears in the relation between modernism and 
postmodernism. Modernism emphasizes human rationality and its capability. And rational-
ity is a good thing, enabling us to understand God and his communication to us (Christian 
immanence, corner 2). But what does modernism mean by “rationality”? Modernism slides 
the meaning over to non-Christian immanence, corner 4. Rationality in practice means 
the ultimacy of human reasoning, acting independent of fellowship with God. Modernism 
also has confidence in human language as a tool for understanding. But this confidence 
turns out to be a form of non-Christian immanence: language is simply human, and can be 
confidently used in isolation from communion and communication with God.
Postmodernism, by contrast, worries about whether truth is inaccessible. It thinks 
that truths about God, religion, and morality can never be confidently known. 周at 
viewpoint is a form of non-Christian transcendence, corner 3. In part, postmodernism 
is reacting against the overconfidence in human reason in modernism. If modernism is 
rationalistic in tendency, postmodernism is irrationalistic. It reacts to the non-Christian 
immanence in corner 4 by emphasizing non-Christian transcendence in corner 3. And 
postmodernism also has a view of language. Language is seen as a socially constructed 
confinement that we cannot escape. So language in its limitations cannot access final 
truth. 周at view expresses a non-Christian idea of transcendence, corner 3.
But at a deeper level modernism and postmodernism belong together. 周ey are both 
cultural movements that cast off dependence on God. Postmodernism, as the later move-
ment, builds on modernism by continuing the practice of independence from God, and, 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   324
5/14/09   4:46:50 PM
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
copy image from pdf to powerpoint; copy images from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo or all image objects from PDF document in .NET
paste image on pdf preview; cut and paste pdf image
325
Appendix  C: Non-Christian 周inking
if anything, pushes it further. Both movements, to the degree that they are consistent, 
share in an essentially non-Christian view about knowledge, and about language as well. 
Modernism emphasizes rationality and corner 4. But human rationality now and then 
will begin to inspect itself and admit that human beings are limited. Beyond those limits 
is the unknown, and this unknown still has the character of non-Christian transcendence, 
corner 3. Conversely, postmodernism’s emphasis on doubt and skepticism about “big” 
claims is supported underneath by a rationalistic analysis of language and culture that 
thinks it sees the limits. So a principle of non-Christian immanence in corner 4 remains 
present under the surface.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   325
5/14/09   4:46:50 PM
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
After getting an image / picture / photo with image capturing device, in RasterEdge.com is professional provider of document, content and imaging solutions
copy image from pdf; how to cut and paste image from pdf
326
A
P
P
E
N
D I
 
D
-
Platonic Ideas
Follow the pa瑴ern of sound words that you have heard from me, 
in the faith and love that are in Christ Jesus.
—2 Timothy 1:13
t
he Greek philosopher Plato has had much influence on Western civilization, in-
cluding Western views about thought and about language. We cannot here cover 
the field, but we may sketch some ways in which a biblically based approach to language 
differs from Plato.
1
Plato’s dialogues reflect on key ideas, such as the idea of justice, of piety, of beauty, and 
of truth. Plato thought that the world of the senses was only a shadow of the real world of 
“forms” or ideal abstractions, such as the ideals of justice and beauty. 周e supreme form 
or ideal was the form of the good. And there would also be ideal forms for many kinds 
of things: a form for dog, horse, cow, goat, and so on. 周e goal of the philosopher’s life 
was to know these forms or ideals.
周e Connection with Language
Plato discussed not only these ideal forms but also how we could come to know them. He 
focused on thought. But he wrote in language. And the ideal forms corresponded to key words 
in language, words like “justice” and “goodness.”
2
So indirectly Plato suggested implications 
1. See also John M. Frame, “Greeks Bearing Gi晴s,” in Revolutions in Worldview: Understanding 
the Flow of Western 周ought, ed. W. Andrew Hoffecker (Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian & Reformed, 
2007), 1–36; Vern S. Poythress, “周e Quest for Wisdom,” in Resurrection and Eschatology: 周eology 
in Service of the Church, ed. Lane G. Tipton and Jeffrey C. Waddington (Phillipsburg, NJ: Presby-
terian & Reformed, 2008), 96–100.
2. Of course, Plato used terms in the Greek language; but the challenges are similar in English.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   326
5/14/09   4:46:50 PM
327
Appendix  D: Platonic Ideas
for language. Language and thought are related.
We can make a step in understanding Plato’s approach by contrasting it with our own 
approach to words. Words exist in a multitude of relationships, and can be viewed from 
a multitude of perspectives, such as the particle, wave, and field perspectives.
3
Plato’s 
view uses the particle perspective as if it were the whole truth. Each form is a particle, 
essentially independent of everything else.
Like all units of human action, words possess contrastive-identificational features, 
variation, and context (distribution).
4
Plato wants only the contrastive-identificational 
features. Pure ideas of a Platonic sort would be like pure contrastive features, pure catego-
ries without any necessary connection with the particularities of, for example, particular 
dogs. Variation would be dispensed with. Of course Plato would have admi瑴ed that a 
particular horse was in a sense a “variation” or a particular manifestation of the ideal 
form of horse. But the variation was completely secondary in comparison to the ideal. 
周is demotion of the particulars is characteristic of Plato.
In addition, Platonic categories would be without connection to the contexts in which 
we observe dogs and use whole sentences to talk about them. Context (distribution) 
would be dispensed with. 周e result would be an idealization, to be sure. But it would 
also be unitarian. God is not that way. And God’s world is not made that way. We may 
try to refashion the world to an ideal in our minds, and make the reality conform. But 
that is a reduction.
周e One and the Many
Many philosophers have struggled with what to do about the relation of particulars to 
universals.
5
周e particulars are the individual horses; the universal is the general idea of 
the horse. How do the two relate? Plato’s answer was to emphasize the priority and reality 
of the one, the universal form. But then how do the particulars ever come about?
周e problem of the one and the many finds resolution in Trinitarian doctrine. God 
is both one and three, with no “priority” of oneness to threeness. God is the archetypal 
instance of one and many. Created things offer ectypal or derivative instances of one 
and many. In language, contrastive-identificational features describe the one, the unity 
of many manifestations. Variation describes the many.
Since the interlocking of identity, variation, and context (distribution) reflects Trinitar-
ian coinherence, the interlocking is not accidental. Nor is it an unfortunate byproduct of 
our being in the body and being subject to the senses, as Plato might have claimed. Nor 
is it something that belongs only to words but not to pure thought. It is built into human 
existence and human experience, to be sure. But it is that way among us humans because 
it is first of all a pa瑴ern in God himself, who is the archetype for the one and the many.
Plato pictured the ideal forms as existing in a realm of pure thought. So how did the 
material world come to be? In one of his dialogues, the Timaeus, Plato introduced a 
3. See chapter 7.
4. See chapter 19 on behavioremes.
5. See chapter 33.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   327
5/14/09   4:46:50 PM
328
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
“demiurge,” a kind of god who looked at the forms and created material things using the 
forms as his model. But this demiurge was in the end inferior to the forms, since the forms 
dictated the kind of material things that he was supposed to make. Plato’s demiurge is 
godlike, in some ways; but he is a second-rate god, a counterfeit of the true God.
Moreover, Plato’s view involves non-Christian thinking about transcendence and 
immanence.
6
Plato implies that, if and when a human being grasps the ideal forms, he 
grasps ultimate reality, and he is master of ultimate reality. Human rationality is then 
the standard for judging everything. 周is triumph of human reason is a form of non-
Christian immanence (corner 4 in Frame’s square; see appendix C), where humans are 
the ultimate judges. At the same time, the forms are in practice inaccessible, since human 
beings in their bodily existence always contend with the interference of the senses and 
of the impure particulars, the particular horses or goats or dogs that exist in the material 
world. 周is inaccessibility of the forms represents non-Christian transcendence (corner 
3 in Frame’s square), in which ultimate reality is unknowable.
Christianized Platonism
Christians adapted Plato’s ideas to a Christian framework by placing the ideal forms 
within God’s mind. In this version the forms are no longer independent of and superior to 
God but are simply aspects of God’s own thinking. 周is view is more satisfactory, since 
it no longer tries to subject God to something outside him that is alleged to be superior 
to him. We could also translate this view into a view of language, in which words and 
language are first of all in God’s mind, and then in us.
But Christianized Platonism has not yet eliminated Plato’s view that the one, the 
universal, is prior to the many, the particulars. 周e form of horse, which now exists in 
God’s mind, is prior to the many horses that God creates according to the pa瑴ern of the 
ideal horse that is in his mind. But to say that is a half-truth.
A Christian View of Horses
God as Creator has planned to create not only each individual horse, but the whole spe-
cies of horse. God’s plan, within his mind, is prior to the horses. His plan is also prior to 
the creation of the whole species of horses, the universal group. 周e created world has a 
universal, namely, the species of horses, and the particulars, namely, individual horses. 
周is is a created one and many. Behind this created one and many lies God’s plan for both 
one and many. 周e one and the many are equally ultimate in his plan, in his mind. 周ey 
must be, because both reflect the Trinitarian character of God, who is one and many.
周inking about one and many is closely related to two perspectives on language 
that we have considered. 周e focus on the one, on the universal, corresponds to the 
contrastive-identificational features belonging to words (or other pieces of language). 
周e word “horse” is one word. It is the same word, every time it occurs. 周e focus on 
the many corresponds to variation. Each occurrence of the word “horse” has its own 
6. See appendix C.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   328
5/14/09   4:46:51 PM
329
Appendix  D: Platonic Ideas
pronunciation, loud or so晴. It belongs to a distinct sentence, u瑴ered within a distinct 
context. But we should not forget context (distribution). Words occur in contexts to 
which they are related. Analogously, horses occur in contexts—contexts with other 
horses, contexts in relation to human beings who care for them, and contexts of fields 
in which they graze and run.
God’s plan for horses has a context, namely, his plan for the rest of the world with 
which horses interact. God’s plan for all of history is one. It is unified by the harmony of 
his own mind—unified, ultimately by the harmony of the three persons of the Trinity 
in coinherence. Even within God’s mind, there is no isolated “idea” of horse. It cannot 
be isolated, because the persons of the Trinity are coinherent. And derivative from this 
archetypal coinherence, the contrast, variation, and context (distribution) of “horse” 
are coinherent.
Cross-cultural Universality and Particularity
Now let us consider the relation of Platonic thought to the diversity of languages and 
cultures. Plato thought of the ideal forms as ideals that were absolutely the same for all 
thinking human beings, within all cultures. For Plato, human rationality, when it was 
sound, was completely universal, with no variation. It was the same for all human be-
ings. According to his view, one universal rationality was trying to grasp one, universal 
form—let us say, the form of horse. At this level of thought, no room existed for cultural 
variation. 周is vision of human unity is, in spirit, unitarian rather than Trinitarian.
What does human unity look like when we try to take into account the Trinitarian 
character of God? 周ere is still a deep unity in all sound human thinking, since God is 
one and all human beings are made in his image. But the diversity of persons in God 
is reflected at a human, ectypal level. Human beings are diverse in their thinking. 周at 
can be destructive, when errors and sins and pride corrupt our thinking. But within the 
body of Christ, renewed by the Holy Spirit, not all diversity is disruptive. Rather, it is 
enriching.
What does this diversity look like? We may use some simple examples. Let us begin 
with horses. My wife’s friend keeps horses. She trains them. She trains young riders. She 
knows the individual dispositions and bodily infirmities of each horse. Each horse be-
comes a friend. For her, the idea of horse is colored by her experience with each horse.
Now compare her experience with a farmer trying to drive wild horses off his farm-
land. Do the two have the same “concept” of horse? Does either have the same “concept” 
as a veterinarian who specializes in horses? Or a zoologist who studies the relation of 
domestic horses to the other members of the horse family (Equidae)? Or the specialized 
researcher who is studying how best to cure horse hoof canker?
All of these people may have some concept of the species of domestic horse. But their 
concept of the species represents only one aspect of God’s knowledge. God’s knowledge 
is comprehensive. It includes all the details that any one of these horse people knows. 
It includes knowing the entire perspective that one person brings to horses, against the 
background of his interests and his experience. It is a reduction to smash this into a 
Platonic universal—horseness.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   329
5/14/09   4:46:51 PM
330
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
If the people are all knowledgeable rather than deluded, they carry genuine knowledge. 
It is all true. 周ey complement one another, rather than fighting over whose concept of 
horse is “right.” Each can learn from the others. In the process, each grows to an enlarged 
appreciation of God’s comprehensive knowledge, which includes knowledge of the rela-
tion of horses to the whole of his plan.
周e diversity of different views of horses holds even among people who use the same 
language, say, English. We should expect that inspection of other languages will further 
highlight diversity. Other languages may have vocabulary that does not match English. 
周ey may, for example, make distinctions between colors or tempers or breeds of horses 
that are not common among English-speaking people. 周ey may have classifications of 
types of animals that cut across our familiar classifications. But this should not disturb us. 
We classify whales and dolphins as mammals from the standpoint of technical scientific 
classification, and we can still classify them colloquially as “fish” from the standpoint 
of their bodily shape and watery habitat. Partial classifications can be true, as long as 
they do not make sweeping claims that exclude all other perspectival classifications by 
automatically pronouncing them “false.”
Perspectives
Diversity in spatial perspectives offers a simple analogy for understanding differences 
in views of horses, as well as differences in vocabulary and other differences between 
languages. Suppose we have several people looking at one house. Abe sees my house 
from an airplane. Barb sees my house from the street. Charlo瑴e sees my house from the 
backyard. Dorothy sees my house while si瑴ing in my living room. Is what each of them 
sees false or wrong? Of course not. Mathematically it is possible to “translate” between 
these perspectives with equations that calculate the differences in angle from any of the 
vantage points. And we can translate between perspectives in a way that anticipates what 
objects will be out of sight because they are blocked by some closer object. 周e perspec-
tives are all valid, and all the people see what is real. 周ey see my house.
God planned all these perspectives. God knows them all exhaustively. God endorses 
them as genuinely what human beings are supposed to experience. He also planned the 
relations between perspectives, which we experience when we move from one location 
to another.
So also, God planned all the perspectives on horses. He planned all the languages. He 
endorses their use; these languages are genuinely what human beings are supposed to 
be using. By contrast to this richness, Platonic ideas would allegedly be purely the same 
for all peoples in all languages. 周ey collapse richness, and reduce it to unity without 
diversity.
Within language, the difficulties of sinful corruption do enter in. But the removal of 
sin does not require the removal of other kinds of genuine diversity. Why? Because it is 
diversity in unity: God is Trinitarian. 周e diversity of spatial perspectives are unified by 
our unified human understanding, allowing us to translate between them. 周e unity of 
our human understanding reflects the archetypal unity in God’s understanding. But it 
does not wipe out or make unreal the genuineness of Dorothy’s particular experience 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   330
5/14/09   4:46:51 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested