reportviewer c# windows forms pdf : Copy picture to pdf control software platform web page windows asp.net web browser PoythressVernInTheBeginningWasTheWord34-part35

341
Appendix  F: Translation 周eory
a structurally simple level, and (3) to generate the stylistically and semantically equivalent 
expression in the receptor language.
14
As Nida indicates in the surrounding discussion, an approach of this type looks prom-
ising particularly for languages whose formal, grammatical structures do not match well 
those of Indo-European languages such as English, German, Greek, and Latin. All lan-
guages show “remarkably similar kernel structures.”
15
So if we can decompose meaning 
into these kernels, we can transfer it more easily from one language to another. In addi-
tion, the nonkernel structures do not necessarily reveal directly the underlying semantic 
relations. For example, the sentence “he hit the man with a stick”
16
may mean either that 
he used the stick as an instrument, or that the man who received the blow had a stick in 
hand. Such ambiguous constructions o晴en have to be translated differently depending 
on the underlying meaning. Nida therefore proposed a three-stage process, in which the 
first stage involves decomposition into underlying kernel meanings.
周e three-stage process promises benefits. But it comes at the cost of leaving out much 
of the richness of meaning that Nida expounded in the immediately preceding chapter. 
We have a breathtaking reduction here. Let us list some of its features.
First, we engage in reduction by ignoring all the idiosyncrasies of an individual 
speaker.
Second, we reduce meaning to the meaning of sentences, and no longer consider 
the interaction with situational context or the larger textual context of discourse. It 
should be noted in Nida’s favor that elsewhere he explicitly called for a瑴ention to the 
larger contexts of paragraphs and discourse.
17
But this sound advice of his is at odds 
with the transformational generative model of his day, which confined its analysis to the 
sentence and its constituents. 周e reduction to considering only sentence meaning, and 
to considering sentences one by one, leads to ignoring discourse cohesion, including 
cohesion achieved through the repetition of key words. 周is reduction then inhibits the 
reader from seeing meaning relations not only within individual books of the Bible but 
in later allusions to earlier passages. 周e important theme of promise and fulfillment in 
the Bible is damaged.
周ird, we reduce all figurative expressions to a literal level, since the core formal 
structures in transformational generative grammar deal only with literal meanings.
Fourth, we reduce meaning from a richness including referential, emotive, expressive, 
and other dimensions to the single plane of “linguistic meaning.”
Fi晴h, we assume that meanings in the original are all clear and transparent. 周is as-
sumption may be approximately true with some types of source texts on technical subjects 
14. Nida, Toward a Science of Translating, 68. We can see the three-stage process worked out 
more explicitly and practically in Nida and Taber, 周eory and Practice of Translation, 104.
15. Nida, Toward a Science of Translating, 68. 周ese kernel structures are similar to some of 
what we discussed earlier when we focused on sentences.
16. An example used in ibid., 61.
17. “. . . expert translators and linguists have been able to demonstrate that the individual 
sentence in turn is not enough. 周e focus should be on the paragraph, and to some extent on the 
total discourse” (Nida and Taber, 周eory and Practice of Translation, 102).
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   341
5/14/09   4:46:53 PM
Copy picture to pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste picture into pdf preview; how to copy a picture from a pdf file
Copy picture to pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy images from pdf to word; copy image from pdf to powerpoint
342
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
or on mundane affairs; but it is far from being true with the Bible, which contains both 
obscurities and depths.
18
Sixth, we reduce the meaning of a complex nonkernel sentence to its constituent 
kernels.
19
周is move is a genuine reduction, since meanings in fact do not reduce in 
a simple way to the meanings of kernel structures. Consider the expression “God’s 
love.” Can we reduce this expression to the kernel structure “God loves you”? In many 
contexts, this involves a decided change of meaning, since the expression “God’s love” 
does not indicate the object of his love. Supplying an object such as “you” or “people,” 
as we must do in a kernel sentence, forces upon us greater definiteness than the original 
expression.
20
A similar problem o晴en occurs with passives. “Bill was overwhelmed” is less definite 
than “Something overwhelmed Bill.” For one thing, the passive expression does not 
indicate whether or not some one particular thing did the overwhelming. Maybe Bill 
felt overwhelmed, but there was no easily identifiable source for the feeling. Or maybe 
some other person, rather than some circumstance, overwhelmed Bill. 周e running back 
charged into him and overwhelmed him on the football field.
Similar problems occur when the back-transformation into a kernel requires us to 
supply an object. For example, the expression “Charlo瑴e’s kiss” gets transformed into 
the kernel sentence “Charlo瑴e kissed someone.” But did she kiss her dog? 周e “some-
one” in question may be an animal rather than a human being. 周e word someone does 
not then represent the possibilities quite adequately. Or did she throw a kiss to a large 
audience? Or did she just make a kissing sound, without directing her lips toward any 
particular someone? If we produce a kernel sentence to represent meaning, we expect 
it to have an object. But with any object we supply, such as “someone,” we change the 
meaning by introducing assumptions that are not contained in the vaguer expression, 
“Charlo瑴e’s kiss.”
21
周e reduction arises partly from reductive moves that have already taken place 
within the theory of transformational generative grammar, which Nida was using as a 
18. 周e point about depth versus transparency is made eloquently by Stephen Pricke瑴, Words 
and the Word (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986), 4–36.
19. Compare Noam Chomsky, Aspects of the 周eory of Syntax (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 
1965), 132.
20. Still another problem exists with an expression like “the love of God.” 周is expression may 
indicate either the love that God has toward someone, or the love that someone has toward God, 
depending on the context. And some contexts may deliberately play on the potential ambiguity. 
21. Generative grammar in 1965 could potentially handle some of this kind of complexity using 
so-called “subcategorization rules.” But such rules were still an abstraction that exists several steps 
away from the particular changes in meaning-nuances that we may observe in actual sentences 
in natural languages.
Linguists can escape this problem temporarily by conceiving of the kernel sentences not as 
sentences in English but as abstract representations. But they are still on the horns of a dilemma. 
Either they try to represent every nuance of meaning in the abstract representation, which would 
make it intolerably complex and defeat the purpose of having it be a generalized representation, 
or else they admit that fully concrete English has nuances of meaning not captured in the abstract 
representation.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   342
5/14/09   4:46:53 PM
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy picture from pdf to word; paste image into pdf reader
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
cut image from pdf online; how to copy images from pdf to word
343
Appendix  F: Translation 周eory
model. 周ey also occur because somewhere along the line people may begin to assume 
that the transformations in question are meaning-preserving. But they actually change 
meaning, as Nida admi瑴ed when he talked about “two levels of linguistic meaning,” 
the second of which is “supplied by the particular terminal construction.”
22
Moreover, 
from a semantic point of view, the speaker does not necessarily start psychologically 
with a kernel sentence.
23
周e speaker may not know or may not be concerned to supply 
semantically absent information that would have to be supplied in order to construct 
a kernel structure.
In fact, generative grammar originated as an a瑴empt to describe grammar, not mean-
ing. It so happened that generative transformations connected sentences with analogous 
meanings. But no one could guarantee that the meanings would be identical. Sometimes 
differences in meaning are obvious. Compare the question “Did you feed the dog?” with 
the analogous statement “You fed the dog.” 周ese two are transformationally related. 
But they differ in meaning because one is a question. By that very fact it has a different 
function in communication than the corresponding statement.
To insist that the meanings must be identical constitutes a reduction.
24
It may still 
be a useful reduction. 周e linguist who uses the reductive process achieves rigor and 
insight of various kinds. But he also puts himself and his disciples in a position where 
they may forget the reduction, or refuse to acknowledge it. 周ey then force meaning in 
human discourse to match their “scientific” results, rather than forcing their science to 
acknowledge the full reality of human communication.
22. Nida, Toward a Science of Translating, 65.
23. In fact, Chomsky warned against understanding generative grammar as a psychological 
theory (Chomsky, Aspects of the 周eory of Syntax, 9).
24. 周ere are complexities about how we might treat transformations. In Syntactic Structures 
(1957) Chomsky postulated a simple system of phrase structure rules leading to a relatively 
simple set of kernel sentences. Under this schema, questions were to be derived from statements 
by applying the optional transformation “T
q
” (p. 63). But by 1965 Chomsky had incorporated the 
question marker into the base structure, and the question transformation became obligatory, so 
that a transformation analogous to T
q
could preserve the additional meaning involved in asking 
a question (see Chomsky, Aspects of the 周eory of Syntax, 132).
Obviously, over a period of time we could incorporate more and more previously neglected 
meaning aspects into the base grammar, in hopes of achieving a more adequate account of mean-
ing. But the cost is increasing complexity in the base. In the most extreme case, we might imagine 
a situation where all the lost meaning has been reintegrated; but the cost would likely be a hor-
rendous complexity. In fact, for the sake of rigorous testability, generative grammar chooses in 
spirit to seek reduction rather than fullness of meaning.
In 1964 Nida did not fully endorse Chomsky’s later (1965) view that transformations must 
be meaning-preserving. Whether because he was working with Chomsky’s 1957 view in Syntactic 
Structures, or because he saw the reductionism inherent in generative grammar, he affirmed that 
some extra meaning is contributed by the “particular terminal construction” (Toward a Science of 
Translating, 65). But if so, it vitiates the a瑴empt to translate by reducing meaning to the underlying 
kernel structures (as Nida proposed in Toward a Science of Translating, 68). 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   343
5/14/09   4:46:53 PM
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
copying images from pdf files; how to cut picture from pdf file
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
paste picture to pdf; how to copy text from pdf image to word
344
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
Scientific Rigor
周e occurrence of the words “science” and “scientific” in the discussions can also signal 
a difficulty. Many have observed that social scientists have o晴en envied the rigor and 
prestige of natural sciences, and have struggled to achieve the same level of rigor within 
their own fields. But a field dealing with human beings contains innate complexities and 
multidimensional relations. In such a situation, rigor and fullness of meaning will o晴en 
be like two ends of a seesaw. If one goes up, the other must go down.
25
Nida’s 1964 book shows some telltale symptoms of this difficulty. He entitles the 
book, Toward a Science of Translating. Its title already introduces a tension: will we have 
“science,” so-called, with its ever-increasing rigor? If so, will we put ourselves at odds 
with the centuries-old philological and hermeneutical instinct that interpretation and 
translation alike are arts, not sciences?
Yes, we may have maxims for interpretation or translation. At points, we may have 
highly technical procedures for checking out our instincts, and for searching ever more 
minutely the meaning of particular words in particular contexts, and the meanings of 
various grammatical constructions. But in the end the process of translation is so complex 
and multidimensional that it must remain an art; it involves technique, to be sure, as all 
good art does, but it is never reducible to a merely mechanical or formal process.
26
Now Nida’s title does not say, “周e Science of Translating,” but “Toward a Science of 
Translating.” 周e word “toward” signals that we are still feeling our way. We have not yet 
arrived at a full-fledged science. But the title nevertheless holds out as a goal the reduction 
of translation to science. And this, I believe, contains a built-in bias in favor of formalism, 
and with it an invitation to move toward a reductionist approach to meaning. It suggests 
in particular that all figurative, allusive, and metaphorical language must be reduced to 
the level of the literal, in order to be fit for processing by the scientific machinery.
In contrast to this reductionistic movement, Nida himself displays in his chapter 3 a 
great deal of sensitivity and understanding concerning the multidimensional character 
of the meaning of texts. 周e problem, if you will, is not with Nida’s own personal aware-
ness of meaning, but with the program he proposes to others—others who may be less 
aware of the complexities.
We can see the problem coming to life if we look at Nida’s description of translation 
a晴er his discussion of generative grammar and kernel sentences:
Instead of a瑴empting to set up transfers from one language to another by working out long 
series of equivalent formal structures which are presumably adequate to “translate” from 
one language into another, it is both scientifically and practically more efficient (1) to 
reduce the source text to its structurally simplest and most semantically evident kernels, 
25. Kelly delineates the problem: “Linguists’ models assume that translation is essentially 
transmission of data, while hermeneutic theorists take it to be an interpretative re-creation of 
text. It is hardly surprising then, that each group, sure that it has the whole truth, lives in isolation 
from the other” (Kelly, True Interpreter, 34).
26. Note the duality that Kelly sees in theories of translation: “For the majority, translation 
is a literary cra晴 . . .” “In contrast, linguists and grammarians have identified theory with analysis 
of semantic and grammatical operations” (Kelly, True Interpreter, 2).
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   344
5/14/09   4:46:53 PM
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copy pdf picture to powerpoint; copy image from pdf acrobat
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
copy picture to pdf; how to copy a picture from a pdf
345
Appendix  F: Translation 周eory
(2) to transfer the meaning from source language to receptor language on a structurally 
simple level, and (3) to generate the stylistically and semantically equivalent expression 
in the receptor language.
27
周is key sentence contrasts two kinds of approach, both of which are u瑴erly formalistic 
and mechanical about the translation process. 周e first approach would match surface 
grammatical structures between two languages, using an interminably long list. 周e 
second approach matches underlying kernels instead of surface structures.
But Nida has here presupposed that the only alternative to one formalistic approach 
is another formalistic one. He has not even mentioned the possibility of an art—the art 
of translation.
28
What if by art we have someone translate who has a high level of com-
prehension of complex meanings in both languages? Is not this nonformal, nonmecha-
nistic approach superior to both of Nida’s alternatives? Nida in his excitement over the 
potential of linguistics has lost sight of the complementary perspectives offered in the 
centuries-long traditions of hermeneutical theorists and literary analysts.
29
周e inclusion of the word “scientifically” in the middle of the sentence from Nida 
that is quoted above increases the difficulty. It biases readers to understand translation 
as a formal, mechanical process. It suggests that once the appropriate transformational 
rules are known for the two languages in question, we can simply apply the mechanical 
process in order to produce the appropriate result.
We should say in Nida’s defense that he is partly thinking of the practical constraints 
on Bible translations into exotic languages. 周e professionally trained missionary Bible 
translator cannot hope to have the native speaker’s competence in Mazotec or Quechua. 
Given the translator’s limitations, thinking in terms of kernel sentences and transforma-
tions can provide genuine insights into differences between languages, and suggest ways 
in which the verses of Scripture may have to be re-expressed in Mazotec.
But, as Nida stresses elsewhere, there is no good substitute for testing a proposed 
translation with native speakers.
30
周e translator must take into account the full effects 
of connotative and affective meanings, of context, of previous enculturation, and so 
on. 周ere can be no science of translation in the strict sense, and Nida’s own practical 
discussions are proof of it. 周e formalization of meaning constitutes a danger, because it 
can lead to a reductionistic approach to translation by those who do not see the partial 
27. Nida, Toward a Science of Translating, 68.
28. Further down on the same page (ibid.) Nida mentions “the really competent translator,” 
by which he presumably means someone who knows both languages intimately. But Nida uses 
this temporary tip of the hat toward competence only as evidence that restructuring is sometimes 
legitimate; he does not consider whether the existence of this competent translator also shows the 
limitations in the reductionism and formalism that Nida proposes everywhere else on the page.
29. See Kelly, True Interpreter, 2–4, 36. “In the polemic between these three groups of theo-
rists, only a few individuals have perceived that their approaches are complementary” (pp. 3–4). 
“Where linguistics concentrates on the means of expression, the complementary hermeneutic 
approach analyses the goal of linguistic interactions. 周e focus here is anti-empiricist: the central 
reality is not the observable expression, but the understanding of the cognitive and affective levels 
of language through which communication takes place” (7).
30. Nida and Taber, 周eory and Practice of Translation, 163–182.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   345
5/14/09   4:46:53 PM
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
copy pictures from pdf to word; how to copy pdf image into word
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
how to copy an image from a pdf to word; pasting image into pdf
346
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
and one-sided character of Nida’s proposed procedure. A wide human sensitivity and 
comprehension is needed, and this larger human involvement complements technical 
study of language and linguistics.
31
And I should underline the complementarity here. 
周e technical study of language and linguistics does have much to contribute. I am not 
advocating an ignorance of linguistics, or a minimization of its value, but an awareness 
of the specialized character of its foci and consequent limitations in the vision of any 
one linguistic approach.
In considering Nida’s approach and its subsequent development, we should also bear in 
mind the practical limitations that arise in many situations where the target for translation 
is a tribal culture with no previous literacy. Cultures with no previous knowledge of the 
Bible or Christianity, and sometimes with li瑴le or no previous knowledge of worldwide 
cultures, create special difficulties for communicating religious truths. 周e extra barriers 
put a heavy premium on making everything simple and clear. Without this simplicity—
which itself constitutes a kind of reduction—the target readers, with minimal skills in 
literacy, may give up altogether and not read the message at all. In such a situation the 
missionary wants primarily to spread the basic message of the gospel to a new culture, 
not to produce a Bible translation for an already mature church. We can sympathize with 
the goals of utmost simplicity and clarity in such cases without converting these goals 
into general standards for Bible translation or for discourse meaning and semantics.
Componential Analysis of Meaning
We can see a similar encroachment of reductionism in the componential analysis of 
meaning. In the approach called componential analysis, the meaning of a word gets 
reduced to a series of binary components. A “bachelor” is (1) human, (2) male, and 
(3) unmarried. Linguists have a formal notation to describe these components. 周e first 
component, “human,” is denoted “[+ human].” 周e plus sign indicates that it is human 
as opposed to nonhuman. 周e meaning “nonhuman” would be denoted “[- human].” 
Similarly, “[+ male]” indicates the meaning “male.” “[- male]” would mean “female.” 
“[- married]” means “unmarried.” We can then summarize the meaning of “bachelor” 
by listing three binary components: [+ human], [+ male], and [- married].
Componential analysis has a considerable history in the area of analyzing sound 
(“phonology”). Here it works reasonably and insightfully, because the sound system of 
a language offers a small, limited system of sounds whose significance depends largely 
on contrasts with other elements in the system. 周us in English the sound (phoneme) 
“p” is distinguished from “b” by the role of the vocal chords.
32
With “p” the vocal chords 
do not vibrate, and so “p” is called an “unvoiced” consonant. “P” differs from “f” and 
“v” by the fact that with “p” the air stream is at one point completely stopped. 周us, “p” 
can be characterized both as “unvoiced” and as stopping the air stream. In the formal 
notation of linguistics, we may say that “p” is [- voiced] (unvoiced) and [+ stop] (it stops 
the flow of air). In keeping with its formalistic and reductionistic program, generative 
31. Kelly notes the complementarity in True Interpreter, 3–4.
32. Technically, in some contexts aspiration is also a factor.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   346
5/14/09   4:46:54 PM
347
Appendix  F: Translation 周eory
grammar soon adopted the use of componential analysis in its study of meaning. By 
analogy with the procedure of decomposing sounds into distinctive binary features for 
sound, it decomposed meanings into distinctive binary meaning components such as 
[+ male] or [- married].
When we deal with kinship terms and certain other well-defined, limited areas of 
meanings,
33
an analysis into meaning components may yield significant insight. And it 
may be of value more broadly for the language learner who is trying to appreciate key 
meaning contrasts in a new language. Nida rightly saw the value and introduced “com-
ponential analysis” of meaning in connection with his instruction about translation.
34
But Nida also indicated some limitations:
By analyzing only the minimal features of distinctiveness, many supplementary 
and connotative elements of meaning are disregarded, . . .
35
周e danger here is that careless practitioners may later overlook the reductionistic character 
of componential analysis, and consider it to be the definitive statement about meaning.
周e reductionism in componential analysis can get added to other reductionisms that 
we have observed in Nida’s use of kernel sentences. As a result, reductionistic approaches 
to meaning may enter the process of Bible translation. Anthony H. Nichols, in his extended 
analysis of dynamic equivalence translation, has shown that dangers of this kind are not 
merely hypothetical but have had a baleful effect on some sample translations.
36
Unfortunately, the formalistic, “scientific” cast of the theory may make it difficult to 
take criticism. 周eorists tell themselves that science is superior to the rabble’s naïveté. 
Once they have a scientific theory, criticism from outside can easily be dismissed as un-
informed, because it does not bow before the power and insight of the theory. 周eorists 
have then discovered a means for self-protection. When an outside observer complains 
about losses of meaning in a sample translation,
37
he may be told that he is not com-
petent to judge, because he is not initiated into the mysteries of componential analysis 
33. Modern linguistic theory speaks of “semantic domains” or “semantic fields.” See, e.g., John 
Lyons, Semantics, 2 vols. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977), 1:250–269. For an ap-
plication to Greek lexicography, see Johannes P. Louw and Eugene A. Nida, Greek-English Lexicon 
of the New Testament Based on Semantic Domains, 2 vols. (New York: United Bible Societies, 1988). 
For an example using kinship terms, see Nida, Toward a Science of Translating, 90–93.
34. Ibid., 82–87.
35. Ibid., 87; other limitations are listed on the same page.
36. Anthony Howard Nichols, “Translating the Bible: A Critical Analysis of E. A. Nida’s 
周eory of Dynamic Equivalence and Its Impact upon Recent Bible Translations,” Ph.D. disserta-
tion, University of Sheffield, 1996. As we might have guessed from the nature of Nida’s dynamic 
equivalence model, one of the effects is a fla瑴ening or elimination of figurative speech. Figurative 
speech poses a genuine challenge for translation, because a word-for-word rendering of a figure 
into another language may be difficult to understand or may invite misunderstanding. But this is 
not to say that we must go to the opposite extreme and systematically eliminate figurative expres-
sions because of an aversion to anything that is not transparently clear. 
37. For an eloquent complaint by such an “outsider,” see Leland Ryken, 周e Word of God 
in English: Criteria for Excellence in Bible Translation (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2002). Note the 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   347
5/14/09   4:46:54 PM
348
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
and translation theory. What the translation theorist’s net does not catch is summarily 
judged not to be fish!
Decades ago, Bible translators learned that they must listen carefully to the judgments 
of native speakers about meaning. It would be ironic if now, as translation theory grows 
more mature, it were used in reverse to pronounce “expert” judgments about which kinds 
of meaning native speakers may be allowed to worry about.
Continued Development
Linguistically based translation theory has continued to develop since Nida wrote in 
1964.
38
Analysis of propositional relations and discourse has enriched the early model.
39
Translators like Ernst-August Gu瑴 have explicitly criticized over-simple approaches to 
meaning that characterized the early days of translation theory.
40
Kenneth L. Pike early 
recognized the complexity of the interlocking between form and meaning, and the em-
bedding of language meaning in a larger human context.
41
Textlinguistics emphasizes 
the role of a full discourse, including paragraphs and larger cohesive structures, rather 
than confining a瑴ention only to individual sentences in isolation.
42
Above all, be瑴er translators have always known that translation is an art; Nida’s and 
others’ technical tools are properly used only as one dimension in the process of trying 
to do justice to total meaning.
43
appendix (ibid., 295–327) by C. John Collins, who has more of an “insider’s” understanding of 
the issues.
38. See, e.g., the extensive bibliography at <h瑴p://www.ethnologue.com/bibliography.
asp>.
39. John Beekman and John Callow, Translating the Word of God: With Scripture and Topical 
Indexes (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1974), especially 267–342; Kathleen Callow, Discourse 
Considerations in Translating the Word of God (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1974). For a frame-
work that acknowledges still more dimensions of meaning, see Vern S. Poythress, “A Framework 
for Discourse Analysis: 周e Components of a Discourse, from a Tagmemic Viewpoint,” Semiotica 
38/3–4 (1982): 277–298; Poythress, “Hierarchy in Discourse Analysis: A Revision of Tagmemics,” 
Semiotica 40/1–2 (1982): 107–137.
40. Ernst-August Gu瑴, Relevance 周eory: A Guide to Successful Communication in Translation 
(Dallas: Summer Institute of Linguistics, 1992); Gu瑴, Translation and Relevance: Cognition and 
Context (Oxford/Cambridge: Blackwell, 1991).
41. Kenneth L. Pike, Language in Relation to a Unified 周eory of the Structure of Human Behavior 
(周e Hague/Paris: Mouton, 1967), especially 62–63; Vern S. Poythress, “Gender and Generic 
Pronouns in English Bible Translation,” in Language and Life: Essays in Memory of Kenneth L. Pike, 
ed. Mary Ruth Wise, 周omas N. Headland, and Ruth M. Brend (Dallas: SIL International and 
the University of Texas at Arlington, 2003), 371–380.
42. See, in particular, Robert E. Longacre, 周e Grammar of Discourse, 2nd ed. (New York: 
Plenum, 1996); Longacre, “Holistic Textlinguistics,” SIL, 2003 (available at <h瑴p://www.sil.
org/silewp/2003/silewp2003-004.pdf>).
43. But Nichols, “Translating the Bible,” demonstrates that in practice translators adhering to 
the “dynamic equivalence” approach associated with Eugene Nida have too seldom risen above 
the limitations of a reductionistic theory of meaning.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   348
5/14/09   4:46:54 PM
349
Appendix  F: Translation 周eory
All this is good news. But the dangers of reductionism remain as long as linguists 
and translation theorists experience pressure from the prestige of scientific rigor. Rigor 
is possible in linguistics and in translation when we isolate a sufficiently small piece of 
language, or one dimension of language, and temporarily ignore the residue that does 
not cleanly fit into a formalized model. Such models do offer insights, but they can be 
misused in a clumsy or arrogant manner.
Language in the Context of Divine Speech and Divine Sovereignty
As we have seen, from the beginning God’s speaking plays a key role in human life. We may 
put it provocatively: God is a native speaker of each human language, and a member—the 
key member—of the linguistic community. Given that reality, we must take care not to 
use linguistic insights in a reductionistic fashion. Rather, we must rethink the nature of 
language itself, free from the assumption that it involves only horizontal communication 
between human beings and that its meanings can be completely and definitively captured 
under the microscope of linguistic technique.
周e principle of avoiding reductionism applies especially to the character of God’s 
speech. But it applies derivatively to the speech of human beings, who are made in the 
image of God and who therefore have the capability of thinking God’s thoughts a晴er 
him.
What does it mean to think God’s thoughts a晴er him? We are creatures and never 
become God. But we can know truth. Any truth that we know is first of all in God’s mind. 
We are not the first to have thought about it. God thinks it first. And because our mind is 
made like his, we can imitate him, and can know truths. God can express truths by speak-
ing. Likewise, human beings, in imitation of God, can express truths by speaking.
Linguistics is useful in analyzing speech, because it does make evident some of the 
structural regularities belonging to language. But any particular approach within linguistics 
will have limitations because it is selective in its focus.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   349
5/14/09   4:46:54 PM
350
A
P
P
E
N
D I
 
G
-
Symbolic Logic and Logical 
Positivism
I speak as to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I say.
—1 Corinthians 10:15
L
et us now consider developments in symbolic logic. Reflection about logic goes 
all the way back to Aristotle. But formal symbolic logic blossomed in the late 
nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with the work of Go瑴lob Frege, Bertrand 
Russell, and others.
1
Symbolic logic made more rigorous the idea of a valid proof. 
And it proves useful in uncovering logical fallacies in informal reasoning. But what of 
its limitations?
For the most part, the use of symbolic logic requires that we begin with isolated sen-
tences. 周is step already involves a reduction of the full richness of human communica-
tion as it occurs in long discourses and social interaction. It also requires that a sentence 
be isolated from its situational context, that is, the context surrounding human beings 
when they communicate with one another at a particular time and place. Logic isolates 
the sentence into a “proposition” (without context) and then treats the sentence almost 
wholly in terms of its truth value.
2
1. For an introduction, see Susanne K. K. Langer, An Introduction to Symbolic Logic (New 
York: Dover, 1953); Irving M. Copi, Introduction to Logic, 4th ed. (New York: Macmillan, 
1972).
2. A part of these comments on logic is taken, with modifications, from Vern S. Poythress, 
“Truth and Fullness of Meaning: Fullness versus Reductionistic Semantics in Biblical Interpreta-
tion,” Westminster 周eological Journal 67/2 (2005): 211–227; also appearing in Wayne Grudem 
et al., Translating Truth: 周e Case for Essentially Literal Bible Translation (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   350
5/14/09   4:46:54 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested