reportviewer c# windows forms pdf : Cut image from pdf online SDK control service wpf web page asp.net dnn pShopGuide10-part339

U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
101  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Working with Color 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
101  
System (Mac OS) Displays the standard Mac OS 256-color system palette.
System (Windows) Displays the standard Windows 256-color system palette. 
Saving and loading color tables
You use the Save and Load buttons in the Color Table dialog box to save your indexed 
color tables for use with other Adobe Photoshop images. Once you load a color table into 
an image, the colors in the image change to reflect the color positions they reference in 
the new color table. 
Note: You can also load saved color tables into the Swatches palette. (See the procedure to 
save and reuse custom swatch sets in 
U
sing the S
w
at
ches palett
e
on page 
260
.)
Cut image from pdf online - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to paste picture on pdf; how to copy pdf image
Cut image from pdf online - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy image from pdf file; copying image from pdf to powerpoint
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
102  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
102  
Producing Consistent Color 
(Photoshop)
Why colors sometimes don’t match
No device in a publishing system is capable of reproducing the full range of colors 
viewable to the human eye. Each device operates within a specific color space, which can 
produce a certain range, or gamut, of colors.
The RGB (red, green, blue) and CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, black) color modes represent 
two main categories of color spaces. The gamuts of the RGB and CMYK spaces are very 
different; while the RGB gamut is generally larger (that is, capable of representing more 
colors) than CMYK, some CMYK colors still fall outside the RGB gamut. (See 
C
olor gamuts 
(P
hot
oshop)
on page 
91
for an illustration.) In addition, different devices produce slightly 
different gamuts within the same color mode. For example, a variety of RGB spaces can 
exist among scanners and monitors, and a variety of CMYK spaces can exist among 
printing presses.
Because of these varying color spaces, colors can shift in appearance as you transfer 
documents between different devices. Color variations can result from different image 
sources (scanners and software produce art using different color spaces), differences in 
the way software applications define color, differences in print media (newsprint paper 
reproduces a smaller gamut than magazine-quality paper), and other natural variations, 
such as manufacturing differences in monitors or monitor age.
About color management
Because color-matching problems result from various devices and software that use 
different color spaces, one solution is to have a system that interprets and translates color 
accurately between devices. A color management system (CMS) compares the color space 
in which a color was created to the color space in which the same color will be output, and 
makes the necessary adjustments to represent the color as consistently as possible among 
different devices.
Note: Don’t confuse color management with color adjustment or color correction. A CMS 
won’t correct an image that was saved with tonal or color balance problems. It provides 
an environment where you can evaluate images reliably in the context of your final 
output.
Photoshop follows a color management workflow based on conventions developed by 
the International Color Consortium (ICC). The following elements and concepts are 
integral to such a color-managed workflow.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class source code. A powerful
copy pdf picture; how to paste a picture into pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed. Access to freeware download and online VB.NET class
copy pictures from pdf to word; how to copy picture from pdf
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
103  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
103  
Color management engine Different companies have developed various ways to 
manage color. To provide you with a choice, a color management system lets you choose a 
color management engine that represents the approach you want to use. Sometimes called 
the color management module (CMM), the color management engine is the part of the 
CMS that does the work of reading and translating colors between different color spaces. 
Color numbers Each pixel in an image document has a set of color numbers that describe 
the pixel’s location in a particular color mode—for example, red, green, and blue values for 
the RGB mode. However, the actual appearance of the pixel may vary when output or 
displayed on different devices, because each device has a particular way of translating the 
raw numbers into visual color. (See 
W
h
y c
olors sometimes don
ma
t
ch
on page 
102
.) 
When you apply color and tonal adjustments or convert a document to a different color 
space, you are changing the document’s color numbers.
Color profiles An ICC workflow uses color profiles to determine how color numbers in a 
document translate to actual color appearances. A profile systematically describes how 
color numbers map to a particular color space, usually that of a device such as a scanner, 
printer, or monitor. By associating, or tagging, a document with a color profile, you provide 
a definition of actual color appearances in the document; changing the associated profile 
changes the color appearances. (For information on displaying the current profile name in 
the status bar, see 
D
ispla
ying fi
le and image inf
or
ma
tion
on page 
48
.) Documents 
without associated profiles are known as untagged and contain only raw color numbers. 
When working with untagged documents, Photoshop uses the current working space 
profile to display and edit colors. (See 
A
b
out w
or
k
ing spac
es
on page 
106
.)
Do you need color management?
Use the following guidelines to determine whether or not you need to use color 
management:
You might not need color management if your production process is tightly controlled 
for one medium only, for example, if you’re using a closed system where all devices are 
calibrated to the same specifications. You or your prepress service provider may prefer 
to tailor CMYK images and specify color values for a known, specific set of printing 
conditions.
You also might not need color management if you are producing images for the Web or 
other screen-based output, since you cannot control the color management settings of 
monitors displaying your final output. It is helpful, however, to use the Web Graphics 
Defaults setting when preparing such images, because this setting reflects the average 
RGB space of many monitors. (See 
U
sing pr
edefi
ned c
olor managemen
t settings
on 
page 
105
.)
You can benefit from color management if you have more variables in your production 
process (for example, if you’re using an open system with multiple platforms and 
multiple devices from different manufacturers). Color management is recommended if 
you anticipate reusing color graphics for print and online media, if you manage 
multiple workstations, or if you plan to print to different domestic and international 
presses. If you decide to use color management, consult with your production 
partners—such as graphic artists and prepress service providers—to ensure that all 
aspects of your color management workflow integrate seamlessly with theirs.
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
how to cut picture from pdf file; pdf cut and paste image
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL.
how to cut and paste image from pdf; copy image from pdf acrobat
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
104  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
104  
Creating a viewing environment for color management
Your work environment influences how you see color on your monitor and on printed 
output. For best results, control the colors and light in your work environment by doing 
the following:
View your documents in an environment that provides a consistent light level and color 
temperature. For example, the color characteristics of sunlight change throughout the 
day and alter the way colors appear on your screen, so keep shades closed or work in a 
windowless room. To eliminate the blue-green cast from fluorescent lighting, consider 
installing D50 (5000 degree Kelvin) lighting. Ideally, view printed documents using a 
D50 lightbox or using the ANSI PH2.30 viewing standard for graphic arts.
View your document in a room with neutral-colored walls and ceiling. A room’s color 
can affect the perception of both monitor color and printed color. The best color for a 
viewing room is polychromatic gray. Also, the color of your clothing reflecting off the 
glass of your monitor may affect the appearance of colors on-screen.
Match the light intensity in the room or variable lightbox to the light intensity of your 
monitor. View continuous-tone art, printed output, and images on-screen under the 
same intensity of light.
Remove colorful background and user-interface patterns on your monitor desktop. 
Busy or bright patterns surrounding a document interfere with accurate color 
perception. Set your desktop to display neutral grays only.
View document proofs in the real-world conditions under which your audience will see 
the final piece. For example, you might want to see how a housewares catalog looks 
under the incandescent lightbulbs used in homes, or view an office furniture catalog 
under the fluorescent lighting used in offices. However, always make final color 
judgments under the lighting conditions specified by the legal requirements for 
contract proofs in your country.
Setting up color management
Photoshop simplifies the task of setting up a color-managed workflow by gathering most 
color management controls in a single Color Settings dialog box. You can choose from a 
list of predefined color management settings, or you can adjust the controls manually to 
create your own custom settings. You can even save customized settings to share them 
with other users and other Adobe applications, such as Illustrator 9.0, that use the Color 
Settings dialog box.
Photoshop also uses color management policies, which determine how to handle color 
data that does not immediately match your current color management workflow. Policies 
provide guidelines on what to do when you open a document or import color data into an 
active document.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit
how to copy pdf image to word document; how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
to zoom and crop image and achieve image resizing. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET
copy paste image pdf; cut image from pdf online
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
105  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
105  
To specify color management settings:
1 Do one of the following:
In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Color Settings.
In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Color Settings.
To display helpful descriptions of the options that appear in the dialog box, position 
the pointer over a section heading or menu item. These descriptions appear in the 
lower area of the dialog box. 
2 Do one of the following:
To set up a predefined color management workflow, see 
U
sing pr
edefi
ned c
olor 
managemen
t settings
on page 
105
.
To customize your own color management settings, see 
C
ust
omizing c
olor 
managemen
t settings
on page 
107
.
Using predefined color management settings
Photoshop offers a collection of predefined color management settings designed to 
produce consistent color for a common publishing workflow, such as preparation for Web 
or offset press output. In most cases, the predefined settings will provide sufficient color 
management for your needs. These settings can also serve as starting points for custom-
izing your own workflow-specific settings.
To choose a predefined color management setting, choose one of the following options 
from the Settings menu in the Color Settings dialog box.
Color Management Off Uses passive color management techniques to emulate the 
behavior of applications that do not support color management. Although working space 
profiles are considered when converting colors between color spaces, Color Management 
Off does not tag documents with profiles. Use this option for content that will be output 
on video or as on-screen presentations; do not use this option if you work mostly with 
documents that are tagged with color profiles.
ColorSync Workflow (Mac OS only) Manages color using the ColorSync CMS with the 
profiles chosen in the ColorSync control panel. Use this option if you want to use color 
management with a mix of Adobe and non-Adobe applications. This color management 
configuration is not recognized by Windows systems, or by versions of ColorSync earlier 
than 3.0.
Emulate Photoshop 4 Emulates the color workflow used by the Mac OS version of 
Adobe Photoshop 4.0 and earlier.
Europe Prepress Defaults Manages color for content that will be output under common 
press conditions in Europe.
Japan Prepress Defaults Manages color for content that will be output under common 
press conditions in Japan.
Photoshop 5 Default Spaces Preparation of content using the default working spaces 
from Photoshop 5.
U.S. Prepress Defaults Manages color for content that will be output under common 
press conditions in the U.S.
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL.
how to copy an image from a pdf in preview; how to copy pictures from a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. use it to extract all images from PDF document. page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the
pasting image into pdf; how to copy pdf image to word
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
106  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
106  
Web Graphics Defaults Manages color for content that will be published on the World 
Wide Web.
When you choose a predefined configuration, the Color Settings dialog box updates to 
display the specific color management settings associated with the configuration.
About working spaces
Among other options, predefined color management settings specify the color profiles to 
be associated with the RGB, CMYK, and Grayscale color modes. The settings also specify 
the color profile for spot colors in a document. Central to the color management workflow, 
these profiles are known as working spaces. The working spaces specified by predefined 
settings represent the color profiles that will produce the best color fidelity for several 
common output conditions. For example, the U.S. Prepress Defaults setting uses a CMYK 
working space that is designed to preserve color consistency under standard Specifica-
tions for Web Offset Publications (SWOP) press conditions.
A working space acts as the color profile for untagged documents and newly created 
documents that use the associated color mode. For example, if Adobe RGB (1998) is the 
current RGB working space, each new RGB document that you create will use colors within 
the Adobe RGB (1998) color space. Working spaces also define the destination color space 
of documents converted to RGB, CMYK, or Grayscale color mode.
About color management policies
When you specify a predefined color management setting, Photoshop sets up a color 
management workflow that will be used as the standard for all documents and color data 
that you open or import. For a newly created document, the color workflow operates 
relatively seamlessly: the document uses the working space profile associated with its 
color mode for creating and editing colors.
However, it is common to encounter the following exceptions to your color-managed 
workflow:
You might open a document or import color data (for example, by copying and pasting 
or dragging and dropping) from a document that is not tagged with a profile. This is 
often the case when you open a document created in an application that either does 
not support color management or has color management turned off.
You might open a document or import color data from a document that is tagged with 
a profile different from the current working space. This may be the case when you open 
a document that has been created using different color management settings, or a 
document that has been scanned and tagged with a scanner profile.
In either case, Photoshop must decide how to handle the color data in the document. 
A color management policy looks for the color profile associated with an opened 
document or imported color data, and compares the profile (or lack of profile) with the 
current working space to make default color management decisions. If the profile is 
missing or does not match the working space, Photoshop displays a message that 
indicates the default action for the policy. In many cases you will also be provided with the 
opportunity to choose another action. For detailed information on the color management 
decisions associated with different policies, see 
S
p
ecifying c
olor managemen
t p
olicies
on page 
108
.
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
107  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
107  
Working with policy warnings and messages
The predefined color management workflows are set to display warning or option 
messages when a default color management policy is about to be used. Although you can 
disable the repeated display of some warnings and messages by selecting the Don’t Show 
Again option, it is highly recommended that you continue to display all policy messages, 
to ensure the appropriate color management of documents on a case-by-case basis. 
(See 
R
esetting all w
ar
ning dialo
gs
on page 
56
.) You should only turn off message 
displays if you are very confident that you understand the default policy decision and are 
willing to accept it for all documents that you open. You cannot undo the results of a 
default policy decision once a document has been saved.
Customizing color management settings
Although the predefined settings should provide sufficient color management for many 
publishing workflows, you may sometimes want to customize individual options in a 
configuration. For example, you might want to change the CMYK working space to a 
profile that matches the proofing system used by your printer or your service bureau.
It’s important to save your custom configurations so that you can reuse and share them 
with other users and Adobe applications that use the same color management workflows. 
The color management settings that you customize in the Color Settings dialog box are 
contained in an associated preferences file called Color Settings. 
Note: The default location of the Color Settings file varies by operating system; use your 
operating system’s Find command to locate this file.
To customize color management settings:
1 Do one of the following:
In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Color Settings.
In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Color Settings.
2 To use a preset color management configuration as the starting point for your customi-
zation, choose that configuration from the Settings menu.
3 Specify the desired color settings (working spaces and policies). As you make adjust-
ments, the Settings menu option changes to Custom by default. 
For detailed customization instructions, see 
S
p
ecifying w
or
k
ing spac
es
on page 
107
S
p
ecifying c
olor managemen
t p
olicies
on page 
108
, and 
C
ust
omizing ad
v
anc
ed c
olor 
managemen
t settings
on page 
110
.
4 Save your custom configuration so that it can be reused. (See 
S
a
ving and loading c
olor 
managemen
t settings
on page 
112
.)
Specifying working spaces
In a color-managed workflow, each color mode must have a working space profile 
associated with it. (See 
A
b
out w
or
k
ing spac
es
on page 
106
.) Photoshop ships with a 
standard set of color profiles that have been recommended and tested by Adobe Systems 
for most color management workflows. By default, only these profiles appear in the 
working space menus. 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
108  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
108  
To display additional color profiles that you have customized or installed on your system, 
select Advanced Mode in the Color Settings dialog box. To appear in a working space 
menu, a color profile must be bidirectional, that is, contain specifications for translating 
both into and out of color spaces. You can also create a custom RGB, CMYK, Grayscale, or 
Spot working space profile to describe the color space of a particular output or display 
device. (See 
C
r
ea
ting cust
om R
GB pr
ofi
les
on page 
120
C
r
ea
ting cust
om CMYK pr
ofi
les
on page 
121
, and 
C
r
ea
ting cust
om gr
a
y
sc
ale and sp
ot-c
olor pr
ofi
les
on page 
125
.)
For information about a specified RGB or CMYK working space profile, see the Description 
area of the Color Settings dialog box. (See 
S
etting up c
olor managemen
t
on page 
104
.) 
The following information can help you specify an appropriate Gray or Spot working 
space:
For images that will be printed, you can specify a Gray or Spot working space profile 
that is based on the characteristics of a particular dot gain. Dot gain occurs when a 
printer’s halftone dots change as the ink spreads and is absorbed by paper. Photoshop 
calculates dot gain as the amount by which the expected dot increases or decreases. 
For example, a 50% halftone screen may produce an actual density of 60% on the 
printed page, exhibiting a dot gain of 10%. The Dot Gain 10% option represents the 
color space that reflects the grayscale characteristics of this particular dot gain.
Proof (no dot gain), and printed image (with dot gain)
For images that will be used online or in video, you can also specify a Gray working 
space profile that is based on the characteristics of particular gamma. A monitor’s 
gamma setting determines the brightness of midtones displayed by the monitor. Gray 
Gamma 1.8 matches the default grayscale display of Mac OS computers and is also the 
default grayscale space for Photoshop 4.0 and earlier. Gray Gamma 2.2 matches the 
default grayscale display of Windows computers.
Specifying color management policies
Each predefined color management configuration sets up a color management policy for 
the RGB, CMYK, and Grayscale color modes and displays warning messages to let you 
override the default policy behavior on a case-by-case basis. If desired, you can change the 
default policy behavior to reflect a color management workflow that you use more often. 
For more information on policies, see 
A
b
out c
olor managemen
t p
olicies
on page 
106
To customize color management policies:
1 In the Color Settings dialog box, under Color Management Policies, choose one of the 
following to set the default color management policy for each color mode:
Off if you do not want to color-manage new, imported, or opened color data.
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
109  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
109  
Preserve Embedded Profiles if you anticipate working with a mix of color-managed and 
non-color-managed documents, or with documents that use different profiles within 
the same color mode.
Convert to Working Space if you want to force all documents to use the current working 
space.
For detailed descriptions of the default behaviors associated with each policy option, 
see the table following this procedure.
2 For Profile Mismatches, select either, both, or neither of the following:
Ask When Opening to display a message whenever you open a document tagged with 
a profile other than the current working space. You will be given the option to override 
the policy’s default behavior.
Ask When Pasting to display a message whenever color profile mismatches occur as 
colors are imported into a document (via pasting, drag-and-drop, placing, and so on). 
You will be given the option to override the policy’s default behavior.
The availability of options for Profile Mismatches depends on which policies have been 
specified.
3 For Missing Profiles, select Ask When Opening to display a message whenever you open 
an untagged document. You will be given the option to override the policy’s default 
behavior.
The availability of options for Missing Profiles depends on which policies have been 
specified.
It is strongly recommended that you keep the Ask When Opening and Ask When Pasting 
options selected.
Policy option
Default color management behavior
Off
New documents and existing untagged documents remain 
untagged.
Existing documents tagged with a profile other than the current 
working space become untagged. 
Existing documents tagged with the current working space profile 
remain tagged.
For color data imported into a document using the same color 
mode, color numbers are preserved.
For all other import cases, colors are converted to the document’s 
color space.
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
110  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
110  
Customizing advanced color management settings
When you select Advanced Mode at the top of the Color Settings dialog box, you have the 
option of further customizing settings used for color management.
Specifying a color management engine
The color management engine specifies the system and color-matching method used to 
convert colors between color spaces. For information about the specified engine, see the 
Description area of the Color Settings dialog box. (See 
S
etting up c
olor managemen
t
on 
page 
104
.)
Specifying a rendering intent
Converting colors to a different color space usually involves an adjustment of the colors to 
accommodate the gamut of the destination color space. Different translation methods use 
different rules to determine how the source colors are adjusted; for example, colors that 
fall inside the destination gamut may remain unchanged, or they may be adjusted to 
preserve the original range of visual relationships as translated to a smaller destination 
gamut. These translation methods are known as rendering intents because each technique 
is optimized for a different intended use of color graphics.
Note: The result of choosing a rendering intent depends on the graphical content of 
documents and on the profiles used to specify color spaces. Some profiles produce 
identical results for different rendering intents. Differences between rendering intents are 
apparent only when you print a document or convert it to a different color space.
Preserve Embedded 
Profiles
New documents are tagged with the current working space profile.
Existing documents tagged with a profile other than the current 
working space remain tagged with the original embedded profile. 
Existing untagged documents use the current working space for 
editing but remain untagged. 
For color data imported within the same color mode between 
either a non-color-managed source or destination, or from a CMYK 
document into a CMYK document, color numbers are preserved.
For all other import cases, colors are converted to the document’s 
color space.
Convert to Working Space
New documents are tagged with the current working space profile.
Existing documents tagged with a profile other than the current 
working space are converted to and tagged with the working space 
profile.
Existing untagged documents use the current working space for 
editing but remain untagged.
For color data imported within the same color mode between 
either a non-color-managed source or destination, color numbers are 
preserved.
For all other import cases, colors are converted to the document’s 
color space.
Policy option
Default color management behavior
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested