reportviewer c# windows forms pdf : Paste jpg into pdf Library software component asp.net winforms html mvc pShopGuide11-part340

U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
111  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
111  
The following rendering intent options are available.
Perceptual  Known as the Image intent in Adobe PageMaker and Illustrator 8, Perceptual 
aims to preserve the visual relationship between colors in a way that is perceived as 
natural to the human eye, although the color values themselves may change. This intent is 
most suitable for photographic images.
Saturation Known as the Graphics intent in Adobe PageMaker and Illustrator 8, 
Saturation aims to create vivid color at the expense of accurate color. It scales the source 
gamut to the destination gamut, but preserves relative saturation instead of hue, so when 
scaling to a smaller gamut, hues may shift. This rendering intent is suitable for business 
graphics, where the exact relationship between colors is not as important as having bright 
saturated colors.
Relative Colorimetric This intent is identical to Absolute Colorimetric except for the 
following difference: Relative Colorimetric compares the white point of the source color 
space to that of the destination color space and shifts all colors accordingly. Although the 
perceptual rendering intent has traditionally been the most common choice for photo-
graphic imagery, Relative Colorimetric —with the Use Black Point Compensation option 
selected in the Color Settings dialog box—can be a better choice for preserving color 
relationships without sacrificing color accuracy. Relative Colorimetric is the default 
rendering intent used by all predefined configurations in the Settings menu of the Color 
Settings dialog box.
Absolute Colorimetric Leaves colors that fall inside the destination gamut unchanged. 
This intent aims to maintain color accuracy at the expense of preserving relationships 
between colors. When translating to a smaller gamut, two colors that are distinct in the 
source space may be mapped to the same color in the destination space. Absolute Colori-
metric can be more accurate if the image’s color profile contains correct white point 
(extreme highlight) information.
Using black-point compensation
The Use Black Point Compensation option controls whether to adjust for differences in 
black points when converting colors between color spaces. When this option is selected, 
the full dynamic range of the source space is mapped into the full dynamic range of the 
destination space. When deselected, the dynamic range of the source space is simulated 
in the destination space; although this mode can result in blocked or gray shadows, it can 
be useful when the black point of the source space is darker than that of the destination 
space.
The Use Black Point Compensation option is selected for all predefined configurations in 
the Settings menu of the Color Settings dialog box. It is highly recommended that you 
keep this option selected. 
Using dither
The Use Dither (8-bit/channel images) option controls whether to dither colors when 
converting 8-bit-per-channel images between color spaces. When this option is selected, 
Photoshop mixes colors in the destination color space to simulate a missing color that 
existed in the source space. Although dithering helps to reduce the blocky or banded 
appearance of an image, it may also result in larger file sizes when images are compressed 
for Web use.
Paste jpg into pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste image on pdf preview; how to copy pictures from a pdf
Paste jpg into pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copying image from pdf to word; how to cut image from pdf file
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
112  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
112  
Desaturating monitor colors
The Desaturate Monitor Colors By option controls whether to desaturate colors by the 
specified amount when displayed on the monitor. When selected, this option can aid in 
visualizing the full range of color spaces with gamuts larger than that of the monitor. 
However, this causes a mismatch between the monitor display and the output. When the 
option is deselected, distinct colors in the image may display as a single color.
Blending RGB colors
The Blend RGB Colors Using Gamma option controls how RGB colors blend together to 
produce composite data (for example, when you blend or paint layers using Normal 
mode). When the option is selected, RGB colors are blended in the color space corre-
sponding to the specified gamma. A gamma of 1.00 is considered “colorimetrically 
correct” and should result in the fewest edge artifacts. When the option is deselected, 
RGB colors are blended directly in the document’s color space. 
Saving and loading color management settings
When you create a custom color management configuration, you should name and save 
the configuration to ensure that it can be shared with other users and applications that 
use the Color Settings dialog box, such as Adobe Illustrator and Adobe InDesign. You can 
also load previously saved color management configurations into the Color Settings 
dialog box.
To save a custom color management configuration:
1 In the Color Settings dialog box, click Save.
2 Name your color settings file, and click Save. 
To ensure that the saved configuration appears in the Settings menu of the Color Settings 
dialog box, save the file in one of the following recommended locations:
(Windows) Program Files/Common Files/Adobe/Color/Settings.
(Mac OS 9.x) System Folder/Application Support/Adobe/Color/Settings. 
(Mac OS X) User/CurrentUser/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Color/Settings.
3 Enter any comments that you want to associate with the configuration, and click OK.
The comments that you enter will appear in the Description area of the Color Settings 
dialog box when the pointer is positioned over the configuration in the Settings menu.
To load a color management configuration:
1 In the Color Settings dialog box, click Load.
2 Locate and select the desired color settings file, and click Load.
When you load a custom color settings file, it appears as the active choice in the Settings 
menu of the Color Settings dialog box. If you load a settings file that has been saved 
outside the recommended location, it temporarily replaces the Other option in the 
Settings menu until another settings file is loaded.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET Turn multiple pages PDF into multiple jpg files in
how to cut a picture from a pdf document; how to paste a picture into a pdf document
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Turn multiple pages PDF into single jpg files respectively online. Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages.
copy and paste images from pdf; paste picture into pdf
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
113  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
113  
Synchronizing color management between applications
The Color Settings dialog box represents the common color management controls shared 
by several Adobe applications, including Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. If you 
modify and save over the current color settings file in any application other than 
Photoshop, you may be prompted to synchronize the common color settings upon 
starting Photoshop or upon reopening the Color Settings dialog box in Photoshop. 
Synchronizing the color settings helps to ensure that color is reproduced consistently 
between Adobe applications that use the Color Settings dialog box. To share custom color 
settings between applications, be sure to save and load the settings file in the desired 
applications. (See 
S
a
ving and loading c
olor managemen
t settings
on page 
112
.)
Soft-proofing colors
In a traditional publishing workflow, you print a hard proof of your document to preview 
how the document’s colors will look when reproduced on a specific output device. In a 
color-managed workflow, you can use the precision of color profiles to soft-proof your 
document directly on the monitor—to display an on-screen preview of the document’s 
colors as reproduced on a specified device. In addition, you can use your printer to 
produce a hard-proof version of this soft proof. (See 
U
sing c
olor managemen
t when 
pr
in
ting
on page 
478
.) The following diagram shows how the source document profile, 
proof profile, and monitor profile are used to represent colors in a soft proof.
Color-managed workflow: 
A. Document space B. Proof space C. Monitor space
Keep in mind that the reliability of the soft proof is highly dependent upon the quality of 
your monitor, your monitor and printer profiles, and the ambient lighting conditions of 
your work station. (See 
C
r
ea
ting an IC
C monit
or pr
ofi
le
on page 
117
.)
To display a soft proof:
1 Choose View > Proof Setup, and choose the proof profile space that you want to 
simulate:
Custom soft-proofs colors using the color profile of a specific output device. Follow the 
instructions after this procedure to set up the custom proof.
Working CMYK soft-proofs colors using the current CMYK working space as defined in 
the Color Settings dialog box.
Working Cyan Plate, Working Magenta Plate, Working Yellow Plate, Working Black Plate, 
or Working CMY Plates soft-proofs specific CMYK ink colors using the current CMYK 
working space.
Macintosh RGB or Windows RGB soft-proofs colors in an image using either a standard 
Mac OS or Windows monitor as the proof profile space to simulate. Neither option is 
available for Lab or CMYK documents.
A
B
C
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
convert PDF documents from multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp Component for combining multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file in C#
how to copy images from pdf to word; extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Get JPG, JPEG and other high quality image files from PDF document. Able to extract vector images from PDF. Extract
paste jpg into pdf preview; paste picture to pdf
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
114  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
114  
Monitor RGB soft-proofs colors in an RGB document using your current monitor color 
space as the proof profile space. This option is unavailable for Lab and CMYK 
documents.
Simulate Paper White previews the specific shade of white exhibited by the print 
medium defined by a document’s profile. This option is not available for all profiles and 
is available only for soft-proofing, not printing.
Simulate Ink Black previews the actual dynamic range defined by a document’s profile. 
This option is not available for all profiles and is available only for soft-proofing, not 
printing.
2 Choose View > Proof Colors to turn the soft-proof display on and off. When soft 
proofing is on, a check mark appears next to the Proof Colors command.
When soft proofing is on, the name of the current proof profile appears next to the color 
mode in the document’s title bar.
To create a custom proof setup:
1 Choose View > Proof Setup > Custom.
If you want the custom proof setup to be the default proof setup for documents, close 
all document windows before choosing the View > Proof Setup > Custom command.
2 Select Preview to display a live preview of the proof settings in the document while the 
Proof Setup dialog box is open. 
3 To use a preset proof setup as a starting point, choose it from the Setup menu. If the 
desired setup does not appear in the menu, click Load to locate and load the setup.
4 For Profile, choose the color profile for the device for which you want to create the 
proof.
5 If the proof profile you chose uses the same color mode as the document, do one of 
the following:
Select Preserve Color Numbers to simulate how the document will appear without 
converting colors from the document space to the proof profile space. This simulates 
the color shifts that may occur when the document’s color values are interpreted using 
the proof profile instead of the document profile.
Deselect Preserve Color Numbers to simulate how the document will appear if colors 
are converted from the document space to their nearest equivalents in the proof profile 
space in an effort to preserve the colors’ visual appearances. Then specify a rendering 
intent for the conversion. (See 
S
p
ecifying a r
ender
ing in
t
en
t
on page 
110
.)
6 If needed, select any of the following:
Simulate Paper White to preview, in the monitor space, the specific shade of white 
exhibited by the print medium described by the proof profile. Selecting this option 
automatically selects the Simulate Ink Black option.
Simulate Ink Black to preview, in the monitor space, the actual dynamic range defined 
by the proof profile.
The availability of these options depends on the proof profile chosen. Not all profiles 
support both options.
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Scan high quality image to PDF, tiff and various image formats, including JPG, JPEG, PNG, GIF, TIFF, etc. Able to
how to copy and paste a pdf image; how to cut an image out of a pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
multiple image formats in VB.NET, including Jpg, Png, Bmp Turn multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF Crop and paste specified image area to PDF page.
paste picture into pdf preview; cut and paste pdf image
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
115  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
115  
7 To save your custom proof setup as a preset proof setup, click Save. To ensure that the 
new preset appears in the View > Proof Setup menu, save the preset in the Program Files/
Common Files/Adobe/Color/Proofing folder (Windows), System Folder/Application 
Support/Adobe/Color/Proofing folder (Mac OS 9.x), or Library/Application Support/
Adobe/Color/Proofing folder (Mac OS X).
Changing the color profile of a document
In some cases you may want to convert a document’s colors to a different color profile, tag 
a document with a different color profile without making color conversions, or remove the 
profile from a document altogether. For example, you may want to prepare the document 
for a different output destination, or you may want to correct a policy behavior that you 
no longer want implemented on the document. The Assign Profile and Convert to Profile 
commands are recommended only for advanced users.
When using the Assign Profile command, you may see a shift in color appearance as color 
numbers are mapped directly to the new profile space. Convert Profile, however, shifts 
color numbers before mapping them to the new profile space, in an effort to preserve the 
original color appearances.
To reassign or discard the profile of a document:
1 Choose Image > Mode > Assign Profile.
2 Select one of the following:
Don’t Color Manage This Document to remove the profile from a tagged document. 
Select this option only if you are sure that you want the document to become 
untagged.
Working color mode: working space to tag the document with the current working space 
profile. 
Profile to reassign a different profile to a tagged document. Choose the desired profile 
from the menu. Photoshop tags the document with the new profile without converting 
colors to the profile space. This may dramatically change the appearance of the colors 
as displayed on your monitor.
3 To preview the effects of the new profile assignment in the document, select Preview.
To convert colors in a document to another profile:
1 Choose Image > Mode > Convert to Profile.
2 Under Destination Space, choose the color profile to which you want to convert the 
document’s colors. The document will be converted to and tagged with this new profile.
3 Under Conversion Options, specify a color management engine, a rendering intent, and 
black point and dither options. (See 
C
ust
omizing ad
v
anc
ed c
olor managemen
t settings
on page 
110
.)
4 To flatten all layers of the document onto a single layer upon conversion, select Flatten 
Image. 
5 To preview the effects of the conversion in the document, select Preview. This preview 
becomes more accurate if you select Flatten Image.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
copy picture to pdf; paste picture pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
PDF documents to multiple image formats, including Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff, Bitmap, .NET Graphics, and REImage. Turn multipage PDF file into image files in
how to paste a picture into a pdf; how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
116  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
116  
Embedding profiles in saved documents
By default, a tagged document will have its profile information embedded upon saving in 
a file format that supports embedded ICC profiles. Untagged documents are saved by 
default without embedded profiles. 
You can specify whether or not to embed a profile as you save a document; you can also 
specify to convert colors to the proof profile space and embed the proof profile instead. 
However, changing the profile-embedding behavior is recommended only for advanced 
users who are familiar with color management.
To change the embedding behavior of a profile in a document:
1 Choose File > Save As. 
2 Do one of the following:
To toggle the embedding of the document’s current color profile, select or deselect ICC 
Profile (Windows) or Embed Color Profile (Mac OS). This option is available only for the 
native Photoshop format (.psd) and PDF, JPEG, TIFF, EPS, DCS, and PICT formats. 
To toggle the embedding of the document’s current proof profile, select or deselect Use 
Proof Setup (available for PDF, EPS, DCS 1.0, and DCS 2.0 formats only). Selecting this 
option converts the document’s colors to the proof profile space and is useful for 
creating an output file for print. For information on setting up a proof profile, see 
S
of
t-
pr
o
ofi
ng c
olors
on page 
113
.
3 Name the document, choose other save options, and click Save.
Obtaining, installing, and updating color profiles
Precise, consistent color management requires accurate ICC-compliant profiles of all of 
your color devices. For example, without an accurate scanner profile, a perfectly scanned 
image may appear incorrect in another program, simply due to any difference in color 
space between the scanner and the program displaying the image. This misleading repre-
sentation may cause you to make unnecessary, time-wasting, and potentially damaging 
“corrections” to an already satisfactory image. With an accurate profile, a program 
importing the image can correct for any gamut differences and display a scan’s actual 
colors.
Once you obtain accurate profiles, they will work with all applications that are compatible 
with your color-management system. You can obtain profiles in the following ways, with 
the most precise methods listed first:
Generate profiles customized for your specific devices using professional profiling 
equipment.
Use the settings in the Custom CMYK dialog box to describe your device, and then save 
the settings as a color profile. (See 
C
r
ea
ting cust
om CMYK pr
ofi
les
on page 
121
.)
Obtain a profile created by the manufacturer. Unfortunately, such profiles do not 
account for individual variations that naturally occur among machines (even identical 
modes from the same manufacturer) or from age.
Substitute an available profile that may be appropriate for the device’s color space. 
For example, many Mac OS scanners have been optimized for an Apple RGB monitor 
color space, so you might try using an Apple monitor profile for these devices; for a 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Support various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to paste a picture in a pdf; how to copy a picture from a pdf file
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
117  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
117  
non-profiled Windows scanner, try substituting the sRGB color space. Be sure to proof 
images created with the profile before using the profile in production.
Adding device profiles to the color management system
You can add color profiles to your system so that they appear as choices in the Color 
Settings dialog box. To minimize confusion when working with profiles, delete any profiles 
for devices not used by you or your workgroup. Once you have added a profile to the 
recommended location on your system, you may need to load it or restart Photoshop so 
that the profile appears in the Color Settings dialog box.
Note: In Mac OS, you can organize the ColorSync Profiles folder by creating additional 
folders within it, or adding aliases to other folders. However, nested folders may cause 
conflicts with some applications, such as Adobe PressReady.
To add profiles to your system:
Copy profiles to one of the following recommended locations:
(Windows 2000) WinNT/System/Spool/Drivers/Color.
(Windows NT) WinNT/System32/Color.
(Windows 98) Windows/System/Color.
(Mac OS 9.x) System Folder/ColorSync Profiles.
(Mac OS X) Users/CurrentUser/Library/ColorSync.
Note: If you use ColorSync 2.5 but have used earlier versions, some profiles may still be 
stored in the System Folder/Preferences/ColorSync
Profiles folder on your hard disk. 
For compatibility with ColorSync 2.5 or later, store profiles in the ColorSync Profiles folder 
in the System Folder.
Updating profiles
The color reproduction characteristics of a color device change as it ages, so recalibrate 
devices periodically and generate updated profiles. Profiles should be good for approxi-
mately a month depending on the device. Some monitors automatically compensate for 
phosphor aging.
Also, recalibrate a device when you change any of the factors that affect calibration. 
For example, recalibrate your monitor when you change the room lighting or the monitor 
brightness setting.
Creating an ICC monitor profile
Your monitor will display color more reliably if you use color management and accurate 
ICC profiles. Using an ICC monitor profile helps you eliminate any color cast in your 
monitor, make your monitor grays as neutral as possible, and standardize image display 
across different monitors.
On Windows, you can use the Adobe Gamma software (installed with Photoshop) to 
create a monitor profile. On Mac OS, you can use the Apple calibration utility to create a 
monitor profile. In addition, there are hardware-based utilities that you can use to create a 
monitor profile. Be sure to use only one calibration utility to display your profile; using 
multiple utilities can result in incorrect color.
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
118  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
118  
Calibrating versus characterizing a monitor
You can use profiling software such as Adobe Gamma (Windows) or the Apple calibration 
utility (Mac OS) to both characterize and calibrate your monitor. When you characterize 
your monitor, you create a profile that describes how the monitor is currently reproducing 
color. When you calibrate your monitor, you bring it into compliance with a predefined 
standard, for example, the graphics arts standard white point color temperature of 5000 
Kelvin.
Determine in advance the standard to which you are calibrating so that you can enter the 
set of values for that standard. Coordinate calibration with your workgroup and prepress 
service provider to make sure you’re all calibrating to the same standard. However, if you 
have implemented a good color management workflow, you need not calibrate all 
monitors to the same standard; you simply need to characterize each monitor to produce 
accurate profiles.
About monitor calibration settings
Monitor calibration involves adjusting video settings, which may be unfamiliar to you. 
A monitor profile uses these settings to precisely describe how your monitor reproduces 
color.
Brightness and contrast The overall level and range, respectively, of display intensity. 
These parameters work just as they do on a television set. 
Gamma The brightness of the midtone values. The values produced by a monitor from 
black to white are nonlinear—if you graph the values, they form a curve, not a straight 
line. The gamma value defines the slope of that curve halfway between black and white. 
Gamma adjustment compensates for the nonlinear tonal reproduction of output devices 
such as monitor tubes.
Phosphors The substance that monitors use to emit light. Different phosphors have 
different color characteristics.
White point The coordinates (measured in the CIE XYZ color space) at which red, green, 
and blue phosphors at full intensity create white.
Guidelines for creating an ICC monitor profile
The following guidelines can help you create an accurate monitor profile.
You may find it helpful to have your monitor’s user guide handy while creating an ICC 
monitor profile.
You don’t need to calibrate your monitor if you’ve already done so using an 
ICC-compliant calibration tool and haven’t changed your video card or monitor 
settings.
Make sure that you are using a standard desktop (CRT) monitor.
If you have the Monitor Setup utility (included with PageMaker
®
6.0) for Windows or 
the Knoll Gamma control panel (included with Adobe Photoshop 4.0 and earlier) for 
Mac OS, remove it; it is obsolete. 
Make sure your monitor has been turned on for at least a half hour. This gives it suffi-
cient time to warm up for a more accurate color reading.
Make sure your monitor is displaying thousands (16 bits) of colors or more.
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
119  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
119  
Remove colorful background patterns on your monitor desktop. Busy or bright patterns 
surrounding a document interfere with accurate color perception. Set your desktop to 
display neutral grays only, using RGB values of 128. For more information, see the 
documentation for your operating system.
If your monitor has digital controls for choosing the white point of your monitor from a 
range of preset values, set those controls before starting the profiling utility. 6500 K is a 
good white point for most uses; 5000 K is the common standard for U.S. prepress 
providers.
Monitor performance changes and declines over time; recharacterize your monitor 
every month or so. If you find it difficult or impossible to calibrate your monitor to a 
standard, it may be too old and faded.
Calibrating with Adobe Gamma (Windows)
The ICC profile you get using Adobe Gamma uses the calibration settings to describe how 
your monitor reproduces color. 
Note: Adobe Gamma can characterize, but not calibrate, monitors used with Windows NT. 
In addition, the ICC profile you create with Adobe Gamma can be used as the system-level 
profile in Windows NT. Adobe Gamma’s ability to calibrate settings depends on the video 
card and video driver software. In such cases, some calibration options documented here 
may not be available.
To use Adobe Gamma:
1 Start Adobe Gamma, located in the Control Panels folder or in the Program Files/
Common Files /Adobe/Calibration folder on your hard drive.
2 Do one of the following:
To use a version of the utility that will guide you through each step, select Step by Step, 
and click OK. This version is recommended if you’re inexperienced. If you choose this 
option, follow the instructions described in the utility. Start from the default profile for 
your monitor if available, and enter a unique description name for the profile. When 
you are finished with Adobe Gamma, save the profile using the same description name. 
(If you do not have a default profile, contact your monitor manufacturer for appropriate 
phosphor specifications.)
To use a compact version of the utility with all the controls in one place, select Control 
Panel, and click OK. This version is recommended if you have experience creating color 
profiles.
At any time while working in the Adobe Gamma control panel, you can click the 
Wizard button to switch to the wizard for instructions that guide you through the 
same settings as in the control panel, one option at a time.
Saving and loading working space profiles
If none of the working space options in the Color Settings dialog box accurately describe 
the color space of your particular output or display device, you can create a custom RGB, 
CMYK, Grayscale, or Spot working space profile. Saving your custom profile ensures that 
you can reuse it and share it with other users and other Adobe applications that use the 
Color Settings dialog box.
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
120  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
120  
You can also load a profile that has not been saved in the recommended profile location, 
so that the profile appears in the Color Settings dialog box. 
To save a custom profile:
1 Do one of the following:
In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
2 Create a custom working space profile. (See 
C
r
ea
ting cust
om R
GB pr
ofi
les
on 
page 
120
C
r
ea
ting cust
om CMYK pr
ofi
les
on page 
121
, or 
C
r
ea
ting cust
om gr
a
y
sc
ale 
and sp
ot-c
olor pr
ofi
les
on page 
125
.)
3 Under Working Spaces, choose Save Color Space from the appropriate menu.
4 Name and save the profile. (See 
O
btaining
,
installing
,
and up
da
ting c
olor pr
ofi
les
on 
page 
116
for the recommended location to save the profile.)
To access a saved profile, you may need to load it or restart Photoshop. If you do not save a 
custom profile, it will be stored only in the custom color settings file of which it is a part 
and will not be available as a profile option in the Color Settings dialog box.
To load a custom profile:
1 Do one of the following:
In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
2 Under Working Spaces, choose Load Color Space from the appropriate menu.
3 Locate and select the desired profile, and click Open.
If you load a profile that has been saved outside the recommended location, it temporarily 
replaces the Other option in the Working Spaces menu, until another profile is loaded.
Creating custom RGB profiles
When designing a custom RGB profile, you can specify the gamma, white point, and 
phosphor settings of your monitor or RGB device.
To create a custom RGB profile:
1 Do one of the following:
In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
2 Under Working Spaces, choose Custom RGB from the RGB menu.
3 For Name, enter the name for the custom profile.
4 For Gamma, enter the gamma value you want to use.
5 For White Point, choose a setting.
For more information on gamma and white point settings, see 
A
b
out monit
or c
alibr
a
tion 
settings
on page 
118
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested