reportviewer c# windows forms pdf : How to copy an image from a pdf to word Library control class asp.net azure html ajax pShopGuide12-part341

U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
121  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
121  
6 For Primaries, choose a set of red, green, and blue phosphor or primary types. This 
option is based on the different red, green, and blue phosphors or primaries used by 
monitors to display color. If the correct type is not listed, enter custom red, green, and blue 
chromaticity coordinates.
Note: Because you are defining the color space in which to edit images, the primaries do 
not have to match your monitor.
7 Click OK. 
8 Save the custom profile. (See 
S
a
ving and loading w
or
k
ing spac
e pr
ofi
les
on page 
119
.)
Creating custom CMYK profiles
When designing a custom CMYK profile, you can specify the ink colors, dot gain, 
separation type, and black generation of your output device. If you have saved Printing 
Inks and Separation Setup files from Photoshop 4.x or earlier, you can load them for use as 
a working space profile in the Color Settings dialog box. (See 
S
a
ving and loading w
or
k
ing 
spac
e pr
ofi
les
on page 
119
.)
Custom CMYK profiles are mainly useful for providing color management compatibility 
with documents created in versions of Photoshop prior to 6.0. In general, the CMYK 
working space profiles included with the current version of Photoshop produce more 
accurate results.
Entering custom CMYK settings
Use the following instructions to create a custom CMYK profile.
To create a custom CMYK profile:
1 Do one of the following:
In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Color Settings.
In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Color Settings.
2 Under Working Spaces, choose Custom CMYK from the CMYK menu.
3 For Name, enter a new name for the custom profile if desired. However, because the 
default name automatically reflects changes that you make to the Custom CMYK settings, 
it is recommended that you accept the default name.
4 For Ink Colors, choose an ink type. (See 
S
p
ecifying ink c
olors
on page 
122
.)
5 For Dot Gain, specify a value. (See 
S
p
ecifying dot gain
on page 
123
.)
6 Specify separation options. (See 
A
djusting the separ
a
tion t
yp
e and black gener
a
tion
on page 
124
.)
7 Click OK.
8 Save the custom profile. (See 
S
a
ving and loading w
or
k
ing spac
e pr
ofi
les
on page 
119
.)
How to copy an image from a pdf to word - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy text from pdf image to word; copy image from pdf to ppt
How to copy an image from a pdf to word - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copying images from pdf files; paste image into pdf preview
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
122  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
122  
Specifying ink colors
The Ink Colors menu lets you choose from the following options:
The preset ink options are designed to produce quality separations using standard inks 
and printing specifications. These ink standards differ slightly from one another. 
Similarly, the color and ink absorption qualities of the paper stock affect the final 
printed result. You can think of this information as telling Photoshop what printed cyan, 
magenta, yellow, and black look like given a certain set of inks and paper stock under 
your lighting conditions.
The Custom option lets you customize the on-screen display of ink colors to match 
printed output by entering values obtained from a color proof. (See 
P
r
in
ting a har
pr
o
of
on page 
127
.) For example, you may want to use the Custom option to specify 
an ink set not listed as a preset option. When you change these settings, you change 
the profile that Photoshop uses to display the ink colors on-screen. See the following 
procedure for instructions on entering custom ink values.
If you have loaded a CMYK profile or color settings file that has been saved outside the 
recommended location, the ink setting for that profile or settings file temporarily 
replaces the Other option in the Ink Colors menu.
Note: In most cases, printing ink characteristics do not vary greatly from printer to printer 
within the same printer type. For example, one Tektronix Phaser II printer prints ink hues 
very similar to another one. But the amount of dot gain can vary significantly. Thus, for a 
different printer of the same type, you may have to change the dot gain setting in the 
CMYK Setup dialog box but not the printing ink colors.
To enter custom ink color values:
1 In the Custom CMYK dialog box, for Ink Colors, choose Custom.
By default, the Ink Colors dialog box defines colors using the CIE coordinates of Y 
(lightness), x, and y values. The default ink sets are calibrated for viewing conditions of 
5000 K (when viewed under D50 lighting), 2° field of view. CIE coordinates are an interna-
tional color definition standard supported by PostScript Level 2 and higher.
Note: Colors appear slightly different based on how much of the eye’s field of view they 
cover. The CIE has defined two standard ways of measuring color coordinates, one based 
on colors filling 10° of the eye’s field of view, and one based on colors filling 2° of the field of 
view. Photoshop uses the 2° field of view standard.
2 If desired, select L*a*b Coordinates to enter the color box coordinates as Lab values 
rather than Yxy values. Use this option if your spectrophotometer only has Lab readouts.
3 Using your printed CMYK proof, take a reading of the color values using a spectropho-
tometer, and then enter those values in the appropriate text boxes. 
Alternatively, you can click the color box of the ink color you want to adjust and then 
adjust the color on-screen until it matches the patch on the color proof. Make sure that 
you are viewing the proof under the proper lighting conditions.
4 If desired, select Estimate Overprints to automatically estimate the overprint colors 
(MY, CY, CM, and CMY) using the CMYK and white values you entered. This is useful if you 
don’t have a spectrophotometer.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
copy image from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy pdf image into word
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
copying a pdf image to word; copy images from pdf
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
123  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
123  
Specifying dot gain
Dot gain or loss can occur when the specified printer’s halftone dots change as the ink 
spreads and is absorbed by paper. As a general rule, you should not adjust the dot gain 
value until you have run a hard proof (which includes a calibration bar) and have 
measured the density values on the proof with a reflective densitometer. Adjust this value 
if your print shop has provided a different value for estimated dot gain.
The Custom CMYK dialog box gives you the following ways to specify a printer’s dot gain: 
You can define a single dot gain value at the 50% level. This means that all four inks gain 
the same amount at 50%.
You can set up to 13 values along the grayscale range to create a customized dot gain 
curve for one or more CMYK plates. Use this method if your proof has a significant color 
cast in its neutral gray values.
To specify the dot gain at the standard 50% mark:
1 Print a hard proof with calibration bars included. (See 
S
etting output options
on 
page 
473
.)
2 Using a reflective densitometer, take a reading at the 50% mark of the printed 
calibration bar.
3 In the Custom CMYK dialog box, for Dot Gain, choose Standard. Then enter the total 
amount of dot gain measured by the densitometer. For example, if the densitometer 
reading is 54%, enter 4 in the text box to specify a dot gain of 4%.
Note: If you don’t have a densitometer, adjust the Dot Gain value until the image on-
screen looks like the proof, and then add that value to your printer’s estimate of the 
expected dot gain between proof and final output.
To specify the dot gain using curves:
1 Print a hard proof with calibration bars included. (See 
S
etting output options
on 
page 
473
.)
2 Using a reflective densitometer, take a reading at one or more marks of the printed 
calibration bar.
3 In the Custom CMYK dialog box, for Dot Gain, choose Curves.
4 In the lower right of the Dot Gain Curves dialog box, select the ink plate for which you 
want to set dot gain curves. To set the same curves for all the plates, select All Same.
5 Do one of the following:
Enter the values of your densitometer readings in the text boxes.
For example, if you have specified a 30% dot, and the densitometer reading is 36%, you 
have a 6% dot gain in your midtones. To compensate for this gain, enter 36% in the 30% 
text box.
Click to add an adjustment point in the dot gain curve, and drag the point to change its 
value. The value then appears in the appropriate text box.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a they are using different types of word processors.
copy picture from pdf to powerpoint; copy picture from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
copy images from pdf to powerpoint; copy pdf picture to powerpoint
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
124  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
124  
Adjusting the separation type and black generation
To make color separations, the three additive colors (red, green, and blue) are translated 
into their subtractive counterparts (cyan, magenta, and yellow). In theory, equal parts of 
cyan, magenta, and yellow combine to subtract all light reflected from the paper and 
create black. Due to impurities present in all printing inks, however, a mix of these colors 
instead yields a muddy brown. To compensate for this deficiency in the color separation 
process, printers remove some cyan, magenta, and yellow in areas where the three colors 
exist in equal amounts, and they add black ink. 
A given color can be translated from RGB mode to CMYK mode in an endless number of 
ways. But prepress operators typically use one of the following ways to generate black 
in print:
In undercolor removal (UCR), black ink is used to replace cyan, magenta, and yellow ink 
in neutral areas only (that is, areas with equal amounts of cyan, magenta, and yellow). 
This results in less ink and greater depth in shadows. Because it uses less ink, UCR is 
used for newsprint and uncoated stock, which generally have greater dot gain than 
coated stock.
In gray component replacement (GCR), black ink is used to replace portions of cyan, 
magenta, and yellow ink in colored areas as well as in neutral areas. GCR separations 
tend to reproduce dark, saturated colors somewhat better than UCR separations do 
and maintain gray balance better on press.
Choose the type of separation based on your paper stock and the requirements of your 
print shop.
To adjust the separation type and black generation:
1 In the Custom CMYK dialog box, select a separation type.
The Separation Options area displays a graph based on current settings showing how 
neutral colors in the image will separate. In the graph, sometimes called a gray ramp, 
neutral colors have equal parts of cyan, magenta, and yellow. The horizontal axis repre-
sents the neutral color value, from 0% (white) to 100% (black). The vertical axis represents 
the amount of each ink that will be generated for the given value. In most cases, the cyan 
curve extends beyond the magenta and yellow curves, because a small extra amount of 
cyan is required to produce a true neutral. 
2 If you selected GCR as the separation type, choose an option for Black Generation:
None generates the color separation using no black plate.
The Light and Heavy settings decrease and increase the effect of the Medium setting 
(the default). In most cases, Medium produces the best results. 
Maximum maps the gray value directly to the black plate. This option is useful for 
images with a large amount of solid black against a light background, such as screen 
shots from a computer.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
copy images from pdf file; paste image into pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
how to copy pictures from pdf to word; how to copy pdf image into powerpoint
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
125  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
125  
Custom lets you adjust the black generation curve manually. Before choosing Custom, 
first choose an option (Light, Medium, Heavy, or Maximum) that is closest to the type of 
black generation you want. This gives you a black generation curve to use as a starting 
point. Then choose Custom, position the pointer on the curve, and drag to adjust the 
black curve. The curves for cyan, magenta, and yellow are adjusted automatically 
relative to the new black curve and the total ink densities.
Black generation examples: 
A. No black generation (Composite image, CMY, K) B. Medium black generation (Composite image, 
CMY, K) C. Maximum black generation (Composite image, CMY, K)
3 If needed, specify values for Black Ink Limit and Total Ink Limit (the maximum ink 
density your press can support). Check with your print shop to see if you should adjust 
these values. 
In the Gray Ramp graph, these limits determine the cutoff points for the CMYK curves.
4 If you selected GCR as the separation type, specify an amount for undercolor addition 
(UCA) to increase the amount of CMY added to shadow areas. Check with your print shop 
for the preferred value. If you are unsure of this value, leave it at 0%.
UCA compensates for the loss of ink density in neutral shadow areas. This additional ink 
produces rich, dark shadows in areas that might appear flat if printed with only black ink. 
UCA can also prevent posterization in subtle detail in the shadows. 
Creating custom grayscale and spot-color profiles
You can create a custom grayscale or spot-color profile based on the specific dot-gain or 
gamma characteristics of your output device. You can also load a CMYK profile into the 
Gray working space menu to generate a custom grayscale profile based on the CMYK 
space. (See 
S
a
ving and loading w
or
k
ing spac
e pr
ofi
les
on page 
119
.)
A
B
C
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert
how to copy an image from a pdf to word; paste image in pdf preview
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
copy image from pdf to word; how to copy images from pdf file
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
126  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
126  
To create a grayscale or spot-color profile based on a custom dot gain:
1 Print a hard proof with calibration bars included. (See 
S
etting output options
on 
page 
473
.)
2 Using a reflective densitometer, take a reading at one or more marks of the printed 
calibration bar.
3 Do one of the following:
In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
4 Under Working Spaces, for Gray or Spot, choose Custom Dot Gain.
5 For Name, enter the name for the custom profile.
6 Do one of the following:
Using your densitometer readings, calculate the required adjustments, and enter the 
percentage values in the text boxes.
For example, if you have specified a 30% dot, and the densitometer reading is 36%, you 
have a 6% dot gain in your midtones. To compensate for this gain, enter 36% in the 30% 
text box.
Click to add an adjustment point in the dot gain curve, and drag the point to change its 
value. The value then appears in the appropriate text box.
Click OK.
7 Save the custom profile. (See 
S
a
ving and loading w
or
k
ing spac
e pr
ofi
les
on page 
119
.)
To create a grayscale profile based on a custom gamma:
1 Do one of the following:
In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Color Settings, and select Advanced Mode.
2 Select Advanced.
3 Under Working Spaces, for Gray, choose Custom Gamma.
4 For Name, enter the name for the custom profile.
5 Specify the desired gamma value, and click OK.
6 Save the custom profile. (See 
S
a
ving and loading w
or
k
ing spac
e pr
ofi
les
on page 
119
.)
Compensating for dot gain in film using transfer functions
When using CMYK color profiles, you cannot customize dot gain settings. However, you 
may be able to compensate for dot gain from a miscalibrated imagesetter by using 
transfer functions.
Transfer functions enable you to compensate for dot gain between the image and film. For 
example, the Transfer function makes 50% dots in the image print as 50% dots on film. 
Similar to dot gain curves, the transfer functions let you specify up to 13 values along the 
grayscale to create a customized transfer function. Unlike dot gain curves, transfer 
functions apply only to printing—they don’t affect the image color data.
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
127  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
127  
Use the following guidelines to determine the best method of accounting for dot gain:
If you are using a custom CMYK profile, use the dot gain settings in the custom CMYK 
dialog box to adjust dot gain so that it matches the printed results.
If you are using an ICC profile and the dot gain values do not match the printed results, 
try to obtain a new profile with values that do match.
Use transfer functions only if neither of the previous methods is an option.
To adjust transfer function values: 
1 Use a transmissive densitometer to record the density values at the appropriate steps in 
your image on film.
2 Choose File > Print with Preview.
3 Select Show More Options, and choose Output from the pop-up menu.
4 Click the Transfer button.
5 Calculate the required adjustment, and enter the values (as percentages) in the Transfer 
Functions dialog box. 
For example, if you specified a 50% dot, and your imagesetter prints it at 58%, an 8% dot 
gain occurs in the midtones. To compensate for this gain, enter 42% (50% – 8%) in the 50% 
text box of the Transfer Functions dialog box. The imagesetter then prints the 50% dot 
you want.
When entering transfer function values, keep in mind the density range of your image-
setter. On a given imagesetter, a very small highlight dot may be too small to hold ink. 
Beyond a certain density level, the shadow dots may fill as solid black, removing all detail 
in shadow areas. 
Note: To preserve transfer functions in an exported EPS file, select Override Printer’s 
Default Functions in the Transfer Functions dialog box and then export the file with 
Include Transfer Functions selected in the EPS Format dialog box. (See 
S
a
ving fi
les in 
P
hot
oshop EPS f
ormat (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
448
.)
To save the current transfer function settings as the default:
Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) to change the Save button to —> Defaults, 
and click the button. 
To load the default transfer function settings:
Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) to change the Load button to <— Defaults, 
and click the button.
Printing a hard proof
A hard proof can help you check the accuracy of a custom CMYK working space profile. 
You can produce a hard proof by printing a CMYK image. Do not print an RGB image that 
has been converted to CMYK in Photoshop. Instead use an image that has been saved in 
CMYK format without an embedded ICC profile and whose CMYK values have been 
assigned directly in CMYK mode.
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
128  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Producing Consistent Color (Photoshop) 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
128  
To create your own CMYK proof document:
1 Create a new Photoshop document in CMYK mode.
2 Use the Assign Profile command to remove any existing color profile from the 
document. (See 
C
hanging the c
olor pr
ofi
le of a do
cumen
t
on page 
115
.)
3 Create a set of swatches that includes the following:
Four swatches, each containing 100% of the CMYK colors (100% cyan, 100% magenta, 
100% yellow, and 100% black).
Four combination swatches (100% each of magenta and yellow, 100% each of cyan and 
yellow, 100% each of cyan and magenta, and 100% each of cyan, magenta, and yellow).
A set of swatches that make up a four-color black, such as 60% cyan, 50% magenta, 
50% yellow, and 100% black.
4 Print a hard proof with calibration bars included. (See 
S
etting output options
on 
page 
473
.)
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
129  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Making Color and Tonal Adjustments 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
129  
Making Color and Tonal 
Adjustments
Basic steps for correcting images
Photoshop and ImageReady give you a range of commands and features for adjusting the 
tonal quality and color balance of images. For simple image correction, use one of the 
quick adjustment commands. (See 
M
ak
ing quick o
v
er
all adjustmen
ts t
o an image
on 
page 
150
.) For more precise and flexible adjustments, use the following color-correction 
workflow.
1. Calibrate your monitor.
In preparation for adjusting images, characterize and calibrate your monitor to a color-
display standard suited to your working needs. Otherwise, the image on your monitor 
may look very different from the same image when printed or when viewed on another 
monitor. (See 
C
r
ea
ting an IC
C monit
or pr
ofi
le
on page 
117
.)
2. Check the scan quality and tonal range.
Before making adjustments, look at the image’s histogram to evaluate whether the image 
has sufficient detail to produce high-quality output. The greater the range of values in the 
histogram, the greater the detail. Poor scans and photographs without much detail can be 
difficult if not impossible to correct. Too many color corrections can also result in a loss of 
pixel values and too little detail. 
The histogram also displays the overall distribution of shadows, midtones, and highlights 
to help you determine which tonal corrections are needed. (See 
C
heck
ing sc
an qualit
and t
onal r
ange (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
131
.)
3. Adjust the tonal range.
Begin tonal corrections by adjusting the values of the extreme highlight and shadow 
pixels in the image, setting an overall tonal range that allows for the sharpest detail 
possible throughout the image. This process is known as setting the highlights and 
shadows or setting the white and black points.
Setting the highlights and shadows typically redistributes the midtone pixels appropri-
ately. When pixel values are concentrated at either end of the tonal range, however, you 
may need to adjust your midtones manually. It is not usually necessary to adjust midtones 
in images that already have a concentrated amount of midtone detail.
There are several different ways to set an image’s tonal range:
You can drag sliders along the histogram in the Levels dialog box. (See 
U
sing L
e
v
els t
set highligh
ts
,
shado
w
s
,
and midt
ones
on page 
137
.)
(Photoshop) You can adjust the shape of the graph in the Curves dialog box. This 
method lets you adjust any point along a 0–255 tonal scale and provides the greatest 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
130  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Making Color and Tonal Adjustments 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
130  
control over an image’s tonal quality. For more information, see 
U
sing the C
ur
v
es 
dialo
g b
o
x (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
139
.
(Photoshop) You can assign target values to the highlight and shadow pixels using 
either the Levels or Curves dialog box. This can be a useful method for images intended 
for printing on a press. For more information, see 
U
sing tar
get v
alues t
o set highligh
ts 
and shado
w
s (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
141
.
4. Adjust the color balance.
After correcting the tonal range, you can adjust the image’s color balance to remove 
unwanted color casts or to correct oversaturated or undersaturated colors. Examine your 
image with reference to the color wheel to determine which color adjustments you need 
to make. (See 
A
b
out the c
olor wheel
on page 
146
.) You can choose from the following 
color adjustment methods:
(Photoshop) The Auto Color command automatically corrects the color balance in an 
image. For more information, see 
U
sing the A
ut
o C
olor c
ommand (P
hot
oshop)
on 
page 
151
.
(Photoshop) The Color Balance command changes the overall mixture of colors in an 
image. For more information, see 
U
sing the C
olor B
alanc
e c
ommand (P
hot
oshop)
on 
page 
146
.
The Hue/Saturation command adjusts the hue, saturation, and lightness values of the 
entire image or of individual color components. (See 
U
sing the Hue/S
a
tur
a
tion 
c
ommand
on page 
147
.)
(Photoshop) The Replace Color command replaces specified colors in an image with 
new color values. See 
U
sing the R
eplac
e C
olor c
ommand (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
149
.
(Photoshop) The Selective Color command is a high-end color-correction method that 
adjusts the amount of process colors in individual color components. For more infor-
mation, see 
U
sing the S
elec
tiv
e C
olor c
ommand (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
149
.
The Levels dialog box lets you adjust color balance by setting the pixel distribution for 
individual color channels. In Photoshop, you can also use the Curves dialog box to 
make these adjustments. For more information, see 
U
sing L
e
v
els t
o adjust c
olor 
(P
hot
oshop)
on page 
139
and 
U
sing the C
ur
v
es dialo
g b
o
x (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
139
.
(Photoshop) The technique of blending colors from different channels can also produce 
color adjustments. For more information, see 
M
ixing c
olor channels (P
hot
oshop)
on 
page 
271
.
(Photoshop) To best preserve the original detail in your image as you make color 
adjustments, convert the image to 16 bits per channel. (See 
C
on
v
er
ting b
et
w
een bit 
depths
on page 
93
.) When you finish making color adjustments, convert it back to an 
8-bit-per-channel image.
5. Make other special color adjustments.
Once you have corrected the overall color balance of your image, you can make optional 
adjustments to enhance colors or produce special effects. (See 
A
pplying sp
ecial c
olor 
eff
ec
ts t
o images
on page 
152
.)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested