reportviewer c# windows forms pdf : Copy picture from pdf to word SDK Library service wpf asp.net .net dnn pShopGuide15-part344

U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
151  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Making Color and Tonal Adjustments 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
151  
To use the Auto Levels command:
Choose Image > Adjustments > Auto Levels.
To change the amount of white and black values clipped:
Do one of the following:
(Photoshop) Set clipping values in the Auto Correction Options dialog box. For more 
information, see 
S
etting aut
o c
or
r
ec
tion options (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
144
.
(ImageReady) Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and click Options in the 
Levels dialog box. Enter the percentage of extreme highlight and shadow pixels to 
ignore, and click OK. A value between 0.5% and 1% is recommended.
Using the Auto Contrast command
The Auto Contrast command adjusts the overall contrast and mixture of colors in an RGB 
image automatically. Because it does not adjust channels individually, Auto Contrast does 
not introduce or remove color casts. It maps the lightest and darkest pixels in the image to 
white and black, which makes highlights appear lighter and shadows appear darker. 
When identifying the lightest and darkest pixels in an image, Auto Contrast clips the white 
and black pixels by 0.5%—that is, it ignores the first 0.5% of either extreme. This ensures 
that white and black values are based on representative rather than extreme pixel values.
Auto Contrast can improve the appearance of many photographic or continuous-tone 
images. It does not improve flat-color images.
To use the Auto Contrast command:
Choose Image > Adjustments > Auto Contrast.
To change the amount of white and black values clipped:
Do one of the following:
(Photoshop) Set clipping values in the Auto Correction Options dialog box. For more 
information, see 
S
etting aut
o c
or
r
ec
tion options (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
144
.
(ImageReady) Hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and click Options in the 
Levels dialog box. Enter the percentage of extreme highlight and shadow pixels to 
ignore, and click OK. A value between 0.5% and 1% is recommended.
Using the Auto Color command (Photoshop)
The Auto Color command adjusts the contrast and color of an image by searching the 
actual image rather than the channels’ histograms for shadows, midtones, and highlights. 
It neutralizes the midtones and clips the white and black pixels based on the values set in 
the Auto Correction Options dialog box. (See 
S
etting aut
o c
or
r
ec
tion options 
(P
hot
oshop)
on page 
144
.)
To use the Auto Color command:
Choose Image > Adjustments > Auto Color.
Copy picture from pdf to word - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copy picture from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy image from pdf to word document
Copy picture from pdf to word - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy image from pdf to; copy picture from pdf
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
152  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Making Color and Tonal Adjustments 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
152  
Using the Variations command
The Variations command lets you adjust the color balance, contrast, and saturation of an 
image by showing you thumbnails of alternatives. 
This command is most useful for average-key images that don’t require precise color 
adjustments. It does not work on indexed-color images (Photoshop).
To use the Variations command:
1 Open the Variations dialog box. (See 
M
ak
ing c
olor adjustmen
ts
on page 
132
.)
Note: If the Variations command does not appear in the Adjustments submenu, the Varia-
tions plug-in module may not have been installed. (See 
U
sing plug-in mo
dules
on 
page 
58
.)
The two thumbnails at the top of the dialog box show the original selection (Original) and 
the selection with its currently selected adjustments (Current Pick). When you first open 
the dialog box, these two images are the same. As you make adjustments, the Current Pick 
image changes to reflect your choices.
2 Select Show Clipping if you want to display a neon preview of areas in the image that 
will be clipped by the adjustment—that is, converted to pure white or pure black. Clipping 
can result in undesirable color shifts, as distinct colors in the original image are mapped to 
the same color. Clipping does not occur when you adjust midtones. 
Note: Clipped colors are not the same as out-of-gamut colors.
3 Select what to adjust in the image:
Shadows, Midtones, or Highlights to indicate whether you want to adjust the dark, 
middle, or light areas.
Saturation to change the degree of hue in the image. If you exceed the maximum 
saturation for a color, it may be clipped.
4 Drag the Fine/Coarse slider to determine the amount of each adjustment. Moving the 
slider one tick mark doubles the adjustment amount. 
5 Adjust the color and brightness:
To add a color to the image, click the appropriate color thumbnail. 
To subtract a color, click the thumbnail for its opposite color. (See 
A
b
out the c
olor 
wheel
on page 
146
.) For example, to subtract cyan, click the More Red thumbnail.
To adjust brightness, click a thumbnail on the right side of the dialog box.
Each time you click a thumbnail, other thumbnails change. The center thumbnail always 
reflects the current choices.
Applying special color effects to images
The Desaturate, Invert, Equalize (Photoshop), Threshold (Photoshop), and Posterize 
(Photoshop) commands change colors or brightness values in an image but are typically 
used for enhancing color and producing special effects, rather than for correcting color. 
Note: You can also make color adjustments by blending colors from different channels. 
(See 
M
ixing c
olor channels (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
271
.)
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
preview paste image into pdf; copy pictures from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
copy image from pdf preview; copy picture to pdf
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
153  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Making Color and Tonal Adjustments 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
153  
Using the Desaturate command 
The Desaturate command converts a color image to a grayscale image in the same color 
mode. For example, it assigns equal red, green, and blue values to each pixel in an RGB 
image to make it appear grayscale. The lightness value of each pixel does not change.
This command has the same effect as setting Saturation to –100 in the Hue/Saturation 
dialog box.
Note: If you are working with a multilayer image, Desaturate converts the selected layer 
only.
To use the Desaturate command:
Choose Image > Adjustments > Desaturate.
Using the Invert command 
The Invert command inverts the colors in an image. You might use this command to make 
a positive black-and-white image negative or to make a positive from a scanned black-
and-white negative. 
Note: Because color print film contains an orange mask in its base, the Invert command 
cannot make accurate positive images from scanned color negatives. Be sure to use the 
proper settings for color negatives when scanning film on slide scanners.
When you invert an image, the brightness value of each pixel in the channels is converted 
to the inverse value on the 256-step color-values scale. For example, a pixel in a positive 
image with a value of 255 is changed to 0, and a pixel with a value of 5 to 250.
To use the Invert command:
Choose Image > Adjustments > Invert, or choose Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Invert 
(Photoshop). 
Using the Equalize command (Photoshop)
The Equalize command redistributes the brightness values of the pixels in an image so 
that they more evenly represent the entire range of brightness levels. When you apply this 
command, Photoshop finds the brightest and darkest values in the composite image and 
remaps them so that the brightest value represents white and the darkest value repre-
sents black. Photoshop then attempts to equalize the brightness—that is, to distribute the 
intermediate pixel values evenly throughout the grayscale. 
You might use the Equalize command when a scanned image appears darker than the 
original and you want to balance the values to produce a lighter image. Using Equalize 
together with the Histogram command lets you see before-and-after brightness 
comparisons.
To use the Equalize command: 
1 Choose Image > Adjustments > Equalize.
2 If you selected an area of the image, select what to equalize in the dialog box, and 
click OK:
Equalize Selected Area Only to evenly distribute only the selection’s pixels.
Equalize Entire Image Based on Selected Area to evenly distribute all image pixels 
based on those in the selection. 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
how to copy images from pdf to word; copy picture from pdf reader
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf; how to copy pictures from a pdf to word
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
154  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Making Color and Tonal Adjustments 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
154  
Using the Threshold command (Photoshop)
The Threshold command converts grayscale or color images to high-contrast, black-and-
white images. You can specify a certain level as a threshold. All pixels lighter than the 
threshold are converted to white; all pixels darker are converted to black. The Threshold 
command is useful for determining the lightest and darkest areas of an image.
To use the Threshold command to convert images to black and white: 
1 Open the Threshold dialog box. (See 
M
ak
ing c
olor adjustmen
ts
on page 
132
.)
The Threshold dialog box displays a histogram of the luminance levels of the pixels in the 
current selection.
2 Drag the slider below the histogram until the threshold level you want appears at the 
top of the dialog box, and click OK. As you drag, the image changes to reflect the new 
threshold setting.
To use the Threshold command to identify representative highlights and shadows:
1 Open the Threshold dialog box. (See 
M
ak
ing c
olor adjustmen
ts
on page 
132
.)
2 Select Preview.
3 To identify a representative highlight, drag the slider to the far right until the image 
becomes pure black. Drag the slider slowly toward the center until some solid white areas 
appear in the image, and place a color sampler on one of the areas. 
4 To identify a representative shadow, drag the slider to the far left until the image 
becomes pure white. Drag the slider slowly toward the center until some solid black areas 
appear in the image, and place a color sampler on one of the areas. 
5 Click Cancel to close the Threshold dialog box without applying changes to the image.
You can use the Info palette readouts of the two color samplers to determine your 
highlight and shadow values.
Using the Posterize command (Photoshop)
The Posterize command lets you specify the number of tonal levels (or brightness values) 
for each channel in an image and then maps pixels to the closest matching level. For 
example, choosing two tonal levels in an RGB image gives six colors, two for red, two for 
green, and two for blue.
This command is useful for creating special effects, such as large, flat areas in a photo-
graph. Its effects are most evident when you reduce the number of gray levels in a 
grayscale image. But it also produces interesting effects in color images.
If you want a specific number of colors in your image, convert the image to grayscale 
and specify the number of levels you want. Then convert the image back to the 
previous color mode, and replace the various gray tones with the colors you want.
To use the Posterize command:
1 Open the Posterize dialog box. (See 
M
ak
ing c
olor adjustmen
ts
on page 
132
.)
2 Enter the number of tonal levels you want, and click OK.
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
how to copy picture from pdf file; copying image from pdf to word
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to copy pdf image into powerpoint; paste image into pdf in preview
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
155  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Making Color and Tonal Adjustments 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
155  
Using the Gradient Map command (Photoshop)
The Gradient Map command maps the equivalent grayscale range of an image to the 
colors of a specified gradient fill. If you specify a two-color gradient fill, for example, 
shadows in the image map to one of the endpoint colors of the gradient fill, highlights 
map to the other endpoint color, and midtones map to the gradations in between.
To use the Gradient Map command:
1 Open the Gradient Map dialog box. (See 
M
ak
ing c
olor adjustmen
ts
on page 
132
.)
2 Specify the gradient fill you want to use:
To choose from a list of gradient fills, click the triangle to the right of the gradient fill 
displayed in the Gradient Map dialog box. Click to select the desired gradient fill, and 
then click in a blank area of the dialog box to dismiss the list. (See 
M
anaging libr
ar
ies 
with the P
r
eset M
anager (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
54
for information on customizing the 
gradient fill list.)
To edit the gradient fill currently displayed in the Gradient Map dialog box, click the 
gradient fill. Then modify the existing gradient fill or create a new gradient fill. 
(See 
C
r
ea
ting smo
oth gr
adien
t fi
lls
on page 
245
.)
By default, the shadows, midtones, and highlights of the image are mapped respectively 
to the starting (left) color, midpoint, and ending (right) color of the gradient fill.
3 Select either, none, or both of the Gradient Options:
Dither adds random noise to smooth the appearance of the gradient fill and reduce 
banding effects.
Reverse switches the direction of the gradient fill, reversing the gradient map.
Sharpening images
Unsharp masking, or USM, is a traditional film compositing technique used to sharpen 
edges in an image. The Unsharp Mask filter corrects blurring introduced during photo-
graphing, scanning, resampling, or printing. It is useful for images intended for both print 
and online viewing.
Unsharp Mask locates pixels that differ from surrounding pixels by the threshold you 
specify and increases the pixels’ contrast by the amount you specify. In addition, you 
specify the radius of the region to which each pixel is compared. The effects of the 
Unsharp Mask filter are far more pronounced on-screen than in high-resolution output. 
If your final destination is print, experiment to determine what settings work best for your 
image.
For information on other filters for sharpening images, see 
S
har
p
en fi
lt
ers
on page 
333
.
To use Unsharp Mask to sharpen an image: 
1 Choose Filter > Sharpen > Unsharp Mask. Make sure the Preview option is selected.
Click on the image in the preview window to see how the image looks without 
the sharpening. Drag in the preview window to see different parts of the image, 
and click + or – to zoom in or out.
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Powerful PDF image editor control, compatible with .NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
copying a pdf image to word; paste image in pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link Visual Studio .NET PDF image editor control, compatible Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
how to paste a picture into a pdf document; pdf cut and paste image
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
156  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Making Color and Tonal Adjustments 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
156  
2 Do one of the following:
Drag the Amount slider or enter a value to determine how much to increase the 
contrast of pixels. For high-resolution printed images, an amount between 150% and 
200% is usually recommended. 
Drag the Radius slider or enter a value to determine the number of pixels surrounding 
the edge pixels that affect the sharpening. For high-resolution images, a Radius 
between 1 and 2 is usually recommended. A lower value sharpens only the edge pixels, 
whereas a higher value sharpens a wider band of pixels. This effect is much less 
noticeable in print than on-screen, because a 2-pixel radius represents a smaller area 
in a high-resolution printed image. 
Drag the Threshold slider or enter a value to determine how different the sharpened 
pixels must be from the surrounding area before they are considered edge pixels and 
sharpened by the filter. To avoid introducing noise (in images with fleshtones, for 
example), experiment with Threshold values between 2 and 20. The default Threshold 
value (0) sharpens all pixels in the image.
If applying Unsharp Mask makes already bright colors appear overly saturated, 
convert the image to Lab mode and apply the filter to the Lightness channel only. 
This sharpens the image without affecting the color components.
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
157  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Selecting 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
157  
Selecting
About selections
Since there are two different types of data in your image—bitmap and vector—you need 
to use separate sets of tools to make selections of each type. You can use selection borders 
to select pixels. When you select pixels, you are selecting resolution dependent infor-
mation in the image. For more information about bitmap images and vector graphics, 
see 
A
b
out bitmap images and v
ec
t
or gr
aphics
on page 
61
.
You can also create selections using the pen or shape tools, which produce precise 
outlines called paths. A path is a vector shape that contains no pixels. (See 
M
o
ving
,
c
op
ying
,
and pasting selec
tions and la
y
ers
on page 
167
.) You can convert paths to selec-
tions or convert selections to paths. (See 
C
on
v
er
ting b
et
w
een pa
ths and selec
tion 
b
or
ders (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
218
.)
In Photoshop, you can use the Extract command to isolate an object from its background 
and erase the background to transparency. You can also make sophisticated selections 
using masks. (See 
S
a
ving a mask selec
tion
on page 
281
.)
Making pixel selections
You can select pixels in an image by dragging with the marquee tools or lasso tools, or by 
targeting color areas with the magic wand tool. In Photoshop, you can also use the Color 
Range command. Making a new selection replaces the existing one. Additionally, you can 
create selections that add to a selection, subtract from a selection, select an area inter-
sected by other selections, or select the union of a new selection and the current 
selection.
Using the Select menu
You can use commands in the Select menu to select all pixels, to deselect, or to reselect. 
To select all pixels on a layer within the canvas boundaries:
1 Select the layer in the Layers palette.
2 Choose Select > All. 
To deselect selections:
Do one of the following:
Choose Select > Deselect.
If you are using the rectangle marquee, rounded rectangle marquee (ImageReady), 
elliptical marquee, or lasso tool, click anywhere in the image outside the selected area.
To reselect the most recent selection:
Choose Select > Reselect.
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
158  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Selecting 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
158  
Using the marquee tools
The marquee tools let you select rectangles, ellipses, rounded rectangles (ImageReady), 
and 1-pixel rows and columns. By default, a selection border is dragged from its corner.
To use the marquee tools:
1 Select a marquee tool:
Rectangle marquee   to make a rectangular selection. 
(ImageReady) Rounded rectangle marquee   to select a rounded rectangle such as a 
Web-page button.
Elliptical marquee   to make an elliptical selection.
Single row   or single column   marquee to define the border as a 1-pixel-wide row or 
column. 
 In the options bar, specify whether to add a new selection  , add to a selection  , 
subtract from a selection  , or select an area intersected by other selections  .
3 Specify a feathering setting in the options bar. Turn anti-aliasing on or off for the 
rounded rectangle or elliptical marquee. (See 
S
of
t
ening the edges of a selec
tion
on 
page 
166
.)
4 For the rectangle, rounded rectangle, or elliptical marquee, choose a style in the 
options bar:
Normal to determine marquee proportions by dragging. 
Fixed Aspect Ratio to set a height-to-width ratio. Enter values (decimal values are valid) 
for the aspect ratio. For example, to draw a marquee twice as wide as it is high, enter 2 
for the width and 1 for the height. 
Fixed Size to specify set values for the marquee’s height and width. Enter pixel values in 
whole numbers. Keep in mind that the number of pixels needed to create a 1-inch 
selection depends on the resolution of the image. (See 
A
b
out image siz
e and 
r
esolution
on page 
62
.)
5 For aligning your selection to guides, a grid, slices, or document bounds, do one of the 
following to snap your selection:
(Photoshop) Choose View > Snap, or choose View > Snap To and choose a command 
from the submenu. The marquee selection can snap to a document bound and more 
than one Photoshop Extra. This is controlled in the Snap To submenu. (See 
U
sing the 
S
nap c
ommand
on page 
172
.)
(ImageReady) Choose View > Snap To > Guides.
6 Do one of the following to make a selection:
With the rectangle, rounded rectangle, or elliptical marquee, drag over the area you 
want to select. Hold down Shift as you drag to constrain the marquee to a square or 
circle. To drag a marquee from its center, hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) 
after you begin dragging.
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
159  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Selecting 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
159  
With the single row or single column marquee, click near the area you want to select, 
and then drag the marquee to the exact location. If no marquee is visible, increase the 
magnification of your image view.
To reposition a rectangle, rounded rectangle, or elliptical marquee, first drag to create 
the border, keeping the mouse button depressed. Then hold down the spacebar and 
continue to drag. If you have finished drawing the border, drag from inside the selection.
Using the lasso, polygonal lasso, and magnetic lasso tools
The lasso and polygonal lasso tools let you draw both straight-edged and freehand 
segments of a selection border. With the magnetic lasso tool (Photoshop), the border 
snaps to the edges of defined areas in the image. 
The magnetic lasso tool is especially useful for quickly selecting objects with complex 
edges set against high-contrast backgrounds.
To use the lasso tool:
1 Select the lasso tool  , and select options. (See 
S
etting options f
or the lasso
,
p
oly
gonal lasso
,
and magnetic lasso t
o
ols
on page 
160
.)
2 Drag to draw a freehand selection border. 
3 To draw a straight-edged selection border, hold down Alt (Windows) or Option 
(Mac OS), and click where segments should begin and end. You can switch between 
drawing freehand and straight-edged segments. 
4 To erase recently drawn segments, hold down the Delete key until you’ve erased the 
fastening points for the desired segment.
5 To close the selection border, release the mouse without holding down Alt (Windows) 
or Option (Mac OS).
To use the polygonal lasso tool:
1 Select the polygonal lasso tool  , and select options. (See 
S
etting options f
or the 
lasso
,
p
oly
gonal lasso
,
and magnetic lasso t
o
ols
on page 
160
.)
2 Click in the image to set the starting point.
3 Do one or more of the following:
To draw a straight segment, position the pointer where you want the first straight 
segment to end, and click. Continue clicking to set endpoints for subsequent segments.
To draw a freehand segment, hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and drag. 
When finished, release Alt or Option and the mouse button.
To erase recently drawn straight segments, press the Delete key.
4 Close the selection border:
Position the polygonal lasso tool pointer over the starting point (a closed circle appears 
next to the pointer), and click.
If the pointer is not over the starting point, double-click the polygonal lasso tool 
pointer, or Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS).
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
160  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Selecting 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
160  
To use the magnetic lasso tool (Photoshop):
1 Select the magnetic lasso tool  , and select options. (See 
S
etting options f
or the 
lasso
,
p
oly
gonal lasso
,
and magnetic lasso t
o
ols
on page 
160
.)
2 Click in the image to set the first fastening point. Fastening points anchor the selection 
border in place.
3 To draw a freehand segment, move the pointer along the edge you want to trace. 
(You can also drag with the mouse button depressed.) 
The most recent segment of the selection border remains active. As you move the pointer, 
the active segment snaps to the strongest edge in the image, based on the detection 
Width set in the options bar. Periodically, the magnetic lasso tool adds fastening points to 
the selection border to anchor previous segments.
4 If the border doesn’t snap to the desired edge, click once to add a fastening point 
manually. Continue to trace the edge, and add fastening points as needed.
5 To switch temporarily to the other lasso tools, do one of the following:
To activate the lasso tool, hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and drag with 
the mouse button depressed.
To activate the polygonal lasso tool, hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), 
and click.
6 To erase recently drawn segments and fastening points, press the Delete key until 
you’ve erased the fastening points for the desired segment. 
7 Close the selection border:
To close the border with a freehand magnetic segment, double-click, or press Enter or 
Return.
To close the border with a straight segment, hold down Alt (Windows) or Option 
(Mac OS), and double-click.
To close the border, drag back over the starting point and click.
Setting options for the lasso, polygonal lasso, and magnetic lasso 
tools
The lasso tool options let you customize how the different lasso tools detect and select 
edges.
To set options for the lasso tools:
1 If needed, select the tool.
 In the options bar, specify whether to add a new selection  , add to an existing 
selection  , subtract from a selection  , or select an area intersected by other 
selections  .
3 Specify feather and anti-aliasing options. (See 
S
of
t
ening the edges of a selec
tion
on 
page 
166
.)
4 For the magnetic lasso tool (Photoshop), set any of these options:
To specify a detection width, enter a pixel value for Width. The magnetic lasso detects 
edges only within the specified distance from the pointer.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested