reportviewer c# windows forms pdf : How to copy pdf image into powerpoint control software system web page windows html console PoythressVernInTheBeginningWasTheWord36-part37

361
Appendix  H: 周e 周eory of Speech Acts
(Deut. 31:26). What is deposited is part of the wri瑴en documents of the covenant or 
treaty between God and Israel.
26
周e later songs in the book of Psalms and elsewhere 
in the canon are thus to be seen as a continuation of this kind of complex, embedded, 
multipurpose and multivocal speech in Deuteronomy 32.
周e covenant and canon given through Moses involve rich communication. 周e 
covenant through Moses begins with direct speech of God at Mount Sinai and then the 
Ten Commandments wri瑴en with the finger of God (Ex. 31:18; Deut. 9:10). Next God 
commissions Moses to speak his words (Deut. 5:22–33).
27
Later Moses writes God’s 
law in a book (Deut. 31:9–29). 周is writing continues the earlier commission. At the 
same time, the writing uses what has already been spoken; that is, it appropriates earlier 
discourse, including God’s direct writing of the Ten Commandments.
28
Commissioned 
speech, commissioned writing, and appropriation of earlier discourse all have the same 
authority as direct speech and give us unfe瑴ered access to what God says. Hence the 
different modes of speech and writing turn out to be perspectives on the same total 
process of God’s speech and communication, rather than being completely distinct 
brands of speech act and acts of writing, such as a neatly pigeonholed classification 
might like to have.
29
We can illustrate the same complexity if we summarize the entire covenantal rela-
tion between God and Israel in a single simple declaration: “You are my people.” As 
a summary, this sentence condenses a multifaceted relationship. 周e sentence is a 
declarative sentence, and so is most obviously to be classified as an “Assertive” within 
Searle’s taxonomy. It states a true fact. But the fact has become true because of God’s 
declaration that it is to be. Hence, the sentence is also like a “Declaration.” It is also 
a promise, since God commits himself, and so is a “Commissive.” It expresses God’s 
a瑴itude (“Expressives”) and implies an obligation of loyalty on the part of the people 
(“Directives”). It combines into one all five major kinds of speech acts in Searle’s 
classification.
30
Focus on the Sentence
We may observe in more detail some of the simplifications and narrowing in focus that 
occur in John Searle’s exploration of speech-act theory in his book Speech Acts. Fairly 
early, he chooses to focus on sentence-level speech acts, rather than longer speeches:
Since every meaningful sentence in virtue of its meaning can be used to perform a particular 
speech act (or range of speech acts), and since every possible speech act can in principle 
26. Meredith G. Kline, 周e Structure of Biblical Authority (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1972).
27. In the terminology of Nicholas Wolterstorff, this kind of commissioned speech is “depu-
tized” (Wolterstorff, Divine Discourse, 42–46).
28. Wolterstorff (ibid., 51–54) discusses “appropriated” discourse.
29. See also Vern S. Poythress, “Divine Meaning of Scripture,” Westminster 周eological Journal 
48 (1986): 241–279; Poythress, “周e Presence of God Qualifying Our Notions of Grammatical-
Historical Interpretation: Genesis 3:15 as a Test Case,” Journal of the Evangelical 周eological Society 
50/1 (2007): 87–103. 
30. See Searle, Expression and Meaning, 12–20.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   361
5/14/09   4:46:56 PM
How to copy pdf image into powerpoint - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to cut pdf image; how to copy text from pdf image to word
How to copy pdf image into powerpoint - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy images from pdf to word; paste jpg into pdf
362
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
be given an exact formulation in a sentence or sentences [does this mean several alterna-
tive sentences, any one of which could be used to manifest or illustrate the same speech 
act, or does it mean a paragraph or longer discourse?] (assuming an appropriate context 
of u瑴erance), the study of the meanings of sentences and the study of speech acts are not 
two independent studies but one study from two different points of view.
31
周e first and most obvious simplification here is the move to focus on sentence-level 
speeches; Searle leaves aside more complex actions that can be built up using many 
sentences linked together in one or more paragraphs within a monologue.
32
周e text 
also simplifies by apparently assuming that any one sentence has only one meaning, “its 
meaning.” In fact, we frequently find instances in which a sentence is ambiguous and 
could sponsor more than one meaning, depending on the context.
33
“Bob hit the man 
with a stick.” Was the stick the instrument that Bob used, or was it in possession of “the 
man”? “Bob feared him.” Was the fear dread of a fellow human being, or reverential fear 
of God? 周is illustration with respect to language for God is particularly significant. Do 
words like “fear” have quite the same meaning when used with respect to a human being 
as when used with respect to God?
周e Ideal of Complete Knowledge
周e essay also speaks about supplying for “every possible speech act” “an exact formu-
lation in a sentence or sentences,” and says that this is possible “in principle.” But it is 
only “in principle.” 周e larger context in Searle’s book shows awareness of the fact that 
any one particular human language may have to be expanded or adjusted to make such 
a formulation possible:
I can in principle if not in fact increase my knowledge of the language, or more radically, 
if the existing language or existing languages are not adequate to the task, if they simply 
lack the resources for saying what I mean, I can in principle at least enrich the language by 
introducing new terms or other devices into it.
34
31. Searle, Speech Acts, 18 (the question in brackets is my own addition to Searle’s text). See 
also 25. In a more technical discussion, 30–31, Searle introduces specific technical terms—“deep 
structure,” “phrase marker,” and “deletion transformations”—which belong to Chomskyan transfor-
mational generative grammar (note also the expression “generative grammar,” 120). As we observed 
in appendix E, the Chomskyan approach simplifies in a host of ways for the sake of rigor. Among 
these is the decision to treat sentences without considering their larger context in discourse. 
32. Searle’s statement excluding “molecular propositions” and concentrating on atomic ones 
occurs later in the book (ibid., 33). But we can see its influence even at this early point. Mary Louise 
Pra瑴 recognizes the focus on sentences and endeavors to extend the analysis to longer discourses 
(Pra瑴, Toward a Speech Act 周eory of Literary Discourse [Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 
1977], 85, 141–142).
33. Elsewhere, Searle indicates his awareness of ambiguity (Searle, Expression and Meaning, 
117).
34. Searle, Speech Acts, 19–20.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   362
5/14/09   4:46:56 PM
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Ability to put image into defined location on PDF page. Provide image attributes adjust functionalities, such as resize image by zooming and cropping.
how to paste a picture into a pdf; pasting image into pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf.
copy image from pdf; how to copy images from pdf
363
Appendix  H: 周e 周eory of Speech Acts
周us Searle is not in the end interested in any particular natural language. Rather, he 
considers a hypothetically enriched language that would have whatever resources the 
speaker needs. 周is move to a hypothetical language is certainly an idealization.
We may note another idealization in the sentence just quoted. Searle says, “. . . if they 
simply lack the resources for saying what I mean.” 周e “I” whom he mentions is assumed 
already to know exactly what he means, independent of any and every linguistic resource 
for expressing what he means. He then only needs to look around for the convenient 
means, or to invent them if they do not yet exist.
But real people sometimes have the experience of struggling toward what they mean. 
周ey may grope for words, not completely knowing what they are a晴er until they find 
a way of saying it. Or, even a晴er they have said it, they may sometimes have a dim sense 
that they expressed themselves inadequately, but they have no idea how to proceed to 
“invent” ideal linguistic resources that would allow them to grasp even for their own 
benefit what they are groping a晴er. 周ey are experiencing the limitations of their finite-
ness and of their own grasp of language.
But perhaps Searle did not mean to overlook the existence of such struggles. Rather, in 
Searle’s key paragraph the “I” could be something like a corporate “I”: it tacitly includes 
all investigators and language innovators, who might together introduce further distinc-
tions and clarifications in the way that we talk. 周e limitations of any individual are then 
supposed to be overcome by an ongoing corporate program of improvement. Searle is 
right that any language has potential for innovation.
But if that is all that he means, his wording is infelicitous. 周e use of the singular “I” sug-
gests that any limitations can be overcome by a single individual who unproblematically 
knows what he means. 周ere is a real danger that some readers will understand Searle’s 
statement in a way that ignores the limitations that belong to actual speakers. 周e “I” in 
question then becomes a superhuman “I,” an “I” who magically ascends above all the 
influences and limitations of any particular culture or language. 周is “I” has achieved a 
godlike, masterful position. 周is “I” has risen above the limitations of any one language, 
and knows what is cross-culturally universal merely from rationally clarifying its vision 
from within one language and culture.
35
Plurality of Languages and Cultures
By speaking about the possible inadequacy of “existing languages,”
36
Searle has also by-
passed another important question, the question of differences in cultures and languages, 
35. In fairness we should note that John Searle’s book, Speech Acts, links itself with Chomskyan 
transformational generative grammar, which has a strong interest in linguistic universals. Speech-act 
theory might then appeal to the work of linguists as the basis for its assurance of its own cross-
cultural universality. But, as seen in appendix E, generative grammar in the tradition of Chomsky 
has its own limitations, due primarily to its preference for rigor instead of complexity. Its internal 
structure minimizes the role of context, including context in larger bodies of discourse and context 
in culture. And so it is not suited for wrestling with the full complexities of cross-cultural under-
standing. It too cannot achieve a full, true transcendence above the limitations of cultures.
36. Ibid., 19–20.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   363
5/14/09   4:46:57 PM
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
how to paste a picture in a pdf; how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy pictures from pdf in
364
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
and the difference that they might make. To put it in another way, speech-act theory 
bypasses the distinction between insiders’ and outsiders’ views of language and culture.
37
周at simplification can have potentially disastrous consequences, because a person is 
undertaking to analyze all languages by analyzing only one (in this case, English). All 
the discussion is intended to be completely universal. But it conveniently uses English 
and the broader context of scholarship in the Western tradition as its context for what 
it hopes will be culturally universal truths.
38
周e results are stimulating and suggestive. 
But the method is unsound anthropologically. We need to check other languages and 
cultures, in order to find out whether some feature that appears to be salient from our 
insider’s cultural standpoint within English is indeed universal rather than being limited 
to English.
Exactitude
Next, we can observe an idealization in the expression “exact formulation.”
39
Whether 
or not Searle’s book intends it, such an expression opens the door to the idealization 
in which we conveniently forget or suppress variation and context (distribution), 
and retain only contrastive-identificational features in an idealized sentence. “Exact-
ness” in philosophical circles too easily connotes perfect precision in concepts (no 
variation), and perfect isolation from context (no distributional influence), both of 
which are idealizations for the sake of a certain kind of cleanness or neatness.
40
More 
rigorous results can then follow. But the rigor is obtained at the price of certain forms 
of artificiality.
Sentences and Speech Acts
Searle’s book also simplifies by correlating a single sentence with a single kind of speech 
act. For example, the book says that a speaker in u瑴ering the sentence “Sam smokes ha-
bitually” is characteristically making an assertion.
41
周is act of asserting then contrasts 
with the act of asking a question, using the sentence “Does Sam smoke habitually?” 周at 
certainly makes sense, but it lays aside the way in which particular contexts help to de-
termine the nature of a particular speech act. “Sam smokes habitually” might be said by 
a speaker to a listener within a context where both know very well what Sam’s smoking 
habits are, but where the main topic of discussion is the foolishness of habitual smoking, 
and its effects on health. “Sam smokes habitually” is then not exactly an “assertion,” as if 
it were intended to inform the listener of something he probably does not yet know, but 
37. See chapter 19, and the discussion of the difference between “etic” (outsider) and “emic” 
(insider) viewpoints.
38. See Umberto  Eco, 周e Search for  the Perfect  Language (Oxford: Blackwell, 1995), 
312–316.
39. Searle, Speech Acts, 18.
40. In fairness to Searle, it should be noted that several times he indicates awareness of fuzzy 
boundaries in the meaning of key concepts.
41. Searle, Speech Acts, 22–23.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   364
5/14/09   4:46:57 PM
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
how to copy picture from pdf file; copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Excellent .NET control for turning all PowerPoint presentation into high quality PDF without losing formatting in C#.NET Class. Convert
how to copy text from pdf image; copy picture from pdf
365
Appendix  H: 周e 周eory of Speech Acts
more a reproach, or a comment on Sam’s lack of foresight.
42
Or the speaker might use the 
same sentence in another context, in which he and his conversation partner have been 
talking about various ways in which they might honor Sam as their leader and exemplar. 
What habits should they adopt in imitation of him, in order to solidify their comrade-
ship? 周en the sentence is not an “assertion” as much as an indirect proposal about one 
such habit that they might adopt.
周e exact force of an u瑴erance does depend on context. Searle’s book protects itself 
to some extent by noting that these phenomena appear not with complete and u瑴er 
uniformity, but “characteristically,” and “in appropriate circumstances.”
43
It specifies at 
one point that the speaker “is speaking literally.”
44
It later acknowledges the possibility 
that “one and the same u瑴erance may constitute the performance of several different 
illocutionary acts.”
45
And Searle’s discussion of “indirect speech acts” supplements the 
analysis of simple, direct speech acts.
46
But it is easy for less skilled practitioners to forget indirect speech acts, and to suppress 
the multitude of possibilities for contextual influence. 周is is not a trivial simplification, 
since one of the points of speech-act theory is to see particular sentences in the context 
of human action.
周e Isolation of Illocutionary Force
Next, Searle introduces a key distinction between propositions and illocutionary acts:
Since the same proposition can be common to different kinds of illocutionary acts, we 
can separate our analysis of the proposition from our analysis of kinds of illocutionary 
acts.
47
周e key example, which Searle has already introduced, involves the same “proposition” 
about Sam and his smoking, but with four possible illocutionary acts:
1. Sam smokes habitually. [asserting]
2. Does Sam smoke habitually? [asking a question]
3. Sam, smoke habitually! [giving an order]
4. Would that Sam smoked habitually. [expressing a wish or desire]
48
42. In the circumstances I have envisioned, would the speaker be likely to say, “I assert that 
Sam smokes habitually”? No, I think not. 周e speaker does imply the truth of the proposition 
that Sam smokes habitually. But he typically would not use the word “assert” if he intends his 
remark as a reproach.
43. Searle, Speech Acts, 22.
44. Ibid., 18.
45. Ibid., 70.
46. Searle, Expression and Meaning, 30–57.
47. Searle, Speech Acts, 31.
48. Ibid., 22. 周e remarks in brackets are my own explanatory additions to Searle’s text.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   365
5/14/09   4:46:57 PM
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
document. Ability to put image into specified PDF page position and save existing PDF file or output a new PDF file. An independent
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; how to cut a picture out of a pdf file
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
how to copy pdf image into word; how to copy an image from a pdf to word
366
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
周e distinction between propositions and illocutionary acts does make sense, since 
we can see the distinction in action in this and any number of other cases. It is a valuable 
distinction. But it is not “pure”; that is, it does not separate two aspects perfectly, in such 
a way that there is no longer interaction or entanglement.
周is area of entanglement needs some explanation. Consider first a simple yes-no 
question: “Does Sam smoke habitually?” According to Searle’s analysis, a speech like 
this one can be broken up into two separate aspects: the underlying proposition and the 
“illocutionary force.” 周e illocutionary force is the character of the speaker’s commitment 
in the act of delivering the u瑴erance. In this case, the illocutionary force is asking a ques-
tion, and can be symbolized by the question marker, “?”. 周e underlying proposition is 
“Sam smokes habitually,” but without the force of an assertion, a question, or any other 
particular action on the part of the speaker. 周ese two, the proposition and the speech 
action, can be roughly separated. But is the separation “pure” and complete?
Searle himself recognizes a remaining impurity when he notes that with questions 
that ask “how?” or “what?” or “why?” the “propositional” aspect consists not in a full 
proposition but in an incomplete proposition. For example, consider the question, “Why 
did he do it?” 周e illocutionary force is to ask a question, and is represented by the 
question marker, “?”. 周e underlying proposition, freed from the influence of the act 
of asking, would be “He did it because . . .” But we have to supply something else. 周e 
proposition in this case is incomplete, because the word “why” within the question asks 
the respondent to supply some particular reason, which will form part of the proposition 
when it is given assertive force.
49
In addition there are other, subtle interactions. Assertions are typically made about 
states of affairs from the past, whereas commands and requests are typically made concern-
ing potential states of affairs in the future. In assertions, the reference and the predication 
can o晴en be made quite definite: “周is tree branch fell down in the last storm.” But an 
order concerning the future may sometimes presuppose conditions that affect the abil-
ity of the order to refer and to predicate. “Tomorrow cut down the bo瑴om tree branch 
on this tree” presupposes that you will still be alive tomorrow to perform the task, and 
that the tree branch in question will be there waiting (rather than having fallen down in 
a storm tonight, or having been cut down by someone else during the night).
In his sample case about Sam smoking, Searle neatly avoids some of the difficulties 
about time by making the proposition “habitual.” “Sam smokes habitually.” It is not about 
past or future time, but it is a general affirmation about all times. But there are still subtle 
influences. Typically, an assertion that “Sam smokes habitually” focuses on the past, 
about which the speaker knows. By contrast, the command “Sam, smoke habitually!” 
focuses on the future, and is unlikely to be given as an order to Sam if Sam already smokes 
habitually. So the predication “smokes habitually” is not quite the same in its temporal 
relation to the real world in the two cases. In other words, when we try to reduce these 
two propositional expressions to completely atemporal propositions, we must spell out 
explicitly the temporal conditions, and we end up with two distinct propositions in 
the two cases. “Smokes habitually” as an assertion means “smokes habitually (looking 
49. Ibid., 31.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   366
5/14/09   4:46:57 PM
367
Appendix  H: 周e 周eory of Speech Acts
backward in time).” “Smoke habitually” as a command means “smoke habitually (look-
ing forward in time).”
50
For the sake of rigor, Searle wants an exact separation of the two components, as can 
be seen from the fact that he introduces a rigorous symbolic notation:
周e general form of (very many kinds of) illocutionary acts is
F(p)
where the variable “F” takes illocutionary force indicating devices as values and “p” takes 
expressions for propositions.
51
周e point is that “F” is notationally separated perfectly from “p.” Rigor is achieved by 
ignoring the subtleties in natural language that involve entanglement of the two.
周e Ordinary Reader
And here, does the “ordinary” reader or listener o晴en have the advantage? Perhaps many 
ordinary readers have tacitly known all along about speech acts. 周at is, they know the 
difference between questions, requests, commands, songs, sermons, parables, and reports.52 
Of course, these categories are “insider” categories that may then differ from one language 
to another. But human nature has sufficient unity so that the ordinary reader still appreci-
ates to a considerable extent how different kinds of u瑴erances differ in their purposes. And 
then he probably does be瑴er than the theoretical analyst, because he responds as a whole 
person, who appreciates multidimensional purposes, rather than as an analyst, who stands 
one step removed from full interaction with the textual communication.
周e analyst, by stepping back, achieves a kind of human analogue to transcendence. 
But he remains finite, a flesh and blood human being. His own analytical activity is part 
50. Searle may escape using the route of idealization already mentioned: he is not actually 
talking about any actual language, including English, but about idealized propositions that are 
exact in meaning. But now we are traveling into the area of artificial language that may have no 
implications for any actual language.
Another kind of idealization takes place when we move from live performative expressions 
like “I promise . . .” to the theoretical idea of illocutionary force. If we wish, we may make explicit 
what kind of speech act we are performing, by adding a “performative” expression such as “I as-
sert,” “I promise,” or “I ask.” But in these cases, the performative expression is itself qualified by 
a larger context, so that it is not perfectly “pure” and isolatable. “I ask you, ‘Are you going?’” does 
not usually mean exactly the same thing as “Are you going?” It may connote by its explicitness 
that the speaker is being more formal or official. He already knows the answer, or he is trying to 
force an answer from a reluctant addressee, or he indicates that in some other way the relation 
between speaker and addressee is peculiar. His main commitment is still to ask a question, but 
the way that he asks has additional emotive, conative, and phatic implications (see Jakobson, 
“Closing Statement,” 353–358).
51. Searle, Speech Acts, 31.
52. J. L. Austin, introducing his lectures on speech acts, modestly comments, “What I shall 
have to say here is neither difficult nor contentious; the only merit I should like to claim for it is 
that of being true, at least in parts” (Austin, How to Do 周ings with Words, 1).
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   367
5/14/09   4:46:57 PM
368
Interaction with Other Approaches to Language
of a larger situation, which is in turn subject to analysis that uncovers purposes and as-
sumptions and sins of which he is not yet aware.
53
Philosophical Purposes in Speech-act 周eory
We may also consider the more long-range purposes of speech-act theory. One of its 
short-range purposes, as we said, is to focus on and make clear the context of u瑴erances 
in human action. At that point its purposes overlap with those of linguists, especially 
sociolinguists and linguists who focus on “pragmatics,” that is, the use of language in 
the context of human action.
54
Are there then any notable differences that differentiate 
speech-act theory from the work of linguists?
Nowadays there are many interdisciplinary crossovers. So we would be oversimplify-
ing to say that speech-act theory belongs to the tradition of philosophical investigation 
of language. But there is still something to be learned here. Ludwig Wi瑴genstein did not 
use the terminology of “speech acts,” but in his later period his examination of “language 
games” shows a瑴ention to language use in a context of human action, and in the broader 
context of “forms of life.” “Forms of life” are next door to what we have discussed concern-
ing the diversity of human cultures. Wi瑴genstein, then, begins reflection on speech acts 
without using the terminology. And what is his purpose? 周ere may be many purposes, 
but one is to dissolve philosophical conundrums by examining the ways language is used 
in ordinary life and in philosophy.
55
And so we come again to the problem of transcendence. Philosophy sometimes asks 
deep and searching questions about wisdom. It asks the big questions about reality, knowl-
edge, and the human condition. One way that we might approach such questions is through 
reflection that focuses on metaphysics; that is, we focus on what is, and on what is reality. 
Classical Greek philosophy primarily followed this route. But Immanuel Kant declared 
this route to be impossible because of the limits of human reason. For Kant, epistemology, 
that is, the study of what can be known and how it can be known, becomes the primary key 
for answering the other big questions, and—significantly—for showing which questions 
are impossible to answer because of the limitations of our finite condition.
Contemporary philosophy shows a turn from epistemology to language. If we know 
how language functions, we may be able to dissolve or dispense with questions that arise 
from ill-use of language. Limitations in language play a role here analogous to the role 
played in Kantian philosophy by limitations in human reason.
53. 周e best forms of deconstruction have a profound awareness of this problem of analysis. 
Human analysis can never be complete, and human beings never have a final point of view that 
terminates the possibility of a further step of standing back.
54. Gabriel Falkenberg notes that, mainly due to Searle’s work, “problems such as those of 
illocutionary forces, u瑴erance meaning and context interpretation are in safe keeping in linguistics 
proper today [1990]” (Falkenberg, “Searle on Sincerity,” in Burkhard, ed., Speech Acts, Meaning, 
and Intentions, 130).
55. We may observe a similar interest in J. L. Austin, How to Do 周ings with Words, in that 
he explicitly addresses philosophers (2, 38); and in John R. Searle, in the very title of his book: 
Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   368
5/14/09   4:46:57 PM
369
Appendix  H: 周e 周eory of Speech Acts
Speech-act theory, as used in the philosophical tradition, can then potentially serve 
as a key to understanding language. Speech-act theory is richer than the earlier tendency 
to think only in terms of disembodied propositional truths. But it can be a key only if it 
does not truncate the full richness of language. Truncating that richness would be likely 
to have the long-range effect in philosophical reasoning of truncating the world about 
which language can be used to speak. And so speech-act theory, precisely because it 
does not capture the full richness of language, cannot capture either the full richness of 
personhood, or the full richness of God the infinite person in whose image we human 
persons are made. No, if we expect speech-act theory to provide the first few steps, if 
not the complete ladder, to transcendence, we will either be disappointed or will delude 
ourselves into accepting a counterfeit claim to transcendence.
周e danger also arises that some people may treat speech-act theory as if it were an alterna-
tive rather than an added dimension that would supplement a focus on propositional truth.
56
For many people who want to avoid the responsibility of submi瑴ing to objective truth, it 
would be convenient if all questions about truth could be transformed into a subdivision 
of sociological analysis, where we look at what people do to other people through words. 
Unfortunately, questions about truth will not go away. Truth claims occur directly within 
the common speech act of assertion, where a person makes a claim about truth.
57
At its best, speech-act theory can be an insightful contribution to a larger whole, by 
focusing on one dimension of human action. But it runs up against limitations when we 
try to make it into a tool for achieving philosophical wisdom. 周e genius of speech-act 
theory is to teach us to pay a瑴ention to the meaning that u瑴erances receive through 
embedding in a larger context of human purposeful action. But context, its strength, is 
also its weakness. Sentence-level u瑴erances occur in the context of larger discourses. 
Discourse takes place in the context of human action. Human purposeful action takes 
place within the context of culture, and culture in the context of cultures, in the plural. And 
cultures occur in the context of a world and a world history whose interpretation differs 
from culture to culture. And that, as the postmodern relativists have seen, can lead to an 
ultimate relativism in the whole human project. In the end, such relativism at a high level, 
relativism generated by multiple cultures, injects relativism back down into the meaning of 
any speech act—unless there is a transcendent adjudication of truth. God gives wisdom; 
God brings reconciliation between man and God and between cultures.
56. Paul Helm expresses this concern eloquently in an Internet posting, “Propositions and 
Speech Acts,” <h瑴p://paulhelmsdeep.blogspot.com/2007/05/analysis-2-propositions-and-
speech-acts.html, May 1, 2007. J. L. Austin makes it clear that in his view particular speech acts 
presuppose or imply a host of truths (Austin, How to Do 周ings with Words, 45–46). So Austin 
clearly does not make his approach an alternative to a concern for truth, but rather a supplement 
or complement to it.
57. Moreover, the sociological analysis concerning what people do to one another has a deep 
interest only because it makes definite claims. 周ese claims, either tacitly or explicitly, are claims 
concerning truth.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   369
5/14/09   4:46:58 PM
370
A
P
P
E
N
D I
 
I
-
Reaching Out to Deconstruction
Look carefully then how you walk, not as unwise but as wise,  
making the best use of the time, because the days are evil.
—Ephesians 5:15–16
H
ow can we use our appreciation of language as we interact with other people, 
including those outside the Christian faith? How do we talk with people who 
have thought hard about language, but have denied its relation to God?
Deconstruction
For example, what would it be like to reach out to one particular group, namely, the 
advocates and practitioners of “deconstruction”? I pick them because they have thought 
about language and have much to say about language. At the same time, many of them 
do not believe in the God of the Bible. Many of their views are akin to what we have seen 
in postmodern contextualism.
1
Deconstruction is notoriously hard to define.
2
For our purposes, we do not need a 
definition, because we are not trying to capture the whole of deconstruction but only 
to single out a few concerns and to indicate points of contact that a dialogue could 
pursue.
1. See appendices A and B.
2. For a helpful introduction, see Heath White, Postmodernism 101: A First Course for the Curious 
Christian (Grand Rapids, MI: Brazos, 2006); John D. Caputo in Jacques Derrida, Deconstruction 
in a Nutshell: A Conversation with Jacques Derrida, edited with a commentary by John D. Caputo 
(New York: Fordham University Press, 1997).
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   370
5/14/09   4:46:58 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested