reportviewer c# windows forms pdf : Copy image from pdf reader Library SDK component asp.net wpf windows mvc pShopGuide6-part387

U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
61  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
61  
Getting Images into Photoshop 
and ImageReady
About bitmap images and vector graphics
Computer graphics fall into two main categories—bitmap and vector. You can work 
with both types of graphics in Photoshop and ImageReady; moreover, a Photoshop file 
can contain both bitmap and vector data. Understanding the difference between the two 
categories helps as you create, edit, and import artwork.
Bitmap images Bitmap images—technically called raster images—use a grid of colors 
known as pixels to represent images. Each pixel is assigned a specific location and color 
value. For example, a bicycle tire in a bitmap image is made up of a mosaic of pixels in that 
location. When working with bitmap images, you edit pixels rather than objects or shapes.
Bitmap images are the most common electronic medium for continuous-tone images, 
such as photographs or digital paintings, because they can represent subtle gradations of 
shades and color. Bitmap images are resolution-dependent—that is, they contain a fixed 
number of pixels. As a result, they can lose detail and appear jagged if they are scaled 
on-screen or if they are printed at a lower resolution than they were created for. 
Example of a bitmap image at different levels of magnification
Vector graphics Vector graphics are made up of lines and curves defined by mathe-
matical objects called vectors. Vectors describe an image according to its geometric 
characteristics. For example, a bicycle tire in a vector graphic is made up of a mathematical 
definition of a circle drawn with a certain radius, set at a specific location, and filled with a 
specific color. You can move, resize, or change the color of the tire without losing the 
quality of the graphic. 
24:1
3:1
Copy image from pdf reader - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document; paste image into pdf acrobat
Copy image from pdf reader - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy pdf image; how to copy text from pdf image to word
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
62  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
62  
Vector graphics are resolution-independent—that is, they can be scaled to any size and 
printed at any resolution without losing detail or clarity. As a result, vector graphics are the 
best choice for representing bold graphics that must retain crisp lines when scaled to 
various sizes—for example, logos.
Example of a vector graphic at different levels of magnification
Because computer monitors represent images by displaying them on a grid, both vector 
and bitmap data is displayed as pixels on-screen.
About image size and resolution
In order to produce high-quality images, it is important to understand how the pixel data 
of images is measured and displayed.
Pixel dimensions  The number of pixels along the height and width of a bitmap image. 
The display size of an image on-screen is determined by the pixel dimensions of the image 
plus the size and setting of the monitor. 
For example, a 15-inch monitor typically displays 800 pixels horizontally and 600 vertically. 
An image with dimensions of 800 pixels by 600 pixels would fill this small screen. On a 
larger monitor with an 800-by-600-pixel setting, the same image (with 800-by-600-pixel 
dimensions) would still fill the screen, but each pixel would appear larger. Changing the 
setting of this larger monitor to 1024-by-768 pixels would display the image at a smaller 
size, occupying only part of the screen.
When preparing an image for online display (for example, a Web page that will be viewed 
on a variety of monitors), pixel dimensions become especially important. Because your 
image may be viewed on a 15-inch monitor, you may want to limit the size of your image 
to 800-by-600 pixels to allow room for the Web browser window controls.
Example of an image displayed on monitors of various sizes and resolutions
24:1
3:1
15"
20"
1024 x 768 / 640 x 480
832 x 624 / 640 x 480
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
how to cut a picture out of a pdf; copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
copy paste image pdf; how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
63  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
63  
Image resolution The number of pixels displayed per unit of printed length in an image, 
usually measured in pixels per inch (ppi). In Photoshop, you can change the resolution of 
an image; in ImageReady, the resolution of an image is always 72 ppi. This is because the 
ImageReady application is tailored to creating images for online media, not print media.
In Photoshop, image resolution and pixel dimensions are interdependent. The amount of 
detail in an image depends on its pixel dimensions, while the image resolution controls 
how much space the pixels are printed over. For example, you can modify an image’s 
resolution without changing the actual pixel data in the image—all you change is the 
printed size of the image. However, if you want to maintain the same output dimensions, 
changing the image’s resolution requires a change in the total number of pixels.
Example of an image at 72-ppi and 300-ppi
When printed, an image with a high resolution contains more, and therefore smaller, 
pixels than an image with a low resolution. For example, a 1-by-1-inch image with a 
resolution of 72 ppi contains a total of 5184 pixels (72 pixels wide x 72 pixels high = 5184). 
The same 1-by-1-inch image with a resolution of 300 ppi contains a total of 90,000 pixels. 
Higher-resolution images usually reproduce more detail and subtler color transitions than 
lower-resolution images. However, increasing the resolution of a low-resolution image 
only spreads the original pixel information across a greater number of pixels; it rarely 
improves image quality.
Using too low a resolution for a printed image results in pixelation—output with large, 
coarse-looking pixels. Using too high a resolution (pixels smaller than the output device 
can produce) increases the file size and slows the printing of the image; furthermore, the 
device will be unable to reproduce the extra detail provided by the higher resolution 
image.
Monitor resolution The number of pixels or dots displayed per unit of length on the 
monitor, usually measured in dots per inch (dpi). Monitor resolution depends on the size 
of the monitor plus its pixel setting. Most new monitors have a resolution of about 96 dpi, 
while older Mac OS monitors have a resolution of 72 dpi. 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. The
how to cut pdf image; how to copy picture from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
paste image on pdf preview; copy and paste image from pdf to pdf
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
64  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
64  
Understanding monitor resolution helps explain why the display size of an image on-
screen often differs from its printed size. Image pixels are translated directly into monitor 
pixels. This means that when the image resolution is higher than the monitor resolution, 
the image appears larger on-screen than its specified print dimensions. For example, 
when you display a 1-by-1 inch, 144-ppi image on a 72-dpi monitor, it appears in a 2-by-2 
inch area on-screen. Because the monitor can display only 72 pixels per inch, it needs 
2 inches to display the 144 pixels that make up one edge of the image.
Printer resolution The number of ink dots per inch (dpi) produced by all laser printers, 
including imagesetters. Most desktop laser printers have a resolution of 600 dpi, and 
imagesetters have a resolution of 1200 dpi or higher. To determine the appropriate 
resolution for your image when printing to any laser printer, but especially to image-
setters, see “screen frequency.”
Ink jet printers produce a microscopic spray of ink, not actual dots; however, most ink jet 
printers have an approximate resolution of 300 to 720 dpi. To determine your printer’s 
optimal resolution, check your printer documentation.
Screen frequency The number of printer dots or halftone cells per inch used to print 
grayscale images or color separations. Also known as screen ruling or line screen, screen 
frequency is measured in lines per inch (lpi)—or lines of cells per inch in a halftone screen.
The relationship between image resolution and screen frequency determines the quality 
of detail in the printed image. To produce a halftone image of the highest quality, you 
generally use an image resolution that is from 1.5 to at most 2 times the screen frequency. 
But with some images and output devices, a lower resolution can produce good results. To 
determine your printer’s screen frequency, check your printer documentation or consult 
your service provider. 
Note: Some imagesetters and 600-dpi laser printers use screening technologies other than 
halftoning. If you are printing an image on a nonhalftone printer, consult your service 
provider or your printer documentation for the recommended image resolutions.
Screen frequency examples: 
A. 65 lpi: Coarse screen typically used to print newsletters and grocery coupons B. 85 lpi: Average 
screen typically used to print newspapers C. 133 lpi: High-quality screen typically used to print 
four-color magazines D. 177 lpi: Very fine screen typically used for annual reports and images in 
art books
A
B
C
D
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
how to copy pictures from a pdf file; how to copy an image from a pdf in
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. C#.NET Example: Convert One Image to PDF in Visual C# .NET Class.
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf; how to copy a picture from a pdf
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
65  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
65  
File size The digital size of an image, measured in kilobytes (K), megabytes (MB), or 
gigabytes (GB). File size is proportional to the pixel dimensions of the image. Images with 
more pixels may produce more detail at a given printed size, but they require more disk 
space to store and may be slower to edit and print. For instance, a 1-by-1-inch, 200-ppi 
image contains four times as many pixels as a 1-by-1-inch, 100-ppi image and so has four 
times the file size. Image resolution thus becomes a compromise between image quality 
(capturing all the data you need) and file size. 
Another factor that affects file size is file format—due to varying compression methods 
used by GIF, JPEG, and PNG file formats, file sizes can vary considerably for the same pixel 
dimensions. Similarly, color bit-depth and the number of layers and channels in an image 
affect file size. 
Photoshop supports a maximum file size of 2 GB and maximum pixel dimensions of 
30,000 by 30,000 pixels per image. This restriction places limits on the print size and 
resolution available to an image.
Changing image size and resolution
Once you have scanned or imported an image, you may want to adjust its size. In 
Photoshop, the Image Size command lets you adjust the pixel dimensions, print dimen-
sions, and resolution of an image; in ImageReady, you can only adjust the pixel dimen-
sions of an image.
For assistance with resizing and resampling images in Photoshop, choose Help > 
Resize Image. This interactive wizard helps you scale your images for print or online 
media.
Keep in mind that bitmap and vector data can produce different results when you resize 
an image. Bitmap data is resolution-dependent; therefore, changing the pixel dimensions 
of a bitmap image can cause a loss in image quality and sharpness. In contrast, vector data 
is resolution-independent; you can resize it without losing its crisp edges.
Displaying image size information
You can display information about the current image size using the information box at the 
bottom of the application window (Windows) or the document window (Mac OS). 
(See 
D
ispla
ying fi
le and image inf
or
ma
tion
on page 
48
.)
To display the current image size:
Do one of the following:
(Photoshop) Press Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), position the pointer over the file 
information box, and hold down the mouse button. The box displays the width and 
height of the image (both in pixels and in the unit of measurement currently selected 
for the rulers), the number of channels, and the image resolution.
(ImageReady) Click an image information box, and select Image Dimensions from the 
pop-up menu. The box displays the width and height of the image in pixels.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
An independent .NET framework viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able
copying image from pdf to word; copy picture from pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component in
how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint; copying a pdf image to word
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
66  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
66  
About resampling
Resampling refers to changing the pixel dimensions (and therefore display size) of an 
image. When you downsample (or decrease the number of pixels), information is deleted 
from the image. When you resample up (or increase the number of pixels), new pixels are 
added based on color values of existing pixels. You specify an interpolation method to 
determine how pixels are added or deleted. (See 
C
ho
osing an in
t
er
p
ola
tion metho
d
on 
page 
66
.)
Resampling examples: 
A. Downsampled B. Original C. Resampled up (Selected pixels displayed for each image)
Keep in mind that resampling can result in poorer image quality. For example, when you 
resample an image to larger pixel dimensions, the image will lose some detail and 
sharpness. Applying the Unsharp Mask filter to a resampled image can help refocus the 
image’s details. (See 
S
har
p
ening images
on page 
155
.)
You can avoid the need for resampling by scanning or creating the image at a high 
enough resolution. If you want to preview the effects of changing pixel dimensions on-
screen or print proofs at different resolutions, resample a duplicate of your file. 
Choosing an interpolation method 
When an image is resampled, an interpolation method is used to assign color values to any 
new pixels it creates, based on the color values of existing pixels in the image. The more 
sophisticated the method, the more quality and detail from the original image are 
preserved. 
The General Preferences dialog box lets you specify a default interpolation method to use 
whenever images are resampled with the Image Size or transformation commands. The 
Image Size command also lets you specify an interpolation method other than the default.
To specify the default interpolation method: 
1 Do one of the following:
In Windows or Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Preferences > General.
(Photoshop) In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Preferences > General.
(ImageReady) In Mac OS X, choose ImageReady > Preferences > General.
2 For Interpolation, choose one of the following options:
Nearest Neighbor (Jagged) for the fast but less precise method. This method is recom-
mended for use with illustrations containing non-anti-aliased edges, to preserve hard 
edges and produce a smaller file. However, this method can result in jagged effects, 
which become apparent when distorting or scaling an image or performing multiple 
manipulations on a selection. 
A
C
B
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
67  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
67  
(Photoshop) Bilinear for a medium-quality method.
Bicubic (Smooth) for the slow but more precise method, resulting in the smoothest 
tonal gradations.
Changing the pixel dimensions of an image
When preparing images for online distribution, it’s useful to specify image size in terms of 
the pixel dimensions. Keep in mind that changing pixel dimensions affects not only the 
size of an image on-screen but also its image quality and its printed characteristics—
either its printed dimensions or its image resolution. (See 
A
b
out image siz
e and 
r
esolution
on page 
62
.) 
To change the pixel dimensions of an image (Photoshop):
1 Choose Image > Image Size.
2 Make sure that Resample Image is selected, and choose an interpolation method. 
(See 
C
ho
osing an in
t
er
p
ola
tion metho
d
on page 
66
.)
3 To maintain the current proportions of pixel width to pixel height, select Constrain 
Proportions. This option automatically updates the width as you change the height, 
and vice versa.
4 Under Pixel Dimensions, enter values for Width and Height. To enter values as 
percentages of the current dimensions, choose Percent as the unit of measurement.
The new file size for the image appears at the top of the Image Size dialog box, with the 
old file size in parentheses.
For best results in producing a smaller image, downsample and apply the Unsharp 
Mask filter. To produce a larger image, rescan the image at a higher resolution.
To change the pixel dimensions of an image (ImageReady):
1 Choose Image > Image Size.
2 To maintain the current proportions of pixel width to pixel height, select Constrain 
Proportions. 
3 Under New Size, enter values for Width, Height, or Percent. The New Size text field 
displays the new file size for the image.
4 Select a resampling method from the Quality pop-up menu.
For information on setting action options, see 
R
ec
or
ding image siz
e options 
(ImageR
ead
y)
on page 
489
.
Changing the print dimensions and resolution of an image 
(Photoshop)
When creating an image for print media, it’s useful to specify image size in terms of the 
printed dimensions and the image resolution. These two measurements, referred to as the 
document size, determine the total pixel count and therefore the file size of the image; 
document size also determines the base size at which an image is placed into another 
application. You can further manipulate the scale of the printed image using the Print with 
Preview command; however, changes you make using the Print with Preview command 
affect only the printed image, not the document size of the image file. (See 
P
ositioning 
and sc
aling images
on page 
472
.)
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
68  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
68  
If you turn on resampling for the image, you can change print dimensions and resolution 
independently (and change the total number of pixels in the image). If you turn resam-
pling off, you can change either the dimensions or the resolution—Photoshop adjusts the 
other value automatically to preserve the total pixel count. For the highest print quality, 
it’s generally best to change the dimensions and resolution first without resampling. Then 
resample only as necessary.
To change the print dimensions and resolution of an image:
1 Choose Image > Image Size.
2 Change the print dimensions, image resolution, or both:
To change only the print dimensions or only the resolution and adjust the total number 
of pixels in the image proportionately, make sure that Resample Image is selected. 
Then choose an interpolation method. (See 
C
ho
osing an in
t
er
p
ola
tion metho
d
on 
page 
66
.)
To change the print dimensions and resolution without changing the total number of 
pixels in the image, deselect Resample Image.
3 To maintain the current proportions of image width to image height, select Constrain 
Proportions. This option automatically updates the width as you change the height, and 
vice versa.
4 Under Document Size, enter new values for the height and width. If desired, choose a 
new unit of measurement. Note that for Width, the Columns option uses the width and 
gutter sizes specified in the Units & Rulers preferences. For more information, see 
U
sing 
c
olumns (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
44
.
5 For Resolution, enter a new value. If desired, choose a new unit of measurement.
To return to the original values displayed in the Image Size dialog box, hold down 
Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and click Reset.
To view the print size on-screen:
Do one of the following:
Choose View > Print Size.
Select the hand tool or zoom tool, and click Print Size in the options bar.
The magnification of the image is adjusted to display its approximate printed size, as 
specified in the Document Size section of the Image Size dialog box. Keep in mind that the 
size and resolution of your monitor affect the on-screen print size.
Determining a recommended resolution for an image 
(Photoshop)
If you plan to print your image using a halftone screen, the range of suitable image resolu-
tions depends on the screen frequency of your output device. You can have Photoshop 
determine a recommended resolution for your image based on your device’s screen 
frequency. (See 
A
b
out image siz
e and r
esolution
on page 
62
.)
Note: If your image resolution is more than 2.5 times the screen ruling, an alert message 
appears when you try to print the image. This means that the image resolution is higher 
than necessary for the printer. Save a copy of the file, and then reduce the resolution. 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
69  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
69  
To determine a suggested resolution for an image:
1 Choose Image > Image Size.
2 Click Auto. 
3 For Screen, enter the screen frequency for the output device. If desired, choose a new 
unit of measurement. Note that the screen value is used only to calculate the image 
resolution, not to set the screen for printing.
Important: To specify the halftone screen ruling for printing, you must use the Halftone 
Screens dialog box, accessible through the Print with Preview command. (See 
S
elec
ting 
half
t
one scr
een attr
ibut
es
on page 
475
.)
4 For Quality, select an option:
Draft to produce a resolution the same as the screen frequency (no lower than 72 pixels 
per inch).
Good to produce a resolution 1.5 times the screen frequency.
Best to produce a resolution 2 times the screen frequency.
Scanning images
Before you scan an image, make sure that the software necessary for your scanner has 
been installed. To ensure a high-quality scan, you should predetermine the scanning 
resolution and dynamic range your image requires. These preparatory steps can also 
prevent unwanted color casts from being introduced by your scanner.
Scanner drivers are provided and supported by the manufacturers of the scanners, not 
Adobe Systems Incorporated. If you have problems with scanning, make sure that you are 
using the latest version of the appropriate scanner driver.
Importing scanned images
You can import scanned images directly from any scanner that has an Adobe Photoshop-
compatible plug-in module or that supports the TWAIN interface. To import the scan using 
a plug-in module, choose the scanner name from the File > Import submenu. See your 
scanner documentation for instructions on installing the scanner plug-in. For general 
plug-in information, see 
U
sing plug-in mo
dules
on page 
58
.
If your scanner does not have an Adobe Photoshop-compatible scanner driver, import the 
scan using the TWAIN interface. (See 
Imp
or
ting an image using the 
T
W
AIN in
t
er
fac
e
on 
page 
69
.)
If you can’t import the scan using the TWAIN interface, use the scanner manufacturer’s 
software to scan your images, and save the images as TIFF, PICT, or BMP files. Then open 
the files in Photoshop or ImageReady.
Importing an image using the TWAIN interface 
TWAIN is a cross-platform interface for acquiring images captured by certain scanners, 
digital cameras, and frame grabbers. The manufacturer of the TWAIN device must provide 
a Source Manager and TWAIN Data source for your device to work with Photoshop and 
ImageReady. 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
70  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
70  
You must install the TWAIN device and its software, and restart your computer, before you 
can use it to import images into Photoshop and ImageReady. See the documentation 
provided by your device manufacturer for installation information.
To import an image using the TWAIN interface (Photoshop):
Choose File > Import, and choose the device you want to use from the submenu.
To import an image using the TWAIN interface (ImageReady):
1 If you’re using the TWAIN device for the first time with ImageReady, choose File > 
Import > TWAIN Select. Then select the device you want to use. You do not need to repeat 
this step for subsequent use of the TWAIN module.
If more than one TWAIN device is installed in your system and you want to switch devices, 
use the TWAIN Select command. 
2 To import the image, choose File > Import > TWAIN Acquire.
Importing images using WIA (Windows Image Acqui-
sition) Support
Certain digital cameras and scanners can be used to import images using WIA Support. 
When you use WIA Support, Photoshop works with Windows and your digital camera or 
scanner software to import images directly into Photoshop.
Note: WIA Support is only available if you are using WindowsME or Windows XP.
To import images from a digital camera using WIA Support:
1 Choose File > Import > WIA Support.
2 Choose a destination on your computer for saving your image files. 
3 Make sure Open Acquired Images in Photoshop is checked. If you have a large number 
of images to import, or if you want to edit the images at a later time, deselect it. 
4 Make sure Unique Subfolder is selected if you want to save the imported images 
directly into a folder named with the current date.
5 Click Start.
6 Select the digital camera that you want to import images from.
Note: If the name of your camera does not appear in the submenu, verify that the software 
and drivers were properly installed and that the camera is connected.
7 Choose the image or images you want to import:
Click the image from the list of thumbnails to import the image.
Hold down Shift and click on multiple images to import them at the same time.
Click Select All to import all available images.
8 Click Get Picture to import the image.
To import images from a scanner using WIA Support:
1 Choose File > Import > WIA Support.
2 Choose a destination on your computer to save image files to. 
3 Click Start.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested