reportviewer c# windows forms pdf : How to paste a picture into pdf software SDK dll windows wpf azure web forms pShopGuide8-part389

U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
81  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
81  
The placed artwork appears inside a bounding box at the center of the Photoshop image. 
The artwork maintains its original aspect ratio; however, if the artwork is larger than the 
Photoshop image, it is resized to fit. 
4 If desired, reposition the placed artwork by doing one or more of the following:
Position the pointer inside the bounding box of the placed artwork, and drag.
In the options bar, enter a value for X to specify the distance between the center point 
of the placed artwork and the left edge of the image. Enter a value for Y to specify the 
distance between the center point of the placed artwork and the top edge of the 
image. 
To adjust the center point of the placed artwork, drag the center point to a new 
location, or click a handle on the center point icon   in the options bar.
5 If desired, scale the placed artwork by doing one or more of the following:
Drag one of the handles at the corners or sides of the bounding box. Hold down Shift as 
you drag a corner handle to constrain the proportions.
In the options bar, enter values for W and H to specify the width and height of the 
artwork. By default, these options represent scale as a percentage; however, you can 
enter another unit of measurement. To constrain the proportions of the artwork, click 
the Constrain Proportions icon  ; the option is on when the icon has a white 
background.
6 If desired, rotate the placed artwork by doing one or more of the following:
Position the pointer outside the bounding box of the placed artwork (the pointer turns 
into a curved arrow), and drag. 
In the options bar, enter a value (in degrees) for the Rotation option  . 
The artwork rotates around the center point of the placed artwork. To adjust the center 
point, drag it to a new location, or click a handle on the Center Point icon   in the 
options bar.
7 If desired, skew the placed artwork by holding down Ctrl (Windows) or Command 
(Mac OS), and dragging a side handle of the bounding box.
8 Set the Anti-alias option in the options bar as desired. To blend edge pixels during 
rasterization, select the Anti-alias option. To produce a hard-edged transition between 
edge pixels during rasterization, deselect the Anti-alias option.
9 To commit the placed artwork to a new layer, do one of the following:
Click the OK button   in the options bar.
Press Enter or Return.
To cancel the placement, click the Cancel button   in the options bar, or press Esc.
To place a file (ImageReady):
1 Open the ImageReady image into which you want to place the file.
2 Choose File > Place, select the file you want to place, and click Open.
3 Select offset options:
From the Horizontal pop-up menu, choose an option for placing the file horizontally 
with respect to the image. In the Pixels text box, enter the number of pixels to offset the 
placed image horizontally.
How to paste a picture into pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to cut an image out of a pdf file; copy and paste images from pdf
How to paste a picture into pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste image into pdf form; how to paste a picture into a pdf
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
82  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
82  
From the Vertical pop-up menu, choose an option for placing the file vertically with 
respect to the image. In the Pixels text box, enter the number of pixels to offset the 
placed image vertically.
Note: To enter a negative number (and offset the placed file to the left or below the 
image), type a hyphen (-) before the number.
4 Click OK.
5 If you are placing a PDF file that contains multiple pages, select the page you want to 
place, and click OK. 
6 If you are placing a PDF or EPS file, select Rasterize options, and click OK:
Enter Width and Height values for Image Size.
Select Anti-aliased to minimize the jagged appearance of the artwork’s edges as it is 
rasterized.
Select Constrain Proportions to maintain the same height-to-width ratio.
Managing files with WebDAV (Photoshop)
Photoshop supports the Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV) server 
technology. Using this technology, you can connect to a WebDAV server, download and 
upload files, lock files so others cannot work on them at the same time as you, and add 
additional files (called assets) to the server. Use a WebDAV server to work in a collaborative 
environment without fear that files will be accidentally overwritten or updates lost.
About workgroup management
When working in a collaborative environment, users must share files. The process of 
passing files from one collaborator to another involves working with a workgroup. 
Controlling the hand-off—so that only one person can edit a file at any given time—
is called workgroup management. 
A WebDAV server provides workgroup management via the Web. When a file is managed 
by a WebDAV server, multiple users can download copies of the file, but only one user at a 
time can check out the file. The user who checks out the file can share his or her work with 
other users by updating the file on the server; however, other users can’t make changes to 
the managed file until it is checked in. This check out/check in system allows multiple 
users to access the same file but prevents users from overwriting each other’s work. 
Getting started with workgroup management
To use the workgroup management features in Photoshop, you must be able to connect 
to a WebDAV server. You can find detailed information and the latest news about WebDAV 
at www.webdav.org.
Important: Firewall software can interfere with the process of connecting to a WebDAV 
server. Check with your system administrator or refer to your firewall software documen-
tation for information about setting options to access outside servers.
You can also set preferences to determine whether or not the Workgroup pop-up 
menu   appears and the default behavior for checking out and updating files. 
To set up a server for use with Photoshop:
1 Choose File > Workgroup > Workgroup Servers.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
vector images to PDF file. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Ability to put image into
copy picture from pdf reader; paste picture to pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
copy pdf picture to powerpoint; paste picture pdf
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
83  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
83  
2 Specify a folder in which you want to store local copies of managed files. To change the 
default location, click Choose, and specify a different folder. Click Show to locate a folder in 
the Windows Explorer or the Mac OS Finder.
Note: The path you choose here is used for all servers you want to add. Changing this path 
does not change the location of files on existing servers. 
3 Select the WebDAV server you want to use, or do one of the following:
To add a new server to the list, click New Server, specify a unique server nickname and 
URL, and click OK.
To edit a server in the list, click Edit Server. To view the folder where local copies of 
managed files are stored, click Advanced Options, then click Show.
To remove a server from the list, click Remove, and then click OK to the warning 
message.
4 Click Done.
To set workgroup management preferences:
1 Do one of the following:
In Windows and Mac OS 9.x, choose Edit > Preferences > File Handling.
In Mac OS X, choose Photoshop > Preferences > File Handling.
2 Do one of the following:
To show the Workgroup pop-up menu   at the bottom of the application window 
(Windows) or document window (Mac OS), select Enable Workgroup functionality.
To hide the Workgroup pop-up menu, deselect Enable Workgroup functionality.
3 Select one of the following options for Check Out from Server:
Never to open the local copy of the file without displaying a dialog box and without 
checking it out.
Always to automatically check out the file when you open it.
Ask to display a dialog box when you open a file that is not checked out.
4 Select one of the following options for Update from Server: 
Never to open the local copy of the file without displaying a dialog box and without 
downloading the latest version of the file from the server.
Always to automatically download the latest version of the file from the server.
Ask to display a dialog box asking if you want to download the latest version.
Logging on and off WebDAV servers
Different WebDAV servers have different authentication requirements. Some servers 
require you to enter a user name and password for every transaction; other servers require 
authentication only once per session. When the Authentication dialog box appears, enter 
your user name and password. 
To log off all WebDAV servers:
Choose File > Workgroup > Logoff All Servers.
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature, logo, etc. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file.
how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint; pasting image into pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
how to paste a picture into pdf; how to copy a picture from a pdf file
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
84  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
84  
Opening managed files
To view a managed file, open a copy of the file from a WebDAV server. The File > 
Workgroup > Open command creates a local copy of the file on your hard drive.
After you have a local copy of a file, you can revert it to the version of the file on the server 
(for checked out files) or update it with changes from the file on the server (for non-
checked out files). Reverting and updating permanently discard all changes you’ve made 
to the file.
To open a managed file:
1 Choose File > Workgroup > Open.
2 Select a server, a directory, and the file you want to open.
3 Do one of the following:
Click Check Out if you want to open and check out at the same time. (See 
C
heck
ing 
les out and in
on page 
84
.)
Click Open if you want to open a local copy without checking it out.
To revert a checked out file to the version on the server:
1 Open your local copy of the file.
2 Do one of the following:
Choose File > Workgroup > Revert. 
Choose Revert from the Workgroup pop-up menu   at the bottom of the application 
window (Windows) or document window (Mac OS). 
To update a non-checked out file from the version on the server:
1 Open your local copy of the file.
2 Do one of the following:
Choose File > Workgroup > Update.
Choose Update from the Workgroup pop-up menu  . 
Checking files out and in
Checking out a file prevents other users from making changes to it on the WebDAV server. 
When you’re finished making edits, check in the file to update your changes to the server 
and release your lock on the managed file. 
To check out a file:
Do one of the following:
To check out the file that you already have open, choose File > Workgroup > Check Out. 
Alternately, choose Check Out from the Workgroup pop-up menu   at the bottom of 
the application window (Windows) or document window (Mac OS).
To open and check out a file at the same time, choose File > Workgroup > Open. Then, 
locate and select the file and click Check Out. (See 
Op
ening managed fi
les
on 
page 
84
.)
To verify if a local file is available for check out:
1 Open your copy of the file.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
the size of SDK package, all dlls are put into RasterEdge.DocImagSDK a Home folder under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
paste image into pdf reader; copy image from pdf acrobat
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on IIS
reduce the size of SDK package, dlls are not put into Xdoc.HTML5 dll files listed below under RasterEdge.DocImagSDK/Bin directory and paste to Xdoc see picture).
how to paste a picture in a pdf; copy a picture from pdf
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
85  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Getting Images into Photoshop and ImageReady 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
85  
2 Choose File > Workgroup > Verify State, or choose Verify State from the Workgroup 
pop-up menu.
To check in a file:
Do one of the following:
To check in the file and update changes to the server, choose File > Workgroup > 
Check In. Alternately, choose Check In from the Workgroup pop-up menu.
To check in the file without updating changes to the server, choose File > Workgroup > 
Cancel Check Out. Alternately, choose Cancel Check Out from the Workgroup 
pop-up menu.
Saving changes to the server
While you have a file checked out, you can save changes to the managed file on the server. 
This allows you to share your work with other users without giving up your lock on the file.
To save changes to the server:
1 Open your local copy of the file.
2 Do one of the following:
Choose File > Workgroup > Save.
Choose Save from the Workgroup pop-up menu   at the bottom of the application 
window (Windows) or document window (Mac OS). 
Adding files to the server
Adding a file to a WebDAV server initiates workgroup management for the file; in other 
words, you create a managed file by adding it to a server. 
To add a file to a WebDAV server:
1 Open the file you want to add to the server.
2 Do one of the following:
Choose File > Workgroup > Save As.
Choose Save As from the Workgroup pop-up menu   at the bottom of the application 
window (Windows) or document window (Mac OS). 
3 Choose a server from the pop-up menu; then locate the directory to which you want to 
save the file. 
4 Type in a filename in the Name text box, and choose a format from the Format pop-up 
menu.
Note: Be sure to specify a file extension if the file will be downloaded to a computer 
running a Windows operating system.
5 To check out the file, select Keep This File Checked Out for Editing.
6 Click Save.
C# Raster - Modify Image Palette in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET to reduce the size of the picture, especially in
how to copy pdf image to jpg; how to paste a picture into a pdf document
C# Word - Document Processing in C#.NET
Open(docFilePath); //Get the main ducument IDocument doc = document.GetDocument(); //Document clone IDocument doc0 = doc.Clone(); //Get all picture in document
how to copy picture from pdf file; how to copy pictures from pdf to word
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
86  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Working with Color 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
86  
Working with Color
About color modes and models (Photoshop)
A color mode determines the color model used to display and print images. Photoshop 
bases its color modes on established models for describing and reproducing color. 
Common models include HSB (hue, saturation, brightness); RGB (red, green, blue); CMYK 
(cyan, magenta, yellow, black); and CIE L*a*b*. Photoshop also includes modes for 
specialized color output such as Indexed Color and Duotone. ImageReady uses RGB mode 
to work with images.
In addition to determining the number of colors that can be displayed in an image, color 
modes affect the number of channels and the file size of an image.
You can set up the Info palette so that you can select any tool, position the pointer 
over any part of an image, and determine the color value under the pointer. You can 
customize the Info palette and color samplers to express color values using HSB, RGB, 
CMYK, Lab, or Grayscale modes without changing the mode of the image itself. (See 
S
eeing the c
olor v
alues of pix
els (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
133
and the procedure to change 
Info palette options in 
U
sing the Inf
o palett
e (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
32
.)
HSB model
Based on the human perception of color, the HSB model describes three fundamental 
characteristics of color:
Hue is the color reflected from or transmitted through an object. It is measured as a 
location on the standard color wheel, expressed as a degree between 0° and 360°. 
In common use, hue is identified by the name of the color such as red, orange, or green.
Saturation, sometimes called chroma, is the strength or purity of the color. Saturation 
represents the amount of gray in proportion to the hue, measured as a percentage 
from 0% (gray) to 100% (fully saturated). On the standard color wheel, saturation 
increases from the center to the edge.
Brightness is the relative lightness or darkness of the color, usually measured as a 
percentage from 0% (black) to 100% (white).
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
87  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Working with Color 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
87  
Although you can use the HSB model in Photoshop to define a color in the Color palette or 
Color Picker dialog box, there is no HSB mode available for creating and editing images.
HSM model: 
A. Saturation B. Hue C. Brightness D. All hues
RGB model
A large percentage of the visible spectrum can be represented by mixing red, green, and 
blue (RGB) colored light in various proportions and intensities. Where the colors overlap, 
they create cyan, magenta, yellow, and white.
Because the RGB colors combine to create white, they are also called additive colors. 
Adding all colors together creates white—that is, all visible wavelengths are transmitted 
back to the eye. Additive colors are used for lighting, video, and monitors. Your monitor, 
for example, creates color by emitting light through red, green, and blue phosphors.
Additive colors (RGB)
RGB mode
Photoshop’s RGB mode uses the RGB model, assigning an intensity value to each pixel 
ranging from 0 (black) to 255 (white) for each of the RGB components in a color image. 
For example, a bright red color might have an R value of 246, a G value of 20, and a B value 
of 50. When the values of all three components are equal, the result is a shade of neutral 
gray. When the value of all components is 255, the result is pure white; when the value is 0, 
pure black.
RGB images use three colors, or channels, to reproduce up to 16.7 million colors on-screen; 
the three channels translate to 24 (8 x 3) bits of color information per pixel. (In 16-bit-per-
channel images, this translates to 48 bits per pixel, with the ability to reproduce many 
more colors.) In addition to being the default mode for new Photoshop images, the RGB 
model is used by computer monitors to display colors. This means that when working in 
color modes other than RGB, such as CMYK, Photoshop uses RGB mode for display 
on-screen. 
A
B
C
D
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
88  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Working with Color 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
88  
Although RGB is a standard color model, the exact range of colors represented can vary, 
depending on the application or display device. Photoshop’s RGB mode varies according 
to the working space setting that you have specified in the Color Settings dialog box. 
(See 
A
b
out w
or
k
ing spac
es
on page 
106
.)
CMYK model
The CMYK model is based on the light-absorbing quality of ink printed on paper. As white 
light strikes translucent inks, certain visible wavelengths are absorbed while others are 
reflected back to your eyes. 
In theory, pure cyan (C), magenta (M), and yellow (Y) pigments should combine to absorb 
all light and produce black. For this reason these colors are called subtractive colors. 
Because all printing inks contain some impurities, these three inks actually produce a 
muddy brown and must be combined with black (K) ink to produce a true black. (K is used 
instead of B to avoid confusion with blue.) Combining these inks to reproduce color is 
called four-color process printing.
The subtractive (CMY) and additive (RGB) colors are complementary colors. Each pair of 
subtractive colors creates an additive color, and vice versa.
Subtractive colors (CMYK)
CMYK mode
In Photoshop’s CMYK mode, each pixel is assigned a percentage value for each of the 
process inks. The lightest (highlight) colors are assigned small percentages of process ink 
colors, the darker (shadow) colors higher percentages. For example, a bright red might 
contain 2% cyan, 93% magenta, 90% yellow, and 0% black. In CMYK images, pure white is 
generated when all four components have values of 0%.
Use the CMYK mode when preparing an image to be printed using process colors. 
Converting an RGB image into CMYK creates a color separation. If you start with an RGB 
image, it’s best to edit first and then convert to CMYK. In RGB mode, you can use the Proof 
Setup commands to simulate the effects of a CMYK conversion without changing the 
actual image data. (See 
S
of
t-pr
o
ofi
ng c
olors
on page 
113
.) You can also use CMYK mode 
to work directly with CMYK images scanned or imported from high-end systems.
Although CMYK is a standard color model, the exact range of colors represented can vary, 
depending on the press and printing conditions. Photoshop’s CMYK mode varies 
according to the working space setting that you have specified in the Color Settings 
dialog box. (See 
A
b
out w
or
k
ing spac
es
on page 
106
.)
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
89  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Working with Color 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
89  
L*a*b model
The L*a*b color model is based on the model proposed by the Commission Internationale 
d’Eclairage (CIE) in 1931 as an international standard for color measurement. In 1976, this 
model was refined and named CIE L*a*b.
L*a*b color is designed to be device independent, creating consistent color regardless of 
the device (such as a monitor, printer, computer, or scanner) used to create or output the 
image.
L*a*b color consists of a luminance or lightness component (L) and two chromatic compo-
nents: the a component (from green to red) and the b component (from blue to yellow).
L*a*b* model: 
A. Luminance=100 (white) B. Green to red component C. Blue to yellow component
D. Luminance=0 (black) 
Lab mode
In Photoshop, Lab mode (the asterisks are dropped from the name) has a lightness 
component (L) that can range from 0 to 100. In the color picker, the a component (green-
red axis) and the b component (blue-yellow axis) can range from +128 to –128. In the 
Color palette, the a component and the b component can range from +120 to –120.
You can use Lab mode to work with Photo CD images, edit the luminance and the color 
values in an image independently, move images between systems, and print to PostScript 
Level 2 and Level 3 printers. To print Lab images to other color PostScript devices, convert 
to CMYK first. 
Lab color is the intermediate color model Photoshop uses when converting from one 
color mode to another.
Bitmap mode
This mode uses one of two color values (black or white) to represent the pixels in an 
image. Images in Bitmap mode are called bitmapped 1-bit images because they have a bit 
depth of 1. (See 
S
p
ecifying 8-bit c
olor displa
y (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
91
.)
Grayscale mode
This mode uses up to 256 shades of gray. Every pixel of a grayscale image has a brightness 
value ranging from 0 (black) to 255 (white). Grayscale values can also be measured as 
percentages of black ink coverage (0% is equal to white, 100% to black). Images produced 
using black-and-white or grayscale scanners typically are displayed in Grayscale mode. 
B
C
A
D
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
90  
Adobe Photoshop Help
Working with Color 
U
sing H
elp
C
on
t
en
ts
Inde
x
B
ack
90  
Although Grayscale is a standard color model, the exact range of grays represented can 
vary, depending on the printing conditions. In Photoshop, Grayscale mode uses the range 
defined by the working space setting that you have specified in the Color Settings dialog 
box. (See 
A
b
out w
or
k
ing spac
es
on page 
106
.)
These guidelines apply to converting images to and from Grayscale mode:
You can convert both Bitmap-mode and color images to grayscale. 
To convert a color image to a high-quality grayscale image, Photoshop discards all color 
information in the original image. The gray levels (shades) of the converted pixels 
represent the luminosity of the original pixels.
You can mix information from the color channels to create a custom grayscale channel 
by using the Channel Mixer command.
When converting from grayscale to RGB, the color values for a pixel are based on its 
previous gray value. A grayscale image can also be converted to a CMYK image (for 
creating process-color quadtones without converting to Duotone mode) or to a Lab 
color image.
Duotone mode
This mode creates duotone (two-color), tritone (three-color), and quadtone (four-color) 
grayscale images using two to four custom inks. (See 
P
r
in
ting duot
ones
on page 
479
.)
Indexed Color mode
This mode uses at most 256 colors. When converting to indexed color, Photoshop builds a 
color lookup table (CLUT), which stores and indexes the colors in the image. If a color in 
the original image does not appear in the table, the program chooses the closest one or 
simulates the color using available colors. 
By limiting the palette of colors, indexed color can reduce file size while maintaining visual 
quality—for example, for a multimedia animation application or a Web page. Limited 
editing is available in this mode. For extensive editing you should convert temporarily to 
RGB mode. (See 
C
on
v
er
ting t
o inde
x
ed c
olor (P
hot
oshop)
on page 
97
.)
Multichannel mode
This mode uses 256 levels of gray in each channel. Multichannel images are useful for 
specialized printing.
These guidelines apply to converting images to Multichannel mode:
Channels in the original image become spot color channels in the converted image.
When you convert a color image to multichannel, the new grayscale information is 
based on the color values of the pixels in each channel. 
Converting a CMYK image to multichannel creates cyan, magenta, yellow, and black 
spot channels.
Converting an RGB image to multichannel creates cyan, magenta, and yellow spot 
channels.
Deleting a channel from an RGB, CMYK, or Lab image automatically converts the image 
to Multichannel mode. (See 
A
b
out c
olor channels
on page 
93
for more information on 
channels.) 
To export a multichannel image, save it in Photoshop DCS 2.0 format.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested