51
Chapter  7: Exploring Examples of Language
this knowledge in common. If my wife and I did not have a common knowledge 
of “go,” communication would not succeed.
We can look in a similar way at every other word in the sentence spoken to 
my wife: “I,” “am,” “to,” “the,” “store,” and so on. Each one has a meaning, which 
a dictionary tries to summarize. Each one also has a sound, if spoken orally, and 
a spelling, if wri瑴en down. 周e sounds of different words are distinct, so that 
my wife knows which word I have said. (Occasionally, different words, like “site” 
and “sight” and “cite,” have the same sound. But the context usually enables us 
to tell them apart.)
Using language is so natural to us that we typically do not think about all the 
knowledge and all the kinds of organization in language on which we are relying. 
Once we look under the surface, however, we find astonishing complexity and 
astonishing detail in structure. 周is complexity has been established by God, as 
part of his overall plan for the universe and for our role in it.
God’s Involvement in Language
We have the word “go” in English. It has meaning and sound and spelling that 
God has given it. It also has a history behind it; it is part of the story of the En-
glish language and its development. And it has a history in my personal life. I 
had to learn English as I grew up. I learned the meaning and the sound of “go” 
through hearing it used by others. 周us human beings had a decisive role. Both 
my parents and my immediate friends, and those who preceded them through 
the centuries, were involved in transmi瑴ing this word “go” to me.
God sovereignly rules over and controls all these events in my past and the 
past of others who transmi瑴ed the word “go.” It is important to say so. Otherwise, 
instead of thinking in terms of the God of the Bible, we will probably be thinking 
in terms of an absentee god, for example the god of deism. Deism says that a god 
created the world and set it going at the beginning. But a晴er that he is distant 
and essentially uninvolved. 周e world goes on simply by itself, like a clock that 
has been wound up and can then keep on ticking. 周e god of deism would be 
involved in our present-day language only in a very indirect way, through his act 
of creating the world in the very distant past. 周e God of the Bible, by contrast, is 
intimately involved with the world at all times, including the present. As primary 
cause he is the one who has controlled the way in which I learned the word “go” 
from my parents, as well as its present meaning and sound.
God also gave me and other human beings the capacity to use the word “go.” 
He gave me a mouth and a tongue, so that I can form the “g” sound. He gave me 
vocal chords and lungs, and the ability to hear vibrations in the air at the frequen-
cies with which my vocal chords vibrate. He gave me a brain that can process the 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   51
5/14/09   4:46:08 PM
Pdf cut and paste image - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste picture pdf; how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
Pdf cut and paste image - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy pdf image to word document; copying image from pdf to word
52
Part  1: God’s Involvement with Language 
vocal sounds that I hear from others. We rely on all these stabilities every time 
we use the word “go.”
God has charge not only of individual words like “go” but of entire u瑴erances 
like “I am going to the store to get more bananas.” 周e words fit together in a 
particular way, designed by God, in order to make a complete communication. 
And there are smaller pieces within the u瑴erance that have an identifiable unity 
of their own, like the prepositional phrase “to the store,” indicating the destina-
tion, the infinitive clause “to get more bananas,” indicating the purpose, and the 
noun phrase “more bananas,” indicating the object to be obtained.
Ordinarily we take for granted the existence and stability of these pieces. But 
they can be a source for praising God. God gives us this stability. “周ank you,” 
we can say. God gives us the resources for communication, and the pleasures 
and accomplishments that come in communication. God is always there, always 
faithful, always wise, always supplying and sustaining both our bodies and our 
mental resources and our language resources. God is involved in the details. God 
gave me the useful word “go.”
Perspectives on Language: 周e Wave Perspective
We have been looking at language as composed of stable pieces. It is composed 
of words like “go” that have stable meanings (“proceed, leave, depart”), stable 
sounds, and stable spellings. It also has larger pieces, such as whole sentences. 
周is way of looking at language as composed of stable pieces is a valid one, and is 
the most common one among people who are not trained in academic linguistics. 
周e linguist Kenneth L. Pike has dubbed it the “particle view.”
3
Within academic 
linguistics this perspective has its uses, but there are times when linguists may 
adopt other perspectives, specifically the “wave” perspective or the “field” per-
spective.
4
What do these perspectives do?
周e wave perspective looks at language not primarily in terms of stable pieces 
but in terms of process. According to this approach, language is dynamic. I say 
to my wife, “I,” followed by “am,” followed by “going,” and so on, in a process. 
周e pieces are still there, but they can be decomposed. “am” decomposes into  
3. “周e normal, relaxed a瑴itude of the human being in most of his actions treats life as if 
it were made of particles” (Kenneth L. Pike, Linguistic Concepts: An Introduction to Tagmemics 
[Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1982], 19). Pike’s approach to language and 
linguistics, though not as familiar as some other approaches, is congenial to my purposes. For one 
thing, it explicitly acknowledges the importance of multiple perspectives on language, and in so 
doing avoids reducing language to a single one of its dimensions. (See appendix F for a discussion 
of the trade-off between rigor and complexity.) I learned from personal conversations that Pike 
was also convinced that language contained reflections of the Trinitarian character of God, and 
the three perspectives that we introduce here are one instance of this pa瑴ern.
4. Ibid., 19–38.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   52
5/14/09   4:46:08 PM
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf. PDFDocument
copy pdf picture to powerpoint; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
' Get page 3 from the document. Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point (50F, 100F). VB.NET: Copy and Paste PDF Pages.
pasting image into pdf; paste image into pdf form
53
Chapter  7: Exploring Examples of Language
a + m, either in sound or in writing. 周e “a” flows into the “m”. 周e mouth is open 
in pronouncing “a,” and then gradually closes at the lips until the lips are pressed 
together for the “m.”
周e processes flow. One sound o晴en flows directly into one another in a con-
tinuous process. Sometimes words flow into one another, as when a person says 
“I’m” instead of “I am.” And the hearer, my wife, gradually processes what she 
hears. She hears one sound a晴er another, flowing into one another, and one 
meaning a晴er another, flowing into one another. 周e meanings flow because 
she gradually constructs an impression of what I am intending to communicate. 
When she hears, “I am,” she does not know whether the word “am” will function 
as part of a helping verb in a verb complex like “am going,” or whether it will be a 
linking verb leading to an adjective: “I am sad.” She has to be open for both, but 
she already knows that “I” is the subject and that “am” is either the whole verb 
or the beginning of a verbal complex. So she is in the process of preparing for the 
rest of the sentence.
A whole u瑴erance is also part of a larger process. I tell my wife where I am 
going. I go out the door, go to the store, get the bananas, come back, and tell her, 
“Here are the bananas.” She says, “Couldn’t you get any ripe ones?” I say, “No, 
they only had these under-ripe ones.” I put them on top of the refrigerator. 周ey 
ripen. Eventually we eat them, one by one. 周en she goes to the store to get more 
food. And so on. Processes continue on and on, for a whole lifetime. 周e verbal 
communications fit into life processes, and find useful functions within those life 
processes, which include many nonverbal actions and purposes.
周e processes involving the bananas fit into one another in complex ways. 
My u瑴erance before leaving for the store fits into what I do at the store. My 
explanation, “No, they only had these under-ripe ones,” is not only an immedi-
ate response to my wife’s query but also refers back to the time at the store, and 
indicates some of the circumstances that led to my less-than-ideal purchase. I 
nevertheless purchased the bananas, because, from the further past, I already 
knew something about bananas. I knew that they would ripen if le晴 for a while. 
周at already anticipates what happened a晴er the bananas were set on top of the 
refrigerator. And of course all these small-scale actions fit the larger purposes that 
we have in life. I got the bananas because we need food to eat to sustain us, in 
order to carry on all kinds of activities in work, leisure, child rearing, and social-
izing. My particular u瑴erance makes sense within a much larger, richer complex 
of human knowledge, intentions, and plans, and those in turn make sense within 
a world in which bananas ripen and are good for food.
God is in control of all these processes. God specifies the stabilities of the 
pieces, as we have seen with regard to the particle perspective. He also specifies 
the processes. He has designed the world so that one event flows into another, 
and so that actions have consequences. In fact, “control” is a process, in the usual 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   53
5/14/09   4:46:08 PM
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
document page. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file. Export high quality image from PDF document in .NET program. Remove
copy and paste image from pdf to pdf; how to copy image from pdf to word document
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
how to copy a picture from a pdf file; cut image from pdf online
54
Part  1: God’s Involvement with Language 
way in which we think about it. God acts and causes things to happen in the world. 
He causes one thing, and then another thing, and then another, as the “primary 
cause.” At the same time there are these secondary causes in human actions, and 
even in subhuman actions, as when one billiard ball hits another.
God controls the li瑴le actions, like my saying the word “am.” He controls the 
bigger actions, like my going to the store. He controls still bigger sequences, namely, 
entire lifetimes: “. . . in your book were wri瑴en, every one of them, the days that 
were formed for me, when as yet there were none of them” (Ps. 139:16). God 
knows all my days, including the days that are still future and unknown to me. By 
implication, he knows all the details in the days. He knows about each bite of food 
that I will eat, each time of distress or joy, each work of each cell in my intestines 
in the process of digestion, each work of each muscle cell in the beating of each 
heartbeat, each movement of my vocal chords, each movement of my tongue in 
making a speech. “Even before a word is on my tongue, behold, O Lord, you know 
it altogether” (Ps. 139:4). He knows the details, and controls them.
He also controls larger groupings, such as periods of human history:
For his dominion is an everlasting dominion, and his kingdom endures from gen-
eration to generation; all the inhabitants of the earth are accounted as nothing, and 
he does according to his will among the host of heaven and among the inhabitants 
of the earth; and none can stay his hand or say to him, “What have you done?” 
(Dan. 4:34–35).
周e Most High rules the kingdom of men and gives it to whom he will (Dan. 
4:32).
周ere is a God in heaven who reveals mysteries, and he has made known to King 
Nebuchadnezzar what will be in the la瑴er days [concerning several successive 
kingdoms over a period of hundreds of years] (Dan. 2:28).
God knows the word “go” that I use. He controls not only my immediate 
memory of the word “go” and its uses but also the entire process of centuries of 
English-speaking culture that transmi瑴ed that word to me. I thank him for it.
To many people nowadays, it might seem that such thorough control from 
God is also thoroughly oppressive. But it is not. Human decision making, human 
choices, and human responsibility play a central role in this process. I decide to 
go to the store. I decide to tell my wife what I am going to do. In the process I am 
responsible to tell the truth. 周e language resources that God gave me through 
my past open up a large number of possibilities: to say nothing, to lie, to tell a 
joke, to talk about the weather, and so on. 周e process of speaking involves a 
large number of choices, each of which is linked to the preceding choices and to 
choices with respect to my overall plans.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   54
5/14/09   4:46:08 PM
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
paste image in pdf preview; how to copy an image from a pdf to word
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
how to copy images from pdf; how to copy images from pdf file
55
Chapter  7: Exploring Examples of Language
周e Field Perspective
A third way of looking at language is the field perspective. We focus on the net-
work or “field” of relations between various parts of language. 周is focus offers 
a relational perspective on language.
周e relations are of many kinds. 周e word “go” is related in meaning to other 
words with similar meaning, like “proceed,” “depart,” “leave,” and “move.” It is 
related to verbs of motion like “walk,” “run,” “drive,” and “travel.” It is related to 
words with somewhat contrasting meaning, like “come” and “stop” and “stay” 
and “remain.”
周e word “go” also has grammatical relations with its various forms: “go,” 
“going,” “went,” and “gone.” And these relations fit into larger pa瑴erns. 周e rela-
tions among the forms of “go” show similarities to the relations that occur in 
other verbs: “sing,” “singing,” “sang,” and “sung.” We can begin to fill out a chart 
of verb forms (chart 7.1).
Verb Forms
Simple Present
Participle
Simple Past
Past Participle
go
going
went
gone
sing
singing
sang
sung
move
moving
moved
moved
wash
washing
washed
washed
introduce
introducing
introduced
introduced
see
seeing
saw
seen
hide
hiding
hid
hidden
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
C
hart
7.1
Each row contains a distinct verb. Each column represents a particular form of 
the verb: present tense (“go”), participle (“going”), past tense (“went”), and past 
participle (“has gone”).
周e chart shows a regular network of relations that involves not only forms of 
“go” but forms of many other verbs in English. 周ose who speak English know 
how to use the forms of the word “go.” 周is knowledge is not simply an isolated 
piece of information but has a close relation to information about how to use 
forms of other verbs.
If you think about it, this is a very good thing. It would be burdensome, and in 
the end impossible, to master a distinct set of rules for “go,” and another set of rules 
for “sing,” and another set for “move,” and so on. We depend on the regularities of 
language to save us from this tedium. In effect, we learn a single set of rules about 
when it is appropriate to use the simple present form of a verb—any verb—and 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   55
5/14/09   4:46:08 PM
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
position, such as PDF text, image and PDF table. Delete or remove partial or all hyperlinks from PDF file in VB.NET class. Copy, cut and paste PDF link to
how to copy pictures from pdf file; cut picture pdf
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and And PDF file text processing like text writing, extracting, searching Image Process.
copy images from pdf to powerpoint; pdf cut and paste image
56
Part  1: God’s Involvement with Language 
when it is appropriate to use a participle (“going”) or a simple past (“went”), or 
for that ma瑴er an infinitive (“to go”). Language depends on a network of relations 
that tie all the verbs together, through a single set of rules. And we could make a 
similar observation about nouns and adjectives and prepositions.
Of course there are also tantalizing variations that do not reduce completely 
to general rules. 周e past tense of “go” is “went.” You could not have predicted 
that fact from the fairly general observation that usually the past tense of a verb 
is formed by adding “-ed”: “wash” becomes in its past tense “washed.” But even 
though “went” has a very different sound and spelling than “go,” it still fits into 
the verb chart (chart 7.1). We depend on the regularities represented in the 
chart in the process of understanding how to use “went” and how its meaning 
and function differ from “go.”
周e verb “go” not only has a relation to other verbs; it also relates to what comes 
before it and a晴er it in a sentence. 周e word “go” expects to have a subject, as in 
the sentences “I go” or “I am going.” Optionally, it can have a prepositional phrase 
a晴er it indicating the goal: “I am going to the store.” Some verbs regularly have 
a direct object: “I hit the ball.” But “go” is called an “intransitive” verb because 
it does not take a direct object. We do not hear people saying, “I am going the 
ball.” All these are regularities about the word “go,” and they are regularities that 
consist in relations between the word “go” and words and phrases that go with it 
or do not go with it.
God specifies all these relations. Just as he rules over the processes that are the 
focus of the wave perspective, so he rules over the relations of the field perspec-
tive. Likewise, all the pieces of language, the “particles,” have a relation to God. 
周ey are what they are in relation to him. Since he is the origin of all meaning 
and all order, everything that exists is sustained in relation to him. Likewise, the 
processes are related to him as the giver of processes, and the relations between 
various pieces depend on him. All order in language derives from God’s having 
given order. And so, relations to God are an indispensable aspect in accounting 
for any particular thing. When we study language, we are uncovering a display 
of the wisdom that God has in giving us this stable, complex, and flexible tool 
for our use. (周ank you, God!) We can praise God for his wisdom, and for his 
generosity and goodness in giving us language, one of the most valuable things 
that human beings can ever enjoy.
周ree Interlocking Perspectives
So we have three distinct perspectives on language, namely, the particle, wave, and 
field perspectives. 周ese three perspectives are an image of the Trinity. 周e particle 
perspective is closely related to stability, which is established by the unchanging 
stability of the plan of the Father. 周e wave perspective is closely related to the 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   56
5/14/09   4:46:09 PM
57
Chapter  7: Exploring Examples of Language
controlling work of the Son, who brings about action in history: “he upholds the 
universe by the word of his power” (Heb. 1:3). 周e field perspective is closely 
related to the Spirit’s presence. Whenever we relate two pieces of language to 
one another, we conceive of them as simultaneously present in mind, and o晴en 
even as simultaneously present in space, as we lay them side by side in a pa瑴ern. 
周e Spirit, as present to us, and indwelling us who are believers in Christ (Rom. 
8:9–11), expresses God’s relation to us. Accordingly, the three perspectives on 
language—particle, wave, and field—are coinherent.
Each of the three perspectives can be applied to any part of language. 周ey are 
complementary to one another and interlocking. For example, the field perspective 
depends on the fact that there are distinct pieces of language, like “go” and “went,” 
that enjoy a relation to one another. 周at is, the field perspective depends on the 
“particles,” on the stable pieces. It depends also on the fact that, as analysts, we 
can move from one set of relations to another. 周is movement is itself a “wave” 
made by the analyst. We shi晴, for example, from considering the relation of “go” 
and “went” to considering the relation of “sing” and “sang.”
Similarly, the particle perspective depends on the field perspective. Any one 
piece of language, like the word “go,” is identified for what it is partly through its 
distinctive sound and spelling. It is “go” rather than “no” or “so.” It is related to 
other words that are similar to it or that contrast with it. And knowing about “go” 
involves knowing how to use it in communication, which is a wave process. We 
depend on this process of communication for language learning.
周e wave perspective likewise depends on the particle perspective. Movement 
from one sound to another or from one meaning to another becomes perceptible 
as movement precisely because there are stable endpoints. 周e endpoints can 
be identified as distinct wholes, as pieces. 周ey are stable, that is, particles. And 
various wave movements are related to one another (field perspective) as instances 
of more general pa瑴erns. For example, the contraction “I’m” for “I am” is one of 
a number of contractions with “I” plus helping verbs: “I’ll,” “I’d,” “I’ve,” where 
the verb begins with a vowel or an open consonant (“w,” “h”).
Dependence
周e field perspective makes it evident that no one word exists in absolute isola-
tion. It exists, to begin with, as part of a particular language. “Go” is a word of 
English. It would be meaningless in some other language, just as “chien,” which is 
French for “dog,” means nothing in English. In fact, the meaning of “go” depends 
not only on English as a whole but in a subtle way on things in its environment, 
and on the dynamics of its use.
For example, the present tense in English is distinctly a present tense partly 
by its being in contrast to the simple past tense. “I go” contrasts with “I went.” 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   57
5/14/09   4:46:09 PM
58
Part  1: God’s Involvement with Language 
By itself, no tense is perfectly specific, because there are not an infinite number 
of tenses.
We find that the present tense is used in several kinds of ways. It may be used to 
describe something that is regularly true: “I go to the grocery store every Wednes-
day.” It can describe something in the near future: “Tomorrow I go to school.” Or 
it can describe an event in the past, within the context of a larger narrative:
Let me tell you what happened yesterday. I was standing on the sidewalk, and I 
saw a beggar looking at me pleadingly. So I go to him and say, “I know what you 
are thinking . . .”
周e exact significance of the present tense depends on the context in which it is 
used. Its meaning is not simply the meaning of the present tense in isolation, but 
in relation to a context. 周e context shows whether it is being used for a regular, 
repeated event, or for the near future, or in some other way.
Words are sometimes used in a metaphorical or figurative way. For example, 
Jesus says about Herod, “Go and tell that fox, . . .” (Luke 13:32). We know from the 
context that Jesus is referring to Herod, rather than to a literal fox. 周e context in 
relation to the word “fox” indicates that we have a metaphor. So, in such a context, 
is the meaning the old, original meaning, or a new meaning imparted by context? 
And could we not create still new metaphors and new contexts, indefinitely, and 
so destabilize an original “fixed” dictionary meaning?
If meanings depend on the context of language, are they a stable basis for 
knowledge? Or are they inherently unstable? A kind of stability comes from 
the interaction of two parts, namely, the sameness of an identifiable word and 
a relation to a particular context. Consider an example. My friend hears me say, 
“Tomorrow I go to school.” From the word “go” he knows that I am talking about 
motion of some kind. 周at knowledge comes from the stable meaning of the word 
“go.” But from the one word alone—without context—he cannot know whether 
I am talking about the present or the past or the future or a repeated event. But 
he also hears the word “tomorrow.” He knows from the use of the word “tomor-
row,” and from the way that “tomorrow” is linked to “go” within the sentence, 
that I am talking about the future. By observing the relation of the word “go” to 
its context, he comes to a definite conclusion.
But does he really know? Maybe I am joking, and the context of our previ-
ous conversation, or the smile on my face, shows that I am joking. So my friend 
must look not only at one sentence, but must know something about discourse. 
And discourse occurs in the context of human culture. And human cultures are 
multiple. 周ey arise in the context of the environment of the whole world, and 
the whole history of the world.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   58
5/14/09   4:46:09 PM
59
Chapter  7: Exploring Examples of Language
To determine the meaning of the word “go” in a particular context, we begin 
with what we already know about the stable meaning of the word. But we also 
look at its relations. We push out into the environment, both the environment 
of English as a language and the environment of speakers using words in waves 
of communication. 周e field of relations extends out indefinitely, from word to 
sentence to u瑴erance to small acts of human behavior to whole human lifetimes. 
And the final environment is God. God is at the beginning of history as its cre-
ator, and at the end as its consummator. And he is in between as the sustainer of 
the entire environment of the universe. Knowing the meaning of the word “go” 
depends on knowing relations, which depends on God. We can thank God for 
all of this provision.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   59
5/14/09   4:46:09 PM
60
C
H
A
P
T
E
 
8
-
周e Rules of Language
Forever, O Lord, your word
is firmly fixed in the heavens.
Your faithfulness endures to all generations;
you have established the earth, and it stands fast.
By your appointment they stand this day,
for all things are your servants.
—Psalm 119:89–91
G
od sustains language partly by sustaining regularities about language. Even 
with a small piece of language, like the word “go,” we meet an impressive 
number of regularities or rules. 周e word “go” has a stable meaning, and the 
dictionary gives a kind of rule or rules about what meanings it has. 周e diction-
ary also gives a description of how the word “go” is pronounced and how it is 
spelled, and those descriptions are rules. 周e word “go” also has distinct forms, 
like “went” and “gone.” 周ere are regularities describing how to use these forms, 
that is, how to use different verbal tenses in English.
We need to look at the character of language rules, because here also God 
shows his goodness and his control.
周e Rules
Each person who uses language relies on language rules. Many of the rules he 
knows tacitly, without having them explicitly taught in a classroom.
1
He may 
1. On tacit knowledge, see especially Michael Polanyi, 周e Tacit Dimension (Garden City, 
NY: Anchor, 1967); and more expansively, Polanyi, Personal Knowledge: Towards a Post-critical 
Philosophy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1964).
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   60
5/14/09   4:46:09 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested