syncfusion pdf viewer mvc : How to copy pdf image into powerpoint application control tool html azure web page online pub1370-part436

Council on Library and Information Resources 
and Library of Congress 
Washington, D.C. 
Capturing Analog Sound  
for Digital Preservation:
Report of a Roundtable Discussion of Best 
Practices for Transferring Analog Discs and Tapes 
Commissioned for and sponsored by the
March 2006
�������������������
������������������
��������������������������
���������
����������������
��������
�������������������
������������������
��������������������������
How to copy pdf image into powerpoint - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy pictures from pdf in; paste image into pdf reader
How to copy pdf image into powerpoint - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copying image from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy image from pdf to word document
ii
ISBN 1-932326-25-1
ISBN 978-1-932326-25-3
CLIR Publication No. 137
Copublished by: 
Council on Library and Information Resources 
1755 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Suite 500
Washington, DC 20036
Web site at http://www.clir.org
and
Library of Congress
101 Independence Avenue, SE
Washington, DC 20540
Web site at http://www.loc.gov
Additional copies are available for $20 per copy. Orders must be placed through CLIR’s Web site. 
This publication is also available online at no charge at http://www.clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub137abst.html.
The paper in this publication meets the minimum requirements of the American National Standard 
for Information Sciences—Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials ANSI Z39.48-1984.
Copyright 2006 in compilation by the Council on Library and Information Resources and the Library of Congress. No part of this 
publication may be reproduced or transcribed in any form without permission of the publishers. Requests for reproduction or other 
uses or questions pertaining to permissions should be submitted in writing to the Director of Communications at the Council on 
Library and Information Resources.
8
The National Recording Preservation Board
The National Recording Preservation Board was established at the Library of Congress by the National 
Recording Preservation Act of 2000. Among the provisions of the law are a directive to the Board to
study and report on the state of sound recording preservation in the United States. More information 
about the National Recording Preservation Board can be found at http://www.loc.gov/rr/record/nrpb/.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Ability to put image into defined location on PDF page. Provide image attributes adjust functionalities, such as resize image by zooming and cropping.
copy paste image pdf; paste image into pdf in preview
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf.
copy picture from pdf; how to copy pictures from a pdf to word
iii
Contents
Foreword ........................................................................................................................iv
Preface .............................................................................................................................v 
Part One ..........................................................................................................................1
Introduction ...........................................................................................................1
The Preservation Challenge:  
Changing Technologies for Recorded Sound .......................................1
Addressing the Challenge of Preserving Our Audio Heritage ..........3
Summary of Meeting Discussions .....................................................................4
Mitigating Deterioration of the Original Analog Carrier ...................4
Obtaining an Accurate Transfer .............................................................8
Best Practices for Digital Conversion/Considering  
a Sampling Standard ..............................................................................10
The Human Touch versus Automated Transfer .................................11 
Creating Metadata ..................................................................................12
Recommendations ..................................................................................13
Conclusion ...............................................................................................16
Part Two ........................................................................................................................17
Recommended Procedures for Transferring Analog Audio Tape and  
Analog Audio Disc for Digital Output, with Participant Commentary .....17
Appendix 1. Suggested Road Map for Best Practices Document  
for Analog-to-Digital Conversion .....................................................34 
Appendix 2. Meeting Participants ...........................................................................37
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
paste picture into pdf preview; how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
paste image into pdf; how to copy picture from pdf file
iv
Foreword
For more than 115 years audio recordings have documented our culture and 
enabled us to share artistic expressions and entertainment. Among all the me-
dia employed to record human creativity, sound recordings have undergone 
particularly radical changes in the last 25 years. The “digital revolution” has 
introduced new audio formats to consumers and library collections. Institu-
tional archives are now making a transition from preserving audio collections 
on tape reels to creating digital files. Libraries and archives face both oppor-
tunities and challenges. New distribution systems have provided archives 
with a broader universe from which to acquire collections, but, at the same 
time, new formats have created new demands on our preservation resources.
In the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000, the U.S. Congress rec-
ognized the significance of sound recordings in our lives and the need to sus-
tain them for future generations. That law created in the Library of Congress 
the National Recording Registry of historically, culturally, and aesthetically sig-
nificant recordings; the National Recording Preservation Foundation; and the 
National Recording Preservation Board, a body of recording industry and li-
brary professionals who advise the Library of Congress on preservation issues. 
Congress’s commitment to assuring the future of professional audio pres-
ervation was further demonstrated in the law’s directive to the Recording 
Board to conduct a study of “the current state of sound recording archiving, 
preservation and restoration activities.” The study was to include, according 
to the legislation, an examination of “the establishment of clear standards for 
copying old sound recordings.” This publication, the third in the series for the 
preservation study and the first to address technical issues relating to audio 
preservation, provides some useful indicators of progress in audio preservation 
standards by reviewing current practices in copying analog discs and tapes. 
While libraries develop ways to maintain and serve their digital collec-
tions, they still face challenges in maintaining audio collections in older for-
mats. Analog discs and tapes continue to require attention and pose particu-
lar challenges. For historical audio recordings to be accessible to researchers 
in the future, specialized equipment must be maintained for playback. Many 
of these analog recordings are deteriorating and must be reformatted while 
they are still playable. 
Authoritative manuals on how to create preservation copies of analog 
audio recordings do not yet exist. There are, however, many highly skilled 
preservation engineers working throughout the United States. To begin 
to fulfill the Congressional mandate to establish standards for audio 
preservation, the Library hosted a roundtable discussion in 2004 and 
invited some of these talented engineers to share their methods for copying 
recordings. The roundtable revealed agreement on most practices and on a 
number of areas in which further research is needed. I am extremely grateful 
to these professionals for donating their time and sharing their expertise. 
As this report indicates, much more work remains if we are to preserve the 
knowledge and expertise of these individuals in order to inform preservation 
professionals in the future. The National Recording Preservation Board 
is committed to documenting best practices for sustenance of our audio 
heritage and sharing that work with the preservation community. 
James H. Billington
Librarian of Congress
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
copy image from pdf; how to copy a pdf image into a word document
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Excellent .NET control for turning all PowerPoint presentation into high quality PDF without losing formatting in C#.NET Class. Convert
paste image in pdf preview; cut and paste pdf images
v
Preface
The ability to record and play back the sounds that surround us—human 
voices, musical performances, the sounds of nature—has existed for little more 
than 125 years. Yet the body of recorded sound that has been produced since 
its inception in 1877 already constitutes one of the greatest creative, historical, 
and scientific legacies of the United States. Given the importance of recorded 
sound to our economic well-being, cultural enrichment, and ability to stay in-
formed by means of radio, television, and the World Wide Web, it is alarming 
to realize that nearly all recorded sound is in peril of disappearing or becom-
ing inaccessible within a few generations.
Our audio heritage is fragile because it depends on technologies and me-
dia that are constantly improving and are thus constantly replaced and unsup-
ported by newer generations of hardware and software. Our continued ability 
to hear recorded sound will depend, first and foremost, on technologies that 
capture audio signal on obsolete formats—such as wire recordings, cylinders, 
instantaneous lacquer discs—and migrate or reformat them onto current tech-
nologies. To ensure that the recorded sounds of the past century are available 
for study and pleasure by future generations, we must not only preserve the 
media on which they were recorded but also guarantee that we have the hard-
ware to play back the recordings, an understanding of the media, and the ex-
pertise to extract the best-possible sounds from antique recordings of all types. 
That said, the formidable technical challenges are merely the proximate cause 
of the fragility of these recordings. The ultimate challenge to providing access 
now and in the future is political and organizational: As a society, we must 
find the will and the resources to define this problem as a priority and to ad-
dress the problems that technology poses.
Recognizing the importance of our audio heritage to the nation, the U.S. 
Congress created the National Recording Preservation Board (NRPB) in the 
National Recording Preservation Act of 2000. Operating under the aegis of the 
Library of Congress (LC), the NRPB is leading a national effort to address the 
preservation of and access to the recorded sound held by libraries, archives, 
historical societies, studio vaults, and private collectors as well as by others 
who create, care for, and care about audio. In the legislation that created the 
NRPB, Congress directed the Board and the Library to report on the current 
state of recorded sound preservation and to develop a national plan to pre-
serve and broaden access to recorded sound. The Library asked the Council on 
Library and Information Resources (CLIR) to commission background inves-
tigations and to convene experts to inform their study. This publication is the 
third of a series that has been produced in response to the LC’s request. The 
first two publications reported on the accessibility of out-of-print recordings 
and copyright of recorded sound.* 
This report is the first of two documents that will investigate procedures 
to reformat sound on analog carriers to digital media or files. It summarizes 
discussions and recommendations emerging from a meeting of leading audio 
preservation engineers held January 29–30, 2004, to assess the present state of 
standards and best practices for capturing sound from analog discs and tapes. 
* Survey of Reissues of U. S. Recordings, by Tim Brooks (August 2005) and Copyright Issues 
Relevant to Digital Preservation and Dissemination of Pre-1972 Commercial Sound Recordings by 
Libraries and Archives, by June M. Besek (December 2005).
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
document. Ability to put image into specified PDF page position and save existing PDF file or output a new PDF file. An independent
copying a pdf image to word; how to paste a picture into a pdf document
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document; how to copy pdf image into powerpoint
vi
A companion report, dealing with key aspects of digital technologies, includ-
ing file formats and standards, metadata, storage media, repositories, soft-
ware tools, and collaboration between the archival and scientific community, 
will be published later this year. 
The meeting summary, presented in part one of this report, was written 
by music writer and historian Paul Kingsbury. Prior to the meeting, Larry 
Appelbaum and Peter Alyea of the Library of Congress prepared a step-by-
step description of practices for transferring two source materials—analog 
audio tape and analog audio disc—to digital for the purpose of preservation 
reformatting. These workflow documents were edited and distributed to par-
ticipants before the meeting and served as the focus of in-depth discussions 
of preferred reformatting practices at the meeting. Annotations were made 
to the documents as a result of these discussions, and the revised drafts were 
then sent back to participants for further comment and annotation through a 
listserv. That online discussion was closed April 1, 2004. The resulting docu-
ment is presented in part two of this report.
Much may be learned from the collective expertise of the roundtable 
members, many of whom are the country’s most respected audio preserva-
tion engineers. Documented here are some of the techniques that have been 
developed to transfer deteriorating sound recordings, and the tools used. The 
discussions reveal the many times these engineers agree on approaches to 
obtain the best possible audio transfer from historical recordings, and the oc-
casional instances in which they disagree. The report is not intended to be a 
handbook on audio preservation engineering. Rather, it is an important com-
ponent of the study of the current state of audio preservation that Congress 
requested of the National Recording Preservation Board: a survey of achieve-
ments, concurrence, divergence, and needs for further research. 
The meeting was devoted nearly exclusively to a discussion of signal-
capture techniques. The NRPB sponsored a subsequent round of discussions 
on March 10–11, 2006; the topic at these sessions was digital file standards 
and metadata schema. In preparation for those discussions, recording engi-
neer and producer George Massenburg prepared a set of proposed standards 
for digital file creation; it is provided in Appendix 1. 
Responsibility for ensuring long-term access to the recorded-sound heri-
tage of this nation rests with many communities and organizations, public 
and private, technical and legal, scholarly and popular—indeed, with all who 
care about recorded sound. LC and the NRPB hope that this report and oth-
ers that follow will enable those involved to work from a common pool of 
knowledge and expertise toward solutions that will benefit all.
Abby Smith, Consultant 
Council on Library and Information Resources
Samuel Brylawski, Consultant
National Recording Preservation Board
Library of Congress
1
INTRODUCTION
The Preservation Challenge:  
Changing Technologies for Recorded Sound
The recording and playback of sound began with Thomas Edison’s 
invention of the phonograph in 1877. In the wake of that landmark 
innovation, history has seen the emergence of one innovative record-
ing technology after another. Each new technology has rapidly sup-
planted its predecessor. Thus, 10 years after the arrival of Edison’s 
phonograph, Emile Berliner patented his disc gramophone. And 
within a few decades, Edison’s cylinder recordings were largely 
replaced by Berliner’s more-convenient flat audio discs, recorded 
at approximately 78 revolutions per minute (rpm) and usually com-
posed of hard but brittle shellac. Following World War II, the shellac 
78 gave way to the almost-simultaneous introduction of the flex-
ible vinyl 45-rpm single and 33-
1
/3
–rpm long-playing (LP) record in 
1948–1949 and to magnetic recording tape. Magnetic tape, developed 
in Germany and brought to the United States after World War II, 
came into widespread use in commercial recording sessions by the 
late 1940s. 
By the mid-1960s, when record companies began to offer for sale 
prerecorded, continuous-loop, eight-track tapes, consumers began 
participating in the audio tape revolution in earnest. Smaller, more-
convenient cassette tapes—both blank and prerecorded—reached 
the market by the end of the 1960s. The next major breakthrough in 
consumer playback came with the arrival of the first widely avail-
able digital carrier, the compact disc (CD), which was introduced in 
1982. Since then, the parade of new playback and recording formats 
has continued. As digital audio has gained precedence, new digital 
carriers—digital versatile discs (DVDs) and MP3 players, among oth-
ers—are already jostling the CD for preeminence.
PART ONE
Paul Kingsbury
Capturing Analog Sound for Digital Preservation
As one considers the swift evolution and succession of recording 
and playback technology, it is clear that innovation and obsolescence 
are constants in audio recording. Cylinders, 78-rpm shellac records, 
and eight-track tapes are no longer commercially viable media. The 
LP disc and the cassette tape have seen declining sales for some time.
For many years after digital recording and playback came into 
wide use in the 1980s, there was an ongoing debate in the record-
ing community about the merits of preserving audio programs in a 
digital, rather than analog, format. In 1997, in an in-depth, two-part 
series on problems of audio preservation and storage within the 
major record companies in the United States published in Billboard 
magazine, reporter Bill Holland stated that the consensus among 
leading audio engineers and such organizations as the Audio Engi-
neering Society (AES), the National Academy of Recording Arts and 
Sciences (NARAS), and the Association for Recorded Sound Col-
lections (ARSC) was that “because analog tape has been proved to 
last, generally, and because the shelf life of digital tape is unknown, 
recordings should be stored or backed up, at least in the analog tape 
format.”1
Since that time, however, it has become increasingly clear that 
analog magnetic tape no longer provides the safe haven for preserva-
tion that it once may have. As of 2005, only one major manufacturer, 
Quantegy (formerly Ampex), still manufactures analog magnetic 
recording tape stock for the U.S. market. Only a handful of compa-
nies still manufacture the machines that play open-reel tapes. Some 
tapes manufactured for preservation reformatting, such as polyester 
tape, have been found to deteriorate over time. For example, they 
can be damaged by hydrolysis, the process by which the chemical 
that bonds the recording oxide to the polyester base absorbs mois-
ture from the air. Upon playback, these tapes can break down and 
become unplayable. 
Increasingly, leading audio engineers and audio preservationists 
believe that the future of audio preservation is in the digital arena. 
Unlike subsequent generations of analog dubs, each of which is 
farther removed from the original sound (much as a copy of a film 
photograph is removed in quality from that of the original image), 
each digital capture is capable of producing an identical copy of the 
original recording. Digital recordings are also easily transported and 
transmitted in a variety of ways, including the World Wide Web, 
making public access easy and cost-effective. Acknowledging that 
digital tape is as subject to deterioration as analog tape, some pres-
ervationists are developing systems to manage sound recordings as 
digital files, to be archived in repositories and periodically refreshed 
and migrated.
1
Holland, Bill. 1997. Upgrading Labels’ Vaults No Easy Archival Task. Billboard 
(July 19): 99.
3
Report of a Roundtable Discussion of Best Practices for Transferring Analog Discs and Tapes
Addressing the Challenge of  
Preserving Our Audio Heritage
The importance of preserving and ensuring access to the nation’s 
audio heritage is now widely recognized, and many in the public 
and private sectors have called for a coordinated national effort to 
address the preservation challenge. 
In response, in 2000 the U.S. Congress enacted Public Law 106-
474, creating the National Recording Preservation Board (NRPB) 
under the aegis of the Library of Congress (LC) and charging these 
bodies to identify and address the major challenges to audio pres-
ervation. The legislation specifically charges the LC and NRPB to 
conduct a study of “the current state of sound recording archiving, 
preservation, and restoration activities.” Areas to be explored include 
“the methodology and standards needed to make the transition from 
analog ‘open reel’ preservation of sound recordings to digital pres-
ervation of sound recordings,” “standards for access to preserved 
sound recordings by researchers, educators, and other interested 
parties,” and “the establishment of clear standards for copying old 
sound recordings (including equipment specifications and equaliza-
tion guidelines).” The study is intended to inform key players in 
the preservation of recorded sound and to be a prelude to a national 
plan. 
As a first step in this process, in January 2004 LC and CLIR con-
vened a group of leading audio engineers and audio preservation 
specialists, including several audio engineer members of the NRPB, 
to participate in a roundtable discussion of preferred methods of 
transferring analog audio for reformatting as digital files. (A list of 
participants is provided in Appendix 2.) The goals of the meeting 
were to determine what areas of agreement and disagreement exist 
among reformatting experts, to identify gaps in knowledge about 
crucial techniques in audio transfer, and to make recommendations 
to LC and the NRPB about actions to be taken to address those prob-
lems. This roundtable group was charged with focusing on migrat-
ing an audio signal from endangered analog carriers—disc and tape 
primarily—and the challenges of capturing that signal digitally. A 
second group of engineers and librarians met in March 2006 to dis-
cuss issues related to conversion to digital media and metadata.
Participants were asked to confine their discussions to the two 
most common forms of analog media—audio discs and audio tapes. 
(Less-prevalent forms, such as cylinders and magnetized steel wire 
recordings, were left for future, more-detailed study.) Participants 
worked from two workflow documents prepared by preservation 
reformatting experts at LC. By working through each step in the pro-
cess of reformatting analog tapes and discs, participants were able to 
identify areas of accord on best practice; areas of disagreement; and 
areas where further study, or further development of effective solu-
tions, is needed. 
Although group members represented a fairly broad range of 
audio engineering specialties, they found themselves in agreement 
on nearly all the discussed aspects of transferring analog audio to 
Capturing Analog Sound for Digital Preservation
digital. The following text summarizes these major points. For more 
details, readers are invited to turn to part two, which contains the 
original workflow documents along with extensive annotations 
made by meeting participants.
SUMMARY OF MEETING DISCUSSIONS
This section summarizes the main technical points covered in the 
discussions. It shows where participants agreed and disagreed on 
preservation procedures and what topics they felt needed further 
study. Roundtable members’ recommendations on procedure are dis-
played in italics.
One point emerged clearly from the discussions: Although many 
aspects of transferring analog audio to digital media require hard-
ware and software tools and some are amenable to automation and 
batch processing, there are many areas in which a trained ear and 
years of experience are by far the most important tools. “The ideal,” 
one participant noted, “is to use ears in conjunction with measure-
ment.” Another engineer stated, “Technology will never replace the 
listener.” Subjective as listening can be, there is still no substitute for 
the trained ear when reformatting sound recordings. 
Mitigating Deterioration of the Original Analog Carrier 
Audio Discs 
Commercial audio discs date from 1894; two-sided discs first ap-
peared in 1907–1908. In physical composition, audio discs can range 
from fragile forms such as rubber (the earliest disc recordings), 
acetate or lacquer (sometimes with glass, aluminum, or cardboard 
backings), to more-durable shellac and vinyl discs and the metal 
masters (“metal parts”) used to stamp out commercial discs. The dis-
tinct physical characteristics of each disc type require different, often 
highly specialized, techniques to coax the sound from the carrier. 
Although participants did discuss the possibility of using ad-
vanced materials-science technology (such as laser refraction and 
spectroscopy) to help identify disc composition, it appears that no 
archives in the preservation field currently uses such high-tech as-
sessment tools. Roundtable members agreed that in nearly all cases, 
experienced audio engineers could readily identify the composition 
of a recorded disc. Thus, although use of such technologies may be 
desirable, these experts did not see it as urgent or essential. 
The roundtable panel identified several best practices that hold 
true for virtually all disc formats. These practices are as follows: 
• Cleaning the disc. When transferring an audio program from an 
analog disc, one should always clean the disc first, except in the cases 
of cracks or delamination. Cleaning methods vary somewhat de-
pending upon the composition of the disc. Generally, one should 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested