syncfusion pdf viewer mvc : Cut image from pdf online control Library system azure asp.net winforms console published%20Meta-Analysis2-part444

163
TABLE 5 
Average instructional effect sizes by linguistic category and comparison group for less able and undifferentiated students
Linguistic
category
of
outcome
variable
Sublexical
Morphological
Nonmorphological
Lexical
Supralexical
Comparison
groups
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
A.
Less
able
students
Cohen’s
d
0.99
1.25
0.63
0.25
0.57
0.24
0.67
0.39
SD
0.87
0.27
0.54
0.51
0.54
0.48
0.56
0
Number
of
effects
9
3
5
7
24
15
6
1
Range
0.1,
2.381.06,
1.55–0.04,
1.22–0.53,
0.97
–0.58,
1.61
–0.52,
0.78
0.17,
1.710.39,
0.39
Null
effects
35.5
15.7
10.7
1.8
44.4
3.0
14.1
1.0
B.
Undiffer
entiated
students
Cohen’s
d
0.65
0.24
0.27
0.00
0.40
0.08
0.27
–0.15
SD
0.77
0.31
0.29
0.20
0.50
0.46
0.29
0.23
Number
of
effects
30
8
21
15
72
60
9
8
Range
–0.13,
3.56
–0.34,
0.75
–0.37,
0.71–0.40,
0.30
–0.31,
1.88
–0.78,
1.59
–0.02,
0.97
–0.54,
0.20
Null
effects
67.5
1.6
7.4
72.0
3.2
Note
.
See
note
to
Table
3
for
notes
regarding
abbreviations.
at QUEENS UNIV LIBRARIES on June 18, 2010 
http://rer.aera.net
Downloaded from 
Cut image from pdf online - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy an image from a pdf to word; how to copy a picture from a pdf
Cut image from pdf online - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy images from pdf file; how to cut a picture from a pdf document
Bowers et al.
164
the supralexical level, there were fewer outcome measures for younger and older 
students. The two age groups had a similar small advantage in the E versus C 
comparisons (older: d = 0.29, SD = 0.40; younger: d = 0.27, SD = 0.14), but very 
few null effects would be required to reduce this effect, and this advantage disap-
peared in the E versus AT comparisons. Results in Table 6 indicate that in general 
the preschool to Grade 2 students gain as much or more than the older students 
across lexical categories in the E versus C comparisons. For the E versus AT com-
parisons, the younger students have an advantage only in the sublexical morpho-
logical outcomes.
The Effects of Integrated Versus Isolated Morphological Instruction
The fourth research question concerned the dimension of integrated versus 
isolated morphological instruction. Integrated morphological interventions were 
those in which morphological instruction was integrated with other instruction, 
whereas isolated morphological interventions targeted only morphological con-
tent. Table 2 indicates how each study was coded on this dimension.
The results are presented in Table 7. With the exception of the E versus C com-
parison for sublexical morphological outcomes, in which isolated instruction was 
more successful (0.67 vs. 0.55), all of the comparisons favored integrated instruc-
tion. The E versus AT comparisons for morphological sublexical linguistic out-
comes showed a strong effect for integrated instruction (d = 1.25) compared to a 
small effect (d = 0.24) for isolated instruction, though these effects were based, 
respectively, on only three and eight outcomes.
Discussion
This systematic review investigated the effects of morphological instruction on 
literacy outcomes categorized into sublexical (morphological and nonmorpho-
logical), lexical, and supralexical categories. We calculated the average effect sizes 
in these categories for (a) overall samples, (b) less able versus undifferentiated 
samples, (c) younger (preschool–Grade 2) versus older students (Grades 3–8), and 
(d) samples that received morphological instruction in isolation compared to mor-
phological instruction integrated with other literacy instructional strategies. We 
considered two types of effects, those found comparing morphological instruction 
with a control group that received nothing other than regular classroom instruction 
and those found comparing morphological instruction with some alternative treat-
ment.
Before addressing the research questions, we can make two general observa-
tions about the corpus of studies that we located. First, although research on mor-
phology and literacy is increasing, we were able to locate only a relatively small 
number of instructional studies (n = 22). Although this number is larger than that 
identified by Reed (2008), there is clearly need for more studies particularly across 
age and ability levels. Second, with respect to research design, there were a num-
ber of examples of random assignment of individuals to instructional conditions 
(Abbott & Berninger, 1999; Berninger et al., 2003; Berninger et al., 2008; Kirk & 
Gillon, 2009; Lyster, 1998, 2002; Tyler et al., 2003), though many of the other 
investigators did manage to randomly assign classes. Given that most studies  
saw morphological instruction as a part of regular classroom instruction and that 
the instruction usually took place over several weeks or more, the proportion of 
at QUEENS UNIV LIBRARIES on June 18, 2010 
http://rer.aera.net
Downloaded from 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class source code. A powerful
paste image into pdf preview; copy picture from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed. Access to freeware download and online VB.NET class
copy image from pdf; how to copy pdf image into powerpoint
165
TABLE 6 
Average instructional effect sizes by linguistic category and comparison group for preschool to Grade 2 versus Grade 3 to  
8 students
Linguistic
category
of
outcome
variable
Sublexical
Morphological
Nonmorphological
Lexical
Supralexical
Comparison
groups
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
A.
Preschool–Grade
2
Cohen’s
d
1.24
1.25
0.49
–0.16
0.57
–0.07
0.27
–0.22
SD
0.41
0.27
0.44
0.16
0.48
0.17
0.14
0.22
Number
of
effects
2
3
10
7
19
11
7
5
Range
0.95,
1.53
1.06,
1.55
–0.37,
1.22
–0.4,
0.03
–0.31,
1.88
–0.33,
0.23
0.09,
0.51
–0.54,
-0.02
Null
effects
10.4
15.7
14.5
35.2
2.45
B.
Grade
3–Grade
8
Cohen’s
d
0.62
0.24
0.24
0.20
0.37
0.15
0.29
0.08
SD
0.72
0.31
0.28
0.35
0.48
0.49
0.40
0.29
Number
of
effects
35
8
16
15
74
64
5
4
Range
–0.13,
3.56
–0.34,
0.75
–0.11,
0.71
–0.53,
0.97
–0.58,
1.88
–0.78,
1.59
–0.02,
0.97
–0.28,
0.39
Null
effects
73.5
1.6
3.2
62.9
2.25
Note
.
See
note
to
Table
3
for
notes
regarding
abbreviations.
at QUEENS UNIV LIBRARIES on June 18, 2010 
http://rer.aera.net
Downloaded from 
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
how to copy text from pdf image to word; cut image from pdf online
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL.
paste image into pdf in preview; how to cut picture from pdf file
166
TABLE 7 
Average instructional effect sizes by linguistic category and comparison groups for integrated morphological instruction versus 
isolated morphological instruction
Linguistic
category
of
outcome
variable
Sublexical
Morphological
Nonmorphological
Lexical
Supralexical
Comparison
groups
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
E
vs.
C
E
vs.
AT
A.
Integrated
instruction
Cohen’s
d
0.55
1.25
0.49
0.27
0.46
0.22
0.37
0.39
SD
0.58
.27
0.38
0.53
0.45
0.52
0.21
Number
of
effects
5
3
12
7
31
28
2
1
Range
0.11,
1.53
1.06,
1.55
–0.01,
1.22
–0.53,
0.97
–0.58,
1.05
–0.52,
1.15
0.22,
0.51
0.39,
0.39
Null
effects
8.75
15.7
17.4
2.45
40.3
2.8
1.7
.95
B.
Isolated
instruction
Cohen’s
d
0.67
0.24
0.20
0.00
0.38
0.05
0.26
–0.15
SD
0.74
0.31
0.31
0.20
0.50
0.44
0.28
0.23
Number
of
effects
32
8
14
15
62
46
10
8
Range
–0.13,
3.56
–0.34,
0.75
–0.37,
0.85
–0.4,
0.30
–0.31,
1.88
–0.78,
1.59
–0.02,
0.97
–0.54,
0.2
Null
effects
75.2
1.6
55.8
3.0
Note
.
See
note
to
Table
3
for
notes
regarding
abbreviations.
at QUEENS UNIV LIBRARIES on June 18, 2010 
http://rer.aera.net
Downloaded from 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit
copy and paste image into pdf; how to copy images from pdf to word
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
to zoom and crop image and achieve image resizing. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET
paste picture pdf; how to copy pdf image to word document
Morphological Instruction
167
studies with random assignment of individuals seems reasonable. In future studies, 
more random assignment may be possible in small group instruction studies.
The Effects of Morphological Instruction
To summarize our findings, when we consider the results across all available 
studies (Table 3), it is clear that morphological instruction has its greatest effects 
at the sublexical morphological level. This indicates that morphological instruc-
tion was successful in improving morphological abilities, whether compared to 
control or alternative treatments. The null effects necessary to reduce the d to 0.2 
for morphological outcomes support this finding. At the other linguistic levels in 
the overall analysis, the effects ranged from small to moderate in the experimental 
versus control comparisons and were negligible in the experimental versus alterna-
tive treatment comparisons. There was a consistent moderate effect of morpho-
logical instruction in the experimental versus control comparisons. When effects 
were separated by ability and age of student and type of instruction (integrated vs. 
isolated), more detail was revealed. Experimental versus control effects were 
stronger for the younger students, but this was not true for the experimental versus 
alternative treatment comparisons. There were stronger effects for the less able 
participants in both types of comparison and also for those studies that integrated 
morphological instruction with other literacy instruction. The picture that emerges 
is that morphological instruction is particularly effective when integrated with 
other literacy instruction and aimed at less able and perhaps younger readers.
We need to consider why the effects were often (but not always) greater in the 
experimental versus control rather than the experimental versus alternative treat-
ment comparisons. There are basically two reasons for including alternative treat-
ments  in  a research  design, either  (a) to control for extraneous  effects (e.g., 
Hawthorn effects or instructor attention) that are not part of the phenomenon being 
investigated or (b) to investigate the effects of an alternative treatment that is 
meaningfully designed to affect aspects of the outcomes. Most of the comparisons 
that we categorized as experimental versus control did not involve true control 
groups in the classic sense. Instead of receiving nothing that the experimental 
group did not receive, these groups typically received more regular classroom 
instruction. As such, these groups may be considered as “alternative treatments” 
too. Most of the alternative treatments employed in these studies appear to have 
been designed to achieve the second objective; the majority addressed phonologi-
cal processing or vocabulary. Phonologically oriented instruction is well devel-
oped, widely regarded as a solid basis for learning to read words, and especially 
recommended for students with reading difficulties (National  Reading Panel, 
2000; Rayner, Foorman, Perfetti, Pesetsky, & Seidenberg, 2001). Similar points 
could be made about vocabulary instruction (Beck, McKeown, & Kucan, 2002; 
Biemiller & Boote, 2006; Graves, 2004). Accordingly, it is not surprising that the 
alternative treatments in our sample provided effective instruction. That morpho-
logical instruction generally was as successful as these alternative treatments pro-
vides  evidence  that  morphological  instruction,  a  relatively  new  focus  of 
instructional research, brings benefits comparable to those of instruction designed 
on the basis of extensive research. Our conclusion is that morphological instruc-
tion was effective at the morphological sublexical and lexical levels but  that 
at QUEENS UNIV LIBRARIES on June 18, 2010 
http://rer.aera.net
Downloaded from 
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL.
paste image into pdf; paste jpeg into pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. use it to extract all images from PDF document. page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the
how to copy picture from pdf to word; paste image in pdf preview
Bowers et al.
168
beyond the sublexical morphological level it was often no more effective than 
other well-established instructional methods.
There was considerable variability associated with many of the effects, and in 
some cases relatively few null studies would be required to reduce the effects 
below the benchmark of 0.2. There were also instances of negative effects in some 
studies and weak negative average effects, the latter being largely in alternative 
treatment comparisons at the supralexical linguistic layer (see Tables 3 to 6). This 
high variability suggests that some studies employed methods of instruction that 
were better than others. It will be an important task for future research to determine 
which types of morphological  instruction are most beneficial and how  these 
can best be combined with other forms of instruction (e.g., in phonology and 
vocabulary).
Understanding the Effects of Morphological Instruction
At the outset we hypothesized as to why, in theory, morphological instruction 
might bring additional benefits to literacy instruction. We argued that instruction 
about meaning bearing sublexical elements might produce word knowledge that 
could transfer up to lexical and supralexical skills. We found that instruction about 
sublexical morphological elements brought measurable literacy effects compared 
to controls, and those effect sizes reflected the level of transfer from instruction. 
Morphological instruction performed comparably to the alternative treatments at 
the higher linguistic levels. Morphological instruction was more effective for less 
able learners, and when it was integrated with other aspects of literacy instruction; 
there was some evidence that it was more effective for younger learners.
One way of understanding these results is to conceptualize sublexical morpho-
logical knowledge as a mechanism for strengthening learners’ lexical representa-
tions  (Carlisle  &  Katz,  2006;  Carlisle  &  Stone,  2005).  The  lexical  quality 
hypothesis (Perfetti, 2007; Perfetti & Hart, 2001, 2002) is one potentially fruitful 
framework through which to understand the effects of morphological instruction, 
as is the association of untaught morphological knowledge and literacy skills (e.g., 
Carlisle, 2003; Deacon & Kirby, 2004). In describing the lexical quality hypoth-
esis, Perfetti (2007) presented five features of lexical representation that determine 
lexical quality. The first four, orthography, phonology, grammar, and meaning, are 
constituents of word identity, and the fifth, constituent binding, “is not independent 
but rather a consequence of the orthographic, phonological and semantic constitu-
ents becoming well specified in association with another constituent” (pp. 360–
361). Knowledge of how oral and written morphology work in a given language 
could be understood as a binding agent that pulls together these individual features 
of lexical representation to enhance lexical quality. The word binding is an appro-
priate way to describe how written morphological structure links families of words 
with consistent orthographic patterns. The letter patterns for morphemes are asso-
ciated with phonological representations, and they can also provide grammatical 
cues. In fact, each of the features of lexical quality identified by Perfetti has direct 
associations with oral and written morphological elements. If sublexical morpho-
logical knowledge acts as a constituent binding feature of lexical quality, increas-
ing that sublexical morphological knowledge through instruction should facilitate 
the efficient retrieval of word identities, which in turn should result in improved 
scores on lexical measures, as we found in this review.
at QUEENS UNIV LIBRARIES on June 18, 2010 
http://rer.aera.net
Downloaded from 
Morphological Instruction
169
Perfetti (2007) also argued that lexical quality is important for reading compre-
hension (supralexical performance). He suggested that the source of the ability to 
efficiently retrieve the words needed during reading is the integrated orthographic, 
phonological, grammatical, and semantic word knowledge that the reader has for 
a given word—the quality of that word’s lexical representation. If morphological 
instruction increases lexical quality, those stronger mental representations could 
improve reading comprehension by (a) increasing efficiency of word identifica-
tion, thereby reducing the cognitive load needed for processing and integrating 
connected text, and (b) providing the reader with easier access to semantic infor-
mation associated with that word. The reading comprehension gains from morpho-
logical instruction should be less robust than the lexical gains, at least in the short 
term, but if morphological instruction does improve lexical quality, it should 
become apparent in reading comprehension measures, and that is what we found.
The instruction investigated in this review addresses aspects of word knowl-
edge that directly bear on efficient processing of words and meanings during read-
ing.  Perfetti  (2007)  stated,  “Underlying  efficient  processes  are  knowledge 
components; knowledge about word forms (grammatical class, spellings and pro-
nunciations) and meanings. Add effective practice (reading experience) of these 
knowledge  components, and  the  result  is  efficiency: the rapid,  low-resource 
retrieval of a word identity” (p. 359). The interventions reviewed in this study used 
instruction that explicitly targeted knowledge about oral and written morphologi-
cal features of words. Morphemes are characterized by consistent spelling patterns 
but are also associated with pronunciations and meanings, and they may also mark 
grammatical cues. Explicit morphological instruction offers teachers a way of 
directly targeting the development of lexical quality. Such cognitive processing 
itself may function to strengthen mental representations and decrease cognitive 
load (e.g., Schnotz & Kürschner, 2007; Sweller, 1988) in reading.
However, explicit morphological instruction is not required for morphological 
knowledge to develop and play a role in developing lexical quality. This is dem-
onstrated in the correlational or predictive studies we reviewed briefly at the begin-
ning of this article (for a more extensive review, see, e.g., Carlisle, 2003). In the 
absence of explicit instruction in morphology, children develop considerable com-
petence in it, and this competence is related to success in literacy. There is also 
evidence that simple exposure to the consistent underlying structures that integrate 
morphological families improves the quality of our lexical representations. Nagy, 
Anderson, Schommer, Scott, and Stallman (1989) found that adults read words 
from larger morphological families more fluently than words from small families 
and cited this as evidence that words are processed through morphological rela-
tionships, not as separate entities (for similar results with children, see Carlisle & 
Katz, 2006). Citing the work of Taft and colleagues with adult readers (e.g., Taft, 
2003; Taft & Kougious,  2004; Taft & Zhu, 1995), Carlisle  and Stone (2005) 
described  the  role  of  uninstructed  experiences  with  morphology  on  lexical 
representations by concluding that “frequent encounters with a base word (by itself 
or combined with affixes in words) reinforce the mental representation of the mor-
phemes in those words, and access to memory for the morphemes speeds identifi-
cation of words containing those morphemes” (p. 431).
Untaught morphological knowledge may also lie behind the relative weakness 
of the instructional  effects  beyond  the sublexical  level.  Some children in the  
at QUEENS UNIV LIBRARIES on June 18, 2010 
http://rer.aera.net
Downloaded from 
Bowers et al.
170
control or alternative treatment groups may have developed enough morphological 
knowledge to support their lexical and supralexical processing, so that they per-
form as well as children who received explicit morphological instruction at these 
levels. This may also be related to the stronger effects we found for less able read-
ers (see the next section). Morphological instruction that was sustained and inte-
grated with other literacy instruction over an extensive period of time may show 
greater transfer.
Reading Ability Effects
In response to our second research question, we found that the effects of mor-
phological instruction were stronger on average in groups of less able readers than 
in more broadly based samples. Reed (2008) came to the same conclusion from a 
smaller set of studies. We see four plausible explanations for this pattern. First, the 
more able readers may already have known at least implicitly some of the morpho-
logical content being taught and so would not differ as much from the comparison 
groups as the poor readers, who initially were likely to know little of the content 
being taught. Less able readers may need more explicit instruction. Second, the 
studies involving less able learners generally used small groups rather than class-
sized groups in their instruction. Although smaller group sizes are representative 
of remedial instruction, it is possible that this approach would also have been more 
successful with the more able learners.
The third interpretation is that morphology is a cognitive domain that is a rela-
tive strength for less able readers. A common characteristic of struggling readers 
is weak phonological awareness (e.g., National Reading Panel, 2000). Casalis et 
al. (2004) suggested that dyslexics may use (untaught) morphological knowledge 
as a compensatory strategy and that introducing explicit morphological instruction 
could build on a relative strength for dyslexic learners; the same may be true for 
other less able readers. A phonological processing deficit may be less of a hin-
drance to developing higher quality lexical representations if explicit instruction 
in morphological structure builds up an integrated lexical representation of ortho-
graphic patterns and meaning cues to which phonological associations can be 
linked. Making the written morphological structures more salient could scaffold 
more effective use of phonological knowledge for less able readers. In effect, 
explicit instruction about sublexical morphological structures and how they link to 
orthographic, semantic, phonological, and grammatical cues may activate the con-
stituent  binding quality offered  by  morphology (see the earlier discussion of 
Perfetti’s, 2007, lexical quality hypothesis). Phonological processing deficits may 
be less of an impediment when students are explicitly shown how phonological 
structures link to linguistic structures for which these students have no processing 
deficit.
Findings from one intervention in our review illustrate how morphology might 
act as a binding agent of multiple features for less able readers. Arnbak and Elbro’s 
(2000) intervention with Danish dyslexic students was restricted to oral instruc-
tion, and yet their strongest results were for measures of spelling, and this was 
despite the fact that the control groups had more practice with written words in 
their typical remedial instruction. They hypothesized that awareness of morphemic 
units in words facilitated the segmenting of complex words into linguistic units 
they knew how to spell and that this process may have also eased the load on  
at QUEENS UNIV LIBRARIES on June 18, 2010 
http://rer.aera.net
Downloaded from 
Morphological Instruction
171
verbal working memory. Morphological instruction may have facilitated the abil-
ity to maintain meaningful units of words (morphemes) in working memory while 
spelling, which may be another consequence of increased binding.
The fourth explanation of why morphological instruction was more effective 
for less able readers is through providing increased motivation to work with words. 
A number of authors of the studies in this sample commented on the enthusiasm 
children  showed  during  morphological  instruction;  increased  motivation and 
improved literacy skills may mutually support each other (e.g., Berninger et al., 
2003; Bowers & Kirby, in press; Tomesen & Aarnoutse, 1998). Without measures 
for motivation, however, this explanation remains speculative. The ability and 
motivation to explore language independently, “word consciousness,” is a fre-
quently emphasized goal of vocabulary instruction (Graves, 2006; Scott & Nagy, 
2004; Stahl & Nagy, 2006). Less able readers are likely to have had more frustrat-
ing experiences in school trying to understand how written words work. Introducing 
morphology as an organized system that links words even when pronunciation 
shifts appear irregular (e.g., heal/health, sign/signal) may motivate struggling stu-
dents to study words more closely. Studying morphological families of words also 
has the advantage of exposing struggling older students to advanced, complex 
vocabulary with the support of connected words they do know. For example, 
studying the sign family can be used to introduce words such as design, designate, 
insignia, significantly, and assignment. Studying the structure and meaning con-
nections in these words builds lexical representations in a way that does not require 
struggling readers to process long passages of text.
Further research will be required to select among these explanations for the 
greater effectiveness of morphological instruction with less able readers. It is also 
possible that more able readers would show increased benefit from morphological 
instruction if it were tailored to their strengths.
Grade-Level Effects
The answer to our third research question was that morphological instruction 
was at least as effective for students in the early stages of formal literacy instruc-
tion as it was for students in later grades (see Table 6). These findings challenge 
the assertion by Adams (1990) that “teaching beginning or less skilled readers 
about them [roots and suffixes of morphologically complex words] may be a mis-
take” (p. 152). Evidence that morphological instruction brings benefits to younger 
students and that this instruction brings special benefits to less able students could 
have important practical implications. With a foundation of morphological knowl-
edge gained with the support of instruction from the start, it is possible many 
students who fail in response to typical instruction could achieve much stronger 
success.
A  striking example  of  the  potential of early  and sustained morphological 
instruction comes from Lyster’s (1998, 2002) study with Norwegian children. She 
investigated the effects of morphological and phonological interventions com-
pared to a control group with students prior to school entry. She found a very large 
effect of morphological instruction (d = 1.88) on a word reading measure 6 months 
after the intervention stopped. The phonological intervention group showed a  
gain of d = 0.82 on this same measure. Compared to controls, she also found a 
significant difference for the morphological group (effect sizes not provided) on 
at QUEENS UNIV LIBRARIES on June 18, 2010 
http://rer.aera.net
Downloaded from 
Bowers et al.
172
an orthographic coding task in Grades 2 and 3. Although there were relatively few 
intervention studies with young children, the magnitude of the possible effects 
suggests that further studies be conducted.
Effects of Methods of Instruction
The fourth research question asked whether instruction that integrated mor-
phology with other aspects of literacy instruction would differ in its effects from 
isolated instruction. For the majority of outcome comparisons, including those 
with alternative treatments, integrated instruction was more effective than isolated 
instruction, and in the other cases the effects were similar (see Table 7). Integrated 
instruction should facilitate construction of lexical representations in which pho-
nological, orthographic, grammatical, and semantic information is linked to mor-
phological information. By generating richer lexical representations, instruction 
that integrates morphological and other linguistic features should facilitate lexical 
access and thus enhance the binding role of morphology, more so than would be 
accomplished by isolated instruction.
Vocabulary is one of the most obvious other areas of literacy instruction to 
integrate with morphological instruction. Despite the importance of vocabulary 
instruction cited by National Reading Panel (2000), there is a growing recognition 
that vocabulary instruction has received insufficient attention in classroom instruc-
tion and literacy research (Beck et al., 2002; Biemiller & Boote, 2006). Because 
morphemes, when encoded in print, are fundamentally orthographic representa-
tions of sublexical and lexical meaning units that occur in multiple words, written 
morphological instruction may provide a generative component within vocabulary 
instruction, supporting transfer to the learning of new words (Bowers & Kirby, in 
press).
The final point to be made about methods of instruction concerns the problem-
solving approach adopted in four of the studies reviewed here (Baumann et al., 
2003;  Berninger  et  al., 2003;  Bowers  &  Kirby,  2006,  in  press;  Tomesen & 
Aarnoutse, 1998). Each of these studies used the theme of “detectives” to frame 
their instruction, designed to enhance student motivation. Although not one of our 
research questions, the inclusion of a problem-solving approach may be a critical 
feature in obtaining transfer beyond the morphological sublexical level. Although 
there were not enough appropriate studies to assess this possibility quantitatively, 
the problem-solving approach appears to be worth further investigation. This 
instructional strategy may have its effect in part by increasing students’ focus on 
the working of words while fostering the deeper processing associated with more 
effective long-term learning. Employing problem-solving tasks about spelling–
meaning connections (Templeton, 2004) should also develop the constituent bind-
ing feature in Perfetti’s (2007) lexical quality hypothesis by targeting the juncture 
of semantics, orthography, and phonology during an engaging task.
Limitations, Future Directions, and Conclusions
Several limitations deserve noting. First, this review was limited by the number 
of studies available. If there had been more studies in the literature, further research 
questions could have been addressed and the variability we observed in the effects 
may have been reduced. There is a need for more fine-grained studies of morpho-
logical instruction, to determine how to maximize its effects. We have presented a 
at QUEENS UNIV LIBRARIES on June 18, 2010 
http://rer.aera.net
Downloaded from 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested