syncfusion pdf viewer mvc : How to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint SDK control service wpf web page winforms dnn purchase%20conversion1-part447

- 9 -
Navigation is complicated by the fact that a user could have multiple windows (web browsers) 
open in different areas of the web site, unfortunately in our dataset we see all viewings as a 
continuous stream and do not know with which window a viewing is associated or even if there 
are multiple windows open. 
Many of the patterns in the transition matrix are due to the construction of the web site.  
For example, the many hypertext links from a category page to a product page make it likely the 
user may use one of these links to navigate the web site.  However, navigation is not restricted to 
these links.  Suppose a user requests additional information about shipping which appears as a 
popup window, the user may continue browsing through the web site but leave the popup 
window open.  The user may re-select the popup window later in the session even though there 
is no link to the popup on the current web page.  There is one exception to this stochastic 
approach that we make for the order page.  The only way for a user to get to an order page is 
from the shopping cart page; even if multiple windows are open the previous page must be a 
shopping cart page.  Hence, we assume that a user cannot select the order page unless they are 
currently on a shopping cart page. 
3.  A Dynamic Multinomial Probit Model of Web Browsing 
Our exploratory analysis from the previous section prescribes two important elements 
needed in a formal statistical model: a categorical choice model of web page movement and 
memory to capture dependence in the sequences chosen.  Additionally, past research suggests 
that we need to account for other possible features of the data such as consumer heterogeneity, 
the use of user characteristics and demographics to explain some of this heterogeneity, dynamic 
behavior, the use of covariates to explain transitions between pages, and general error covariance 
patterns to capture unexplained transitions.  The simple first-order Markov model proposed in 
the previous section cannot accommodate all of these facets.  The main problem being that the 
first-order Markov model has a one-period memory, i.e., the present viewing given the last one is 
independent of the previous path. 
Modeling categorical data can be accommodated using a multinomial choice model, such 
as a multinomial probit model.  The probit model makes it easy to incorporate covariates that 
How to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste picture into pdf; how to copy a pdf image into a word document
How to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to paste picture on pdf; copy and paste image from pdf
- 10 -
may explain web navigation choices.  However, the traditional probit model has no memory.  To 
overcome this problem we propose a dynamic multinomial probit model.  Specifically, we 
introduce a vector autoregressive component to the model that can capture dynamics in choice 
(Paap and Franses 2000, Haaijer and Wedel 2001).  Additionally, we incorporate a correlated 
error structure in the model to capture unexplained patterns (i.e., those that cannot be attributed 
to our covariates), which also overcomes the IIA property of multinomial logit models.  We 
frame our model in the context of a hierarchical Bayesian model to allow for heterogeneity 
across users (Rossi and McCulloch 2000, Rossi, McCulloch, and Allenby 1996).  As a final point, 
we note that consumer behavior research has found that users may have goal-directed or 
exploratory search (Moe 2003, Janiszewski 1998) or flow and non-flow states (Hoffman and 
Novak 1996).  Hence we incorporate a mixture process, where the model parameters for an 
individual can switch during the course of a session, to reflect the possibility that browsing 
behavior may be quite different and change suddenly, depending upon a user’s current goals or 
state of mind.  This dynamic mixture process has not been previously considered in a choice 
context.  Overall, our contribution is a conjunction of these techniques applied to a substantively 
new problem. 
3.1.  Model Specification 
Formally, we assume that user i has latent utility U
iqtc
associated with viewing a page in 
category c on viewing occasion t of session q, where there are total of I users, C categories, Q
i
sessions for user i, and T
iq
viewings for the qth session of user i.  In our dataset, I=1,160, C=8, 
Q
i
ranges from 1 to 17, and T
iq
ranges from 2 to 239.  The consumer selects the category (or 
more precisely the page associated with the category as summarized in Table 3) that has the 
highest utility from amongst those that are available.  We denote the user’s selection as Y
iqtc
which yields the following observational equation: 
〈 〉
=
=
=
otherwise
0
)
max(
1 and
if
1
iqt
iqt
iqtc
iqtc
iqtc
U
ι
Y
ι
U
(1) 
Where 
]
, ,
,
[
2
1
iqtC
iqt
iqt
iqt
U
U
U
"
U =
is a C × 1 vector of latent utilities, ι
iqtc
is an indicator variable 
that equals one when category c is available for user i during the tth viewing of session q, ι
iqt
=[ 
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
copy image from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy pictures from a pdf file
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
copy image from pdf to pdf; paste image into pdf form
- 11 -
ι
iqt1
, ι
iqt2, …, 
ι
iqtC
], the operator U<ι> denotes the set of elements from the vector U whose 
corresponding indicator operand (ι) equal to one.  In our model ι
iqt
is a vector of ones except the 
element that corresponds with the order page, which only equals one when the previous page is 
a shopping cart.  The purpose of allowing only a subset of pages to be selected is to eliminate 
impossible transitions (i.e., moving to the order page unless the shopping cart was previously 
selected).  We note that our technique could easily be modified to include other exceptions, but 
as noted in §2 this is the only one present in our dataset. 
The latent utility vector (
iqt
) is modeled as:  
)
( ,
~
,
,
,
, 1
,
, 1
,
> <
> <
> <
> <
> <
+
+
=
s iqt
iqts iqt
iqts iqt
iqt
is iqt
iqt
is iqt
iqt
MVN
ε
ε
U
Φ
X
Γ
U
(2) 
where subscript s<iqt> defines the user’s state (s=1, …, S) for user i during session q at viewing 
t.  For notational simplicity we may drop the dependence of state on the user, session, and 
viewing (<iqt>) and assume that this dependence is understood.  Also, X
iq,t-1
is a vector of the L-
1 covariates given in Table 4 for user i during session q at time t (L=14 as the first element of X 
is unity to incorporate an intercept), 
is
Γ is a C × L parameter matrix, 
is
Φ  is a C × C matrix of 
autoregressive coefficients, and the error vector 
iqts
ε follows a multivariate normal distribution.  
We have included only the first lagged vector of utility which is supported in our empirical 
analysis, although future researchers may want to consider more general lag structures. 
Notice that the X
iq,t-1
covariates associated with the utility at time t, see equation (2), 
correspond to the page contents of the previous viewing at time t-1.  We assume that a user 
decides which category to view at time t largely based upon the information being viewed at time 
t-1 (e.g., the number of links of the page, type of information display, time page viewed, etc.), 
since the page at time t has not yet been displayed.  A potential direction for future research is to 
replace the observed covariates with predicted values since the user only views the covariates of 
the selected alternative.  Hence our current framework relies upon an assumption of the user’s 
rational expectation of these covariates.  Additionally, the initial utility values for the first viewing 
of each session (
iq0
) are not observed but are inferred from the observed data (see Technical 
Appendix).  To ensure identification of our model we follow the usual practice of setting utility 
of a base category to zero, which in our case is the enter/exit category (c=8, U
iqt8
=0), and from 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. The
copy and paste image from pdf to word; copy a picture from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
paste image into preview pdf; how to copy pictures from pdf file
- 12 -
equation (2) and hereafter set C=7 to refer to the remaining categories.  Also, for identification 
we set the first element of the error covariance matrix to unity, 
[
]
1
11,
=
Σ
s
3.2.  Modeling State Transitions 
We consider both a zero and first-order hidden Markov process to model the state 
variate (s<iqt>).  The zero-order Markov process states that there is a vector 
i
ν —which is 
independent of time and path—that defines the probability of user i being in state s: 
[
]
[
]
=
=
>=
<
iS
i
i
i
is
i
,
s
iqt
s
ν
ν
ν
ν
"
2
1
where
 Pr
ν
ν
(3) 
We formulate the first-order Markov process by assuming that there is a hidden, 
continuous time Markov chain , D
iqt
, which indicates the state.  Note that s<iqt> is only defined 
at integer time values, while D
iqt
is continuous and equal to s<iqt> at integer values
1
 The waiting 
time between transitions (w
iqt
) in our continuous time domain follows an exponential 
distribution: 
[
]
=
=
iS
i
i
i
iD
iqt
iD
i
iqt
iqt
iqt
w
w
λ
λ
λ
λ
λ
"
2
1
,
,
where
},
exp{
| ]
Pr[
λ
λ
(4) 
Where 
is
λ
is an intensity parameter for state s, and the expected waiting time till the next is the 
inverse of this parameter (
is
λ
1
).  Given that a transition has occurred, the transition matrix 
(
i
P) that defines our first-order Markov process is: 
[
]
=
>
=
=
=
+
0
0
0
where
 if 1,
, ,
Pr
2
1
2
21
1
12
,
"
#
# %
#
"
"
iS
iS
i S
i
i S
i
i
igs
i
i
iqt
iq t t w
P
P
P
P
P
P
t
P
g
sD
D
iqt
P
ν P
(5) 
where P
igs
denotes the conditional distribution for user i to switch to state s given the previous 
state was g, hence the rows sum to one.  Notice that the diagonal elements are zero since same 
state transitions are captured through the waiting time.  Finally, the initial state probability for 
the first viewing of a session is: 
 if 1
]
Pr[
,
=
=
=
t
v
s
D
iqt
i D
i
iqt
ν
(6) 
where we redefine the probability vector 
i
ν  as the initial starting probabilities. 
1
We define time between viewings as a standard time unit, and not as the time of day.  The elapsed clock time 
between viewings is irregular, and may include viewings at other sites or non-computer activities (e.g., getting a 
cup of coffee).  The disadvantage of this approach is a loss of information.  However, we do include elapsed 
time as a covariate, but find that it is a poor predictor of browsing, which supports our standardization of time. 
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Create PDF from PowerPoint. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Create PDF from PowerPoint. C#.NET PDF SDK- Create PDF from PowerPoint in C#.
paste image on pdf preview; copy image from pdf to ppt
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
copy images from pdf; copying images from pdf files
- 13 -
In order to identify the states we place a restriction on the means of the latent variable 
iqtc
.  Specifically, we introduce two metrics,
a
iqts
W
and
b
iqts
W
, to capture the user’s tendency to 
browse (e.g., surf or a non-purchase orientation) or deliberate (e.g., focused navigation or a 
purchase orientation) during a session.  
a
iqts
W
is the sum of the expected value of U
iqtc
for the 
account, shopping cart, and order pages, while 
b
iqts
W
is the sum of the expected value of home, 
category, product, and information pages.  We assume state 1 corresponds with the highest 
browsing orientation (lowest value of 
a
iqts
W
and highest value of 
b
iqts
W
) and state S is the state 
that exhibits the most deliberation orientation (highest value of 
a
iqts
W
and lowest value of 
b
iqts
W
).  
That is, 
a
iqt
a
iqt S
a
iqtS
W
W
W
1
( 1)
≥⋅⋅⋅≥
and
b
iqtS
b
iqt
b
iqt
W
W
W
≥⋅⋅⋅≥
2
1
 While we believe these 
metrics are useful in describing the likely cognitive state of a user, this is only a conjecture on our 
part and can be thought of as convenient labels to refer to each state. 
An alternative to this waiting time formulation in continuous time would be to assume a 
discrete time Markov chain with a transition matrix that had a non-zero diagonal.   The 
advantage of the waiting time formulation is that it is more amenable to the Reversible Jump 
Algorithm that we use to estimate this model (see Technical Appendix B, step 9).  However, 
these two formulations are equivalent if the transitions occur at integer values.  To illustrate this 
equivalence notice that the transition matrix for a two-state Markov model can be parameterized 
in terms of the waiting times (the i subscript is suppressed for clarity): 
=
=
}
exp{
1
}
exp{
}
exp{
}
exp{
1
2
2
1
1
22
21
12
11
λ
λ
λ
λ
P
P
P
P
P
(7) 
This equivalence relies upon the “lack of memory” property of the exponential process (cf., 
Johnson, Kotz, and Balakrishnan 1994, Chapter 19), in which the conditional distribution of an 
exponential process given that an event has not occurred is equivalent to the original marginal 
distribution.  The primary difference between these formulations is that our model is more 
general since the transitions may occur at non-integer values.  
3.3.  Specification of the Hyper Distributions 
Following the usual hierarchical Bayesian framework (Rossi, McCulloch, and Allenby 
1996) we incorporate heterogeneity across users by assuming that 
is
Γ  has a random coefficient 
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
from Word. Create PDF from Excel. Create PDF from PowerPoint. Create PDF Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut
how to copy an image from a pdf in; paste image into pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. C#.NET Example: Convert One Image to PDF in Visual C# .NET Class.
copy pdf picture to powerpoint; copy images from pdf to word
- 14 -
specification.  Specifically, the lth column of 
is
Γ , which we denote as
ils
γ , a C × 1 vector, 
follows a multivariate regression: 
( , )
~
,
s
ils
ils
i
ls
ils
MVN
0 Ψ
ς
ς
Π R
γ
+
=
(8) 
where 
i
 is the K × 1 vector of demographic measures, plus an intercept, listed in Table 1 for 
user i (K=10, since the first element is unity to incorporate an intercept), 
ls
Π  is a C × K 
parameter matrix, and 
s
Ψ is a C × C covariance matrix. 
We assume that the VAR coefficients are drawn from a hyper-distribution: 
), )
( (
)~
(
s
s
is
vec
MVN
vec
Φ
Φ
(9) 
where 
is
Φ  is a C × C matrix of autoregressive coefficients and 
s
Ω is a C
2
× C
2
covariance 
matrix.  Finally, we assume that the row vectors of the transition matrix and the vector of initial 
probabilities follow a Dirichlet distribution, and the waiting times follow a gamma distribution: 
~ ( ( , , )
~ ( ),
~ ( ),
sc
sh
is
s
is
j
ij
D
D
λ
λ
λ
ν
Γ
α
τ
P
(10) 
where P
ij
denotes the jth row of the matrix P
i
sc
sh
λ
λ
 and
denote the shape and scale 
parameters, respectively. 
3.4.  Discussion of the Model 
There are two dynamic elements that we include in our model of browsing behavior.  
First, we introduce persistent behavior through a vector-autoregressive (VAR) component of 
lagged latent utility values (Hamilton 1994, Chapter 11).  The idea is that a higher than average 
affinity for a type of page may persist for many viewings.  For example, a user may view many 
product pages consecutively.   This dictates the need for incorporating a memory or time series 
element in the model.  Secondly, we allow for abrupt changes in browsing behavior by 
incorporating a time varying mixture model.  A hidden Markov chain governs the transitions 
between the states of this mixture model.  For example, during a session a user may change their 
goals and decide to focus upon making a purchase, or alternatively decide to just look around 
instead of making a purchase. 
While it might seem redundant to have two time series components in the model, the 
purpose of each is quite different.  The VAR model is meant to capture smoothly trending 
behavior reflective of a certain type of browsing, while the mixture process with the Markov 
- 15 -
transitions is meant to capture abrupt changes in browsing styles.  Additionally, the Markov 
process may be able to capture longer-term dynamics and help lessen the dimensionality of the 
autoregressive process, leading to a more parsimonious model.  To illustrate, consider the 
conditional mean of the latent utility of a two state process (S=2), which can be derived from the 
Markov property of the hidden Markov chain under the assumption of stationarity: 
(
)
(
)
{
}
, 1
1
, 1
1
, 1
1
2
1
, 1
2
1
, 1
1
2
E[
|
]
exp{
}
exp{
} exp{
}
iqt
iqt
i
iqt
i
iqt
i
i
i
iqt
i
i
iqt
i
i
λ
λ
λ
=
+
+
+
+
U
U
X
U
X
U
Γ
Γ
Γ
Γ
Γ
Γ
 (11) 
Notice that the state parameters (λ
1i
, λ
2i
) control the mixing of the VAR parameters. 
The markov switching-autoregressive models that we employ for our latent process were 
first proposed in a univariate model by Hamilton (1989) to describe the U.S. business cycle by 
modeling US real GNP.  Subsequently there has been a great deal of interest in the use of this 
model for studying macroeconomic processes.  Krolzig (1997) studies the multivariate form of 
the model that we employ.  The primary difference with this past work is that we assume our 
latent process follows this structure and not an observed process.  These models all employ 
discrete jumps between states; another approach is the smooth-threshold autoregressive model 
by Teräsvirta (1994), which may offer an interesting direction for future research. 
A univariate version of our dynamic probit model has been considered in the binary time 
series literature (Kedem 1980a).  Specifically, in the context of a discretized autoregressive-
moving average (DARMA) (Kedem 1980b, Keenan 1982).  DARMA models are quite flexible in 
capturing time series trends in binary processes.  Keenan (1982) showed that any stationary time 
series process could be modeled as the discretization of a latent continuous process.  This 
approach contrasts with the usual Markov modeling strategy, which models the observed 
process directly.  While DARMA models can well approximate Markov models, the conditional 
transition probabilities of DARMA processes lose their Markov property (Keenan 1980).  In 
other words knowledge of the previous state is not sufficient for forecasting the next state.  Our 
use of a VAR model should result in a good approximation to the Markov model described in 
our exploratory analysis.  Recently, there have been several applications of VAR models in 
marketing choice models to capture brand inertia and loyalty effects (Paap and Franses 2000, 
- 16 -
Haaijer and Wedel 2001, Seetharaman 2004).  These VAR models can be thought of as a 
multivariate generalization of a univariate DARMA process. 
4.  Estimation Results 
In this section we present the empirical results from estimating the model presented in 
§3 using the data discussed in §2.  We start by considering the fit and predictive performance of 
various formulations of our model as well as other potential benchmark models, and then 
continue with a discussion of some specific features and properties of our best model.  To 
provide an overall comparison of the various model specifications we compute the marginal 
posterior distribution (or the marginal density) and the hit rate.  The marginal posterior 
distribution is computed by taking the mean across the Gibbs iterations weighted by the 
corresponding priors (Newton and Raftery 1994).  The hit rate refers to the percentage of 
viewings whose categories are correctly predicted.  For example, random guessing should yield 
odds of 1 in 8 of a correct guess or a 12.5% hit rate. 
As another measure of model adequacy, we compute out-of-sample predictive 
performance.  Each user’s sessions are divided into two parts, the earlier sessions are used for 
estimation and the later ones are used for prediction.  If a user has one session, then their data 
will only be used for estimation.  Fractions of a session in the estimation and holdout sample are 
rounded up and down respectively (e.g., a user with three sessions would have their first two in 
the estimation sample and the last in the holdout sample).  The construction of the validation 
sample is meant to closely approximate the type of information that B&N would have available 
for their users based upon past information.  There are 1,160 users in the estimation sample and 
268 users in the holdout sample with 9,589 observations and 4,923 observations, respectively.  
The disparity in the number of users is due to the large number of users with only one session.  
For the users in the holdout sample we predict their parameters and the states of the hidden 
Markov model only using the information from the estimation sample. 
- 17 -
4.1.  A Predictive Analysis with State Changes at the Page, Session, and User Level 
Our model permits a great deal of flexibility with regards to changing the underlying 
browsing state, since the state may potentially change with every page viewing.  For example, a 
user may begin their session in a state where purchase is unlikely, but then switch later in the 
session to a state where purchase is likely.  However, allowing state changes at the viewing level 
may result in too much variability.  Hence we consider two additional formulations of our model 
that restricts state changes to the session or user level.  Restricting viewings within a session to 
share a common state reduces the potential of a user switching states in the midst of a session.  
Restricting all of a user’s viewings to a single state permits heterogeneity across users (although 
not within a user), which can capture departures from the normality assumption in our hierarchy. 
We estimate our model using the assumption that states that are allowed to change at the 
page and session level with both a zero and first-order Markov model, and another set of models 
where the state is constant for all of a user’s viewings (only a zero-order Markov process is 
estimated, since there is no pre-user information necessary for a first-order Markov process). 
The question of how many states should be included is an empirical one, hence we estimate our 
model for one, two, and three states (S=1, 2, or 3) to allow the data to inform about this 
parameter.  This yields a total of 15 models from which to investigate the amount of within user 
heterogeneity.  We report the fit and out-of-sample prediction validation in Table 5. 
First, notice transitions defined at the page-level outperform models estimated at a 
session or user level.  This supports the notion that users are likely to change states in the midst 
of a session.  Hence it is inaccurate to describe a user or an entire user session simply being 
either purchase or non-purchase oriented.  Secondly, notice when the hidden states are governed 
by a first-order Markov model the fit is superior to a zero-order process.  This suggests that the 
goals, to the extent they are reflected in a state, show some persistence.  It also suggests that the 
VAR process cannot fully capture a user’s behavior, perhaps due to abrupt changes in a 
consumer’s goal, e.g., a user changes from a browsing orientation to a purchase orientation.  We 
also compute Bayes factors following Kass and Raferty (1995) for three of our page-level 
proposed models: a one-state, two-state and three-state version of the hidden Markov model.  
The two-state model is favored over the one-state model by odds of 117.1.  Also, the two-state 
- 18 -
model is favored over the three-state model by odds of 45.7.  We can also find similar pattern 
for our session and user-level models, indicating a two-state model is adequate.  
State 
Time 
State 
Process 
Number 
of States 
Log 
Marginal 
Density
In-Sample 
Hit Rate 
(%)
Out-of-
Sample Hit 
Rate (%) 
-9378.1
72.05 
(0.46)
65.40 
(0.68) 
-9016.9
79.44 
(0.41)
71.42 
(0.64) 
Zero-
Order 
-9064.0
80.34 
(0.41)
70.56 
(0.64) 
-8545.4
83.23 
(0.38)
79.95 
(0.57) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested