syncfusion pdf viewer mvc : Copy pdf picture to powerpoint control SDK platform web page wpf asp.net web browser purchase%20conversion2-part448

- 19 -
Model 
Log Marginal 
Density 
In-Sample Hit  
Rate (%) 
Out-of-Sample 
Hit Rate (%) 
Zero-Order Markov Model (1 State) 
-20410.4 
20.48 
(0.41) 
12.62 
(0.47) 
Zero-Order Markov Model (2 States) 
-19458.3 
28.18 
(0.46) 
19.02 
(0.56) 
First-Order Markov Model  (1 State) 
-16444.5 
56.06 
(0.51) 
51.59 
(0.71) 
First-Order Markov Model  (2 States) 
-16076.0 
58.61 
(0.50) 
52.08 
(0.71) 
Latent Class Model (1 State) 
-17849.2 
35.47 
(0.49) 
30.78 
(0.66) 
Latent Class Model (2 States) 
-17673.9 
44.29 
(0.51) 
40.21 
(0.70) 
Latent Class Model (3 States) 
-17722.3 
45.29 
(0.51) 
36.14 
(0.68) 
Independent 
-19086.4 
33.23 
(0.48) 
30.35 
(0.66) 
Only-Intercept 
-19335.9 
29.37 
(0.47) 
23.12 
(0.60) 
VAR with Intercept 
-13768.4 
71.13 
(0.46) 
64.38 
(0.68) 
Table 6.  Measures of fit for other alternative model specifications.  The zero- and first-order 
markov models directly model the observed process and do not include VAR or hidden-Markov 
processes to govern state transitions as with the other models. The standard errors of the hit 
rates are provided in parentheses below the estimate. 
Zero-Order Markov Model
Perhaps the simplest model assumes there is a fixed 
probability for each user to select a category, which can be described as a multinomial 
distribution or a zero-order Markov model.  Specifically, the probability that user i chooses 
category c during session q at viewing t is independent of other viewings: 
1
iff
where
,
 )
Pr(
=
=
=
=
iqtc
iqt
c
iqt
c Y
Z
c
Z
δ
(12) 
Notice there is no multinomial probit or vector auto-regression component.  To estimate this in 
a Bayesian specification we employ a diffuse prior on 
c
δ .  This structure can be duplicated in our 
full model with a single state (S=1) when the only covariate is an intercept and the errors are 
independent, standard normal variates: 
,   
~ ( , )
iqt
i
iqt
iqt
N
=
+
U
0I
γ
ε
ε
(13) 
Our Bayesian framework can yield results similar to the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) 
when no individual level covariates are used (R is a vector of ones) and the covariance of the 
hyper-distribution is small (Ψ→0).  Essentially the individual level parameters are shrunk to a 
common, pooled value. 
Copy pdf picture to powerpoint - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy image from pdf to word; how to copy pdf image into word
Copy pdf picture to powerpoint - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to cut an image out of a pdf file; copy image from pdf reader
- 20 -
This model is estimated for both a pooled sample (one-state) and a split sample of 
purchasers versus non-purchasers (two-state).  Notice that these states are determined 
exogenously in contrast with the hidden markov process proposed in the previous section.  The 
estimation results are reported in Table 6 and show that both zero-order Markov models have 
the worst fit and predictive ability amongst all the models considered. 
First-Order, Markov Model
The first-order Markov model assumes that the category 
of the current viewing can be predicted with knowledge of only the past category.  Specifically, 
the probability that user i chooses category c during session q at viewing t will be: 
cd
iqt
iqt
d
c Z
Z
δ
=
=
=
)
Pr(
, 1
(14) 
To estimate this in a Bayesian specification we employ a diffuse prior on 
cd
δ . Although this 
model is not nested within our framework, the VAR process may provide a good approximation 
to such a model.  As with the zero-order Markov model we estimate a two-state model with each 
state made up of purchasers or non-purchasers.  The results in Table 6 show an order of 
magnitude increase in fit over the zero-order model illustrating the importance of memory in 
path analysis, but are inferior to our dynamic multinomial probit model. 
Latent Class Model
A popular model in marketing is the latent class model 
(Kamakura and Russell 1989), which occurs as a special case of our model.  If the state 
transitions in our model are restricted to a single state for each user, then the s subscript in §3 
can be interpreted as an index of the class of the mixing distribution.  Hence, the traditional 
latent class model in a multinomial probit framework occurs when the state transition process is 
characterized by a zero-order Markov model as defined in §3.2 and when each user is restricted 
to a single state for all sessions.  Our Bayesian framework yields estimates similar to the MLE of 
the traditional latent class model when no individual level covariates are used (R is a vector of 
ones) and the covariance of the hyper-distributions are small (Ψ→0, →0).  Although for 
consistency sake we use the same prior settings as our other multinomial probit models; hence, 
our latent class model allows heterogeneity at a user level similar to the work of Allenby, Arora, 
and Ginter (1998), but the heterogeneity is shrunk towards the aggregate parameter vectors for 
the user’s assigned state.  We estimate latent class models with one, two, and three states, and 
find the data favors the two state model using both the log marginal density and out-of-sample 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy pdf image; how to copy image from pdf to word document
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf; how to cut image from pdf
- 21 -
hit rate.  The predictive accuracy falls between the zero and first order markov model, suggesting 
that the covariates are not able to fully capture persistence in latent utility. 
Multinomial Probit Model (Independent, Intercepts only, and VAR)
We estimate 
an independent probit model with the page and session covariates (S=1, S=I) to judge the 
contribution of the correlated error structure (labeled as “Independent” model in Table 6).  This 
model is estimated for a single state without VAR effects (S=1, F
is
=0).  Additionally, we estimate 
our multinomial probit model with only intercepts and no covariates (S=1, 
=[1]
iqt
X
, F
is
=0), to 
assess the effect of the covariates (labeled as “Only-Intercept” in Table 6).  These two models 
benchmark the performance of the popular multinomial probit model without memory.  Finally, 
to help judge the contribution of our covariates in our full model we estimate a discretized 
vector autoregression model without covariates (labeled as “VAR with Intercept”).  This is 
identical to our full model without the page and session covariates but with only a single state 
(S=1, G
is
=0).  Notice from Table 6 that the correlated intercept-only multinomial probit model 
does a poor job since it ignores the contribution of covariates with marketing mix variables, web 
page content characteristics, and web user’s demographic variables.  The independent 
multinomial probit model also does poorly because of the unexplained dependency across web 
page categories.  The VAR with intercept does quite well against all the alternative models, 
demonstrating the much of the improvement of our dynamic multinomial probit model comes 
from its VAR component. 
Discussion
Models with memory, such as the dynamic multinomial probit models 
(from Table 5) the first-order Markov models and the VAR model (from Table 6) perform an 
order of magnitude better in predicting than comparable memory-less models, such as the 
independent, only-intercept, and latent class models.  This clearly demonstrates the importance 
of memory in predicting paths.  This is an important finding since it shows that not only is the 
frequency of viewing different content important, but that there is also a good deal of 
information contained within the sequence of viewings.  This affirms the central thesis of this 
paper that path analysis is informative.  Additionally, the VAR model by itself outperforms the 
first-order Markov model, which shows that while a first-order Markov model may be a good 
first-order approximation, browsing behavior is better represented by a richer memory model. 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
how to copy pdf image to word; how to copy picture from pdf
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy pictures from a pdf document; copy paste image pdf
- 22 -
4.3.  Parameter Estimates 
We focus our discussion of parameter estimates on our best model, which in terms of 
posterior odds and out-of-sample prediction is a two-state dynamic, multinomial probit model 
with transitions at the page-level.  This model is strongly favored using both the posterior odds 
and the out-of-sample hit rate.  First, we consider the parameters that govern our state 
transitions.  We label the first state as a browsing-oriented and the second state as a deliberation-
oriented, following our identification conditions.  While purchases may occur in either state, they 
are more likely to occur in the deliberation-oriented state.  64% of users start in a browsing-
oriented state.  Users tend to stay in a browsing-oriented state for about three viewings, while 
they tend to stay in a deliberation-oriented state for about four viewings. 
Second, we consider the relationship between our covariates and the selection of the 
home category.  The large number of parameters make it impractical to discuss all parameters in 
this text (we refer the reader to the Technical Appendix D for a full report).  However, in order 
to illustrate some of the findings from our model we consider the parameters associated with the 
home category. 
The home category is common entry point for a web site.  Intuitively its use signals the 
beginning of a session (16% of sessions begin at this page) or even within a session the 
beginning of a new goal (for example, a previous path was terminated since the user couldn’t 
find the right book and is starting over at the home page).  Our results show that the home page 
is more likely to be viewed in the browsing state than the deliberation state as indicated by a 
higher intercept value.  The effect of each variable depends quite a bit upon the state of the user.  
Users who are browsing are more likely to visit a home page if they have previously purchased, 
are viewing the page during the weekend, or visited another site.  While users in a deliberation 
state are much less likely to visit the home page as a result of these effects. 
The presence of price information and advertisements tends to lessen the chance of 
viewing the home page for both types of viewers.  Users in a browsing-oriented state are more 
likely to visit the home page if they have bought in a previous session, have a long session, visit 
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
copy images from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy a picture from a pdf file
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copy image from pdf to word; how to paste a picture into a pdf document
- 23 -
during the weekend, or visit other sites during their B&N session.  The differences between the 
states illustrate the importance of allowing heterogeneity both across and within users. 
Demographic characteristics are also predictive of browsing tendencies.  Nested within 
the hyper-distribution is a linear model that relates the demographic characteristics of the user to 
parameters in 
is
Γ .  Again there are a large number of effects, and for illustration purposes we 
consider only the effect of the demographics upon the “Price Present” coefficient for selecting 
the home page.  We find that higher income males with children are more likely to use the home 
page when they are in the browsing state.  In contrast the demographics of users in a 
deliberation oriented state are much less helpful in prediction.  It is possible that gender (Meyers-
Levy 1989), age (Bettman, Luce and Payne 1998), and education (Crosby and Taylor 1981) are 
indicative of cognitive strategies, but demographic variables can be correlated with many other 
characteristics that were not measured in this study. 
4.4.  Capturing Memory 
At the heart of path analysis is the ability to use summaries of past movements or 
memory to predict future movements.   The VAR process was important in improving the 
predictive ability of the model.  For instance the out-of-sample hit-rate jumped from 23% to 
64% when a VAR process was included when compared to a model with only intercepts.  
Similarly, a first-order Markov model has a 52% out-of-sample hit-rate compared with 13% for a 
zero-order Markov model.  Clearly memory plays a crucial role in the predictive ability of models 
for clickstream data.  The memory effects in our model are captured by the first-order Markov 
model that governs state transitions, the VAR parameters, and the time varying covariates.  
Instead of discussing the parameter estimates further (which are reported in our Technical 
Appendix D), we focus on illustrating the dynamic performance of our model. 
The fit and hit-rate provided in Tables 5 and 6 are measures of one-step ahead forecasts.  
However, we are not simply interested in forecasting a single-step ahead, but we are potentially 
interested in predicting the entire path that a user may take.  One way to measure the multi-step 
ahead accuracy of our model is the ability to predict the run length of a path; where we define a 
run-length as the number of intervening viewings between two events of interest, say two 
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
how to copy pdf image to jpg; how to cut pdf image
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
paste jpg into pdf preview; cut and paste pdf images
- 24 -
category viewings.  For example, the run length of “CC”, “C?C”, and “C??C” would be 0, 1, and 
2, respectively (where “?” represents any category other than exit).  Figure 1 illustrates the 
frequency distribution of run-lengths for our actual data (using the estimation sample) as well as 
the predicted run-lengths for various models.  Notice that all the models except for the dynamic 
multinomial probit models substantially under predict the count of runs with zero length.  Also, 
the zero-order Markov model tends to underpredict the length of the remaining runs while the 
first-order Markov and latent class models tends to over predict.  Only the two-state dynamic 
probit model does a good job of capturing the entire distribution.  We present another multi-
step ahead forecasting comparison in the Technical Appendix E which yields similar findings. 
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
0
2
4
6
Run Length
Log(Frequency)
Zero-Order Markov
First-Order Markov
Latent Class
VAR with Intercept
Dynamic Probit (1 State)
Dynamic Probit (2 States)
Figure 1.  Frequency distribution of run-lengths between category viewings (e.g., run length of  
CC, C?C, and C??C, is 0, 1, and 2, respectively).  The vertical axis is given in logged units to 
better illustrate the dispersion amongst the models. 
5.  Predicting Purchase Conversion 
Purchase conversion refers to the percentage of web visitors who make a purchase 
during a visit to an online retailer.  It is a key metric of the success of an e-commerce site since it 
provides a measure of how many visitors are turned into customers.  Despite the rapid growth of 
- 25 -
e-commerce, online purchase conversion rates have remained low.  Online retailers such as 
Amazon.com, Macys.com, JCPenney.com, and MarthaStewart.com have purchase conversion 
rates that range between 1-2% (New York Times 2000).  E-commerce managers are interested in 
understanding what influences purchase conversion and how to improve their conversion rates 
by dynamically adapting to customers’ preferences (Internet Week 2001). 
In this section we consider how our model can be used to predict the purchase 
conversion as a user browses through B&N.  We wish to forecast the probability that given a 
sequence of pages viewed that the user will purchase sometime during his session.  For example, 
if the user has visited the category (C) and shopping cart (S) pages, we wish to know the 
probability the user will order (O) on the next page, or have the sequence “CSO”.  Additionally, 
we need to consider the chance that the user will order two viewings out (i.e., “CS?O”, where 
“?” stands for any page other than exit, since exit terminates a session), three viewings out (i.e., 
“CS??O”), or any path that will lead to a purchase during this session (i.e., “CS*O*E”, where “*” 
stands for any sequence of pages that do not include exit or order).  Notice that we are only 
interested in forecasting orders before the end of the session, otherwise we would be forecasting 
the probability of a ordering in the current session or in any future session, and not just the 
current session.  Additionally, we note that although we focus on purchase conversion the same 
technique could be used to forecast any metric of interest, such as the probability the user will 
return to the home page, exit the web site within five viewings, etc. 
To construct these forecasts we use a simulation method.  For each sweep of our 
MCMC estimation algorithm we simulate the latent category utilities starting with the specified 
forecasting origin and continue until the session is predicted to end (i.e., until the “E” category is 
encountered).  Next, we calculate the purchase conversion probability as the percentage of 
sequences that include an order (O).  The individual-level waiting time and hidden states are 
generated from each user’s corresponding estimates of his hidden Markov chain.  Since the 
covariates of these simulated pages are not known we use the expected value for the 
corresponding category (see Table 2, i.e., expected time to the next viewing is 7.2 seconds). 
To illustrate these purchase conversion forecasts we consider the session produced by 
user 6 as described in Table 3.  We plot the predicted conversion probabilities, as a function of 
- 26 -
the amount of the path that has been observed, for various models in Figure 2.  The category 
abbreviations of each viewing are given along the horizontal axis.  For comparison we plot the 
baseline conversion rate of a 7% probability that a visitor will make a purchase during a session.  
This user starts at a home page, but then immediately moves to a series of viewings at 
information and account pages.  After five viewings we predict that there is better than an even 
chance of this user making a purchase.  Notice that while the user’s purchase probability 
continues to rise to around 80%, the rate of increase slows down significantly after 30 viewings.  
Our model predicts that this user is in a deliberation-oriented state throughout this session. 
Viewing
Purchase Conversion Probability
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
Baseline
First-Order Markov
Latent Class
VAR with Intercept
Dynamic Probit (1 State)
Dynamic Probit (2 States)
Browsing State
Deliberation State
H I I AAAA I I A I I I I I C I I I I C I I C I I CC I I C I I CC I I PP I PP I I PPP I I P I I I CCS I I I I PPPP P I P I I PS I I S I I S I SSSO
Figure 2.  Probability of purchase sometime during the remainder of the user’s session. 
This graph also helps visually depict why the two-state model is better than a one-state 
model.  The two-state model is better able to capture the notion that some viewings of a user in 
a deliberation-oriented state, like viewing a category or information page, are not shifting the 
user from their overall purchase goal, but instead simply supporting the user’s goal.  In contrast 
the one-state model is not able to make this distinction and results in predictions that are more 
susceptible to apparent browsing-oriented behavior.  The other models do a much poorer job of 
tracking conversion, even the intercept only VAR model still only reaches about a 35% 
prediction of purchase by the final observation. 
- 27 -
While this graph illustrates how our model could be applied on a viewing-by-viewing 
basis to forecast purchase conversion, it only summarizes the sequential predictive performance 
for a single session.   To assess the ability to predict user’s conversion probabilities in a more 
systematic way, we compute the probability that a user will purchase sometime during their 
session based upon their initial viewings and report these results in Table 7.  We split our sample 
into those sessions where a purchase occurred and those with no purchase and the cells of Table 
7 report the predicted purchase conversion rate.  For those who purchase this is equivalent to 
the proportion of visitors who were correctly classified, while for non-purchasers it is equal to 
the proportion of visitors who were incorrectly classified.  (See Technical Appendix F for the 
forecasting performance on predicting purchase conversion of other selected models.) 
Forecast Origin/Number of viewings during session 
Sample  Session Type 
Number of 
Sessions 
1
3
6
Purchase 
83 
13.3% 
(0.48)
16.3% 
(0.52)
23.4% 
(0.60)
30.9% 
(0.65) 
34.4% 
(0.67) 
41.5% 
(0.69)
No Purchase  1129 
6.1% 
(0.33)
5.4% 
(0.32)
4.6% 
(0.30)
3.7% 
(0.27) 
3.4% 
(0.26) 
3.1% 
(0.25)
Estimation 
All 
1212 
6.6% 
(0.35)
6.1% 
(0.34)
5.9% 
(0.33)
5.6% 
(0.33) 
5.5% 
(0.32) 
5.7% 
(0.33)
Purchase 
31 
10.4% 
(0.97)
12.8% 
(1.06)
15.2% 
(1.14)
18.0% 
(1.21) 
19.1% 
(1.24) 
21.2% 
(1.29)
- 28 -
The forecast probabilities for the estimation and holdout samples are reported separately 
in Table 7.  The parameter estimates of the estimation sample use all information when 
estimating the user’s parameters (such as inferring state), while those in the holdout sample use 
only past information to estimate the parameters.  However, in either case we do not use any 
future information when forecasting but only condition on past values up to the forecasting 
origin.  Notice that there is a magnitude of decline in out of sample predictions, going from 
41.5% to 21.2%.  However, our odds ratio of differentiating purchasers from non-purchasers is 
still good, about 7. 
In summary, our analysis shows that path analysis can be quite helpful in predicting 
purchase conversion, even early in a session.  The next step would be to consider how managers 
could use these predictions to improve their conversion rates and profitability by dynamically 
customizing the web site.  While a full customization is beyond the scope of this paper, it is 
helpful to understand how the predictive ability of the model would translate into decision 
making.  Suppose B&N were to classify each user after their 5
th
viewing as either deliberation-
oriented or browsing-oriented, and then based upon this classification customize the 
subsequently requested pages with the objective of encouraging purchase conversion.  
Specifically, we make the following changes for users who are browsing-oriented: delete price 
information (if any), add promotion image (if there is not), delete banner ads, reduce the number 
of links to home pages by half, and double the number of links to product, account, and 
information pages.  These choices were made by examining the expected response to these 
covariates (see §4.3 and Technical Appendix E).  For deliberation-oriented users the opposite 
customizations were made: add price information, delete promotion image, delete banner ads, 
double the number of links to a home and product page, and reduce the number of account and 
information page links by half. 
Applying these rules to our holdout sample we find that the conversion rate would 
increase an additional 2.46% (.22) and 3.36% (.26) for the browsing and deliberation-oriented 
users, respectively.  (Standard errors are given in parentheses.)  In summary, conversion rates 
would increase from around 7% to more than 9%.  Given that the gross profit margin for B&N 
is around 25% and currently their operating profit margin is negative, these gains in conversion 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested