syncfusion pdf viewer mvc : Cut and paste image from pdf SDK control API .net web page winforms sharepoint PoythressVernInTheBeginningWasTheWord9-part47

91
C
H
A
P
T E
R
12
-
Imaging
“And let them make me a sanctuary, that I may dwell in their midst.”
—Exodus 25:8
G
od made man in his own image (Gen. 1:26–27). 周at is the origin for 
our human capacity to transcend our immediate situation, and to use 
language to describe large wholes.
We can obtain further insight by considering broader occurrences of the theme 
of imaging in the Bible. Naturally, imaging is associated in a number of passages 
either with human beings as they were created or with human beings as redeemed 
and recreated “a晴er the likeness of God” (Eph. 4:24; see Col. 3:10). But the theme 
occurs in broader ways. According to Colossians 1:15, Christ is the original “image 
of the invisible God.” And, strikingly, the tabernacle and the Solomonic temple 
are copies of a heavenly reality, and so in that respect they “image” that reality 
(Ex. 25:9; Heb. 8:5–6; 9:1–28; 1 Kings 8:12–13, 27–30).
1
Imaging in the Tabernacle and the Temple
Let us begin with the tabernacle and the temple as images. Both the tabernacle 
and the temple symbolize God’s dwelling with his people. 周e New Testament 
indicates that God comes to dwell with us in final form through Christ. John 1:14 
says, “And the Word [God the Son, the second person of the Trinity] became flesh 
and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from 
1. See, for example, the extended discussion of imaging in Meredith G. Kline, Images of the 
Spirit (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, 1980).
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   91
5/14/09   4:46:13 PM
Cut and paste image from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy pictures from a pdf document; how to paste a picture in a pdf
Cut and paste image from pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy image from pdf to word; cut and paste image from pdf
92
Part  2: From Big to Small: Language in the Context of History 
the Father, full of grace and truth.” 周e word “dwelt” suggests that his dwelling 
among us fulfills the Old Testament tabernacle and temple dwellings.
But the connection is actually stronger than that. 周e Greek word for “dwelt” is 
eskēnōsen, an unusual word for “dwelling.” It is related to the Greek word skēnē for 
tent, and so evokes the memory of the tabernacle of Moses, which was a tent. 周e 
mention of glory in the same verse alludes to the cloud of the glory that filled the 
tabernacle and the temple of Solomon a晴er they were completed (Ex. 40:34–38; 
1 Kings 8:10–11; 2 Chron. 5:13–14; 7:1–3). 周e cloud signified the presence of 
God, and anticipated the glorious presence of God in Christ’s incarnation. 周us 
the tabernacle and the temple were forward-pointing symbols anticipating the 
coming of Christ. 周ey were shadows or copies or images not only of the heavenly 
dwelling of God but of the dwelling of God in Christ.
2
周e tabernacle and the temple also show some internal structure that expresses 
the theme of imaging (fig. 12.1). 周ey both have three distinct spaces, with increas-
ing degrees of holiness. 周e outermost of these is the courtyard, where there is 
an altar for burnt offerings (the bronze altar). 周e individual Israelite worshiper 
could come into this space and present his offering. 周e offering would be received 
by one of the priests, the sons of Aaron. 周ey alone were permi瑴ed to approach 
the bronze altar, where a portion or all of the offering was to be burned.
A higher degree of holiness belonged to the “Holy Place,” the outer of the two 
rooms of the tabernacle. It was a tent structure positioned on the far side of the 
bronze altar. Only the priests were permi瑴ed to enter this room. Beyond this room 
was a second room, “the Most Holy Place,” with the greatest degree of holiness 
2. Hebrews 8:5; 10:1; see also Vern S. Poythress, 周e Shadow of Christ in the Law of Moses 
(Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian & Reformed, 1995), 9–40.
F
igure
12.1
Most Holy 
Place
Holy Place
Courtyard
Spaces in the Tabernacle
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   92
5/14/09   4:46:14 PM
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
paste picture into pdf preview; how to cut image from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page. you can use it to extract all images from PDF document Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the
copy image from pdf acrobat; how to copy images from pdf to word
93
Chapter  12: Imaging
(Heb. 9:1–10). Only the high priest was permi瑴ed to enter this room, and only 
once a year, on the day of atonement (Heb. 9:7; Leviticus 16).
周e two outer spaces are in some ways images or shadows of the Most Holy Place, 
and the Most Holy Place is in turn an image of God’s heavenly dwelling. And God’s 
heavenly dwelling still points forward to the dwelling of God with man through 
Christ. In addition, the priests in the Old Testament point forward to Christ the 
final high priest (Heb. 7:1–8:13). In this respect they are “images” of Christ.
3
周e tabernacle and the temple, when considered as wholes, are images point-
ing to Christ. But there is also imaging within them. So we can say that we have 
images like the Most Holy Place that themselves produce other images, namely, 
the Holy Place. Such multiple imaging crops up in a number of places, and is 
quite understandable.
Imaging in Mankind
Christ is the original image, “the image of the invisible God” (Col. 1:15). He is 
himself God, so he is a divine image. Adam was made in the image of God, and so 
is a created image. We can say more precisely that he is in the image of Christ, so 
he is in a sense an image of an image. In addition, there is imaging beyond Adam. 
Adam “fathered a son in his own likeness, a晴er his image, and named him Seth” 
(Gen. 5:3). Seth, then, is an image of Adam.
Imaging is a dynamic structure, expressing the life and activity of God. Imaging 
among created things is itself an image of the living activity of God, who from 
eternity fathers the Son (or in the older language of theology, “begets” the Son).
4
Likewise, in the tabernacle, the Most Holy Place is not only an image of God’s 
heavenly dwelling but produces another image, the Holy Place, which produces a 
third image, the courtyard of the tabernacle. And the holiness within the tabernacle 
is imitated or “imaged” by the holiness of Israel as an entire nation.
周e Activity of Imaging
周e tabernacle shows the activity of imaging, and shows the fecundity or pro-
ductivity of imaging. Holiness is productive, and reproduces itself. Adam, as a 
father, is productive, and reproduces his image in his son Seth, who in turn has 
a son, leading to successive generations of children.
Language has its own productivity and fecundity. We can produce new u瑴er-
ances using old words. We can string together longer and longer phrases: “the gnat 
3. Poythress, Shadow of Christ in the Law of Moses, 9–68; Kline, Images of the Spirit; Vern S. 
Poythress, Redeeming Science: A God-Centered Approach (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2006), 228–231, 
285–292.
4. See Poythress, Redeeming Science, 239–240.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   93
5/14/09   4:46:14 PM
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
document page. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file. Export high quality image from PDF document in .NET program. Remove
how to copy a picture from a pdf file; copy image from pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
cut image from pdf online; paste image on pdf preview
94
Part  2: From Big to Small: Language in the Context of History 
on the fly on the wart on the frog . . .” We can produce packages within packages 
within packages of meaning. We can stand back from our immediate situation, 
and then stand back to analyze the process of standing back, and so on. 周e 
process of repeatedly standing back is itself a form of imaging. So it also reflects 
God’s original image of himself in his Son, who is the Image (Col. 1:15).
Transcendence and Immanence Represented through Imaging
We have already said that the human ability to stand back and analyze imitates 
the transcendence of God. We can re-express this theme through imaging.
Let us begin with the tabernacle, which is an image of God’s heavenly dwell-
ing. 周e tabernacle shows that God is present with the Israelites and their earthly 
dwellings. In the instructions for the tabernacle, God says, “And let them make 
me a sanctuary, that I may dwell in their midst” (Ex. 25:8). God draws near to his 
people, anticipating the time when he would draw near to them in Christ, who 
is “Immanuel,” that is “God with us” (Ma瑴. 1:23).
By contrast, God’s heavenly dwelling more prominently depicts his transcen-
dence. He transcends the limitations of creatures dwelling on earth. If a king has his 
throne placed above the level of the commoners, that exalted position of the throne 
connotes his authority and his rule over the commoners. When God’s throne is 
depicted as exalted to heaven itself, it depicts his control over the entire universe. In 
sum, we can say that God’s transcendence is represented by the upper dwelling in 
heaven, while his immanence is represented by the earthly copy of that dwelling.
But that is not the complete story. Both the tabernacle and its heavenly original 
accurately express God’s character. 周ey express both his control (transcendence) 
and his presence (immanence). 周ese two aspects of God coinhere. His presence 
may be more obviously expressed in the earthly copy. But it implies his control. 
God’s instructions for building the tabernacle indirectly indicate God’s control, 
because the tabernacle is in fact built according to those instructions (Exodus 
36–39). God controls its structure.
God’s control is also expressed a晴er the tabernacle is built. 周e tabernacle 
becomes a source of blessing from God, or of curse from God, depending on 
whether the people observe its regulations.
Nevertheless, it is convenient to think of control as being associated with the 
upper dwelling, and presence with the lower dwelling.
周is same pa瑴ern is then reflected (imaged) in the inner and outer rooms of the 
tabernacle. So, from this point of view, the inner room, the Most Holy Place, repre-
sents transcendence, and the outer room, the Holy Place, represents immanence. 
We then can produce a diagram to indicate this representation (fig. 12.2).
5
5. See further discussion of transcendence and immanence in appendix C.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   94
5/14/09   4:46:14 PM
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
paste picture pdf; copying image from pdf to powerpoint
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
copy pdf picture; copy images from pdf to word
95
Chapter  12: Imaging
Since man is made in the image of God, human beings reflect God’s control 
and presence by their own finite control and presence. 周eir control comes from 
within them, through the plans and will of their minds and hearts. 周eir control is 
made manifest through the activities of their bodies, which express their presence 
on earth. 周us we can have a diagram that indicates human derivative control 
and presence (fig. 12.3).
Man is of course subordinate to God’s rule and control. And when man is 
obedient to God, he represents God’s rule among the creatures. In his own 
person and presence he expresses a special presence of God. And so we can 
shi晴 the diagram to represent both man’s subordination to God’s control and 
his ability to represent God’s presence on earth, as in the next diagram (fig. 
12.4).
Most
Holy
Place
Holy
Place
Immanence
(presence)
Transcendence
(control)
F
igure
12.2
F
igure
12.3
Divine
Transcendence 
(control)
Immanence 
(presence)
Human
Control
Presence
F
igure
12.4
Divine
Transcendence 
(control)
Immanence 
(presence)
Human
Control
Presence
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   95
5/14/09   4:46:14 PM
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Copy, cut and paste PDF link to another PDF Link access to variety of objects, including website, image, document, bookmark, PDF page number, flash, etc.
copy pdf picture to word; how to paste a picture into pdf
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
file(s), and add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and Image Process. If you want to process images contained in PDF document, the
how to cut pdf image; how to cut a picture from a pdf document
96
Part  2: From Big to Small: Language in the Context of History 
A human being is a creature, not the Creator. But he is capable of exercising 
a kind of derivative creativity, as when he makes up a story or makes a manufac-
tured object like a table. When he makes up a story, he creates a fictional world.
6
So we could represent human creativity by adding a further level, for fictional 
creation (fig. 12.5).
A fictional character within a story can become a writer and write his own story 
in turn. So we can see the potential for an indefinite series of images.
Selecting Some Big and Small Pieces
Within language, the process of imaging is reflected in the process of embedding. 
Packages occur within packages within packages. One instance of packaging oc-
curs when an author writes a book, a language “package,” in which is a fictional 
character. If the fictional character writes an essay, this essay is itself a package. And 
the essay may refer to still other characters who engage in writing packages.
So we propose to look in more detail at our ability to use big and small pack-
ages within language. 周at is, we will look at some of the distinct levels, like 
monologues and sentences and words.
For the sake of brevity, we will in subsequent chapters be selective in our focus. 
We will not focus on everything that professional linguists take as their interests. 
Instead, we can begin with God and the whole of history, and then narrow down. 
We will travel down from the biggest groupings of history, to daily human action, 
and then to monologue, to sentence, and to word.
It is important that we begin with the larger vistas of human action, because 
even small pieces of language function to talk about human action and the world 
that God made.
6. See Dorothy L. Sayers, 周e Mind of the Maker (New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1941), on 
artistic creativity as imitative of God’s creativity.
F
igure
12.5
Divine
Transcendence 
(control)
Immanence 
(presence)
Human
Control
Presence
Fictional 
Character
Control
Presence
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   96
5/14/09   4:46:14 PM
97
C
H
A
P
T
E R
13
-
World History
“It is done! I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning  
and the end. To the thirsty I will give from the spring  
of the water of life without payment.”
—Revelation 21:6
W
e now focus on the widest vista of personal action: the whole history 
of the world. 周is history is governed by God’s word, his language: “he 
[Christ] upholds the universe by the word of his power” (Heb. 1:3). But history 
is wider than any one human description. Human language has meaning within 
this larger context, which only God fully masters. So it is important that we think 
about history, and not simply isolate language from history. But of course for our 
purpose we will need eventually to bring our observations about history back 
around to yield insights about language.
周e world did not always exist. Rather, it began when God created it (Gen. 
1:1–31). 周e world therefore exists in a more ultimate context, the context of 
God and his actions. God exists eternally. 周e Father loves the Son and the Son 
loves the Father forever, in the unity of the Holy Spirit.
God in his eternal being and his eternal activity is the source and founda-
tion for activity in creation. God exists. Creatures exist in a derivative manner, 
dependent on God’s existence. God himself acts. And creatures act in a way that 
analogically reflects his action.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   97
5/14/09   4:46:15 PM
98
Part  2: From Big to Small: Language in the Context of History 
Plan and Goal
God is also at the center in the goal of creation, namely, the consummation de-
picted in Revelation 21:1–22:5. 周e goal of history is to “unite all things in him 
[Christ]” (Eph. 1:10). God had a plan from the beginning (Eph. 1:11). He cre-
ated the world as the first stage in the execution of his plan. 周e plan will reach its 
fulfillment when God is “all in all” (1 Cor. 15:28). God’s glory will be displayed 
in the whole of the new heaven and the new earth (Rev. 21:1, 22–27). Both the 
plan and its execution involve all three persons of the Trinity: the Father (1 Cor. 
8:6), the Son (the Word, John 1:1–3), and the Holy Spirit (Gen. 1:2).
In particular, the work of God in creation involved the Father saying, “Let there 
be light” (Gen. 1:3) and other words of command. 周ese commands originated 
in the fullness of God’s word, that is, the Word, the second person of the Trinity 
(John 1:1). 周e world reaches its goal in a glorification that takes place in a way 
that is pa瑴erned a晴er Christ’s glorification. How is this so?
We can begin with Romans 8:18–25:
[18] For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing 
with the glory that is to be revealed to us. [19] For the creation waits with eager 
longing for the revealing of the sons of God. [20] For the creation was subjected 
to futility, not willingly, but because of him who subjected it, in hope [21] that 
the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to corruption and obtain the 
freedom of the glory of the children of God. [22] For we know that the whole 
creation has been groaning together in the pains of childbirth until now. [23] 
And not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, 
groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our 
bodies. [24] For in this hope we were saved. Now hope that is seen is not hope. 
For who hopes for what he sees? [25] But if we hope for what we do not see, we 
wait for it with patience.
周e creation has “longing,” “futility,” “bondage,” and “groaning” in waiting for 
final deliverance. Its situation is pa瑴erned a晴er the situation of the sons of God, 
who “groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption 
of our bodies” (verse 23). 周e redemption of our bodies is a晴er the pa瑴ern of 
Christ’s resurrection, according to 1 Corinthians 15:42–49. 周e pa瑴ern of Christ’s 
suffering and glory is also reflected in Romans 8:18, which speaks of believers’ 
suffering and glory: “For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are 
not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us.”
1
周us Christ is 
the pa瑴ern for believers, and believers for the whole of creation.
1. I owe this insight to William Dennison, who drew my a瑴ention to the pa瑴ern of suffering 
and glory in Romans 8:18–25.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   98
5/14/09   4:46:15 PM
99
Chapter  13: World History
We can find a similar point being made in Revelation 21. We can see in the 
center of the new heaven and the new earth the glory of God in Christ: “And the 
city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God gives it light, 
and its lamp is the Lamb” (Rev. 21:23). 周e glory of God is the glory revealed 
supremely in Jesus Christ: “And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, 
and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace 
and truth” (John 1:14). 周e glory of God was displayed during Christ’s whole 
earthly life. But it is climactically displayed in the crucifixion, resurrection, and 
ascension:
Now is the Son of Man glorified, and God is glorified in him. If God is glori-
fied in him, God will also glorify him in himself, and glorify him at once ( John 
13:31–32).
I [Jesus] glorified you on earth, having accomplished the work that you gave me 
to do. And now, Father, glorify me in your own presence with the glory that I had 
with you before the world existed (John 17:4–5).
Father, I desire that they also, whom you have given me, may be with me where 
I am, to see my glory that you have given me because you loved me before the 
foundation of the world (John 17:24).
In the new Jerusalem of Revelation 21:1–22:5, this glory is displayed centrally 
in God and the Lamb, but the whole city has the glory of God: “he . . . showed 
me the holy city Jerusalem coming down out of heaven from God, having the 
glory of God, . . .” (Rev. 21:10–11). 周us the pa瑴ern of Christ’s glory extends to 
the fullness of the new creation.
Christ’s resurrection is the “firstfruits” for the resurrection of believers:
But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have 
fallen asleep. For as by a man [Adam] came death, by a man [Christ] has come 
also the resurrection of the dead. For as in Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all 
be made alive. But each in his own order: Christ the firstfruits, then at his coming 
those who belong to Christ (1 Cor. 15:20–23).
周e “firstfruits” is not only first in time, but is the pa瑴ern for the rest. Christ’s 
resurrection body already belongs to the order of the new creation. It is the first-
fruits, the first “piece,” the foundation piece, for the whole.
Christ’s resurrection also points to his ascension and rule. 周e la瑴er two are 
implications of the resurrection:
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   99
5/14/09   4:46:15 PM
100
Part  2: From Big to Small: Language in the Context of History 
And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to 
the point of death, even death on a cross. 周erefore God has highly exalted him and 
bestowed on him the name that is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus 
every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, . . . (Phil. 
2:8–10).
We see stages in divine action in the life of Christ. At the beginning, there is the 
initiative of God, both in the incarnation and in the commission of the Son by the 
Father. In the middle, the Son accomplishes the work of the Father. In the end, 
God rewards him in exaltation. 周ese three stages involve the life of one person, 
the Son. But they also have cosmic significance. 周e Son, as 1 Corinthians 15:45 
and 15:22 indicate, is the “last Adam,” the representative for the new humanity. 
So we can stand back and see stages with respect to the whole of history.
Stages
At the beginning of human history, God created man in his image, which cor-
responds to the Son’s being in the image of God (Col. 1:15; Heb. 1:3). God 
commissioned Adam to the work of dominion (Gen. 1:28–30), corresponding 
to the commissioning of the Son (Gal. 4:4; John 17:4). Adam was then supposed 
to carry out his work in obedience to God, but he failed and disobeyed. Hence 
Christ, the last Adam, intervened. Christ as the last Adam achieved his goal of 
dominion in the ascension:
. . . he [God] worked in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him 
at his right hand in the heavenly places, far above all rule and authority and power 
and dominion, and above every name that is named, not only in this age but also 
in the one to come. And he put all things under his feet and gave him as head over 
all things . . . (Eph. 1:20–22).
周us, for the whole of history, we have a pa瑴ern of commission, work, and 
reward. 周ese three stages should have been followed by Adam. 周ey are achieved 
by Christ as the Last Adam.
周ese three stages reflect in a way the three persons of the Trinity. All three 
persons are involved in all three stages. But the commission can be particularly 
associated with God the Father. 周e work is preeminently the work of the Son, 
who is, as it were, the “executor” of the Father’s will. And glorification takes place 
through being filled with the Spirit. 周e Spirit is “the Spirit of glory” (1 Pet. 
4:14).
2
周e diversity in the stages of the work of God reflect the diversity within 
2. See, in particular, Meredith M. Kline, “周e Holy Spirit as Covenant Witness,” 周.M. thesis, 
Westminster 周eological Seminary, 1972.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   100
5/14/09   4:46:15 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested