syncfusion pdf viewer mvc : How to copy image from pdf to word application software utility html windows winforms visual studio rcer_5500-part519

UNIVERSITY OF
ROCHESTER
Social Change: The Sexual Revolution
Greenwood, Jeremy, and Guner, Nezih
Working Paper No. 550
May 2009
How to copy image from pdf to word - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copy image from pdf preview; copying image from pdf to powerpoint
How to copy image from pdf to word - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste image into preview pdf; copy image from pdf to
Version: May 2009
SOCIAL CHANGE: THE SEXUAL REVOLUTION
Jeremy Greenwood and Nezih Guner
y
University of Pennsylvania, and Universidad Carlos III de
Madrid, CEPR, and IZA
Abstract
In 1900only six percent of unwed females engaged in premarital sex. Now, three quarters do. The
sexual revolutionisstudied hereusingan equilibrium matchingmodel, wherethecostsofpremarital
sex fall over time due to technological improvement in contraceptives. Individuals di¤er in their
desire for sex. Given this, people tend to circulate in social groups where prospective partners
share their views on premarital sex. To the extent that a society’s customs and mores re‡ect the
aggregation of decentralized decision making by its members, shifts in the economic environment
may induce changes in what is perceived as culture.
Keywords: Social change; the sexual revolution; technological progress in contraceptives;
bilateral search.
JEL Classi…cation Nos: E1, J1, O3
“Social Change”is the title of a classic book by the great sociologist William F. Ogburn. An abridged
version of this paper, under the same title, will appear inthe International Economic Review. The authors
thank E¤rosyni Adamopoulou, Asen Kochov, Tae Suk Lee and two referees for advice and help.
y
Contact Information: Nezih Guner, Department of Economics,Universidad Carlos III de Madrid,Calle
Madrid 126, Getafe (Madrid) 28903 SPAIN. Email: nguner@eco.uc3m.es.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
how to copy an image from a pdf to word; copy a picture from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
copy picture from pdf; copy picture to pdf
Why is there so much social change today, and why was there so little in
ancient times? The most probable answer, the result of quite extensive study,
is mechanical invention and scienti…c discovery. There is no doubt that use-
ful inventions and researches cause social changes. Steam and steel were major
forces in developing our extensive urban life. Gunpowder in‡uenced the decline
of feudalism. The discovery of seed-planting destroyed the hunting cultures and
brought a radically new form of social life. The automobile is helping to create
the metropolitan community. Small inventions, likewise, have far-reaching ef-
fects. The coin-in-the-slot device changes the range and nature of salesmanship,
radically a¤ects di¤erent businesses, and creates unemployment. The e¤ects of
the invention of contraceptives on population and social institutions isso vast as
to defy human estimation. It is obvious, then, that social changes are caused by
inventions. William F. Ogburn (1936, pp. 1-2)
1 Introduction
There may be no better illustration of social change than the sexual revolution that occurred
during the 20th century. In 1900 almost no unmarried teenage girl engaged in premarital
sex; only a paltry 6 percent –see Figure 1, left panel. By 2002 a large majority (roughly
75 percent) had experienced this. What caused this: the contraception revolution. (Sources
for the U.S. data displayed in all …gures and tables are detailed in the Appendix, Section
12.5.) Both the technology for contraception and education about its practice changed
dramatically over the course of the last century. Another re‡ection of the change in sexual
mores is the rise in the number of sexual partners that unmarried females have. For women
born between 1933 and 1942, the majority of those who engaged in premarital sex had only
one partner by age 20, presumably their future husband –see Figure 1, right panel. By the
1963-1972 cohort, the majority of these women had at least 2 partners. Notwithstanding the
great improvement incontraception technology and education, the number of out-of-wedlock
births to females rose from 3 percent in 1920 to 33 percent in 1999 –Figure 1, left panel.
Despite great public concern about teenage sexual behavior in recent years, there has not
been any attempt to build formal models of it. The current work will attempt to …ll this
void.
1
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a they are using different types of word processors.
copy images from pdf; how to copy pdf image to word document
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
how to paste a picture into a pdf; how to copy and paste a pdf image
1900
1950
2000
Year
0
20
40
60
80
Premarital sexual activity, %
0
10
20
30
Out-of-Wedlock Births, %
1
2
-
4
5+
Number of Partners
0
20
40
60
80
Frequency, %
1933
-
1942
43
-
52
53
-
62
63
-
72
Sex
Births
Figure 1: (i) Percentage of19 year-old femaleswith premaritalsexualexperience (left panel);
(ii) Out-of-wedlock births, percentage (left panel); (iii) Number of partners by age 20 for
women engaging in premarital sex, frequency distribution by birth cohort (right panel)
1.1 The Analysis
The rise in premarital sex will be analyzed within the context of an equilibrium unisex
matching model. The model has three salient features. First, when engaging in premarital
sex individuals deliberate the costs and bene…ts from this risky activity. The availability
of contraceptives and abortion will lower the costs of premarital sex. Second, individuals
di¤er in their tastes for sex. A person desires a mate who is similarly inclined so that they
can enjoy the same lifestyle. This leads to a bilateral search structure. Third, given that
people desire to …nd partnersthat share their viewson sex, they will pick to circulate within
social groups who subscribe to their beliefs. This is the most e¢ cient way to …nd a suitable
partner. The membership of social groups is therefore endogenous. Shifts in the sizes of the
groups re‡ect social change.
It is established theoretically that in the developed matching model’s steady state the
populationsortsveryneatlyinto two social groups.
1
Those who want an abstinent relation-
1
This notion is not without some precedence. For example, Burdett and Coles (1997) illustrate within
the context of a marital search model how people may wed exclusively within their own social class (which
2
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
how to copy an image from a pdf file; how to copy image from pdf to word
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document; paste picture into pdf preview
ship circulate exclusively among people who share the same ideal, while those who prefer a
promiscuous one associate with others who desire the same thing. This allows for e¢ cient
search, which would not transpire in the steady state of a standard search model. It does
not have to happen outside of a steady state. It isalso shown theoretically that the model is
likely to display rapid transitional dynamics. This is desirable since sexual practice appears
to have responded quite quickly to the availability of new and improved contraception. The
model is solved numerically in order to assess its ability to explain the rise in premarital sex
over the twentieth century. A key step in the simulation is the construction of a time series
re‡ecting the cost of sex. Thisseriesisbased upon the observed e¤ectivenessanduse of vari-
ous typesof contraception. The frameworkcan replicate wellthe rapid rise in premarital sex
that the last one hundred years witnessed. Inparticular, it isfound that: (i) the reduction in
the riskof pregnancy due to availability of new and improved contraceptions encouraged the
rise of premarital sex; (ii) increased accessibility to abortion promoted premarital sex. The
model also does a reasonable job mimicing the rise in teenage pregnancies. That it can do
so is not a forgone conclusion. On the one hand, an increase in the e¢ cacy of contraception
implies that there should be less pregnancies. On the other, it promotes more premarital
sex. The end result depends on how these two factors interact.
The search framework developed here has implications that would be harder to examine
usingotherparadigms. First,the modelisable tomatch both the fractionofteenagershaving
sex in a given period, as well as the proportion who have had sex by age 19. Likewise, the
model can give predictions on the fraction of teenagers becoming pregnant each period, and
the proportion who become pregnant by age 19. These two measures would be hard to
disentangle in a static model. Yet, they might have di¤erent relevancies for public policies.
The former could be indicative of the aggregate per-period costs of premaritalsex, the latter
ameasure of the risk of premarital sex for a teenage girl. Second, the model can match the
mediandurationof anadolescent relationshipandtheaveragenumberofpartnersforsexually
active teenagers. In the data there isa huge dispersion acrossthe number of sexualpartners.
The current prototype has di¢ culty matching this latter fact, but future versions might be
is some range of types). Search is not directed within one’s own social class, however. People look over the
entire marriage market. An equilibrium may obtain where individuals choose to reject all potential mates
below their own social class.
3
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
paste image into pdf acrobat; copy picture from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
paste image into pdf reader; preview paste image into pdf
able to do so. Modelling the average number of, and the dispersion in, sexual partners
is likely to be important for shedding light on the spread of sexually transmitted diseases
such as AIDS/HIV. The adjustment of individual behavior to the risk of the infection, to
prophylaxesthat change the risk, and to the likelihood ofhaving the disease based uponpast
behavior, could be important for understanding its transmission. Individuals could search
for partners within certain risk pools, depending on their preferences for di¤erent types of
sex. Future versions of the framework could be used to study this, something that would be
di¢ cult to do in a static framework.
The investigation is conducted within the context of a unisex framework. The model is
used to address some stylized facts concerning female sexual behavior, such as the aforemen-
tioned rise in out-of-wedlock births. The costs of engaging in premarital sex are obviously
di¤erent for males and females. An out–of-wedlock birth may severely a¤ect a young girl’s
educational and job prospects as well as her opportunities for …nding a future mate. There-
fore, girls are likely to be less promiscuous than boys. Additionally, promiscuity may di¤er
by family background, because girlsfrom poorer families may feel that they have lessto lose
from an out-of-wedlock birth. These are important considerations, but incorporating them
would introduce extra complications.
2
The unisex abstraction conducted here really does
little violence to the questions poised by Figure 1.
There is empirical work that connects di¤erences in culture to di¤erences in economic
decision making. Guiliano (2007) …nds that, in the wake of the sexual revolution, young
Americans whose parents came from Southern Europe are now more likely to live at home
compared with those from Northern Europe. She argues that family ties are stronger for
Southerners and that a liberalization of sexual attitudes allowed young adults to remain in
their parents’home whileenjoying anactive sexual life. Likewise, Fernández and Fogli(2009)
examine fertility and labor-force participationratesfor Americanborn womenwhose parents
were immigrants. They argue that ancestral di¤erences in family culture have explanatory
2
Amodelwiththese features ispresentedinFernández-Villaverde,Greenwood, andGuner (2009). Their
analysis is inthespiritofBeckerandMulligan(1997)andDoepkeandZilibotti(2008). Inparticular, achild’s
preferences are a¤ected by parental, and institutional, investments. The focus of the Fernández-Villaverde,
Greenwood, and Guner (2009) is on the socialization of children by their parents and institutions such as
thechurch. Theyillustrate howthe inculcationof sexual mores is a¤ected bythe technologicalenvironment.
4
power for work and fertility behavior today. The current paper should not be read assaying
that culture does not matter, but rather that some part of it may be endogenous.
3
2 Environment
Suppose that there are two social classes in society, one whose members are abstinent,
the other whose members are promiscuous. Members in a social class circulate amongst
themselves. Each class is a separate world, so to speak, but the members of a particular
class are free to switch to the other class at any time. Social change will be measured by
the shift in membership between the two classes.
Each member of society is indexed by the variable j 2 J = fj
1
;j
2
; ;j
n
g, which
represents his or her joy from sex. The value of j is known by an individual. Let j be
distributed across individuals according to the density function J(j
i
)= 
i
,with 0 < 
i
<1,
P
n
i=1
i
=1, and j
1
<j
2
< < j
n
. Suppose that time ‡ows discretely. At the beginning
of each period, an unattached member in a class will match with another single individual
in the same class with probability . The partner’s type will be randomly determined in
accordance with the type distribution prevailing at that time within the class. This couple
must then make two intertwined decisions: whether or not to stay together for the period,
and which social classto join. If they choose not to staytogether, then they must wait until
the next period for another opportunity to match. With probability 1   an unattached
person fails to match with another single one. These individuals just decide upon which
social class to join. This will in‡uence the type of mate that they might draw next period.
3
It maytakesometime for culturetorespondtoanewtechnologicalenvironment. Sometimes the change
is sudden, other times it may be more gradual or smooth. For example, social behavior may be governed
by norms–see the classic paper by Cole, Mailath, and Postelwaite (1992). Individuals who transgress the
norm may be collectively outcast or shunned by other members of society. Giventhis fact most individuals
may rationally choosetosubscribe tothesocial norm. As the economic environment changes it may become
increasingly impossibletosustainsuchanorm. Eventually,itcollapses. Or,theprocessmight be agradualor
smoothchangeinsocializationpractices inresponsetoshiftsintheenvironment,as is modeledinFernández-
Villaverde, Greenwood, and Guner (2009). Alternatively, Fernández, Fogli andOlivetti (2004) assume that
childrens’preferences are afunction of their parents’lifestyles (ina habit-formationway) whichmay change
slowly over time. Another example of culture adapting totechnologicalprogress is containedin Doepke and
Tertilt (forth.). They argue that women’s liberation in the 19th century was the result of rising returns to
human capital formation for females. In extending rights to women, men faced a trade-o¤ between losing
power with their own wives but emancipating other men’s wives, such as their own daughters. This trade
o¤resolves in favor of extending rights for all women when the returns to human capital are high enough.
5
Similarly, at the beginning of each period, matchesin each class from the previous period
break up with probability . Couples in the surviving matches must also make two inex-
tricably linked decisions; to wit, whether or not to remain together and which social class
to join. If they choose to break up then they must wait until the next period for another
matching opportunity. Like single agents who fail to match, couples whose relationships
break up exogenously just decide upon which social class to join.
Let a matched person in the abstinence class enjoy a level of momentary utility level
of u, and a single person realize a momentary utility level of w, with u > w. A matched
person in the promiscuity class realizes a momentary utility level of u + j  c, where j is
the joy from sex and c is the expected cost of it say due to an out-of-wedlock birth or a
sexually transmitteddisease. Note that c can’t represent astigmae¤ect since thisisreally an
attitude. Change in attitudesand behavior are what is being modelled here. An unmatched
person in this class attains a utility of w. Individuals discount next period’s utility by the
factor . Assume that u, w, j, and c are speci…ed in a way that guarantees that expected
lifetime utility is always positive. Assume that u, w, j, and c are …nite, which ensures that
expected lifetime utility is bounded.
To complete the setup, some structure will be placed on the population. First, the size
of the population will be normalized to one. Second, each period a fraction 1    of the
population will move on to another phase of life, which will be interpreted as adulthood.
This latter phase of life will be taken to be a facsimile of their current life, but in a di¤erent
location. These people are selected at randomand are replenished by an equal‡ow of young
unmatched individuals. Let couples relocate together. So, assume that each single, and each
couple, face a relocation probability of 1  .
4
4
Making anadult’s worldlook like ateenager’s one requires some additional assumptions. First,suppose
that adults survive with probability 2 1. Second, assume that some new unmatched adults ‡ow in from
another source at rate 1 ; i.e., there is a ‡ow in of unmatched adults who somehow missed teenage life.
These two assumptions ensure that anadult’s worldwill have the same type distributions as the teenager’s
one. Third, when adults die assume that they realize a utility level of zero from then. Fourth, set the
discount factor for an adult,
e
, so that
e
==[2  1]. The last two assumptions guarantee that the adult’s
programming problem will be a copy of the teenager’s one, even though the former faces death. These
assumptions aremade toensurelogical consistency, not realism. Alternatively, onecouldjust simply assume
that in adult life one obtains an expected lifetime utility of V, a constant. Since a teen shifts into adult
life with an exogenous state-independent probability, , this will not a¤ect any choice that he makes. A
teen’s e¤ective discount factor wouldbe =
b
(1 ), where
b
is his subjective discount factor. To get the
6
Abstinence
Promiscuity
Social Divide
Social Change
A
P
penitence
Figure 2: Social Change
The idea is that over time the cost of premarital sex, c, declines due to technological
progress in contraception and improvements in birth control education. As a consequence,
people move out of the abstinence class, A, into the promiscuity class, P. The situation is
portrayed in Figure 2, by the arrow moving left to right. As will be seen, there may also
be some secondary movement from P to A. For example, some people may choose to live a
promiscuous lifestyle rather than lose their partner. When one of these matches breaks up,
one individual may move back to A.
3 Decision Problems
Let A
m
(j;
e
j) denotethe expectedlifetime utilityfor anindividualoftype j whoiscurrentlyin
an abstinent match with a partner of type
e
j. An individual doesnot experience any joyfrom
sex while abstinent. But, s/he could in the future. Thus, A
m
should still be a function of j.
Also, an individual’s joy from sex does not depend directly upon his partner’s type,
e
j. Still,
equilibrium discussed in the text just set
b
==(1 ).
7
he cares indirectly about
e
jbecause this will delimit his future matching possibilities, as will
be seen. Next, de…ne A
s
(j) to be the expected lifetime utility for a single (or unmatched)
agent in class A. Turn now to the promiscuous class. Here P
m
(j;
e
j) will represent the
expected lifetime utility for individual j who is currently in a promiscuous match with
e
j,
and P
s
(j) will proxy for the expected lifetime utility for a single agent in class P. Finally,
suppose that j and
e
jmeet. What will be the outcome of this meeting? Let a
m
(j;
e
j) be the
equilibrium probability that an abstinent relationship will occur, p
m
(j;
e
j) denote the odds
that a promiscuousone transpires, and 1 a
m
(j;
e
j) p
m
(j;
e
j) give the chance that no match
will ensue.
As will be seen, these equilibrium matching probabilities split the space of potential
pairwise matches, J  J, into four types of zones: viz, one where both parties desire an
abstinent relationship so that a
m
(j;
e
j) = 1; another where both want a sexual one implying
that p
m
(j;
e
j) = 1; a mixing region where one party prefers an abstinent relationship, the
other side a sexual one, but both prefer some sort of relationship to none, so that 0 <
a
m
(j;
e
j);p
m
(j;
e
j) < 1; a zone where no relationship of any sort is possible and a
m
(j;
e
j) =
p
m
(j;
e
j) = 0. An example of this is shown in Figure 3, which is detailed later on–in this
…gure both parties prefer some sort of relationship to none at all.
3.1 The Abstinence Class, A
Suppose person j is matched with
e
jin A. The recursion de…ning the value of this match for
j, or the function A
m
(j;
e
j), is given by
A
m
(j;
e
j) = u +(1 )[a
m0
(j;
e
j)A
m0
(j;
e
j) +p
m0
(j;
e
j)P
m0
(j;
e
j)]
(1)
+f + (1 )[1 a
m0
(j;
e
j) p
m0
(j;
e
j)]gmaxfA
s0
(j);P
s0
(j)g;
where in standard fashion a prime attached to a variable or function denotes its value next
period. The …rst term on the righthand side is the momentary utility realized today from
an abstinent match, u. The rest of the terms give the discounted value of the lifetime utility
that j can expect from tomorrow on. Note that his current match with
e
jwill survive into
8
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested