syncfusion pdf viewer mvc : Extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste Library control component asp.net azure web page mvc rcer_5502-part521

Proof. See the Appendix, Section 12.1.2.
To summarize, following a once-and-for-all decline in c some matched couples will imme-
diately move from A to P. Sometimes one member might move somewhat reluctantly, in
the sense that they would prefer a match in A rather than P. This ideal situation isn’t on
the table, because their partner prefers a relationship in P. Over time these matches will
break up exogenously and the (surviving) low-j partner will return to A. These matches
are captured by the [(1   )]
i
P
b
k=d+1
p
m
(j
h
;
e
j
k
)
h
e
k
terms (for h = 1; ;d) in (16).
Similarly, some matched individuals will remain in A because their partner refuses to have
apromiscuous match. These high-
e
jindividuals will drift into P as their matches break up,
so long as they survive. The [(1   )]
i
P
d
h=1
a
m
(j
h
;
e
j
k
)
h
e
k
terms (for k = d + 1;  ;b)
represent this situation.
It is readily apparent from (16) that the model will generate rapid transitional dynamics
when  is large or  is small; that is, when matches break up quickly or when teenage life is
short. Last, there is a special case where the number of abstinent and promiscuous matches
jump immediately to their new steady-state values. This is established in the corollary
below. This happens when all the matches discussed in Points 3 and 4 involve mixing
[a
m
(j;
e
j) = p
m
(j;
e
j) = 1=2]. Whether or not this will transpire depends upon parameter
values, etc. This situationoccurs inthe simulation discussed in Section9. Note that while at
the aggregate level the number of people engaged in abstinent and promiscuous relationships
is constant over time, at the micro level there is still movement between social classes that
dampens out in line with (16). In this case, at the micro level the ‡ows into and out of the
two social classes balance each other exactly, as is made clear in the proof of the corollary.
Corollary 1 (Instantaneous Aggregate Dynamics) Suppose that for all matched pairs (j;
e
j)
with j <c
and
e
j>c
it is optimal to mix; i.e., assume that a
m
(j;
e
j) = p
m
(j;
e
j) = 1=2 for all
j<c
and
e
j>c
. Then, #A
t
=
P
d
h=1
h
and #P
t
=
P
n
h=d+1
h
for all t.
Proof. Take all matched pairs of a particular type (j;
e
j) with j <c
and
e
j>c
.By the mixing
condition, half of the matches will be in A
t
,the other half in P
t
.Now, every period  of the
surviving matches will breakup in each set. Individuals of type j will go to A
t+1
while those
of type
e
jwill move to P
t+1
. Since for every breakup in A
t
there is one in P
t
,the number of
individuals in A and P will not change over time.
19
Extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to cut image from pdf; how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
Extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy and paste an image from a pdf; paste image into pdf acrobat
Return now to the issue under study, the rise in premarital sex over the last century. In
order to analyze this issue something must be inputted into the simulation for the time path
of costs that governs premarital sex, fc
t
g
1
t=1
.Turn to this subject now.
7 Technological Progress in Contraception
In 1900 engaging in premarital sex was a very risky business. Roughly 71 percent of females
would have gotten pregnant (had they engaged in sex for a year at normal frequencies).
These odds had dropped to 28 percent by 2002. The reduction in the chance of pregnancy
occurred for two reasons: technological improvement in contraceptives, and the dissemina-
tion of knowledge about contraception and reproduction.
7.1 A Brief History
Coitus interruptus has been practiced since ancient times, and is mentioned in the Bible.
8
This was the most important method of contraception historically. The condom has a long
history. In the 18th century, Casanova reported using the “English riding coat.”Handbills
were circulated in England advertising condoms. One said [for a picture see Himes (1963, p.
198)]:
To guard yourself from shame or fear,
Votaries to Venus, haften here;
None in my wares ever found a ‡aw,
Self preservation’s nature’s law.
Early condoms were used more to prevent venereal disease than pregnancy. They were
expensive and uncomfortable. The di¤usion of condoms was promoted by the vulcanization
of rubber in 1843-1844. They were still expensive in 1850, selling for $5 a dozen [McLaren
(1990, p. 184)], which translates into $34 a dozen relative to today’s real wages. So, even
when washed and reused, they were too expensive for the masses to use. Another major
innovation was theintroductionofthelatex condom inthe 1930s, whichdramatically reduced
cost and increased quality. Other methods of birth control were also used, such as a variety
8
This history is compiled from Himes (1964), McLaren (1990), and Potts and Campbell (2002).
20
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Combine scanned images to PDF, such as tiff functions can be implemented independently, without using any Adobe to easily merge and append PDF files with mature
how to copy text from pdf image to word; paste image into pdf in preview
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Turn multipage PDF file into single image files respectively in .NET framework. Description: Convert all the PDF pages to target format images and output
copy pictures from pdf to word; how to cut picture from pdf file
of intrauterine devices. Casanova mentions using half of a lemon as a contraceptive device.
This could have been quite e¤ective since it acted as barrier-cum-spermicidal agent. In 1797
Bentham advocated the use of the sponge to keep down the size of the poor population.
The rubber diaphragm entered service around 1890. It was expensive and had to be …t by
adoctor. This limited its use to those who were relatively well o¤. The pill emblematizes
modern contraception. In 1960 the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of it,
which was a remarkable scienti…c achievement involving the synthesis of a hormone designed
to fool the reproductive system.
The dissemination of knowledge about contraception and reproduction was also very im-
portant. Scienti…c knowledge about reproduction began to arise in the 19th century. Van
Baer discovered mammalian ovum in 1827. Around the same time, the birth control move-
ment in America started with the works of Robert Dale Owen and Dr. Charles Knowlton.
Owen published the …rst book on birth control, Moral Physiology, in 1830. He suggested
coitus interruptus as the best means of contraception. In 1833 Knowlton published Fruits
of Philosophy, which ultimately had more in‡uence. He advocated douching since there is
“(n)o doubt a very small quantity of semen lodged anywhere within the vagina or within
the vulva, may cause conception, if it should escape the in‡uence of cold, or some chemical
agent”–as quoted by Himes (1963, p. 228). He gave some rough prescriptions for douching
agents. Knowlton was prosecuted for obscenity. Scienti…c knowledge continued to progress,
with Newport describing the fertility cycle of frogs in 1853. In 1873 a law was passed under
the urging of Anthony Comstock banning the communication, via mail, of any information
about contraception or abortion. The next year the U.S. Post O¢ ce seized 60,000 rubber
articles and 3,000 boxes of pills.
The modern birth control movement started about 1914 when Margaret Sanger pub-
lished a pamphlet, Family Limitation, for which she was prosecuted. It described the use
of condoms, douching and suppositories. She became a tireless crusader for birth control
clinics. She opened the …rst clinic in 1919. Nine days later the police came. The …rst
continually e¤ective birth control clinic was operational in 1923, according to Himes (1963).
21
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET can help developers convert standard PDF file to all the content (including both images and texts
how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word; how to paste a picture into pdf
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF
how to copy a picture from a pdf; cut and paste image from pdf
Sanger promoted the use of the diaphragm through the clinics. Human ovum were seen for
the …rst time in 1930. An accurate tracking of the ovulaton cycle was also attained in the
1930s, making the safe period method a little safer. At more than 70 years of age, Sanger
persuaded a wealthy philanthropist in 1952 to donate $116,000 toward the development of
the pill.
7.2 The E¤ectiveness and Use of Contraception
The use of various methods of contraception during premarital intercourse with a …rst part-
ner, and their e¢ cacies are shown in Tables 1 and 2. The data for contraceptive use during
…rst premarital intercourse starts in the early 1960s. Between 1960 and 2002 the number
of people not using any birth control fell by a remarkable 40 percentage points. The in-
creased use of contraception may derive from two factors. First, technological improvement
has made them both e¤ective and easy to use. As more and more teenagers engage in sex
on this account, one would see an increase in their use. Second, the di¤usion of contra-
ceptives may be slow, as with any new product. The birth control movement has made
information about contraceptives widely available (in a manner similar to advertising for
other products) and access to them easy. This has greatly sped up their di¤usion. How
much is an open question, for which it would be di¢ cult to provide a quantitative answer.
The condom is the most popular method of birth control and its use has actually increased
over time, notwithstanding the introduction of the birth control pill. Today more than half
of people use condoms for premarital sexual relationships with their …rst partner. Accord-
ing to Darroch and Singh (1999), the rise of condom users played a signi…cant role in the
decline of pregnancies among the teenagers during the 1990s. The increase in the use of
condoms was in‡uenced by the expansion of formal reproductive health education during
the period. On this, Ku, Sonenstein and Pleck (1992) show that sex education about AIDS,
birth control, and resisting sexual activity is associated with more consistent condom use.
Furthermore, Lindberg, Ku and Sonenstein (2000) report that formal sex education on these
topics expanded signi…cantly during the 1990s.
22
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge two or several separate PDF files together and into one PDF VB.NET Components to combine various scanned images to PDF Merge PDF without size limitation.
how to paste a picture into a pdf; how to copy pdf image to word
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
of target PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and this situation, you need to convert PDF document to some easily editable files like Word
how to cut a picture out of a pdf file; copy and paste image from pdf to word
In order to measure the decline in risk associated with premarital sex during the 20th
century, anestimate must be made for boththeuse ande¤ectiveness ofcontraceptionin1900.
Takethe use of contraceptionin 1900, …rst. Set the fraction ofnon-users in1900tothe values
observed in 1960-1964 period –Table 1. Clearly, this is a conservative assumption since use
has been increasing steadily over time. Himes (1963) provides information on the fraction
of married females who use di¤erent methods in 1930s. Assume that the selection pattern
for contraception by young female users during their …rst premarital intercourse was similar
to the pattern selected by married women. If one also assumes that the selection pattern
in 1900 was the same as the one displayed in the 1930s (again a conservative assumption),
contraceptive use at …rst premarital intercourse can be constructed for 1900.
9
Table 1: Contraception use At First Premarital Intercourse, percent
Method
1900 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-82 83-88 85-89 90-94 95-98 99-02
none
61.4
61.4
54.2
55.6
53.5
46.9
34.6
36.1
29.7
27.2
21.2
pill
-
4.2
8.6
12.1
12.8
14.2
12.1
19.7
14.1
15.3
16.0
condom
9.42
21.9
24.0
21.0
22.0
26.7
41.8
36.4
49.9
49.8
51.2
withdrawal 11.19
7.3
9.5
7.3
7.5
8.4
8.9
5.6
3.5
4.9
7.3
other
17.99
5.3
3.7
4.0
4.2
3.8
2.6
2.2
2.8
2.8
4.3
Turn now to thee¤ectiveness of contraceptionin 1900. A number for e¤ectiveness in 1900
is constructed as follows: First, Kopp (1934) reports a 45 percent failure rate for condoms
and a 59.2 percent failure rate for withdrawal. His numbers are based on pre-clinical use
by married couples who sought advice from the Birth Control Clinical Research Bureau in
New York City between 1925 and 1929. Although it seems quite high, a 45 percent failure
rate for condoms is quite close to other estimates from the same period.
10
Why was the
9
The results are almost identical if instead the 1900 values are set to the ones observed in 1960-1964 for
teenage female users. Since the pill was not yet introduced in 1900, for these calculations allocate the small
percentage of females in the pill cell into the ‘other’category.
10
Tone (2001) cites two scienti…c studies before the Food and Drug Administration started inspecting
23
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
PDF pages can be converted to separate Word files within a PDF content by outputting its texts and images to Word In order to convert PDF document to Word file
copy pdf picture to powerpoint; copy picture to pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Free online Word to PDF converter without email. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf; how to copy an image from a pdf
failure ratefor withdrawal so highthenas well? The mainreason was that partial withdrawal
was considered as e¤ective as complete withdrawal, and despite better scienti…c evidence this
practice did not change quickly — see Brodie (1994). Second, the other methods that people
used around 1920 were not much more e¤ective, either. Kopp (1934) reports the following
failure rates: douche, 70.6 percent; jelly or suppository, 46.6; lactation, 56.6; pessary 28.1;
sponge, 50, and safe period, 59.7. Hence, it is safe to presume that the failure rate for other
methods at the time was no more than 50 percent. Finally, following Hatcher et al. (1976,
1980, 1984, 1988, 1998, and 2004) assume that using no method, and simply taking your
chances, had an 85 percent failure rate.
Since the 1960s evidence on the e¤ectiveness of di¤erent contraceptives, for both their
ideal and typical use, is quite systematic. From that timeonfailure rates havebeen measured
as the percentage of women who become pregnant during the …rst year of use. By contrast,
the statistics from earlier studies, such as Kopp (1934), are based on married women who
used birth control clinics. First, based on several studies from the early 1960s, Tietze (1970)
reports a 10 to 20 percent failure rate for condoms. According to Hatcher et al. (1976,
1980, 1984, 1988, 1998, and 2004), the failure rates for condoms were pretty constant at 15
to 20 percent during the 1970s and early 1980s, and then declined to about 11 percent in
the mid 1980s. Somewhat mysteriously, they rose slightly in the 1990s. Hence, the condom’s
failure rate has fallen from 45 to 14.5 percent, a (continuously compounded) decline of
about 113 percent, both due to technological improvement and increased knowledge about
its appropriate use.
Second, as can be seen in Table 2, the pill is the most e¤ective method of contraception.
It was introduced in the 1960s. Its initial failure rates were about 5 to 10 percent. They
declined to 3.35 percent by 1989, again due to both technological improvement and better
education about its use. Again, the failure rate rose slightly during the 1990s. Third,
even the e¤ectiveness of withdrawal has increased over time; this shows the importance of
education. Finally, during this period the e¤ectiveness of other methods improved as well.
condoms in the late 1930s. One of these studies from 1924 reports a 50 percent failure rate, while a later
one from 1934-35 reports a 41 percent failure rate.
24
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in ASP.NET application. Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms.
copy and paste image into pdf; how to cut a picture out of a pdf
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from PowerPoint. Free online PowerPoint to PDF converter without email. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
how to copy image from pdf to word; how to copy pdf image into powerpoint
New and much more e¤ective methods, such as injections and implants, were introduced in
the 1990s.
Table 2: Effectiveness of Contraception (annual failure rates, percent)
Method
1900 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-82 83-88 85-89 90-94 95-98 99-02
none
85.0
85.0
85.0
85.0
85.0
85.0
85.0
85.0
85.0
85.0
85.0
pill
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
7.5
3.4
3.4
5.5
5.5
5.5
condom
45.0
17.5
17.5
17.5
17.5
17.5
11.0
11.0
14.5
14.5
14.5
withdrawal 59.2
22.5
22.5
22.5
22.5
22.5
20.5
20.5
20.5
23.0
23.0
other
50.0
20.0
20.0
20.0
20.0
20.0
20.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
So what is the upshot of this analysis? By combining the informationon the e¤ectiveness
and use of contraceptives contained in Tables 1 and 2, one can get a measure of the extent
of technological innovation in birth control. To do this, for each year take an average over
the e¤ectiveness of each method of birth control listed in Table 2. When doing this weight
each practice by its yearly frequency of use, shown in Table 1. The upshot of this calculation
is illustrated (by the line marked ‘Data’) in the right panel of Figure 4, which presents the
riskiness of premarital sex. Even when using conservative estimates for 1900, this riskiness
has fallen by (a continuously compounded) 94 percent, from about 72 percent in 1900 to 28
percent in 2002. Now, the series shown in Figure 4 has an important endogenous component
in it, speci…cally the choice of contraceptive used.
Why individuals would choose to use one method over another is not modelled in the
analysis. Doing so could be di¢ cult, and the bene…t questionable. The same issue also
arises for the conventionally measured aggregate total factor productivity series used by
macroeconomists, although it is not as transparent and perhaps is less problematic. This
series e¤ectively constructs total factor productivity across plants using a Divisia index. Of
course the technology used by any particular plant is an endogenous variable, and there is a
large variance in the technological practice adopted across plants. The important thing to
25
note is that the data used for constructing the risk of pregnancy reported in Figure 4 are
conditioned upon an individual having sex. Hence, the data used are not directly a¤ected by
the decision to have sex or not, which is the margin under study. That is, the series plotted
shows the average failure rate over time conditioned upon a person deciding to engage in
premarital sex.
8 Calibration
Prior to simulating the model, values must be assigned to the various parameters governing
tastes, the matching technology, and the type distribution. Towards this end, set up the
type distribution, J(j), so that it approximates a truncated normal, where the truncation
points are 2.5 standard deviations on either side of the mean. An evenly spaced grid of 300
points is used for J. Hence, J(j) will be governed by two parameters, namely its mean,
j,
and standard deviation, &
j
. Given this, there are 8 parameters to pick: , , , , u, w,
j,
and &
j
.This is done in the following manner:
11
1. Matching parameters, ,  and . In 2002 roughly 34.4 percent of teenagers between
the ages of 15 and 19 had coitus within the last 3 months.
12
Adolescent relationships
are pretty short. On average a teen’s …rst sexual relationship lasts for almost 6 months.
The median duration of an adolescent relationship is about 13 months.
13
Construct a
simple Markov chain to match these two facts. Let teenagers match with probably 
and breakup withprobability . Given the short durationof teenage relationships, take
the model period to be a quarter. This implies that there will be 20 periods of teenage
11
The model is an in…nite horizon framework. The real world is made up of …nitely-lived overlapping
generations. Every year a new generation of young people enters into the dating world for the …rst time,
while members of older cohorts exit due to marriage. This mismatch between the data and the model
appears to be second order, as the results in Section 9 will show.
12
This number is taken from Abma et al. (2004, Table 4, p. 19).
13
Sources: Ryan, Manlove, and Kerry (2003) and Udry and Bearman (1998). According to Udry and
Bearman (1998), the median duration is about 10 months when the respondent is a male and about 13
months when the respondent is a female. The latter is taken here, although the results are very similar if
instead a duration of 10 months is targeted.
26
life between the ages of 15 and 19, inclusive. The mean duration of a relationship is
given by 1=. Thus, let 1= = 13=3 so that  = 0:231. This high destruction rate
speaks for relatively fast transitional dynamics, in light of Lemma 3. Next, choose a
value for  so that the statistical mechanics of the (;)-matching technology imply
that on average a teenager will be sexually active 34.4 percent of time between ages
15 and 19. Assume that a teenager starts o¤ unmatched at the end of his/her 14th
year. Let 
i
represent the odds of a teenager being matched i periods down the road.
Thus, 1  
i
is the probability of being unmatched then. These odds are given by
(17)
2
4
i
1 
i
3
5
=
2
4
1  
1  
3
5
i
2
4
0
1
3
5
; for i = 1; ;20.
The fraction of a promiscuous teenager’s life spent in a sexually active relationship is
then
P
20
i=1
i
=20. Therefore, pick  so that 0:75 
P
20
i=1
i
=20 = 0:344, where it will
be assumed that 75 percent of the 2002 population is sexually active –see below. This
results in  = 0:222. Last, a twenty-period teenage life dictates setting  = 1  1=20.
2. Type distribution parameters,
j and &
j
. Now, in 1900 only 6 percent of unmarried
teenage girls engaged in premarital sex. This had risen to 75 percent by 2002. The
model is solved for two steady states. The …rst one mimics the year 1900. For this
one, set c = c
1900
=0:2729, which is the quarterly failure rate for 1900. The second
steady state matches the year 2002. Here, pick c = c
2002
= 0:0802.
14
Last, the
mean and standard deviation,
jand &
j
,are speci…ed so that in the …rst steady state
6percent of people engage in premarital sex, while in the second 75 percent do. Note
that for the model, the probability of a person …nding a mate in their teenage years
is given by   1   (1   )(1   )=[1   (1   )]. Hence, equations (13) and (14)
should be solved while setting   #P
1900
=0:06 and   #P
2002
=0:75. The result
is
j= 0:1450 and &
j
=0:0857. Lemma 1 implies that in a steady state the number
14
According to the calculations in Section 7.2, the risk of pregnancy was 0.7205 per year in 1900 and
0.2843 per year in 2002. If the probability of pregnancy over a year is bc, then take the quarterly probability,
c, to be given by c = 1  (1  bc)
(1=4)
.
27
of people in A and P depends solely on the cost of sex, c, and the shape of the J(j)
distribution, as governed here by
jand &
j
. Therefore, for given values of c,  and ,
the above procedure solves the two steady-state equations determining the number of
people engaged in premarital sex for the two unknowns
jand &
j
. Given the setup of
the model, there does not seem to be another so-natural criteria for choosing
jand &
j
.
Especially because statistics describing the properties of matching within a class, such
as the average number of partners for a sexually active person, do not depend upon
the shape of the J(j) distribution, as was mentioned in Section 5.
3. Taste parameters, , u, and w. Given that a period is one quarter, set  = 0:99.
In the simulation the values chosen for u and w don’t matter very much. In fact,
theoretically they don’t a¤ect the steady state at all, as Lemma 1 makes clear. In light
of this, simply set u   w = 1 and let w = jminfj
1
;0gj + c
1900
. The latter restriction
ensures that lifetime utility is always positive.
15
The model is now ready to be simulated.
9 Social Change: The Computational Experiment
Go back in time to 1900. Premarital sex is dangerous, since a young woman runs a 72
percent risk of pregnancy. Given this, the vast majority of youth chose to live abstinent
lifestyles. Sex is a taboo subject. All of this is about to change due to technological progress
in contraception. Over time the risk of pregnancy declines. This changes the cost and
bene…t calculation of engaging in premarital sex. Slowly more and more people engage in
premarital sex so that by 2002 a substantial majority of teens are experiencing it. Can the
model capture this pattern of social change?
To answer this question, start the model economy o¤ in a steady state resembling the
situation in 1900. Then, subject it to the time path of technological progress for contra-
15
This restriction is notneeded forthe theoryand does not impact on the numericalresults. It is imposed
because the programming language used has some very fast built-in commands that can be employed when
the matrices in the analysis are positive.
28
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested