syncfusion pdf viewer mvc : How to cut pdf image SDK software API .net winforms html sharepoint rcer_5504-part523

TABLE 4: Monthly Frequency of Sex
(Active females, ages 15 to 19)
#of times
distribution
0
0.3890
1
0.0945
2to 3 (= 2.5)
0.1604
4to 7 (= 5.5)
0.1495
8+ (= 9)
0.2066
Mean = 3.177
10.2 A Framework for Studying Frequency
To model the above facts, change the term in the utility function involving sex to
(20)
lnf
e
jexp(f
=   =)g = ln
e
j+f
=   =; with  < 0 and  > 0;
where f represents the frequency of sex and
e
jnow denotes the joy from it. Let the cost of
sex be given by
(21)
ec = 1   p
f
,
where p is the odds of having a safe sexual encounter. Observe that 1 p
f
is the probability
of becoming pregnant, or the failure rate, given the frequency of sex f. The cost function is
increasing and concave in f, since
dec
df
= (ln p)p
f
>0 and
d
2
ec
(df)
2
= (lnp)
2
p
f
<0;
where the signs of the above expressions follow from the fact that 0  p  1. Therefore,
while the chances of getting pregnant increase with the frequency of sex, they do so at a
diminishing rate.
Cast an individual’s decision regarding the frequency of sex as follows:
max
f
fln
e
j+f
=   =   1+ p
f
g:
39
How to cut pdf image - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; paste image on pdf preview
How to cut pdf image - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy picture from pdf; paste jpeg into pdf
The …rst- and second- order conditions for this problem are
(22)
f
 1
= (ln p)p
f
;
and
(23)
(   1)f
 2
+(lnp)
2
p
f
<0:
The …rst-order condition simply sets the marginal bene…t from coitus, f
 1
,equal to its
marginal cost,  (lnp)p
f
. One might expect the frequency of sex will rise with an improve-
ment in the e¤ectiveness of contraceptives, or a fall in p. Strictly speaking this need not be
the case since the marginal cost of sex is not necessarily decreasing in p.
Lemma 4 The frequency of sex, f, increases or decreases with the e¤ectiveness of contra-
ception, p, depending on whether  lnp S 1=f.
Proof. Di¤erentiating the e¢ ciency condition (22) yields
df
dp
=
p
f 1
(ln p)fp
f 1
(   1)f
 2
+(lnp)
2
p
f
:
The second-order condition (23) implies that the denominator of the above expression is
negative. Next see that  p
f 1
(lnp)fp
f 1
S0 as  lnp S 1=f.
Now, for empirically relevant values of p and f it will transpire that df=dp > 0, as will be
clear from the discussion below.
Giventhe form of(20) themarginal bene…t fromsex does not dependon the person’s type
e
j. This abstraction is unrealistic, yet its simplicity is a big virtue. It allows the framework
for the frequency of sex to be tacked on to the existing apparatus in a very simple manner,
as will be discussed. If type and frequency are allowed to interact then each partner to a
match would have to bargain over frequency, at least if their types di¤ered.
Is the above framework consistent with the observed increase in the frequency of sex?
The answer is yes. The question really amounts to asking whether or not there exits values
for  and  such that the e¢ ciency condition (22) returns the observed frequencies of sex in
1900 and 2002, given the observed probabilities of safe sex in these years. To this end, note
40
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Sample Code: Clone a PDF Page Using C#.NET.
how to copy and paste a pdf image; how to copy pictures from a pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
example that you can use it to extract all images from PDF document. ' Get page 3 from the document. Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the
copy a picture from pdf; paste picture into pdf preview
from (21) that the probability of a safe sexual encounter is given by p
t
=(1  ec
t
)
1=f
t
,where
the subscript t refers to the time period for a variable. Recall that the quarterly failure
rate of contraception in 1900 was 0.27 and the observed frequency of sex 7.92. Hence, the
probability of a safe sexual encounter in 1900 is given by p
1900
=(1 0:2729)
1=7:92
=0:9606.
Likewise, in 2002 the odds of not becoming pregnant werep
2002
=(1 0:0543)
1=12:71
=0:9956.
Interestingly, while asingle sexualencounterin2002 looks very safe, havingsex 412:71 = 51
times over the course of the year results in a 28.5 percent chance of pregnancy.
Next, it follows from (22) that
(
f
2002
f
1900
)
 1
=
(lnp
2002
)(p
2002
)
f
2002
(lnp
1900
)(p
1900
)
f
1900
:
This equation can be used to pin down a value for , given observations for f
1900
,f
2002
,p
1900
,
and p
2002
. Speci…cally,
= ln
(ln p
2002
)(p
2002
)
f
2002
(ln p
1900
)(p
1900
)
f
1900
=ln
f
2002
f
1900
+1 =  3:13.
Finally, a value for  can also be backed out from (22). In particular, set
=
( lnp
1900
)(p
1900
)
(f
1900
)
 1
=149:39:
To summarize given  =  3:13 and  = 149:39, the above procedure implies that the …rst-
order condition (22) will return f = 7:92 when p = 0:9606, and f = 12:71 when p = 0:9956.
The second-order condition (23) also holds when evaluated at the 1900 and 2002 values.
Thus, a maximum obtains notwithstanding the concave cost function.
23
With regard to
Lemma 2, observe that once the framework has been calibratedto matchthe observed(fairly
small) values for f it must transpire that df=dp > 0, since ln p ' 0.
Last, to tack the above framework onto the earlier model simply let ln
e
j = j 2 J =
fj
1
;j
2
;  ;j
n
g and c =  f
= + = + ec. Hence, the cost of sex in Section 2 must now
incorporate into it the utility derived from the optimal frequency of sex. Transforming the
23
Also, note that f
=  =  (1  p)
f
>0 for both 1900 and 2002 so that an individual is obtaining
positive utility from the frequency of sex. This consideration is important for deciding which matches to
accept or reject, or which social class to join.
41
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
application, this VB.NET image cropper library SDK provides a professional and easy to use .NET solution for developers to crop / cut out image file in a short
copy and paste images from pdf; how to copy image from pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
document page. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file. Export high quality image from PDF document in .NET program. Remove
how to copy picture from pdf; copying a pdf image to word
type distribution in this way and following the procedure mentioned in Section 8, Point 2,
results in
j=  47:6261 and &
j
=0:1226.
11 Conclusions
What causes social change? The idea here is that a large part of social change is areaction to
technological progress in the economy. Technological progress a¤ects society’s consumption
and production possibilities. It therefore changes individuals’incentives to abide by social
customs andmores. As peoplegradually change their behavior to take advantage ofemerging
opportunities, custom (an aggregation of individual behavior) slowly evolves too.
This notion is applied here to the rocket-like rise in premarital sex that occurred over
the last century. Now, a majority of youth engage in premarital sex. One hundred years
ago almost none did. This is traced here to the dramatic decline in the expected cost of
premarital sex, due technological improvement in contraceptives and their increased avail-
ability. This is modeled within the context of an equilibrium matching model. The model
has two key ingredients. First, individuals weigh the cost and bene…t of coitus when engag-
ing in premarital sexual activity. Second, they associate with individuals who share their
own proclivities. Such a model mimics well the observed rise in premarital sexual activity,
given the observed decline in the risk of sex.
Improvement in contraceptive technology may also partially explain the decline in the
fraction of life spent married for a female from 0.88 in 1950 to 0.60 in 1995.
24
This is due to
delays in …rst marriages and remarriages, and a rise in divorce. Historically, the institution
of marriage was a mechanism to have safe sex, among other things. As sex became safer,
the need for marriage declined on this account. According to Becker (1991, p. 326):
Since the best way to learn about someone else is by being together, intensive
search is more e¤ective when unwed couples spend considerable time together,
perhaps including trial marriages. Yet when contraceptives are crude and un-
reliable, trial marriages and other premarital contact greatly raise the risk of
pregnancy. The signi…cant increase during this century in the frequency of trial
24
This fact is taken fromGreenwood and Guner(2009), and is analyzed from a di¤erentperspective there.
42
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
copy image from pdf to; paste image into preview pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
how to copy pictures from pdf; cut image from pdf online
marriages and other premarital contact has been in part a rational response to
major improvements in contraceptive techniques, and is not decisive evidence
that young people now value sexual experiences more than they did in the past.
An interesting avenue for future research might be to investigate the implications of the
contraceptive revolution for marriage and divorce.
25 26
12 Appendix
12.1 Lemmas
12.1.1 Lemma 1
Proof. Conjecture a solution for the decision rules and value functions in steady state.
Speci…cally, assume that:
(i) 1
a
(j;
e
j) = 2
a;s
(j;
e
j) = 1
a;p
s
(j) = 1 and 1
p
(j;
e
j) = 0 for all j;
e
j2 A,
(ii) 1
a
(j;
e
j) = 1
a;p
s
(j) = 0 and 1
p
(j;
e
j) = 2
p;s
(j;
e
j) = 1 for all j;
e
j2 P,
(iii) A
m
(j;
e
j) = A
m
(j), where A
m
(j) is a function, for all j;
e
j2 A,
(iv) P
m
(j;
e
j) = P
m
(j), where P
m
(j) is a function, for all j;
e
j2 P.
This conjectured solution will now be veri…ed.
To begin with, establish that there is no incentive for a matched couple in A to switch
to P, or vice versa. To this end, subtract (1) from (3) to obtain P
m
(j;
e
j) A
m
(j;
e
j) = j  c.
Clearly, P
m
(j;
e
j)  A
m
(j;
e
j) R 0 as j R c. Thus, there is no gain for a matched couple (j;
e
j)
2P or another one (j;
e
j) 2 A to switch from their respective social classes.
Now, (i) and (ii) imply that a
m
(j;
e
j) = 1 and p
m
(j;
e
j) = 0 for (j;
e
j) 2 A, and a
m
(j;
e
j) = 0
and p
m
(j;
e
j) = 1 for (j;
e
j) 2 P. Given (i), (ii), and (iii) when (j;
e
j) 2 A equations (1) and
25
Interestingly, Choo and Siow (2006) estimate, using an non-transferable utility model of the U.S.
marriage market, that the gains for marriage accruing to young adults fell sharply between 1971 and 1981.
26
The introduction of infant formula is another example of a small invention having a large impact
on household activity. Albanesi and Olivetti (2009) argue that this promoted labor-force participation by
married women (in addition to advances in pediatric and obstetric medicine). It could also impact on
marriage and divorce.
43
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
copy images from pdf to word; copy image from pdf to pdf
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and And PDF file text processing like text writing, extracting, searching, etc Image Process.
copy image from pdf to powerpoint; paste image into pdf preview
(2) can be represented by
A
m
(j) = u+ (1  )A
m
(j)+ A
s
(j);
and
A
s
(j) = w + A
m
(j) + (1   )A
s
(j):
Clearly, when (j;
e
j) 2 A then A
m
(j;
e
j) is no longer a function of
e
j. This occurs because
e
j
will always desire to remain matched with j and vice versa. Direct calculation reveals that
(24)
A
m
(j) =
[1   (1   )]u +w
;
and
(25)
A
s
(j) =
[1  (1  )]w + u
;
where   (1  )[1   (1      )] > 0. Thus, point (iii) has been shown. For future
reference, let an asterisk attached to a function signify its closed-form solution in a steady
state, de…ned only over the equilibrium set of agents that live in the relevant social class.
Observe that A
m
(j) > A
s
(j), as was conjectured, because u > w.
Likewise, for (j;
e
j) 2 P note that equations (3) and (4) can then be rewritten as
P
m
(j) = u+ j   c+ (1  )P
m
(j)+ P
s
(j);
and
P
s
(j) = w + P
m
(j)+ (1  )P
s
(j):
The solutions to these two equations are given by
(26)
P
m
(j) =
(u+ j   c)[1  (1  )] +w
;
and
(27)
P
s
(j) =
[1  (1  )]w + (u+ j   c)
:
44
It is easy to see that
P
m
(j)  P
s
(j) =
(u +j   c  w)(1  )
:
Thus, P
m
(j) > P
s
(j) when u+ j   c > w, which will hold for all j > c. Therefore, point
(iv) has been established.
Conditions (i) to (iv) imply that P
s
(j) < A
s
(j) for j 2 A and P
s
(j) > A
s
(j) for j 2 P.
First, note that in the conjectured steady state a
s
i
=0 for all i > b and p
s
i
=0 for all i < b.
Using this observation, subtract (2) from (4) in steady state to get
P
s
(j)  A
s
(j) = 
n
X
i=b+1
p
s
i
[a
m
(j;
e
j
i
)A
m
(j;
e
j
i
)+p
m
(j;
e
j
i
)P
m
(j;
e
j
i
)]

b
X
i=1
a
s
i
[a
m
(j;
e
j
i
)A
m
(j;
e
j
i
)+p
m
(j;
e
j
i
)P
m
(j;
e
j
i
)]
+f(1  ) + 
n
X
i=b+1
p
s
i
[1   a
m
(j;
e
j
i
)  p
m
(j;
e
j
i
)]gf1
a;p
s
(j)A
s
(j)+ [1  1
a;p
s
(j)]P
s
(j)g
f(1  )+ 
b
X
i=1
a
s
i
[1  a
m
(j;
e
j
i
)  p
m
(j;
e
j
i
)]gf1
a;p
s
(j)A
s
(j) + [1  1
a;p
s
(j)]P
s
(j)g:
For j 2 P (which implies j > c) it is easy to see that
P
s
(j)  A
s
(j) = 
n
X
i=b+1
p
s
i
P
m
(j;
e
j
i
)  
b
X
i=1
a
s
i
[a
m
(j;
e
j
i
)A
m
(j;
e
j
i
)+ p
m
(j;
e
j
i
)P
m
(j;
e
j
i
)]
+(1  )P
s
(j)   f(1  ) + 
b
X
i=0
a
s
i
[1  a
m
(j;
e
j
i
)  p
m
(j;
e
j
i
)]gP
s
(j)
> P
m
(j)   
b
X
i=1
a
s
i
[a
m
(j;
e
j
i
)+ p
m
(j;
e
j
i
)]P
m
(j;
e
j
i
)

b
X
i=1
a
s
i
[1   a
m
(j;
e
j
i
)  p
m
(j;
e
j
i
)]P
m
(j;
e
j
i
)
= P
m
(j)   
b
X
i=1
a
s
i
P
m
(j;
e
j
i
)> 0
The …rst inequality relies on the facts that P
m
(j;
e
j
i
)> A
m
(j;
e
j
i
)and P
m
(j;
e
j
i
)> P
s
(j) for
j2 P. The latter fact is intuitive. Surely, a promiscuous type would prefer to have sex now
45
and search for another partner later as opposed to searching now and having sex later. It
is straightforward to establish. The last inequality employs the fact that P
m
(j) > P
m
(j;
e
j
i
)
for
e
j
i
2A. Again this is appealing. A promiscuous type should prefer a partner whose type
also lies in P. This, too, is not di¢ cult to prove. Thus, no unmatched j 2 P would want to
switch. A similar argument can be made for j 2 A.
It is easy to deduce that the above facts established about the value functions support
the conjectured decision rules in (i) and (ii).
12.1.2 Lemma 3
Proof. The proof proceeds using the guess-and-verify strategy. To this end, suppose that
the value functions A
m
(j;
e
j), A
s
(j), P
m
(j;
e
j), and P
s
(j) immediately jump to their new
steady-state values upon the once-and-all decline in c. Now, consider a pair in the situation
described by Point 1 in Section 6.1. The relevant payo¤s for j when matched with
e
j, for
j;
e
j2 fj
d+1
; ;j
n
g, will be given by (26) and (27). Note that when this match breaks up
person j will not have to worry about subsequently matching in P with a
e
j2 fj
1
; ;j
d
g,
given Point 2. Thus, from their own limited perspective, these agents will be immediately
jumping into the new steady state since they will never have to mix with a type in the set
fj
1
; ;j
d
g. Next, focus upon those individuals in the situation outlined by Point 2. Their
payo¤s will again be described by (26) and (27). Again, if they switch to P they will not
have to worry about matching next period with a
e
j2 fj
1
; ;j
d
g. So, from their viewpoint,
these agents will be immediately moving into the new steady-state situation in P. (The
optimality of the steady state from an individual’s perspective is detailed in the proof of
Lemma 1.)
Now, move to Point 3. Let j 2 fj
1
; ;j
d
gand
e
j 2 fj
d+1
; ;j
b
g. For it to be op-
timal for j to be matched with
e
jin this situation in A it must transpire that A
m
(j;
e
j) >
maxfA
s
(j);P
s
(j)g and P
m
(j;
e
j) < maxfA
m
(j;
e
j);A
s
(j);P
s
(j)g. First, by subtracting (1)
from (3) it can be seen that P
m
(j;
e
j)   A
m
(j;
e
j) = j   c R 0 as j R c. Therefore, j’s …rst
choice is a match in A, while
e
j’s would be one in P. Now, there are two cases to consider
46
for j. Either she is in a mixing situation with
e
j[implying 2
p;s
(j;
e
j) = 1] or she is refusing a
promiscuous match all together [2
p;s
(j;
e
j) = 0]. Take the latter situation …rst. The conjec-
ture is that today’s value functions will immediately jump to their steady-state values and
remain there. This would imply that 1
a;p
s
(j;
e
j) = 1, a
m
(j;
e
j) = 1, p
m
(j;
e
j) = 0. Using this on
the righthand sides of (1) and (2) and solving for A
m
(j;
e
j) and A
s
(j) results in
A
m
(j;
e
j) = A
m
(j);
[for j  j
d
<j
d+1
e
jand a
m
(j;
e
j) = 1]
and
A
s
(j) = A
s
(j); (for j  j
d
),
where A
m
(j) and A
s
(j) are speci…ed by (24) and (25). Imposing this conjecture on (4)
leads to
P
s
(j) = w + 
n
X
k=d+1
p
s
k
[a
m
(j;
e
j
k
)A
m
(j;
e
j
k
)+ p
m
(j;
e
j
k
)P
m
(j;
e
j
k
)]
+(1  )A
s
(j)
< A
s
(j) < A
m
(j) (for j  j
d
<j
d+1
e
j):
Thus, j will remain happy with her lot in A, so there is no need to change her strategy
today, taking as given
e
j’s strategy.
Next, consider the mixing situation for j. Here, the solution for A
m
(j;
e
j) reads
A
m
(j;
e
j) =
u+ (1  )(j   c
)=2+ A
s
(j)
1  (1   )
<A
m
(j) [for j  j
d
<
e
jand a
m
(j;
e
j) = 1=2]:
For j to agree to a mixing situation it must transpire that A
m
(j;
e
j) > A
s
(j). Observe that
A
m
(j;
e
j) is increasing in j. Thus, mixing cannot occur for any j < j
p
where p = argmax
i
fi :
A
m
(j
i
;
e
j) < A
s
(j
i
)g. When j > j
p
,there will be no incentive for j to switch strategies.
Now, move to person
e
j. For
e
j to be matched with j it must happen that A
m
(
e
j;j) >
maxfA
s
(
e
j);P
s
(
e
j)g. Person
e
j may …nd himself in one of two situations: either a mixing
situation or one where j will refuse a promiscuous match. In the former 2
p;s
(j;
e
j) = 1, while
in the latter 2
p;s
(j;
e
j) = 0. Take the latter case and suppose that the steady-state solution
47
holds true at some point in time. Here, a
m
(j;
e
j) = 1 and p
m
(j;
e
j) = 0. It is then easy to
deduce that A
m
(
e
j;j) and A
s
(
e
j) are given by
A
m
(
e
j;j) = u +(1  )A
m
(
e
j;j) +P
s
(
e
j)
=
u+ P
s
(
e
j)
1 (1   )
>A
m
(
e
j) [for j  j
d
<j
d+1
e
jand a
m
(j;
e
j) = 1];
and
A
s
(
e
j) = w + 
d
X
h=1
a
s
h
[a
m
(
e
j;j
h
)A
m
(
e
j;j
h
)+ p
m
(
e
j;j
h
)P
m
(
e
j;j
h
)]
+(1  )P
s
(
e
j)
< P
s
(
e
j) < P
m
(
e
j) (for j
d+1
e
j).
[Note that P
m
(
e
j;j
h
)> A
m
(
e
j;j
h
)for
e
jand 0  a
m
(
e
j;j
h
)+p
m
(
e
j;j
h
) 1:] Now, an abstinent
match cannot occur for any
e
j> j
q
where q = argmax
i
fi : A
m
(
e
j
i
;j) > P
s
(
e
j
i
)g. When this
is true, there is no incentive for
e
j to shift from the conjectured strategy. Similarly, it is
straightforward to calculate that when there is mixing
A
m
(
e
j;j) =
u+ (1  )(
e
j  c
)=2+ P
s
(
e
j)
1  (1  )
>A
m
(
e
j) [for j  j
d
<j
d+1
e
jand a
m
(j;
e
j) = 1=2]:
As can be seen, mixing will yield
e
ja higher level of utility than a purely abstinent match
when
e
j> c. Mixing cannot occur for any
e
j> j
r
where r = argmax
i
fi : A
m
(
e
j
i
;j) > P
s
(
e
j
i
)g.
Individual
e
j will have no incentive to deviate from the conjectured strategy when this is
true.
The situations described in Points 4 and 5 can be similarly analyzed. The reader is
spared the details.
12.2 Laws of Motion for the Type Distributions
Recall thatthe distributions M
a
;S
a
;M
p
and S
p
are nonnormalized. Let 
P
n
h=1
P
n
i=1
M
a
(j
h
;
e
j
i
)
represent the number of attached agents in A, while similarly  
P
n
h=1
S
a
(j
h
)is thenumber
of unattachedones. Likewise, the number ofunattached people in P reads # 
P
n
h=1
S
p
(j
h
).
48
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested