telerik pdf viewer asp.net demo : How to copy an image from a pdf in preview software control project winforms azure windows UWP recruiting_report_feb10_final0-part619

the voice of foster care
Recruiting the 
Recruiting the 
foster care 
foster care 
workforce of 
workforce of 
the future
the future
A guide for 
fostering services
Helen Clarke
together for chang
e
How to copy an image from a pdf in preview - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste picture into pdf preview; how to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document
How to copy an image from a pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy images from pdf file; copy image from pdf to pdf
Contents 
Foreword 
Acknowledgements   
1.  Why choose a career in fostering? 
What are we offering foster families?    
Are there enough people out there wanting to foster?   
Getting our message right 
How long do people stay?  
2.  The recruitment team   
Roles of the post responsible for recruitment   
Identifying who else is involved   
10 
Who does what at which stage?   
12 
3.  The recruitment strategy – getting it right 
15 
How big should a recruitment strategy be? 
15 
How do you decide what should really be done?   
16 
Putting effective systems in place  
20 
Identifying what works best 
21 
How do you compare with other fostering services? 
21 
4.  Finding the people who could foster 
22 
Annual recruitment target 
22 
How do you identify a recruitment target? 
22 
What information can be gathered? 
22 
Does your fostering service have the capacity to recruit new foster carers?   
25 
5.  Promoting foster care   
26 
What methods work best?  
26 
Continually spreading the word   
27 
How much does it cost?   
29 
6.  Managing interest and encouraging enquiries   
30 
Making it easy 
30 
First impressions count   
30 
Gathering information and encouraging applicants 
31 
Providing information and allaying initial concerns 
32 
Meeting the team   
33 
7.  Approving new fostering households   
36 
One in 10 – the truth about conversion rates 
36 
Keeping in touch and not losing people   
37 
Managing the assessment process 
38 
Conclusion   
40 
Appendix 
Support that is essential to foster families   
41 
Further information   
45 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
how to paste a picture in a pdf; paste image in pdf preview
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
NET. An independent .NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed. Access
how to copy picture from pdf; copy picture from pdf reader
Foreword 
The Fostering Network has for many years been working with fostering services to assist them in 
recruiting and retaining the foster carers they need to look after the over 50,000 children living in 
foster care in the UK on any one day. 
Since July 2004, with funding from the Department for Children, Schools and Families, we have 
been working with fostering services by supporting them and offering advice and guidance on how 
to improve the ways that foster carers are attracted and encouraged to stay in the profession. 
This guide is the culmination of over five years work as part of the Attracting and Keeping Carers 
project and builds on previous publications such as the 
Good Practice Guidelines for the 
Recruitment of Foster Carers
and the interim report 
Improving Effectiveness in Foster Care 
Recruitment
.  
This publication draws on evidence from a recent survey of fostering services, follow-up 
interviews, and focus group work with representatives from local authorities and independent 
fostering providers, as well as feedback from an ongoing programme of training events, 
seminars, workshops and conferences.  
It reflects where the sector has got to with recruitment and looks towards a future where a 
systematic, planned and strategic approach is adopted by every fostering service allowing greater 
co-operation, collaboration, discussion and development to ensure that we build a workforce that 
more people will aspire to join. One that is recognised, valued and rewarded for the extraordinary 
work that foster carers do. 
Within this report key elements required to recruit foster carers have been drawn together in one 
helpful guide for fostering services, both local authorities and independent fostering providers. 
This provides the opportunity to learn from fostering services’ past experiences and to draw on 
examples of good practice and proven successes.  
Together we can work towards a future where we can encourage the people we need to take on a 
unique role in the children’s workforce – that of being a foster carer.  
Robert Tapsfield 
Chief Executive 
The Fostering Network 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net. You may get document preview image from stream object in C#.net.
cut image from pdf online; copy image from pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net. You may get document preview image from stream object in C#.net.
cut and paste image from pdf; how to copy an image from a pdf to word
Acknowledgements 
The Fostering Network would like to thank all the fostering services that have engaged in events 
and activities as part of the Attracting and Keeping Carers project since it began in 2004.  
This guide is the result of a year-long project commencing with a one-day workshop in December 
2008. The Fostering Network would like to thank Martin Farrell for facilitating the workshop and 
the following representatives from fostering services for attending and contributing: 
Ruth Martin, Bath and North East Somerset 
Flo Chiwetu, Banya Fostering 
Sarah Bebbington, Bradford City Council 
Karen Amegashitsi, Bristol City Council 
Florence Coulter, Durham County Council 
Martin Gilboy, Fostering Solutions 
Gill Burtwell and Jane Gallagher, Hampshire County Council 
Alice Moore, Hertfordshire County Council  
Susan Buckman, London Borough of Waltham Forest  
Angie Hanson, TACT East London 
In total 81 fostering services (57 local authorities in England, nine in Wales and 15 independent 
fostering providers) kindly took the time to respond to an online survey carried out in 2009. The 
following people also generously spared their time to discuss further their fostering service’s 
experiences and challenges in telephone interviews held in late 2009. 
Maria White, Oxfordshire County Council 
Sally Frost, Suffolk County Council 
Caroline Quint, Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council  
Julie Ellis, St Helens Council  
Clive Attard, Leicestershire County Council 
Amanda Fritz and Barbara Hewett, Staffordshire County Council 
Sue Westwood, Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council  
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
copy pdf picture to powerpoint; how to copy a pdf image into a word document
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
An independent .NET framework viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able
how to cut image from pdf; how to copy image from pdf to word
1. Why choose a career in fostering? 
On an annual basis fostering services collectively invest millions of pounds to promote their need 
for foster carers, process applications and support foster families in their role. It is estimated 
that each new foster family costs £11, 500
1
to recruit (this includes spending on advertisements, 
preparation training and assessment time). Fostering services are continually looking for 
ultimate success in their recruitment of foster carers - they are looking for a magic solution to 
the continual shortage of foster carers. However, to be truly successful at recruiting the foster 
carers of the future we need to be confident that we are encouraging people into a service that 
they would want to join.  
In 2004 the Fostering Network announced a shortage of 10,000 foster carers in the UK. This was 
based on a survey of local authorities with the specific intention of identifying how many additional 
foster families were needed on top of the current pool to be able to offer all children and young 
people in care placement choice.  
Providing placement stability and finding a foster family that can meet the needs of all looked-
after children first time is at the centre of a fostering service’s objectives.  
What are we offering foster families?  
The Fostering Network recently carried out surveys as part of our new campaign, 
Together for 
Change
. We asked foster carers about their views on payments, support and learning and 
development opportunities. The feedback from our members showed a very varied picture across 
the country. Most worryingly, the surveys found a significant number of foster carers stating that 
they had considered ceasing to foster in the past year or two. 40 per cent of foster carers had 
seriously considered ceasing to work for their fostering service due to a lack of support
2
and 36 
per cent seriously considering giving up fostering because it does not provide a living wage
3
Without improving what is offered to foster families, the sector will continue to find it very difficult 
to attract enough people to fostering. 
Furthermore, the task of fostering can be very challenging. Foster families look after children 
with a whole range of needs and with challenging behaviour. Caring for children on a day-to-day 
basis requires hard work and dedication and foster carers benefit from round the clock, 
accessible and flexible support from their fostering service.  
Therefore, central to any fostering service’s success in the recruitment of foster carers is the 
‘product’. By the product we mean everything we are offering to and expecting from people when 
they embark upon a career in fostering. If fostering services are serious about recruiting foster 
carers they need to be confident they are making the proposition as attractive as possible. The 
appendix looks at a range of support and services that are invaluable to foster families, without 
which fostering services will continue to struggle to attract and retain sufficient numbers of 
people. 
1
Tapsfield, R and Collier, F 
The Cost of Foster Care
(The Fostering Network and BAAF, 2005) 
2
Clarke, H 
Getting the Support they Need
(The Fostering Network, 2009) 
3
Tearse, M 
Love Fostering – Need Pay 
(The Fostering Network, 2010)
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Remove PDF image in preview without adobe
cut and paste pdf image; copy and paste image from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines in VB.NET. Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF control.
cut picture pdf; how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document
Six out of 10 fostering 
services did not meet  
their recruitment  
target in 2008-09. 
Nearly half of fostering 
services reported having 
difficulty recruiting people 
from specific minority 
ethnic groups in 2008-09. 
Are there enough people out there wanting to foster? 
Although we know a lot still needs to be done to invest properly and fully in fostering, fostering 
services report significant interest from the public. Respondees to the recent survey carried out 
by the Fostering Network shared that nearly 15,000 people had contacted just over 35 fostering 
services in 2008-09 (this figure included a substantial number of enquiries to three of England’s 
largest county councils and two of the largest independent fostering providers with offices across 
the country).  
Although general interest in fostering appears to be high, 
fostering services are finding that very few enquirers progress 
to become an approved foster family. Worryingly recruitment 
targets are not being met by many fostering services. 
Fostering services reported a number of reasons for not 
managing to recruit foster carers during 2008-09. The top three reasons were: 
1.  Lack of applications from suitable people. 
2.  Applicants with unsuitable accommodation. 
3.  Staff shortages so unable to process applications. 
Lack of applications from suitable people 
It is true that most people considering fostering are motivated by a desire to help children, and 
this will be at the root of any decision to foster. However, whether or not they have the skills and 
qualities to foster is another matter. New applicants to fostering have to demonstrate that they 
meet induction standards and will follow a development plan supported by their supervising 
social worker. They will also be working with children with often challenging behaviour alongside 
a team of other professionals. Fostering is not for everyone and we need to be even more clear 
about who we do need and attract them to the profession by rewarding and supporting them 
properly. 
Fostering services also reported not being able to find enough people 
to come forward from certain minority ethnic communities. A quarter 
of fostering services had set goals which varied from specific targets 
to just trying to recruit people from as wide a range of ethnic 
backgrounds as possible. Fostering services reported acute 
shortages in some instances, and mentioned the challenges of finding 
foster carers in response to a recent, often unexpected, recruitment 
need often linked to refugee and asylum seeking children.  
Applications with unsuitable accommodation 
Fostering services, particularly in urban areas or areas of deprivation, are struggling to find 
enough people to come forward to foster who have sufficient space in their homes. Applicants do 
not always understand that it is inappropriate for a looked-after child to share a room with their 
own children.   
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF
how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint; how to paste picture on pdf
Furthermore, a recent survey of over 300 current foster carers carried out by the Centre for 
Social Justice revealed that 55 per cent were aged 35 to 54 and living in two parent families
4
. This 
finding resonates with other recent studies and is a cause for concern for fostering services;  
developments in British society mean that fewer households can afford not be working and are 
able to offer a bedroom to one or more foster child, especially as a greater number of children 
are staying at home with their parents well into their 20s.  
Staff shortages 
There is a national shortage of social workers and some posts in fostering services are currently 
vacant. There is also not always sufficient funding to staff teams at the level required to process 
applications to foster. This can mean that applicants are put on hold or assessments take many 
months to complete, with social workers having to prioritise other aspects of their role. This could 
also have an impact right at the very early stages with initial enquiries remaining unanswered. 
Getting our message right 
How people are encouraged into fostering in the future is definitely going to be a challenge. 
Focusing exclusively on children in promotional materials and communication tools is not 
enough.  
TOP TIP 
Fostering services should spend time talking to their foster carers about what attracted them to 
fostering, as well as what keeps them fostering and what would put them off. After all they 
decided that they wanted to foster children and may be able to help identify what will work in 
encouraging other people.  
It is important to challenge and break down the preconceptions/stereotypes held about fostering, 
without alienating current foster carers and offending children and young people in care.  
In 2007-08 the Fostering Network, funded by the Children’s Workforce Development Council, 
commissioned market research to help identify how to encourage more people into a career in 
fostering
5
. It found that the way the task of fostering is communicated is essential for motivating 
people.  
The findings recommended that: 
• 
In order to tackle the challenge of getting enough of the right people to come forward we need 
to portray a realistic but not offputting view of fostering. By knowing more about who we are 
good at attracting and who is more likely to be a committed foster carer, we have more 
chance of success. 
• 
Promotional work needs to highlight why people could be good foster carers and get people to 
consider fostering in the first place. A lot of promotional materials assume that people are 
already thinking about fostering. 
4
Couldn’t Care Less
: A policy report from the Children in Care Working Group (The Centre for Social 
Justice, 2008) www.centreforsocialjustice.org.uk
5
Fostering: recognise the qualities you’ve got (The Fostering Network, 2008) 
55 per cent of fostering 
services reported losing  
10 per cent or less of  
their fostering households 
in 2008-09. 
Just over half of fostering services 
achieved a net gain in the number 
of fostering households in 2008-09. 
• 
Fostering services could be more successful if they thought more about who they really 
needed – profiling current and potential foster carers and considering their core values and 
motivations to help devise a recruitment message. 
• 
It is a good idea to focus communication on emphasising the skills and qualities needed to be 
a good foster carer. 
• 
Word of mouth remains the most successful recruitment tool as foster carers can share what 
they do, their status in the community and the rewards (both emotional and financial) they 
gain from providing foster care. 
• 
Applicants need supporting and motivating throughout the whole journey from initial interest 
through to contacting the fostering service and eventually going on to be an approved foster 
family. 
How long do people stay? 
Previous studies have identified that less than 10 per cent of foster carers cease fostering every 
year
6
. Those foster carers who left spent an average of seven and a half years fostering, with a 
quarter fostering for more than 10 years.  
Retirements and ceasing to foster  
The Fostering Network’s survey asked fostering services to tell us about the number of foster 
families that left their service during 2008-09, and the reasons for this. 58 fostering services 
provided data on the number of foster families that left, which amounted to nine per cent of their 
workforce. 
Fostering services reported a range of different reasons for their 
foster carers ceasing to foster. The most common was retirement (47 
per cent), followed by personal reasons such as poor health (16 per 
cent). Fostering services deregistered some foster carers (12 per 
cent) and others (3 per cent) left because they were dissatisfied with 
treatment by their fostering service. 
In 2009 the Fostering Network published a report warning of an impending recruitment crisis as 
two-thirds of the current fostering workforce is aged over 50
7
. It is essential that fostering 
services regularly review their pool of foster carers and where possible anticipate when 
retirements are likely to happen, either linked to the age of the foster carers or the ending of a 
particular placement. It is important that supervising social workers keep the post responsible for 
recruitment informed of potential retirements. 
Turnover of foster carers 
Often fostering services are only managing to maintain 
their pool of foster carers – recruiting at best only as many 
as the number who are leaving. In the recent survey, 
fostering services were asked about the number of foster 
households recruited in 2008-09 and the number which 
left. Of the 30 fostering services that provided this 
6
Triseliotis J, Borland M and Hill M 
Delivering Foster Care 
(BAAF, 2000) 
7
Clarke H 
The Age of Foster Care
(The Fostering Network, 2009) 
information, just over a half managed to achieve a net gain on their number of fostering 
households. 
A fostering service needs to manage their available workforce and make sure that they are doing 
all that is possible to encourage people to continue fostering for as long as they want to. The 
length of the time it takes to assess a new family means that gaps are rarely filled quickly and 
fostering services might find themselves deficient of resources for quite some time if they do not 
keep on top of recruitment. 
Exit interviews 
The importance of an exit interview must not be undervalued. It is essential to hear the views of 
all those foster carers leaving a fostering service irrespective of the reasons for their departure. 
By asking foster carers to feed back, a fostering service can explore ways to improve its provision 
of support in the future. 
There are a variety of different ways to ask for this feedback. For example, foster carers can be 
invited to respond to a short questionnaire about their experiences with the service, or a 
supervising social worker can carry out a short exit interview asking for feedback on a number of 
key areas. Team managers and directors of fostering services also carry out exit interviews for 
some fostering services. 
What to cover in an exit interview: 
• 
Foster carer’s reason(s) for leaving the service. 
• 
Foster carer’s views on the support provided by the fostering service. 
• 
Discussion about possible ways in which the foster carer might continue to be involved 
(depending on their reason for leaving). 
• 
Any recommendations from the foster carer on the future development of the fostering 
service. 
• 
Opportunity for the foster carer to feed back further in writing. 
To get the most out of any exit interview it is important that the foster carer feels comfortable 
confiding in the person to whom they are talking. Even if they have had a generally positive 
experience with the fostering service, it is still helpful if they feel they can speak candidly about 
their experience and that their views will be fed back to inform the future development of the 
service. 
Only a third of fostering 
services require the post 
responsible for recruitment 
to have a background in 
recruitment. 
2. The recruitment team 
Fostering services with a dedicated recruitment post (regardless 
of professional background) have more success in recruiting 
foster carers
8
. The skills set required by fostering services for this 
post can vary hugely. In some instances this post is not a qualified 
social worker and two-thirds of fostering services, as reported in 
the recent survey, expect the post to have a background in or 
experience of marketing. It is of course possible to develop skills 
and gain experience in the role but fostering services have to be mindful of the wide range of 
tasks expected of this post. If they do not directly have the experience the service should ensure 
that they can call on the assistance of those who do. HR and marketing departments can provide 
excellent advice and support.  
Having a dedicated recruitment post has a range of benefits for a fostering service keen to 
improve its recruitment of foster carers. These include: 
• 
Allocated time to focus fully and become experts on the task of recruiting foster carers. 
• 
Ability to take full responsibility for the recruitment of foster carers and ownership of the 
strategy and process. 
• 
Availability of time to focus on the needs of the fostering service and fully research and 
implement a strategic approach to recruitment. 
• 
Opportunity to free up time for colleagues to focus on their own roles, such as supervising 
placements, handling placements of looked-after children and developing other areas of the 
fostering service. 
• 
Time to develop contacts within the fostering service and the wider community. 
The range of skills involved reflects the many stages of the recruitment process and the need to 
work across the whole of the fostering service. It is essential that this post has links throughout 
the fostering service and should not be working in isolation. It is useful for them to attend a range 
of team meetings and to be kept informed about trends in the children needing foster care, the 
use of the current pool of foster carers, the commissioning of placements with other fostering 
services and colleagues recruiting to other posts in the children’s workforce.  
Roles of the post responsible for recruitment 
Fostering services have wide ranging expectations of the roles and responsibilities of the person 
who has main responsibility for recruitment of foster carers. Core tasks include: 
• 
Writing, monitoring and evaluating the fostering service’s recruitment strategy. 
• 
Managing the recruitment budget. 
• 
Developing and producing promotional materials. 
• 
Promoting the need for foster carers in the local media and area. 
• 
Organising information sessions and other recruitment events. 
• 
Networking and outreach work with community organisations and groups. 
• 
Co-ordinating the fostering service’s approach to recruitment and motivating and keeping the 
team informed. 
8
Clarke, H 
Improving Effectiveness in Foster Care Recruitment 
(The Fostering Network, 2006) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested