telerik pdf viewer mvc : How to copy picture from pdf file Library application component .net html wpf mvc reputation%20in%20online%20markets0-part678

Reputation in Online Markets:  
Some Negative Feedback 
Jennifer Brown 
Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics 
University of California, Berkeley 
John Morgan 
Haas School of Business and Department of Economics 
University of California, Berkeley 
February 2006 
Abstract: Online markets have dramatically altered the retail landscape. By 
eliminating barriers associated with geography as well as the physical costs of 
maintaining a storefront, online markets have created a “democracy” of buyers 
and sellers. However, the fluidity of this marketplace poses unique challenges—
owing to the relative anonymity of transactions, the need for trust is paramount. 
Solving the “trust problem” represents a key competitive advantage for many of 
the successful players in the online space. For instance, much of the remarkable 
success of eBay has stemmed from its ability to create valuable and informative 
reputations for its users through its feedback system. The lock-in associated with 
a user’s reputation on eBay helped it to stave off challenges by Amazon and 
Yahoo. We highlight how eBay’s solution to the “trust problem,” has led to the 
existence of a “market for feedback” whose sole purpose is the “manufacture” of 
reputation for eBay users. We present a case study and statistical analysis of this 
market and show it as a crucial challenge to eBay’s future competitive advantage 
and, more generally, to solving the “trust problem” in other online markets. 
We thank Steven Tadelis and Ryan Kellogg, as well as participants at the Berkeley CED Executive Session, for their 
helpful comments. The first author gratefully acknowledges the financial support of the Institute for Business and 
Economic Research (IBER) at the University of California, Berkeley. The second author gratefully acknowledges 
the financial support of the National Science Foundation. 
How to copy picture from pdf file - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste image into pdf form; how to copy text from pdf image to word
How to copy picture from pdf file - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy and paste a pdf image; how to copy pdf image into powerpoint
1
Reputation in Online Markets:  
Some Negative Feedback 
February 2006 
Abstract: Online markets have dramatically altered the retail landscape. By 
eliminating barriers associated with geography as well as the physical costs of 
maintaining a storefront, online markets have created a “democracy” of buyers 
and sellers. However, the fluidity of this marketplace poses unique challenges—
owing to the relative anonymity of transactions, the need for trust is paramount. 
Solving the “trust problem” represents a key competitive advantage for many of 
the successful players in the online space. For instance, much of the remarkable 
success of eBay has stemmed from its ability to create valuable and informative 
reputations for its users through its feedback system. The lock-in associated with 
a user’s reputation on eBay helped it to stave off challenges by Amazon and 
Yahoo. We highlight how eBay’s solution to the “trust problem,” has led to the 
existence of a “market for feedback” whose sole purpose is the “manufacture” of 
reputation for eBay users. We present a case study and statistical analysis of this 
market and show it as a crucial challenge to eBay’s future competitive advantage 
and, more generally, to solving the “trust problem” in other online markets. 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
NET image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF document file page
how to copy images from pdf; how to copy pdf image to word document
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Enable users to insert images to PDF file in ASPX webpage project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
copy a picture from pdf to word; paste picture pdf
2
 Introduction 
While measuring the Internet’s reach is far from an exact science, no online census reports would 
dispute claims that hundreds of millions of individuals across the world are active Internet users. 
Internet traffic rankings suggest that these users conduct online searches—Yahoo!, Microsoft, 
MSN and Google take the top four spaces in terms of unique visitors.
1
But many of these users 
do more than simply surf the web—they participate as buyers and sellers in a vast, global bazaar. 
Two online marketplaces, eBay and Amazon, are among the top 10 most visited sites on the 
Internet and, indeed, more than 627 million people globally shopped online in 2005.
2
EBay is a giant in the online marketplace. With 135 million registered users listing more than 1.4 
billion items in 2004 alone, eBay dominates the online auction industry.
3
From its humble 
origins as a marketplace for Pez dispensers, eBay has grown to be the fifth most visited web 
property in the US.
4
Throughout its relatively short history, eBay has faced serious challenges to its preeminence in 
the US. Its most notable rivals, Amazon and Yahoo, entered the online auction space in the late 
1990s, undercutting eBay’s fees and using their considerable online presence to promote their 
auction sites. EBay continues to face stiff competition worldwide—for example, Yahoo is the 
principle online auction site in Japan, and a host of local competitors as well as Yahoo in the 
emerging Chinese market.  
How was eBay able to survive these early challenges and expand its market share to 64.3 percent 
by 2001?
5
What enabled eBay to grow into such a dominant player? What does the future hold 
for eBay and online marketplaces more generally? 
Online auctions are what economists term “two-sided markets”—the greater the number of 
buyers and sellers using the exchange platform, the more valuable the market. An online seller’s 
revenue increases with the number of interested bidders, while an online buyer benefits both in 
terms of increased product variety and price competition with more sellers. Because service 
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word; how to copy pdf image to powerpoint
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
how to paste a picture into a pdf document; copying a pdf image to word
3
provision entails large fixed costs, yet low variable costs, platforms for online auctions exhibit 
strong “network effects”. The economics are similar for a wide range of other online platforms 
including Amazon marketplace, Google Adwords, as well as price comparison sites such as 
Shopper.com and MySimon.com,   
Other markets exhibit similar network effects—consider the markets for online search, operating 
systems, and office software suites. However, unlike these markets, electronic marketplaces face 
an enormous “trust problem” which may limit their growth. Specifically, a buyer in an online 
marketplace faces the risk that the seller will deliver an item which differs substantially from 
what was promised in the item description, or not deliver a product at all. The ease with which 
sellers can set up and take down virtual “storefronts” only exacerbates the trust problem. Thus, 
bidders in online auctions will discount their bids in anticipation of such undesirable events. This 
problem was even more pronounced when access to digital photographs for item listings was 
limited. Moreover, early in eBay’s history, the majority of items for sale were used. The trust 
problem is apparent—only sellers of poor quality items would be interested in the discounted 
bids offered by eBay buyers. Those with high quality used items would prefer to sell elsewhere. 
Thus, eBay faced a key challenge in establishing a successful marketplace for online auctions: 
how to solve the trust problem.  
The trust problem was not eBay’s only worry; eBay’s first-mover advantage was facing 
determined competition from Yahoo and Amazon. In other markets, such as online search and 
office  software suites, firms  with  large first-mover  advantages such as AltaVista and 
WordPerfect were eclipsed by such formidable rivals as Google and Microsoft, respectively. 
Thus, first-mover advantage alone was clearly not going to be enough to secure eBay’s 
dominance in the online auction industry—eBay needed to retain customers who were facing a 
growing selection of online auction platforms.
6
EBay’s reputation system neatly solves both the trust problem and the customer retention 
problem in the face of entry. The key to solving the trust problem is to provide good sellers with 
the incentive to list products on eBay, as well as to create a mechanism through which those 
good sellers could signal their quality. By allowing buyers and sellers of completed transactions 
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
cut picture pdf; copy a picture from pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Powerful PDF image editor control, compatible with .NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
how to copy image from pdf to word document; how to copy a picture from a pdf file
4
to offer publicly observable feedback to one another, a good seller builds a history of success and 
has an advantage in terms of buyers’ trust, and possibly premium prices, for future sales on the 
site. At the same time, negative feedback makes it more difficult for bad sellers to masquerade as 
good sellers while passing off inferior or non-existent goods on unwitting buyers. Thus, the 
reputation system enables a form of trust to be built—good sellers are rewarded for providing 
high quality service and bad sellers are punished by the loss of future sales or lower prices or 
both. As a consequence, a wide variety of new and used products are now regular eBay fare. 
The feedback system also solved the entry problem by creating customer stickiness through 
switching costs. For instance, consider an eBay seller with a large number of positive feedback 
points which attracts premium prices. Despite lower selling fees on upstart Yahoo Auctions, such 
a seller would be reluctant to switch—switching would mean rebuilding its entire reputation on 
the rival site and enjoying less than premium prices during that process. Thus, even if the seller 
were able to attract the same number of potential bidders by switching sites, it is far from clear 
that the switch would be worthwhile, even with lower fees. The case for buyers is less direct. 
While a buyer also has a reputation on eBay which conveys some advantages, the cost of “multi-
homing” between eBay and rival sites is fairly low. However, if the reputable sellers do not 
switch to the rival site, both the variety and quality of merchandise available on the other site is 
likely to be lower. Indeed, anecdotal evidence suggests that this is exactly the situation faced by 
buyers on eBay’s rival sites—less reputable sellers selling lower quality merchandise with less 
product variety. EBay’s reputation system has created substantial switching costs that rival sites 
find difficult to surmount, even through lower fees. 
While eBay’s feedback system has proven remarkably effective in solving the trust problem and 
maintaining competitive advantage in the face of entry, eBay faces a number of challenging 
future growth opportunities. Most notably, eBay projects that the bulk of its growth in the US 
online auction market will come from the sale of high-value items such as vehicles, artworks, 
and real estate. High-value transactions lead to substantial listing fees to eBay. In the last two 
quarters of fiscal year 2004, eBay reported that its motors category reported 50 percent growth in 
transaction value.
7
Furthermore, the motors category accounts for more than 33 percent of all 
transaction value in fiscal year 2004. EBay’s recent purchase of the online voice communication 
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
paste picture into pdf preview; how to cut image from pdf
VB.NET TIFF: Add New Image to TIFF File in Visual Basic .NET
". When you want to copy an image, graphics How to - Code. Here is a guide for using VB.NET code to append image or picture to TIFF file in .NET applications
how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document; how to copy a picture from a pdf
5
service Skype provides further evidence that the company expects growth in high-value items; 
eBay’s chief executive officer, Meg Whitman, claimed that the acquisition will make online 
trading easier for eBay users, especially for “big ticket” transactions.
8
Robustness of the reputation mechanisms is essential for growth of big ticket transactions in 
online marketplaces, and eBay in particular. The central dilemma is that the value of a “good 
reputation” to a bad seller, which would allow him to imitate a good seller, is considerably 
higher in markets for high-value items. Thus, even if a seller ruins his or her reputation after only 
a single large transaction, the gains from a successful scam might well be worth the cost of 
increasing his or her reputation. Clearly, the cost of “investing” in reputation is key. In this 
paper, we will show that the feedback system, which has served eBay so well and is a model for 
solving the trust problem in many online marketplaces, is a potential “Achilles heel” in terms of 
growth opportunities for high-value items. In particular, we show that the cost of investing in 
reputation is relatively small and, through a case study, illustrate how some sellers have already 
moved to take advantage of the opportunity.  
Abuse of the feedback system is not the only challenge that big ticket items bring to the online 
marketplace. Fake high value items are also an increasing problem. Again, without trust, the 
presence of fakes threatens to undermine the entire online marketplace for certain types of goods. 
For instance, a recent lead article in the New York Times brought attention to the active market 
for fake collectible jewelry on eBay.
9
While eBay claims that only a small fraction of its listings 
offer fraudulent goods, some experienced users and legitimate companies such as Tiffany 
Jewelry suggest that the sale of counterfeit items is much more pervasive in the market. An eBay 
spokesman is quoted saying, “…we don’t have any expertise [in the goods sold on eBay]… 
We’re experts at building a marketplace and bringing buyers and sellers together.” The size of 
the market and the volume of trade are both evidence of this managerial expertise, yet the 
suggestion of widespread fraud may be troubling for eBay. The notion that counterfeit goods are 
circulated in anonymous markets is not astounding, but does eBay’s reputation system not serve 
to reduce the prevalence of such fraud? Expert legal opinion highlights eBay’s role as an online 
powerhouse—if a pending court case proves that eBay facilitates fraud, the decision could affect 
not just eBay, but the future of ecommerce in general.
10
6
With its powerful online presence and significant contributions to the Internet economy, eBay’s 
successes and failures have widespread impact beyond collectibles and cars. While the lessons 
drawn here are in the context of eBay, the importance of building reputational systems has broad 
applicability, especially in online markets. For example, reputational systems are important in 
the battle for competitive advantage among e-retailers and business-to-business auctions, and in 
the growing online dating markets.
11
Before proceeding, it is useful to explain the process by which buyers and sellers obtain 
“reputation” on eBay. At the conclusion of each completed transaction on the site, the winning 
bidder and the seller have an opportunity to submit “feedback” for each other through the eBay 
system. Feedback consists of a rating—positive, neutral, or negative—as well as a brief verbal 
description of the quality of the transaction. “Great buyer. Prompt payment.” is an example of 
the qualitative feedback submitted after a typical transaction. While numeric ratings and 
comments are assigned on a per-transaction basis, feedback summary statistics are tallied by 
unique user. The most prominent feedback indicator appears next to users’ identification name 
on the site and is the overall user feedback total, calculated as the sum of all feedback points (the 
number of unique users awarding positive points minus the number of unique users assigning 
negative points to the user). Other users may click on this summary score to view a more detailed 
description of the users’ feedback information such as the exact number of positive, negative, 
and neutral feedback over several time periods as well as the detailed comments. Importantly, 
information about the item from which the feedback was derived is only available for 90 days 
following auction close. That is, once the links to past transactions have expired on a users’ 
feedback page, it is impossible to tell whether a “reputable” seller obtained that reputation by 
undertaking many large scale transactions or the same number of trivially-sized transactions. 
Obviously, a buyer might draw very different conclusions about the quality of a given seller were 
he or she able to assess the source of that seller’s reputation. 
 How Valuable is Seller Reputation? 
For eBay’s feedback system to succeed in solving the trust problem, it must be the case that 
7
reputable sellers enjoy price premia and higher probability of making a sale relative to less 
reputable sellers. Absent such differences, reputation has no value. Thus, one may naturally ask: 
“Are differences in sellers’ feedback ratings indeed reflected in prices or the probability of 
sales?” In general, higher positive feedback ratings are weakly correlated with price premia—
there appear to be diminishing returns to feedback levels. In contrast, negative feedback is 
strongly correlated with lower transaction prices overall and unsuccessful auction listings.  
Lucking-Reiley, Bryan, Prasad, and Reeves
find that positive feedback has no effect on prices 
for collectible coins, while negative feedback reduces prices.
12
Eaton examines electric guitar 
sales and finds a similar pattern; positive feedback has no impact, while negative feedback 
reduces the probability of a sale for sellers with low (less than 20) feedback points.
13
Cabral and 
Hortacsu conclude that neither positive nor negative feedback affect auction outcomes.
14
Livingston uses eBay data from 861 auctions of a specific variety of golf clubs to examine the 
effects of seller reputation on sales success and auction revenues.
15
In contrast to the previous 
studies, his results suggest that bidders are more likely to bid, and bid higher, when a seller has 
positive feedback reports. While returns from increasing from zero to 1 to 25 points is 
approximately 3.4 percent in terms of the probability of a sale and 5 percent in terms of auction 
revenue, positive reports beyond the first 25 have little impact on how the buyer rewards a 
seemingly trustworthy seller. Returns of feedback ratings in the highest quartile are positive 
(approximately another 5 percent for probability of sale and revenue), yet the marginal return for 
each individual feedback point must be extremely small if a user must accumulate more than 675 
feedback points to enjoy this reward.  
Several other studies also find that positive feedback had a positive impact on price.
16
Moreover, 
Ba and Pavlou use experiments in the field and find that willingness to pay increased with 
sellers’ positive feedback.
17
They also find that the positive effect increases with item value. 
Resnick, Zeckhauser, Swanson and Lockwood organized a series of controlled field experiments 
selling postcards on eBay.
18
Two-hundred matched pairs of postcard lots were auctioned under 
different seller identities, varying seller feedback ratings to identify the effect of experience and 
8
reputation rating on sales. Initial seller feedback ratings varied from very high (net rating of 
2000, with one negative point) to zero to negative (net rating of -2). Although Resnick 
et al.
cannot account for the possibility that sales to previous customers were responsible for the 
experienced seller’s differential success (
i.e.
private reputation), their findings do suggest that 
buyers are willing to pay approximately 8 percent more for lots sold by the more experienced 
seller identity rather than the new venders. Perhaps surprisingly, they also find that negative 
feedback has little impact on revenue. 
 A Market for Feedback 
Why might one buy a low-quality digital photo of the Golden Gate Bridge for 50 cents, or ten 
copies of an identical e-book? What motivates a buyer to pay 10 cents for a compliment 
requested from a stranger? Among others, these are important questions that might be asked of 
eBay buyers and sellers in a small, but active market for seemingly-valueless items online. The 
answer, of course, is “positive feedback”. 
Some sellers hide their offers in their text advertisements for emailed compliments (where a 
successful bidder may request the exact phrasing of the praise) and digital photographs of 
Bigfoot, national landmarks and Eminem. Other sellers offer explicitly to return positive 
feedback (and only positive feedback!) to buyers who pay the small listing price. EBay’s search 
engine makes the offers easy to retrieve—the term “positive feedback” will reveal hundreds of 
listings for low-prices, valueless item designed only to artificially enhance users’ feedback 
ratings.  
But is this indeed purely a market for feedback, or are the items being sold on the market 
actually otherwise valuable to buyers? We entered the market to investigate. We searched for 
“positive feedback”, chose a representative listing, and bought the feedback point. Figure 1 is an 
eBay screenshot from the auction. The seller offered a “Positive Feedback E-book” and promised 
“Free Positive Feedback” for $0.01 including all shipping fees. Once the one-cent payment was 
processed through Paypal, we received a three-page 
pdf 
file (Adobe Portable Document Format) 
entitled “100 Feed Back in Only 7 Days” by Dave Robinson. The first page notified readers of 
9
their re-sale rights to the document. The following is an excerpt from the e-book text: 
Look on eBay for items that cost next to nothing. You can find the eBay search feature to find 
items which cost anywhere from .01 to $1.00. Try this. ... Now bid on 100 items. If you want to 
speed things up a bit, try and find auctions with the “Buy It Now” option. If the seller offers 
PayPal as a form of payment, go right away and pay for the item. ... If you do this with a hundred 
different sellers you should be able to get your feedback score up to 100 in just a few days. 
Strong anecdotal evidence suggests that this offer, sale and exchange are typical of the 
transactions in the market for feedback. In fact, we purchased five feedback points over several 
weeks and received this identical e-book from three different sellers located the US, UK and 
Australia, respectively. 
It is likely that buyers are already aware of this feedback-enhancing strategy, given their 
participation in the auction. The email document provides both parties with evidence, however 
thin, that their transaction was not a flagrant violation of eBay guidelines. Yet, for all practical 
purposes, the item for sale was no “item” at all, but positive eBay feedback points. Indeed, 
absent the potential for increased feedback, posting such a listing on eBay makes no economic 
sense for the seller. It costs the seller 25 cents for the insertion fee and an additional 5 cents for 
the Buy-It-Now option. By setting a Buy-It-Now price equal to 1 cent with free shipping, the 
most the seller can hope to earn from this transaction is a 29 cent loss.  
While buyers and sellers actively trade feedback, eBay aims to squelch any such market. eBay 
explicitly prohibits the artificial enhancement of any member’s reputation by offering to buy, sell 
or barter feedback.
19
Members who violate the feedback-sale policy may be subject to listing 
cancellation and forfeiture of fees, limits or suspension of account privileges, loss of 
“PowerSeller” status and feedback removal. A brief, online justification for the policy reminds 
users that eBay is founded on trust, and that feedback trade undermines the integrity of the 
system. Despite the warning, our investigation reveals that eBay harbors an active and growing 
market for user feedback, where buyers and seller coordinate to artificially boost their feedback 
status. 
Now, suppose a prospective “power seller” were to follow the advice of the feedback-enhancing 
e-book. Translating the e-book’s guidance into a selling strategy is straightforward: list items at 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested