telerik pdf viewer mvc : Copy a picture from pdf SDK application service wpf azure web page dnn reputation%20in%20online%20markets1-part679

10
low prices using words such as “penny”, accept Paypal and allow buyers to Buy-It-Now to 
accelerate the exchange, and post enough listings to improve your feedback rating within days. 
Would this advice be profitable? The case of 
thelandseller
illustrates the potential impact of 
artificial feedback enhancement.
20
 Case Study: thelandseller 
While the market for feedback is itself interesting, it is the possible impact of such a market on 
business 
outside
the feedback market that deserves attention. The case of 
thelandseller
highlights 
a selling strategy adopted by many participants and confirms our intuition that eBay users are 
actually using the feedback market for gains in other markets. A registered user in the US since 
March, 2003, 
thelandseller
was an active participant in the market for feedback, accumulating 
hundreds of feedback points over a single month. 
Between June 5 and June 28, 2005, 
thelandseller
posted 304 offers for feedback enhancement on 
eBay. The majority of the listings were titled, “Riddle for a PENNY! No shipping - Positive 
Feedback”. As suggested by the descriptive headline, the feedback solicitation is couched in an 
offer of an inexpensive joke to be emailed to the buyer. While selling a joke alone is insufficient 
evidence of feedback trade, two additional features of the offer are less innocent. First, the words 
“positive feedback” are included in the title, ensuring that common feedback enhancing search 
terms will identify the posting. Second, the total joke price including shipping, handling and all 
other charges is one cent, and almost 95 percent of 
thelandseller
’s listings are Buy-It-Now. That 
is, 
thelandseller
locked in a 29 cent loss even in the event of a successful sale. Were he a keen 
eBay user trying in earnest to secure a profit selling jokes online, 
thelandseller
would certainly 
not be pricing below marginal cost. 
If the advice offered in the feedback e-book were written from a seller’s perspective, it would 
describe 
thelandseller
’s strategy almost perfectly—price low, include words such as “positive 
feedback” and “penny” in the item titles, and use the Buy-It-Now feature to speed feedback 
accumulation. 
Copy a picture from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste image on pdf preview; copy picture from pdf
Copy a picture from pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy pictures from a pdf to word; copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
11
Of the 304 offers posted by the eBay user, 
thelandseller
sold 212 jokes to 172 different eBay 
users. 
Thelandseller
’s net revenue from these activities was -$87.64 —nearly $90 worth of eBay 
fees offset by only $2.12 in revenue. In addition, 
thelandseller
purchased “Blonde Jokes Free 
Shipping - Feedback!!” for £0.01 on June 17, 2005. 
Closer  examination  of 
thelandseller
’s  profile  is  revealing—262  of  the  864  total  positive 
comments were received from users who are no longer registered with eBay.
21
Remarkably, 
more than 400 of the  598 unique users who left positive feedback for 
thelandseller
were 
participants in the market for feedback. 
Currently, 
thelandseller
’s eBay feedback rating is 598 (100 percent positive). Counting only the 
feedback transaction identified in our dataset, at least 30 percent of his positive reviews resulted 
from solicitation in the feedback market. If we speculate that the 400 users identified as past 
feedback-boosters also purchased only feedback from 
thelandseller
, this statistic jumps to more 
than 80 percent. All of the links to past joke (feedback) transactions have expired in the user’s 
feedback profile, making the details of the transactions (except the feedback itself) invisible to 
other eBay users. Now, it seems that 
thelandseller
has more lucrative business plans than the 
certain-loss market for online jokes. 
While 
thelandseller
’s behavior in the feedback market is interesting, it is his or her activities 
outside of the market that make for a compelling case study. True to his name, 
thelandseller
now 
sells undeveloped land in Texas that he claims is zoned for a future lakeside housing subdivision. 
According to the text in one land listing, he represents a private investment group specializing in 
the buying and selling of North American properties. The land parcels, which appear for auction 
approximately  every three weeks, have opening bid prices between $2,200 and  $6,000US, 
depending on the lot characteristics. Photos, maps and  other deed details are provided for 
prospective bidders. Text in the listing states that the properties may be valued up to $12,000US. 
Sometimes listed in pairs, at least 11 lots of land have been posted for auction since 
thelandseller
exited the market for feedback. 
At least one of the parcels of land was sold on eBay—
thelandseller
left positive feedback for the 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy picture from pdf; pdf cut and paste image
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
copy images from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy a pdf image into a word document
12
buyer after the completion of the sale in mid-October, yet the buyer did not reciprocate. The 
buyer has subsequently left feedback for transactions with other eBay users, however. 
Clearly, 
thelandseller
is a sophisticated user who used the feedback market to artificially boost 
his online reputation to appear experienced in the market for a high-valued good. A back-of-the-
envelope calculation illustrates the cost of becoming “experienced”. Consider the extreme case 
where all of his feedback was acquired by penny sales—assuming that 70 percent of his listings 
resulted in sales, 
thelandseller
could have create his feedback profile for approximately $360. 
While we cannot know whether 
thelandseller 
is a good or bad seller, it does seem clear that the 
market  for  feedback has  allowed 
thelandseller
to  create  a  false  sense  of  experience  and, 
therefore, trustworthiness.  
 Statistical Study of Market for Feedback 
While the case study above is suggestive of the relationship between the market for feedback and 
a seller’s other activities, it is useful to examine the market for feedback in greater detail. To this 
end, we obtained data for over 6,500 listings in the market for feedback over the period from 
June to December 2005. Below, we describe the data collection procedures and a statistical 
analysis of key features of the market for feedback. 
5.1  Description of the procedures for the study 
Using a custom-designed computer script, we gathered data on eBay’s market for feedback on a 
weekly basis. The automated script was designed to query the set of terms listed below, and then 
retrieve data from completed auctions.
22
Based on manual searches we conducted in the market 
for feedback, we found that the following search terms successfully captured the vast majority of 
transactions in this market: “build feedback, eBay reputation, eBay rating, ebook feedback, free 
feedback, free joke, free jokes, free riddle, get feedback, gmail feedback, gmail rating, golf shots 
hr, increase feedback, new to eBay, ebook money, positive feedback, positive reputation, riddle 
no,  rocket  feedback.”  We  also  used  the  misspelled  search  term  “postive  feedback”  since 
misspellings in subjects headings are not uncommon.  
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy pictures from a pdf; how to copy picture from pdf file
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
pasting image into pdf; copy and paste image into pdf
13
Each listing was carefully hand-reviewed to verify that it was, in fact, only soliciting feedback 
exchange. Any listing also offering a tangible, otherwise valuable or non-feedback good was 
excluded. For example, if a seller promised matchbooks, coins, online data storage or low-value 
long-distance telephone cards along with positive feedback, the observation was removed from 
the dataset. 
In total, 6,526 unique listings posted by 526 sellers were retrieved in January and May 2005, and 
weekly from June 2005 to December 2005. Seventy-six percent of the listings, 5,127 items, 
resulted in a sale. More than 80 percent of the auctions were listed with the Buy-It-Now option, 
whereby a seller sets a fixed price and no bidding auction is conducted for the sale. 
Table 1 provides summary statistics of the data.
23
Several features of the table are noteworthy. 
First, unlike most other eBay markets, the average opening price is higher than the average 
winning bid. Average opening price includes many offers with Buy-It-Now prices set equal to $1 
(or £1 when listed in UK pounds), and these listings often failed attract to bidders—not too 
surprising given the price points of the available alternatives offered by other sellers. Variation in 
the shipping charge for the “virtual” goods sold in the market for feedback is also surprising. 
While no postage was involved for any of the items traded in our data, some sellers sought to 
attract bidders by setting an extremely low (often 1 cent) Buy-It-Now price and to earn profit on 
the shipping and handling charge. Notice that seller profit is miniscule in this market—averaging 
about 8 cents. As the case of 
thelandseller
suggests, however, sellers enter this market not to 
earn profits in the market for feedback itself, but rather to leverage the reputation gained in this 
market to obtain price premia for other, presumably larger, transactions.   
Turning to the characteristics of participants in this market, the median seller has a feedback 
rating of 135 whereas a winning buyer has a much lower “reputation” with a feedback rating of 
only 19. Sellers take advantage of the economies of scale inherent to the market for feedback; the 
median seller listed 51 items in the market for feedback during the period of our study. Put 
differently, if the median seller were to succeed in selling all of his or her listings during the 
period of our study, the transactions would raise his or her existing reputation by 38 percent. As 
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to cut pdf image; how to copy pictures from pdf file
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
how to cut an image out of a pdf file; paste jpeg into pdf
14
on the rest of eBay, negative feedback is rare—the median seller enjoys 100 percent positive 
feedback. Thus, sellers seeking primarily to build rather than rehabilitate their reputations are 
entering this market.  
5.2  Results 
Unlike the usual eBay assortment of electronics, collectibles and cars, feedback is 
created
by the 
transaction and is not scarce in any traditional sense—no single user has inherently more to 
exchange than another. Moreover, buyers and sellers in this market may transition without 
substantial cost from one role to the other. Facing the appropriate incentive, a feedback buyer 
can easily become a feedback seller, and vice versa. Users can move nearly costlessly between 
buying and selling positions in the market, and because both users gain feedback through the 
sale, prices represent cash transfers that smooth out the transaction frictions. While these features 
make the data difficult to interpret directly, they also make the market for eBay feedback 
empirically interesting. The theoretical justification for our valuation estimates is contained in 
the Appendix. 
Buyer Valuations 
We find that an average buyer’s valuation for a point of feedback is at least 61 cents. While this 
may seem like a relatively high valuation for a single point of feedback, it is important to note 
that a buyer’s willingness to pay for a point of feedback in this market is an expression of the 
discounted net present value of the stream of incremental future cash flows from this additional 
point of feedback.  
This calculation of buyer valuations was undertaken assuming that only a single price prevails in 
the market for feedback.
24
However, as Figure 2 illustrates, the dispersion of winning prices in 
the market is remarkable; prices in completed auctions ranged from well below eBay’s seller fees 
to nearly 10 times marginal cost. While the distribution is concentrated near 1 cent, there is also 
considerable mass around $1.  
The feedback profiles of participants in this market are also highly diverse. Seller feedback 
levels range from 0 to 6,732, while winning buyers have feedback ratings ranging from 0 to 
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
cut image from pdf online; how to paste a picture into a pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
copy and paste image from pdf to pdf; how to copy pictures from a pdf document
15
9,231. Previous empirical studies suggest that the 
marginal value
of a point of feedback to a 
buyer should depend on the existing reputation of that buyer. That is, buyers who already have 
established reputations are likely to have a lower valuation for an additional point of feedback 
than buyers with lower reputation. Since the feedback rating of the winning bidder is contained 
in our dataset, it is possible to stratify the data by winners’ feedback ratings. We would expect 
that the bound on buyer valuations would decrease with the feedback rating of the buyer.  
In Figure 3, we divide winning buyers by feedback ratings to obtain valuation bounds for buyers 
in each decile. As the figure shows, buyer valuations are mainly decreasing. For buyers in the 
lowest decile, with feedback ratings of 4 or less, calculations suggest that they value a point of 
feedback at, at least, 71 cents. In contrast, for buyers in the highest decile, those with feedback 
ratings of 439 or higher, an additional point of feedback is worth much less—approximately 42 
cents. Furthermore, the steep decline in the valuations of buyers in the highest two deciles 
suggests  that there  is indeed “diminishing  returns”  to  the  value of an  additional point  of 
feedback.  
At first glance, these values may seem implausibly high. Yet, when one considers the potential 
payoff of improved reputation in markets 
beyond
the market for feedback, the average valuation 
is not unreasonable. Consider the following example: Assume for a moment that an increase 
from zero to 20 feedback points results in a 5 percent increase in auction revenue in an average 
eBay product category such as golf clubs.
25
A new user (with zero feedback points) wants to sell 
a driver and expects to sell it for $250. If he purchases 20 positive points in the feedback market 
for approximately $10.80, he can earn 5 percent more on the golf club sale, $262.50. That is, his 
investment in reputation is more than offset by the extra auction revenue. 
Is the market for feedback profitable to sellers? 
As we saw in Figure 2, there is a considerable range in transactions prices in the market for 
feedback. This also suggests that sellers experience a range of profit outcomes. One of the 
unique features of this dataset is that seller costs (excluding hassle costs associated with posting 
an item) are completely transparent to the researcher. As a consequence, we can determine the 
profitability of each listing in our dataset. Figure 4 graphically displays the distribution of profit 
16
and loss outcomes in this market. As the figure shows, the distribution of profits is bimodal. The 
higher of the two modes, which comprises 1,100 transactions making a loss of 29 cents, arises 
when sellers offer an item in the market for feedback at a Buy-It-Now price of 1 cent with free 
shipping and handling. Since the insertion fee on the US eBay site is 25 cents and the Buy-It-
Now option costs an additional 5 cents at this price point, a seller’s costs for this transaction 
amount to 30 cents; thus leading to a net loss of 29 cents. The other mode occurs at a profit level 
of approximately 64 cents. This profit level, which occurs in 263 transactions, arises when sellers 
successfully offer an item with a Buy-It-Now price of 99 cents and free shipping and handling. 
Figure 5 illustrates the overall profit or loss obtained by each seller in our dataset. Most sellers 
incur losses—the modal seller loses 30 cents per listing. Moreover, even for sellers setting an 
item price equal to nearly one dollar, the feedback market is still relatively unprofitable, since 
these items fail to sell approximately 45 percent of the time. Thus, about half of the 99-cent 
listings lead to a loss of 30 cents while the other half (when the item sells) earn a profit of about 
65 cents. The net expected profit from a 99-cent listing is only 22 cents. It should perhaps not be 
all that surprising that the market for feedback is not a profitable one for sellers. As the case of 
thelandseller
illustrates,  motives  other  than  direct  profits  from  feedback  sales  are  often 
paramount. Moreover, since there is an effectively limitless supply of the “good” in this market, 
there is little reason to expect sellers to earn profits.  
 Managerial Implications 
In markets with millions of nearly-anonymous agents buying and selling a plethora of goods, 
trust is critical. Moreover, the higher the value of the items being bought and sold, the more vital 
is trust to the successful engagement of buyers and sellers. As trade in high-value item becomes 
increasingly profitable on the Internet, online merchants and auctioneers face enormous 
challenges in overcoming the trust problem and creating attractive trading environments. Our 
work suggests that one current “state of the art” solution, the trust system employed by auction 
giant eBay, is vulnerable to being undermined in precisely those areas targeted for future growth.  
Indeed, the impact of the market for feedback stretches beyond eBay. As new businesses enter 
the online space, either as start-up e-retailers or virtual versions of established brick-and-mortar 
17
stores, managers face the challenge of creating an environment of trust that attract and maintain a 
stable customer base. While the enormous success of eBay might tempt the new managers to 
emulate eBay’s feedback system, our work identifies a significant weakness and suggests that 
solutions to the trust problem should be sought elsewhere. The need for new approaches to 
online reputation systems is especially critical for firms seeking growth in emerging online 
markets—e-retailers and auction platforms in these markets may face additional pressure as users 
race to catch up to developed markets. And so, we ask: What can a manager do to build an 
environment of trust online, without being vulnerable to markets for feedback that may 
undermine the system? 
While eBay’s existing reputation mechanism has seemed to work well for smaller items where 
the benefit of investing in a “false reputation” is relatively modest, this is not the case for high-
value items. Moreover, as eBay attempts to expand internationally, particularly in developing 
countries such as China, the need for reliable mechanisms to distinguish good sellers from bad 
will be all the more important—especially since financial systems and credit card use are far less 
developed in these new markets. The presence of markets for feedback suggests a potential 
“Achilles heel” for eBay and other online auction sites seeking these growth opportunities.  
As we have shown, there are several important problems in eBay’s existing reputation system 
that are being exploited in the market for feedback. First, since reputation is not weighted by the 
value of the transactions giving rise to the overall feedback score, there is no way for a buyer to 
distinguish between a seller whose reputation derives from legitimate transactions and one whose 
reputation derives from what are arguably only notional transactions. Second, eBay only retains 
a detailed archive of the transactions comprising the reputation of a seller for 90 days. Thus, it is 
possible for a seller to affect his or her perceived reputation by taking advantage of this short 
time horizon of transparency. Third, since feedback is bilateral, eBay dilutes the incentives for 
buyers to give negative feedback, even when a seller’s performance is not especially good. 
Sellers can, and often do, retaliate against buyers leaving negative feedback by reciprocating the 
negative review. Since the reputation of an individual on eBay is a composite of transactions 
made as a buyer and as a seller, buyers who also sell items on eBay (or who expect to sell items 
in the future) may be reluctant to risk their reputations by leaving negative feedback.  
18
How can eBay address these problems? First, eBay may wish to offer transaction-weighted 
reputational statistics based on the dollar value of the trade rather than the current practice where 
the sale of a car and the sale of a digital photo of Bigfoot have the same reputational effect. 
Second, given the dramatically falling cost of storage and computing, there would seem to be 
little  technological  reason  for  eBay  to  limit  the  time  horizon  of  its  detailed  archive  of 
transactions. More broadly, greater transparency in providing information about the past history 
of a seller should improve the ability of buyers to distinguish between good and bad sellers, and 
thereby avoid the trust problem. Third, there seems to be little reason to pool reputation earned as 
a buyer and reputation earned  as a seller. As we  mentioned above, this pooling creates a 
disincentive for honest reporting and helps to undermine the informational value of the system. 
EBay could easily create separate reputational accounts for a given user, segregating reputation 
by role.  
Why doesn’t eBay and others then implement these solutions? For established platforms, such as 
eBay, a central concern in any reform of an existing reputational system is that it will damage the 
loyalty of its existing user base. For instance, how would existing feedback ratings be treated 
under  a  system  with transaction-weighted  reputation?  In  principle, there  could be  adverse 
litigation consequences from eBay from sellers who felt that their businesses were harmed by 
such a change and who had relied substantially on eBay’s existing rules in determining their 
business  strategy.  Such  a  change  might  also  provide  an  opening  for  eBay’s  formidable 
competitors—Amazon and Yahoo—to grab market share at eBay’s expense. Thus, to some 
extent, eBay appears to be “locked in” to its existing reputational system by virtue of its own past 
success. One wonders, however, whether the pernicious effects of the market for feedback will 
not ultimately undermine eBay’s competitive advantage for the future.  
The managerial challenges in solving the trust problem differ for existing platforms and new 
platforms. For existing platforms, the transition from current reputational systems to more robust 
systems that can operate effectively for high-value items and emerging markets is a central 
business consideration. For new platforms, the weaknesses in existing systems highlighted here 
offer a unique opportunity to overcome the built-in first-mover advantages of the established 
19
players and gain a competitive advantage by innovating new solutions to the trust problem.  
The situation in trust markets appears to us to be analogous to that in online search in the 1990s. 
At that time, the state of the art solution was to use data encoded in metatags to provide search 
results. New players, such as Google, recognized the vulnerability of existing search engines to 
manipulation  of  data  contained  in  these metatags  and  were  able  to  overcome  first-mover 
advantages enjoyed by established players, such as AltaVista. We see the same vulnerability to 
manipulation in existing reputational systems in online markets and, perhaps, an opportunity for 
another Google to leapfrog the competition with solutions that scale to high-value items and 
emerging markets.   
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested