telerik pdf viewer mvc : How to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document Library application component asp.net html .net mvc returns_forrester0-part687

April 2008 
Crafting a Returns Policy that Creates 
a Competitive Advantage Online 
A commissioned study conducted by Forrester Consulting on behalf of UPS 
How to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to cut image from pdf; cut and paste pdf image
How to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy image from pdf to ppt; copy picture from pdf to word
Crafting a Returns Policy that Creates a Competitive Advantage Online 
- 2 - 
Table Of Contents 
Executive Summary...............................................................................................................................3
Study Background..................................................................................................................................4
Retailers Prefer to Avert Returns Altogether.........................................................................................5
Web Shoppers In Contrast Appreciate Generous Returns Policies.....................................................6
A Framework For An Online Returns Strategy....................................................................................15
Conclusions/Recommendations..........................................................................................................17
Appendix A: Supplemental Material.....................................................................................................18
Methodology.....................................................................................................................................18
Appendix B: Endnotes..........................................................................................................................19
© 2008, Forrester Research, Inc. All rights reserved. Forrester, Forrester Wave, RoleView, Technographics, and Total 
Economic Impact are trademarks of Forrester Research, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective 
companies. Forrester clients may make one attributed copy or slide of each figure contained herein. Additional reproduction is 
strictly prohibited. For additional reproduction rights and usage information, go to www.forrester.com. Information is based on 
best available resources. Opinions reflect judgment at the time and are subject to change. 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
NET image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF document file page
how to copy a picture from a pdf file; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
how to copy images from pdf; how to cut an image out of a pdf file
Crafting a Returns Policy that Creates a Competitive Advantage Online 
- 3 - 
Executive Summary 
As the rate of growth in the business-to-consumer eCommerce industry slows, eCommerce 
managers look to innovative initiatives and marketing messages to drive sales and capture market 
share. While sales and specials targeted to first-time customers tend to be popular incentives 
offered by retailers, more eCommerce companies also look to mine their customer databases and 
segment their messaging to drive incremental volume from core customers.  Relatively few retailers, 
however, take advantage of promotions that are associated with the reverse logistics/returns 
process, even though the inability to touch or feel items is a core factor that inhibits online sales.  
The Retailer Perspective 
Few retailers are eager to engage in marketing tactics or programs that affect reverse logistics (e.g. 
the returns process).  While a select few companies (e.g. Netflix, Zappos) have made offers such as 
free returns a core part of their marketing message, and position such offers as a strategic 
advantage, most other retailers view overly-generous and overt return policies as a scourge to be 
avoided at all costs. This is in spite of the fact that the online sales process has inherent limitations 
such as the inability of consumers to touch/feel products, and the fact that it is impossible to render 
a product, particularly aesthetic purchases such as apparel, with 100% accuracy via the Internet.  In 
general, retailers view the returns process as a “margin-drain” and believe their efforts are best 
spent engaging in initiatives to help avert returns altogether. Furthermore, few web retailers believe 
that a liberal returns policy can drive incremental sales or loyalty in the long-term. On the contrary, a 
liberal returns policy would cause consumers to engage in the same behavior as always, just at a 
higher expense to web retailers.  Even among those retailers that have employed more liberal 
returns policies, they often employ those initiatives reluctantly.  Such companies often play in 
competitive landscapes where consumer expectations about returns are often set by a larger, liberal 
player looking to capture market share at the expense of margin/profitability.   
The Consumer Perspective 
While core online shoppers do appreciate the convenience of the web, they also recognize that 
there are risks associated with purchasing products via the Internet. Products occasionally arrive 
damaged or are incongruous with the images depicted online. In such cases, the process of 
returning an item to a retailer tends to be viewed as a hassle and in many cases causes buyers to 
reduce their online spend levels altogether. An inflexible or stringent returns policy can therefore be 
an obstacle to growth, particularly as those consumers most likely to return items also tend to be 
the most active online buyers. Furthermore, those same consumers explicitly say that they are 
more likely to shop in the future with, and recommend, those retailers that have more flexible (e.g. 
free returns, no-questions-asked returns) returns policies than those that have inflexible returns 
policies (e.g. forced return authorizations, limitations on what can be returned and when).  In fact, 
among consumers who have purchased items online within the last six months and either returned 
or intended to return some of those items, we found the following: 
81% agreed with the statement “If an online retailer makes it easier for me to return a 
product, I am more likely to buy from that retailer.” 
81% agreed with the statement “I am more loyal to retailers that have generous return 
policies (e.g. free return shipping, ability to return any time for any reason).” 
73% agreed with the statement “I am less likely to buy in the future from an online retailer 
where the returns process is a hassle.” 
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
how to copy picture from pdf; how to copy text from pdf image
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Powerful PDF image editor control, compatible with .NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
how to copy text from pdf image to word; how to cut a picture out of a pdf
Crafting a Returns Policy that Creates a Competitive Advantage Online 
- 4 - 
This leads us to conclude that online retailers with generous returns policies have a competitive 
advantage over those retailers who install “gates” in their returns process.  We believe these more 
generous policies, in the long term, have the ability to grow sales, generate loyalty, and drive 
incremental revenue for retailers with a web presence.  
Study Background
UPS commissioned Forrester Consulting to conduct primary market research by interviewing online 
retailers to examine the following: 
Current online retailer returns strategies and attitudes towards online returns; 
The business challenges and cost components associated with returns; 
The decision-making process for determining returns policies;  
The effect retailers perceive their returns strategies to have on their customers.  
Additionally, Forrester Consulting conducted primary research via an online survey to evaluate the 
following elements of consumer behavior: 
The demographics of consumers that tend to return online purchases; 
The experiences these customers have with the online returns process; 
Customers’ attitudes toward retailers that offer flexible and inflexible returns policies.   
For more information on the methodology for both the qualitative and quantitative primary research, 
please consult the Methodology section of this paper in Appendix A: Supplemental Material. 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
copy image from pdf preview; how to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
(as shown in picture). RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. Open RasterEdge_AzureC loudService DemoProject, copy following content to your project: Default.aspx.
paste picture into pdf preview; how to copy image from pdf file
Crafting a Returns Policy that Creates a Competitive Advantage Online 
- 5 - 
Retailers Prefer to Avert Returns Altogether  
Retailers in general fall in between two ends of a spectrum in their attitudes toward returns: At one 
extreme is the perspective that returns are evil and should be avoided at all costs because they 
simply drive down margins and are associated with unhappy customer interactions. On the other 
end of the spectrum is the acknowledgment that returns are a natural byproduct of the online sales 
process and, given that consumers cannot touch or feel items prior to purchase, that a generous 
returns policy can in fact be a source of competitive advantage. While a very small group of retailers 
have adopted the latter perspective, the vast majority lean toward the former point of view. In our 
interviews with retailers, we found the following: 
Retailers often play “follow the leader” in matters relating to reverse logistics. 
In general, retailers adopt returns policies that are typically similar to their competitive set.  That is, if 
a company’s direct competitors do not offer features such as free returns, neither do they.  In 
contrast, if a retailer does play in a landscape where prepaid shipping labels are the norm, then they 
too will be forced to offer similar programs for customers.  
“There are a lot of catalog companies out there…..and none of them offer free returns, and for 
good reason—it’s too expensive!” 
“Many of the shoe retailers [with free returns] are just copying one another to grab market 
share…but I suspect none of them is yet profitable.” 
Retailers in lower-margin businesses are the most averse to any generous policies, in either 
outbound shipping programs or reverse logistics.  
Retailers do recognize that accepting a return for a lightweight, high-margin item that can be sent 
back to a manufacturer is not all that expensive, while accepting bulky items that are highly 
seasonal or cannot be offered for resale can often pose an onerous burden on a company’s bottom 
line. Given this reality, those retailers that fear that returns can seriously erode their margins 
generally enact the greatest obstacles to returns.   
“We’re not a [high-end retailer]…we are about being operationally efficient and maintaining 
margins. That means having a team of people managing returns and pushing them back to 
manufacturers. Our returns process has gates like return authorizations—deliberate steps to 
limit the number of returns.” 
“If you have higher margins, you can do so much more with your shipping; this applies to 
vertically integrated manufacturers in particular.”  
Retailers would rather focus efforts on reducing returns altogether rather than employing 
more generous returns policies. 
Because retailers are unable to quantify the effect of a generous returns policy and believe it is a 
cost that is highly correlated to an unsatisfactory customer experience, they generally express an 
interest in trying to control those elements of the web shopping experience that they can affect: 
namely, the depiction of products online and the quality-assurance process around ensuring that 
products are picked, packed, and shipped on-time and accurately.   
“We’d rather open new stores for people to try on products than offer free return shipping.” 
“We try to have multiple images per items to avoid returns…we go overboard on taking 
photos.  That’s also a big reason we have customer reviews on our site.” 
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
Do you need to save a copy of certain SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; RasterEdge.com is professional provider of document, content and
copy image from pdf to word; copy pictures from pdf to word
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
VB.NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your VB powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
cut and paste image from pdf; how to copy pictures from pdf in
Crafting a Returns Policy that Creates a Competitive Advantage Online 
- 6 - 
“Our business is about Six Sigma and ensuring that our operations are top-notch.  That’s the 
best way for us to avoid returns.” 
Even retailers that may unofficially employ generous returns policies believe the advantages 
do not necessarily lie in customer loyalty. 
While consumers say they value companies that enable hassle-free returns, retailers say they do 
not reap the rewards of such programs from consumers directly. In part, this is because few 
companies have engaged lifetime value analyses to assess the impact of more generous returns 
policies on overall sales. Rather, the impact of generous returns is more quantifiable in other areas 
such as call center contacts.  
“We incorporated [a vendor to manage returns] in order to reduce call center volume.” 
“We’ve never formally assessed how much more revenue we could drive from free returns.  
It’s very difficult to do a lifetime value analysis because purchase cycles are so long for 
many of our products and you have to construct an A-B test. This often means waiting 
years for results, and with people changing jobs as often as they do, accurate data is just 
never collected.”  
Web Shoppers In Contrast Appreciate Generous 
Returns Policies 
While web retailers in general do not see the long-term value of how a generous returns policy can 
affect their business, consumers are very clear about how generous returns policies affect their 
future web shopping expenditures. The findings from our consumer survey revealed that generous 
returns policies are most likely to positively affect a web retailers’ best customers and ultimately 
drive long-term sales and loyalty. Among the specific findings were the following: 
Customers who return items purchased online tend to be tenured, high-spending online 
shoppers.  
Return rates for the online retail industry converge at around 7%. Given that the vast majority of 
items purchased online do not end up as returns, and that few customers actively purchase 
products with the intent to return them, it is not surprising that when returns do happen, it is by 
frequent buyers who merely due to the volume of transactions they conduct, are statistically more 
likely to experience some disappointments with their orders. In general, online returners tend to be 
consumers who have shopped online for 7 years and on average spent over $1,200 online in the 
last 6 months (see Figures 1 and 2). This makes them a demographic that retailers would be well-
served to treat particularly well.   
Crafting a Returns Policy that Creates a Competitive Advantage Online 
- 7 - 
Figure 1: Online and Web Shopping Tenure 
“How long have you been going online?”
“When did you start purchasing products or 
services online?”
Source: UPS Online Retail Return Study, Forrester Custom Research prepared for UPS, March 2008
Less than 1 year 
ago, 1.7%
1-3 years ago, 
15.3%
4-6 years ago, 
27.2%
7-9 years ago, 
31.8%
10-12 years ago, 
18.0%
13 years or 
more, 5.9%
Less than 1 
year, 0.3%
1-3 years, 2.4%
4-6 years, 9.8%
7-9 years, 
21.0%
10-12 years, 
30.8%
13 years or 
more, 35.8%
Base: 755 US Online Consumers who have made an online purchase in the past six months
Mean online 
tenure: 10.6 
years
Mean online 
shopping 
tenure: 7.0 
years
Figure 2: Online Returners Spend Significant Sums Online 
2.1%
6.6%
16.2%
24.7%
22.9%
18.8%
4.0%
$1 to $50
$51 to $100
$101 to $250
$251 to $500
$501 to $1,000
$1,001 to $5,000
$5,001 or more
“In total, how much have you spent online in the last 6 months? Please check one”
Source: UPS Online Retail Return Study, Forrester Custom Research prepared for UPS, March 2008
8
Base: 755 US Online Consumers who have made an online purchase in the past six months
Mean online 
spend in last 
6 months: 
$1,219
Crafting a Returns Policy that Creates a Competitive Advantage Online 
- 8 - 
Returns in general are a hassle, and often due to factors beyond a customer’s control.  
Despite the best efforts of retailers to ensure that products are perfectly depicted or that the correct 
items have in fact been shipped, the reality is that a significant percent of returns are due to the fact 
that the wrong items were shipped or that items were not depicted accurately online (see Figures 3 
and 4). This contrasts with the retailer perspective that many returns are simply due to a customer’s 
change of heart and therefore a cost that should be passed on to customers. Furthermore, 
customers report spending both money and time to deal with returns. When consumers pay for 
returns, the average cost is more than $7 and any given return generally consumes approximately 
30 minutes of a customer’s time (see Figures 5 and 6).  
Figure 3: Returns Are An Obstacle To Online Shopping In General 
2.6%
6.2%
7.4%
7.4%
14.9%
15.3%
16.1%
25.6%
30.9%
55.1%
55.2%
79.8%
Information is not available in language / bilingual
The stores I prefer to shop from do not offer online purchasing
Prefer the interaction with sales staff or other people
No credit card or other method of payment
It is cheaper to buy things in person
Difficulty in receiving deliveries at home
It is easier to buy things in person
Dislike sharing payment information over the internet
It takes too long to receive goods / don't want to wait
Prefer to examine (e.g. touch or feel) items in person
Difficult to return / re-stocking fees
Cost of shipping / delivery fees too high
“Which of the following do you think are problems associated withmaking purchases online? 
(Please select all that apply)”
Source: UPS Online Retail Return Study, Forrester Custom Research prepared for UPS, March 2008
Base: 755 US Online Consumers who have made an online purchase in the past six months
Crafting a Returns Policy that Creates a Competitive Advantage Online 
- 9 - 
Figure 4: Key Reasons For Returns Are Outside Consumer Control 
9%
20%
22%
23%
24%
30%
I intentionally ordered more than one size or type of item with
the intent of returning one or several of the items I did not want.
The item I received was damaged.
The item I received was not as portrayed online.
The item I received was the wrong item.
I decided after I received the item that I no longer
needed/wanted it.
Other
“Please indicate all of the reasons you may have returned items, or intended to return packages, you 
purchased in the past.”(Click all that apply)
Source: UPS Online Retail Return Study, Forrester Custom Research prepared for UPS, March 2008
Base: 755 US Online Consumers who have made an online purchase in the past six months
Retailers, not 
customers, are 
frequently 
responsible for 
customer returns
Figure 5: Consumers Spend About A Half-Hour Per Online Return 
Less than 5 
minutes, 25.4%
Between 30 
minutes and 2 
hours, 15.6%
More than 2 
hours, 3.0%
More than 5 
minutes but less
than 30 minutes
56.0%
“How much time did you spend dealing with the complete return process?”
Source: UPS Online Retail Return Study, Forrester Custom Research prepared for UPS, March 2008
Base: 755 US Online Consumers who have made an online purchase in the past six months
Mean time spent 
on returns: 27 
minutes
Crafting a Returns Policy that Creates a Competitive Advantage Online 
- 10 - 
Figure 6: Consumers Who Pay For Returns Spend More than $7 Per Return 
Less than $5, 
16.9%
$5-9, 25.4%
$10-19, 4.4%
$20 or more, 
5.0%
Nothing (free), 
48.3%
“Thinking of the last item you returned (shipped back) after making an online purchase, 
approximately how much money did that return cost you (i.e. shipping and packaging)?”
Source: UPS Online Retail Return Study, Forrester Custom Research prepared for UPS, March 2008
Base: 755 US Online Consumers who have made an online purchase in the past six months
Mean spend on 
returns shipping 
(excluding $0 
spenders): $7.85
Cost is the thorniest issue for customers in dealing with returns. 
When asked to rate the specific attributes of returns that were most frustrating to customers, the 
shipping costs associated with returns were the biggest gripe of customers (see Figure 7). A 
significant percent of customers were also frustrated by the process of having to go to a shipping 
carrier to send back their package. In contrast, consumers that returned items with companies that 
provided prepaid shipping labels and packaging found it a relatively hassle-free and easy 
experience. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested