telerik pdf viewer mvc : Copying image from pdf to powerpoint SDK control project winforms web page wpf UWP Preparing-for-the-ACT3-part72

31
55. Kelly asked 120 students questions about skiing. The
results of the poll are shown in the table below.
After completing the poll, Kelly wondered how many
of the students polled had skied both cross-country and
downhill. How many of the students polled indicated
that they had skied both cross-country and downhill?
A. 73
B. 65
C. 47
D. 18
E. 08
56. The square below is divided into 3 rows of equal area.
In the top row, the region labeled A has the same area
as the region labeled B. In the middle row, the 3 regions
have equal areas. In the bottom row, the 4 regions have
equal areas. What fraction of the square’s area is in a
region labeled A?
F.
G.
H.
J.
K.
57. The  functions  y = sin,x and  y = sin(x + a) + b,  for 
constants a and b, are graphed in the standard (x,y)
coordinate plane below. The functions have the same
maximum  value.  One  of  the  following  statements
about the values of a and b is true. Which statement is
it?
A. a< 0 and b= 0
B. a< 0 and b> 0
C. a= 0 and b> 0
D. a> 0 and b< 0
E. a> 0 and b> 0
Question
Yes No
1. Have you skied either cross-country
or downhill?
65
55
2. If you answered Yes to Question1,
did you ski downhill?
28
37
3. If you answered Yes to Question1,
did you ski cross-country?
45
20
B
A
C
C
D
B
A
B
A
1
__
9
3
__
9
6
__
9
13
___
12
13
___
36
O
y
x
58. Which of the following number line graphs shows the
solution set to the inequality 
x− 5
<−1?
59. As part of a probability experiment, Elliott is to answer
4multiple-choice questions. For each question, there
are 3possible answers, only 1 of which is correct. If
Elliott  randomly  and  independently  answers  each 
question, what is the probability that he will answer
the 4questions correctly?
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
60. The sides of an acute triangle measure 14 cm, 18 cm,
and  20 cm,  respectively.  Which  of  the  following 
equations, when solved for θ, gives the measure of the
smallest angle of the triangle?
(Note: For any triangle with sides of length a, b, and c
that are opposite angles A, B, and C, respectively,
=
=
and c
2
=a
2
+b
2
−2ab cos,C.)
F.
=
G.
=
H.
=
J. 14
2
=18
2
+20
2
−2(18)(20)cos,θ
K. 20
2
=14
2
+18
2
−2(14)(18)cos,θ
F.
G.
4
x
H.
.
6
x
J.
.
6
4
x
K.
.
6
4
x
x
(empty set)
6
4
6
4
27
___
81
12
___
81
4
___
81
3
___
81
1
___
81
sin,C
_____
c
sin,B
_____
b
sin,A
_____
a
1
___
18
sin,θ
_____
14
1
___
20
sin,θ
_____
14
1
___
14
sin,θ
_____
20
ACT-1572CPRE
2
2
END OF TEST 2
STOP! DO NOT TURN THE PAGE UNTIL TOLD TO DO SO.
DO NOT RETURN TO THE PREVIOUS TEST.
Copying image from pdf to powerpoint - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document; copy a picture from pdf
Copying image from pdf to powerpoint - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste image into pdf form; how to copy pictures from a pdf document
Passage I
PROSE FICTION: This passage is adapted from the novel The
Ground Beneath Her  Feet by  Salman  Rushdie  (©1999 by
Salman Rushdie).
Art Deco is an architectural and decorative style that was popu-
lar in the first half of the twentieth century.
When you grow up, as I did, in a great city, during
what just happens to be its golden age, you think of it
as eternal.  Always  was there,  always will  be.  The
grandeur of the metropolis creates the illusion of per-
manence. The peninsular Bombay into which I was
born certainly seemed perennial to me. Malabar and
Cumballa  hills  were  our  Capitol  and  Palatine,  the
Brabourne Stadium was our Colosseum, and as for the
glittering Art Deco sweep of Marine Drive, well, that
was something not even Rome could boast. I actually
grew up believing Art Deco to be the “Bombay style,” a
local invention, its name derived, in all probability,
from the imperative of the verb “to see.” Art dekho. Lo
and  behold art. (When I  began  to  be familiar with
images of New York, I at first felt a sort of anger. The
Americans had so much; did they have to possess our
“style” as well? But in another, more secret part of my
heart, the Art Deco of Manhattan, built on a scale so
much grander than our own, only increased America’s
allure, made it both familiar and awe-inspiring, our
little Bombay writ large.)
In reality  that Bombay was  almost  brand-new
when I knew it; what’s more, my parents’ construction
firm of Merchant & Merchant had been prominent in its
making. In the ten years before my own coming into the
world, the city had been a gigantic building site; as if it
were in a hurry to become, as if it knew it had to pro-
vide itself in finished condition by the time I was able
to start paying attention to it ... No, no, I don’t really
think along such solipsistic lines. I’m not over-attached
to history, or Bombay. Me, I’m the under-attached type.
But let me confess that, even as a child, I was
insanely jealous of  the city in which I was raised,
because it was my parents’ other love. They loved each
other (good), they  loved me (very good),  and they 
loved her (not so good). Bombay was my rival. It was
on account of their romance with the city that they 
drew  up  that  weekly  rota  (list)  of  shared  parental
responsibilities. When my mother wasn’t with me—
when I was riding on my father’s shoulders, or staring,
with him, at the fish in the Taraporewala Aquarium—
she was out there with her, with Bombay; out there
bringing her into being. (For of course construction
work never stops  completely, and supervising  such
work was Ameer’s particular genius. My mother the
master builder. Like her father before her.) And when
my father handed me over to her, he went off, wearing
his local-history hat and a khaki jacket full of pockets,
to dig in the foundations of building sites for the secrets
of the city’s past, or else sat hatless and coatless at a
designing board and dreamed his lo-and-behold dreams.
Maps of the early town afforded my father great
joy, and his collection of old photographs of the edi-
fices and objets of the vanished city was second to
none.  In  these  faded  images  were  resurrected  the
demolished Fort, the “breakfast bazaar” market outside
the Teen Darvaza or Bazaargate, and the humble mutton
shops and umbrella hospitals of the poor, as well as the
fallen palaces of the great. The early city’s relics filled
his imagination as well as his photo albums. It was
from my father that I learned of Bombay’s first great
photographers, Raja Deen Dayal and A. R. Haseler,
whose portraits of the city became my first artistic
influences, if only by showing me what I did not want
to do. Dayal climbed the Rajabai tower to create his
sweeping panoramas of the birth of the city; Haseler
went one better and took to the air. Their images were
awe-inspiring, unforgettable, but they also inspired in
me a desperate need to get back down to ground level.
From the heights you see only pinnacles. I yearned for
the city streets, the knife grinders, the water carriers,
the pavement moneylenders, the peremptory soldiers,
the railway hordes, the chess players in the Irani restau-
rants, the snake-buckled schoolchildren, the beggars,
the fishermen, the moviemakers, the dockers, the book
sewers, the loom operators, the priests. I yearned for
life.
When  I  said  this to  my  father  he  showed  me
photos, still lives of storefronts and piers, and told me I
was too young to understand. “See where people lived
and worked and shopped,” he clarified, with a rare flash
of irritation, “and it becomes plain what they were
like.” For all his digging, Vivvy Merchant was content
with the surfaces of his world. I, his photographer son,
set out to prove him wrong, to show that a camera can
see beyond the surface, beyond the trappings of the
actual, and penetrate to its flesh and heart.
READING TEST
35 Minutes—40 Questions
DIRECTIONS: There are several passages in this test.
Each passage is accompanied by several questions.
After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each
question  and  fill  in  the  corresponding  oval  on  your
answer document. You may refer to the passages as
often as necessary.
GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE.
ACT-1572CPRE
3
3
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
32
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Choose to offer PDF annotation and content extraction Enable or disable copying and form filling functions.
copy image from pdf reader; how to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
NET application. Online C# source code for extracting, copying and pasting PDF pages in C#.NET console class. Support .NET WinForms
paste picture into pdf preview; copy images from pdf to powerpoint
33
1. The passage as a whole can primarily be characterized
as the narrator’s:
A. explanation of the relationship the narrator and his
parents had with the city of Bombay.
B. description of important buildings and locations in
Bombay.
C. argument for Bombay’s prominence in the world
of architecture.
D. concerns  about  the  emotional  environment  in
which the narrator was raised.
2. The narrator describes the photos by Bombay’s first
great photographers as primarily inspiring the narrator
to:
F. turn away from a career in photography.
G. create grand panoramas of the new Bombay.
H. produce images that his father would add to his
collection.
J. photograph subjects that depict everyday life on
Bombay’s streets.
3. In lines 25–31, the narrator muses over, then rejects,
the notion that:
A. Merchant & Merchant played an important role in
the building of Bombay.
B. he started paying attention to Bombay at a young
age.
C. his anticipated birth was one of the causes of the
rush to finish the building of Bombay.
D. Bombay had been a gigantic building site in the
years before he was born.
4. In lines 32–43, the narrator uses which of the follow-
ing literary devices to describe Bombay?
F. Alliteration
G. Allusion
H. Personification
J. Simile
5. Which of the following statements best captures how
the narrator’s parents balanced their parental duties
with their work at the construction company?
A. The narrator’s mother did the majority of the work
at the construction company, while the narrator’s
father took care of the narrator.
B. The narrator’s parents traded off responsibility for
taking care of the narrator and working at the con-
struction company.
C. The  narrator’s  father  worked  at  his  designing
board, while the narrator’s mother took the narra-
tor along to building sites.
D. The narrator’s parents both worked at the con-
struction company, while the narrator stayed home
with a babysitter.
6. As it is used in line 9, the word sweep most nearly
means:
F. overwhelming victory.
G. wide-ranging search.
H. complete removal.
J. broad area.
7. In the context of the passage, the primary function of
lines 6–10 is to:
A. compare architectural landmarks in Bombay to
those elsewhere.
B. help  illustrate  how  the  term  “art  deco”  was
derived.
C. contradict the idea that Bombay was in its golden
age when the narrator was a child.
D. provide examples of “Bombay style” architecture
in Rome.
8. The narrator as a child viewed the work his parents did
for Merchant & Merchant with a strong sense of:
F. joy; the work provided the family with enough
money to live extravagant lives.
G. fear; the narrator knew his parents were often so
exhausted they were careless about safety.
H. jealousy; the work pulled the narrator’s parents
away from him and directed their attention to the
city.
J. respect; his parents were known for their quality
workmanship throughout the city.
9. As it is used in line 38, the phrase drew up most nearly
means:
A. extended.
B. prepared.
C. approached.
D. straightened.
10. In the last paragraph, the narrator’s father shows the
narrator the photos of storefronts and piers in order to:
F. teach the narrator about the commercial progress
the people who work in Bombay have made.
G. convince the narrator that Dayal and Haseler were
Bombay’s first great photographers.
H. clarify his claim that his photo collection was not
about modern-day Bombay but rather about the
early twentieth century.
J. illustrate that photos of places can reveal as much
about the people who spent time there as photos of
the people themselves.
GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE.
ACT-1572CPRE
3
3
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET convert image to PDF Choose to offer PDF annotation and content extraction Enable or disable copying and form filling functions.
paste image into pdf in preview; copy image from pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
protect PDF document from editing, printing, copying and commenting Such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Tiff, images and other C#.NET: Edit PDF Image in ASP.NET.
how to copy image from pdf to word document; how to cut and paste image from pdf
Passage II
SOCIAL  SCIENCE: This  passage  is  adapted  from  Great
Waters: An Atlantic Passage by Deborah Cramer (©2001 by
Deborah Cramer).
The Sargasso Sea is a part of the northern Atlantic Ocean.
As the Cramer idles through the Sargasso Sea,
waiting for the wind to rise, the sea is flat and empty.
Nothing demarcates or divides the smooth expanse of
water dissolving into the horizon. This vast, unrough-
ened surface, this breadth of uniform sea, deceives. But
for a few lonely oceanic islands, the unperturbed sur-
face offers no hint of the grand and sweeping energies
hidden below.
Only one thousand miles offshore, the Cramer has
already  sailed  through  some  of  Atlantic’s  deepest
waters. Contrary to what one might guess, Atlantic’s
deepest waters, like those in other oceans, are along her
edges. As we continue east, toward the middle of the
sea, the bottom rises. The unmarked plains of the abyss,
here flattened by layers of sediment, give way to rising
foothills and  then to mountains. The first maps  of
Atlantic seafloor noted, albeit crudely, this rise. Early
efforts to plumb Atlantic’s depths proved outrageously
inaccurate: one naval officer paid out eight miles (thir-
teen kilometers) of hemp rope from a drifting ship and
concluded the sea had no bottom. Eventually, sailors
more or less successfully calculated depth by heaving
overboard cannonballs tied to bailing twine. When they
hit bottom, the sailors measured and snipped the twine
and then moved on, leaving a trail of lead strung out
across the seafloor. These crude soundings, forming the
basis of the first map of Atlantic’s basin, published in
1854,  identified a prominent  rise  halfway  between
Europe and America.
For  many years no one  could explain  why  the
basin of Atlantic, unlike a bowl, deepened at its edges
and shoaled in its center. People assumed that this
“Middle Ground,” “Telegraph Plateau,” or “Dolphin
Rise,” as it was variously called, was an ancient and
drowned land bridge, or a lost continent, but sailors
repairing transatlantic telegraph cable unknowingly
produced evidence to prove otherwise. Wrestling with
the broken cable, they accidentally twisted off a piece
of the “plateau” and dredged up a twenty-one-pound
(ten-kilogram) chunk of dense black volcanic rock. It
was some of the youngest, freshest rock on earth, and it
was torn not from a piece of continent sunk beneath the
waves, but from the very foundation of the sea.
Today, highly sophisticated sound waves bring the
hazy images of those early soundings into sharp focus,
revealing that one of the largest and most salient geo-
graphic features on the planet lies on the floor of the
ocean. Hidden beneath the waves is an immense sub-
merged mountain range, the backbone of the sea. More
extensive, rugged, and imposing than the Andes, Rock-
ies, or Himalayas, it covers almost as much of earth’s
surface as the dry land of continents. Winding like the
seam of a baseball, it circles the planet in a long, sinu-
ous path, running the entire length of Atlantic, slashing
the basin neatly in two. Its mountains are stark and
black, as black as the sea itself, lit only at their peaks
by a thin, patchy covering of white, the skeletal remains
of tiny microscopic animals that once lived at the sur-
face. Peaks as high as Mount St. Helens sit in a watery
world of blackness, more than a mile below the surface,
beyond the reach of light, beyond the sight of sailors.
A great valley, eclipsing any comparable feature
on dry land, runs through these mountains. Arizona’s
Grand Canyon, one of earth’s most spectacular places,
extends for about 280 miles (450 kilometers). A lesser-
known canyon of similar depth but considerably greater
length  lies  hidden  in  the  mountains  of  the  ridge.
Although offset in many places by breaks in the moun-
tains, the rift valley, as the canyon is called, extends the
length of Atlantic for 11,000 miles (17,700 kilometers).
Here in this bleak and forbidding place, where the
water is almost freezing, subterranean fires have lifted
mounds of fresh lava onto the seafloor. Scientists visit-
ing the rift valley for the first time named the volcanic
hills in this otherworldly setting after distant, lifeless
planets.
Yet, what had seemed so foreign to scientists is an
integral part of earth’s very being, for at the ridge our
own planet gives birth. The floor of the rift valley is
torn; from the gashes has sprung the seafloor underly-
ing all of Atlantic. Here the youngest, newest pieces are
made. Earth is still cooling from her tumultuous birth
four and a half billion years ago. Heat, leaking from the
molten core and from radioactive decay deep inside the
planet, rises toward earth’s surface, powering the volca-
noes that deliver the ridge to the sea.
11. The author’s attitude toward the main subject of the
passage can best be described as:
A. awe and fascination.
B. disbelief and cynicism.
C. amusement and nostalgia.
D. boredom and indifference.
12. The passage makes clear that “Middle Ground,” “Tele-
graph Plateau,” and “Dolphin Rise” were names that
people gave to what was actually:
F. an island in Atlantic.
G. a transatlantic telegraph cable.
H. an ancient and drowned land bridge.
J. the immense mountain range in Atlantic’s basin.
GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE.
ACT-1572CPRE
3
3
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
34
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink Password protected PDF file can be printed to Word source code is available for copying and using
how to copy pdf image into powerpoint; cut image from pdf online
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages Copying and Pasting Pages.
copy pdf picture to word; how to copy picture from pdf
35
13. In the first paragraph, the author describes the stillness
of the Sargasso Sea as the Cramer passes through it
primarily to emphasize that the stillness:
A. won’t last long, for the sea will become rough
when the wind rises.
B. makes it easy for a passenger on the Cramer to
spot oceanic islands that break the water’s surface.
C. is in dramatic contrast to the power of what exists
on and under the seafloor far below.
D. makes it seem as if the Cramer’s wake is dividing
the unbroken expanse of water into two.
14. The passage states that compared to Arizona’s Grand
Canyon, the canyon that lies within the mountains in
Atlantic’s basin is considerably:
F. deeper.
G. older.
H. wider.
J. longer.
15. The main purpose of the information in lines 71–76 is
to:
A. describe in detail scientists’ expectations for their
first trip to the rift valley.
B. characterize the rift valley as an alien, seemingly
barren place.
C. provide statistics about several geographic proper-
ties of the rift valley.
D. list the names that scientists gave to the volcanic
hills in the rift valley.
16. One of the main purposes of the last paragraph is to
state that the:
F. gashes in the rift valley continue to increase in
width.
G. seafloor of Atlantic has cooled.
H. entire Atlantic seafloor has issued from the gashes
in the rift valley.
J. volcanoes on Earth’s dry land have created the
newest, youngest pieces of Atlantic seafloor.
17. The author most strongly implies that people com-
monly assume the deepest waters of an ocean are:
A. about one thousand miles offshore.
B. at the middle of the ocean.
C. dotted with islands.
D. located in trenches.
18. As it is used in line 19, the phrase paid out most nearly
means:
F. dispensed.
G. ascertained.
H. suggested.
J. compensated.
19. According  to  the  passage,  the  mountain  range  in
Atlantic’s basin covers nearly the same amount of
Earth’s surface as does:
A. Mount St. Helens.
B. the Himalayas.
C. the Pacific Ocean.
D. the dry land of continents.
20. According to the passage, the white cover on the peaks
of the mountains in Atlantic’s basin is:
F. skeletal remains of microscopic animals.
G. thin layers of sedimentary volcanic ash.
H. patches of ice.
J. salt deposits.
GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE.
ACT-1572CPRE
3
3
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
The PDFDocument instance may consist of newly created blank pages or image-only pages from an image source. PDF Pages Extraction, Copying and Pasting.
copy picture from pdf; how to cut a picture out of a pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Create PDF from Excel (xlsx, xls); Create PDF from PowerPoint (pptx, ppt PDF page extraction, copying and pasting allow users to move PDF pages; PDF Image Process
how to copy an image from a pdf file; copy and paste image from pdf
GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE.
ACT-1572CPRE
3
3
Passage III
HUMANITIES: Passage A is adapted from the essay “Just This
Side of Byzantium” by Ray Bradbury (©1975 by Ray Bradbury),
which is the introduction to a later edition of Bradbury’s 1957
novel Dandelion Wine. Passage B is adapted from Dandelion
Wine (©1957 by Ray Bradbury).
Passage A by Ray Bradbury
I began to learn the nature of surprises, thankfully,
when I was fairly young as a writer. Before that, like
every beginner, I thought you could beat, pummel, and
thrash an idea into existence. Under such treatment, of
course, any decent idea folds up its paws, turns on its
back, fixes its eyes on eternity, and dies.
It was with great relief, then, that in my early
twenties I floundered into a word-association process in
which I simply got out of bed each morning, walked to
my desk, and put down any word or series of words that
happened along in my head.
I would then take arms against the word, or for it,
and bring on an assortment of characters to weigh the
word and show me its meaning in my own life. An hour
or two hours  later,  to  my  amazement,  a  new story 
would be finished and done. The surprise was total and
lovely. I soon found that I would have to work this way
for the rest of my life.
First I rummaged my mind for words that could
describe my personal nightmares, fears of night and
time from my childhood, and shaped stories from these.
Then I took a long look at the green apple trees
and the old house I was born in and the house next door
where lived my grandparents, and all the lawns of the
summers I grew up in, and I began to try words for all
that.
I had to send myself back, with words as catalysts,
to open the memories out and see what they had to
offer.
So from the age of twenty-four to thirty-six hardly
a day passed when I didn’t stroll myself across a recol-
lection of my grandparents’ northern Illinois grass,
hoping to come across some old half-burnt firecracker,
a rusted toy, or a fragment of letter written to myself in
some young year hoping to contact the older person I
became to remind him of his past, his life, his people,
his joys, and his drenching sorrows.
Along the way I came upon and collided, through
word-association, with old and true friendships. I bor-
rowed my friend John Huff from my childhood in Ari-
zona and shipped him East to Green Town so that I
could say good-bye to him properly.
Along  the  way,  I  sat  me  down  to  breakfasts,
lunches, and  dinners  with the long dead and much
loved.
Thus I fell into surprise. I came on the old and best
ways of writing through ignorance and experiment and
was startled when truths leaped out of bushes like quail
before gunshot. I blundered into creativity as any child
learning to walk and see. I learned to let my senses and
my Past tell me all that was somehow true.
Passage B by Ray Bradbury
The facts about John Huff, aged twelve, are simple
and soon stated. He could pathfind more trails than
anyone since time began, could leap from the sky like a
chimpanzee from a vine, could live underwater two
minutes and slide fifty yards downstream from where
you last saw him. The baseballs you pitched him he hit
in the apple trees, knocking down harvests. He ran
laughing. He sat easy. He was not a bully. He was kind.
He knew the names of all the wild flowers and when 
the moon would rise and set. He was, in fact, the only
god living in the whole of Green Town, Illinois, during
the twentieth century that Douglas Spaulding knew of.
And right now he and Douglas were hiking out
beyond town on another warm and marble-round day,
the sky blue blown-glass reaching high, the creeks
bright with mirror waters fanning over white stones. It
was a day as perfect as the flame of a candle.
Douglas walked through it thinking it would go on
this way forever. The sound of a good friend whistling
like an  oriole,  pegging  the softball, as  you horse-
danced, key-jingled the dusty paths; things were at
hand and would remain.
It was such a fine day and then suddenly a cloud
crossed the sky, covered the sun, and did not move
again.
John Huff had been speaking quietly for several
minutes. Now Douglas stopped on the path and looked
over at him.
“John, say that again.”
“You heard me the first time, Doug.”
“Did you say you were—going away?”
John took a yellow and green train ticket solemnly
from his pocket and they both looked at it.
“Tonight!” said Douglas. “My gosh! Tonight we
were going to play Red Light, Green Light and Statues!
How come, all of a sudden? You been here in Green
Town all my life. You just don’t pick up and leave!”
“It’s my father,” said John. “He’s got a job in Mil-
waukee. We weren’t sure until today ... ”
They sat under an old oak tree on the side of the
hill looking back at town. Out beyond, in sunlight, the
town was painted with heat, the windows all gaping.
Douglas wanted to run back in there where the town, by
its very weight, its houses, their bulk, might enclose
and prevent John’s ever getting up and running off.
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
36
37
21. When Bradbury claims, “Thus I fell into surprise” 
(line 46), he’s most nearly referring to the:
A. discovery that for him the secret to a creative out-
pouring was to use a word-association method to
write fiction.
B. long-forgotten experiences he would remember
when he would talk with his childhood friends in
person.
C. realization that he wrote more effectively about his
current experiences than about his past.
D. several methods other writers taught him to help
him write honest, authentic stories.
22. Passage A indicates that Bradbury believes all begin-
ning writers think that they can:
F. learn the nature of surprises.
G. force an idea into creation.
H. use one word as a catalyst for a story.
J. become a good writer through experiment.
23. Bradbury’s claim “I would then take arms against the
word, or for it” (line 12) most strongly suggests that
during his writing sessions, Bradbury would:
A. attempt to find the one word that for him was the
key to understanding John Huff.
B. often reject a word as not being a catalyst for
meaningful writing.
C. deliberately choose to write only about a word that
inspired his fears.
D. feel as though he were struggling to find a word’s
significance to him.
24. In the seventh paragraph of Passage A (lines 30–37),
Bradbury explains his habit, over many years as a
writer, of almost daily:
F. looking at  and  writing about  objects  from his
childhood that he had saved.
G. wishing he had kept more letters from his child-
hood to trigger his memories.
H. driving past his grandparents’ property, hoping to
notice something that would remind him of his
past.
J. thinking about his grandparents’ property, hoping
to remember something that would bring his past
into focus.
25. Passage A explains that when writing about the charac-
ter John Huff, Bradbury had:
A. placed John in a town in Arizona, where Bradbury
himself had grown up.
B. included John in stories about a town in Arizona
and in stories about Green Town.
C. “moved” John to a town other than the town in
which the real-life John Huff had grown up.
D. “borrowed” John to use as a minor character in
many of his stories.
26. In the first paragraph of Passage B (lines 52–63), the
narrator describes John Huff in a manner that:
F. emphasizes John’s physical strength and intelli-
gence, to indicate John’s view of himself.
G. exaggerates John’s characteristics and actions, to
reflect Douglas’s idolization of John.
H. highlights John’s reckless behavior, to show that
Douglas was most fond of John’s rebelliousness.
J. showcases John’s talents, to make clear why both
children and adults admired John.
27. Within Passage B, the image in lines 74–76 functions
figuratively to suggest that:
A. John’s leaving on a stormy night was fitting, given
Douglas’s sadness.
B. John’s disappointment about moving was reflected
in his mood all day.
C. the mood of the day changed dramatically and
irreversibly once John shared his news.
D. the  sky  in  Green  Town  became  cloudy  at  the
moment John told Douglas he was moving.
28. Both Passage A and Passage B highlight Bradbury’s
use of:
F. a first person omniscient narrator to tell a story.
G. satire and irony to develop characters.
H. allegory  to  present  a  complex  philosophical 
question.
J. sensory  details  and  imaginative  description  to
convey ideas.
29. Based on Bradbury’s description in Passage A of his
writing process, which of the following methods hypo-
thetically depicts a way Bradbury might have begun to
write the story in Passage B?
A. Taking notes while interviewing old friends after
first deciding to write a story about two boys
B. Forming  two  characters,  determining  that  he
would like to tell a story about loss, and then
beginning to write a scene
C. Writing  down  the  words  train  ticket  and  then
spending an hour writing whatever those words
brought to his mind
D. Outlining the plot of a story about two boys that
would end with one boy leaving on a train
GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE.
ACT-1572CPRE
3
3
Questions 21–25 ask about Passage A.
Questions 26 and 27 ask about Passage B.
Questions 28–30 ask about both passages.
GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE.
ACT-1572CPRE
3
3
30. Elsewhere  in  the  essay  from  which  Passage A  is
adapted, Bradbury writes:
Was there a real boy named John Huff?
There was. And that was truly his name. But
he didn’t go away from me, I went away from
him.
How do these statements apply to both the information
about Bradbury’s approach as a storyteller provided in
Passage A and the story of John Huff provided in Pas-
sage B?
F. They reveal that Bradbury believed that to surprise
readers is a fiction writer’s most important task.
G. They reinforce that Bradbury used his life experi-
ences to create fiction but also altered those expe-
riences as he pleased.
H. They prove that Bradbury felt such pain over leav-
ing John that he had to reverse events to be able to
write the story.
J. They indicate that Bradbury rarely used his life
experiences to create fiction.
Passage IV
NATURAL SCIENCE: This passage is adapted from the article
“The Jaws That Jump” by Adam Summers (©2006 by Natural
History Magazine, Inc.).
Recently I was reminded of just how powerful ants
can be when inflicting damage on intruders. A team of
biomechanists has studied the incredibly speedy bite of
a group of Central and South American ants. The team
clocked the bite as the fastest on the planet—and dis-
covered that it also gives the ants the unique ability to
jump with their jaws, adding to an impressive array of
already known defenses.
Trap-jaw ants nest in leaf litter, rather than under-
ground or in mounds. There they often feed on well-
armored and elusive prey, including other species of
ants. As they stalk their dinner, the trap-jaws hold their
mandibles wide apart, often cocked open at 180 degrees
or more by a latch mechanism. When minute trigger
hairs on the inner edge of the mandible come in contact
with something, the jaws  snap shut  at speeds now
known to reach 145 miles per hour. No passerby could
outrace that. The astoundingly high speed gives the
jaws, despite their light weight, enough force to crack
open the armor of most prey and get at the tasty meat
inside.
The key to the jaws’ speed (and their even more
amazing acceleration) is that the release comes from
stored energy produced by the strong but slow muscles
of the jaw. Think how an archer slowly draws an arrow
in a bowstring against the flex of a bow: nearly all the
energy from the archer’s muscles pours into the flexing
of the bow. When released, the energy stored in the bow
wings the arrow toward its target much faster than the
archer could by throwing the arrow like a javelin. The
biomechanics of energy storage is the domain of Sheila
N. Patek and Joseph E. Baio, both biomechanists at the
University of California, Berkeley. They teamed up
with two ant experts, Brian L. Fisher of the California
Academy of Sciences in San Francisco and Andrew V.
Suarez  of  the  University  of  Illinois  at  Urbana-
Champaign, to look at the trap-jaw ant Odontomachus
bauri.
Fisher,  Suarez,  and  other  field  biologists  had
already noted that catching O.bauri was like grabbing
for popping popcorn—and very hot popcorn at that,
because a painful sting goes with an ant’s trap-jaw bite.
The insects bounced around in a dizzying frenzy and
propelled themselves many times their body length
when biologists or smaller intruders approached them.
Patek and Baio made high-speed video images of their
movements, and discovered that the secret of their self-
propulsion  was  the  well-executed  “firing”  of  their
mandibles. They also observed that mandibles started to
decelerate before they meet—possibly to avoid self-
inflicted damage. Most important, the ants had two dis-
tinct modes of aerial locomotion.
In the so-called escape jump, an ant orients its
head and jaws perpendicular to the ground, then slams
its  face  straight  down.  That  triggers  the  cocked
mandibles to release with a force 400 times the ant’s
body weight, launching the insect ten or more body
lengths nearly straight into the air. The ant doesn’t
seem to go in any particular direction, but the jump is
presumably fast and unpredictable enough to help the
insect evade, say, the probing tongue of a lizard. Not
only can the jumping ant gain height and sow confu-
sion, but it may also get to a new vantage point from
which to relaunch an attack.
The second kind of jaw-propelled locomotion is
even more common than escape jumping. If an intruder
enters the ants’ nest, one of the ants bangs its jaws
against the intruder, which triggers the trap-jaw and
propels the interloper (if small enough) in one direc-
tion, out of the nest, and the ant in the other. Often the
force sends the ant skimming an inch off the ground for
nearly a foot. The attack, for obvious reasons, is known
as the “bouncer defense.” In the wild, gangs of defend-
ing ants team up to attack hostile strangers, sending
them head over heels out of the nest.
From an evolutionary point of view, the trap-jaws
are an intriguing story. The ants clearly evolved an
entirely new function, propulsion, for a system that was
already useful—chewing up prey. Several lineages of
trap-jaw ants have independently hit on the tactic of
storing energy in their jaws to penetrate well-defended
prey.  In  Odontomachus,  the  horizontal,  bouncer-
defense jump could have arisen out of attempts to bite
intruders, but the high, escape jump—with jaws aimed
directly at the ground—must have arisen from a differ-
ent,  perhaps  accidental  kind  of  behavior.  Such  a
serendipitous event would have been a rare instance in
which banging one’s head against the ground got good
results.
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
38
39
ACT-1572CPRE
3
3
31. The primary purpose of the passage is to:
A. provide an overview of the mechanics and key
operations of the jaws of trap-jaw ants.
B. analyze Patek and Baio’s techniques for filming
two defensive maneuvers of trap-jaw ants.
C. compare the jaws of Odontomachus bauri to the
jaws of other species of ants.
D. describe the evolution of the ability of trap-jaw
ants to perform an escape jump.
32. The sentence in lines 73–75 and the last sentence of
the passage are examples of the author’s rhetorical
technique of:
F. weaving sarcasm into a mostly casual and playful
article.
G. interjecting a lighthearted tone into a primarily
technical article.
H. integrating a slightly combative tone into an arti-
cle that mostly praises two scientists’ work.
J. incorporating personal anecdotes into an article
that mostly reports data.
33. As it is used in lines 81–82, the phrase well-defended
prey most nearly refers to prey that:
A. have a hard outer shell.
B. attack with a lethal bite.
C. travel and attack in groups.
D. move quickly.
34. The passage makes clear that the main source of the
speed of the jaws of the trap-jaw ant is the:
F. ease of movement of the hinge of the jaw.
G. continuous, steady firing of the jaw’s mandibles.
H. light weight of the jaw in relation to the ant’s body
weight.
J. release of energy stored by muscles of the jaw.
35. The author uses the analogy of trying to grab popcorn
as it pops in order to describe the trap-jaw ants’ ability
to:
A. generate heat with their jaw movements.
B. move to high ground in order to attack prey.
C. attack intruders by tossing them out of the nest.
D. bounce around frantically when intruders approach.
36. One main purpose of the last paragraph is to suggest
that unlike their bouncer-defense jump, the trap-jaw
ants’ escape jump may have arisen through:
F. the ants’ trying and failing to bite intruders.
G. a change in the structure of the mandibles of sev-
eral lineages of ants.
H. an accidental behavior of the ants.
J. the ants’ experiencing a positive outcome when
they would attack in a large group.
37. As it is used in line 31, the word domain most nearly
means:
A. living space.
B. area of expertise.
C. taxonomic category.
D. local jurisdiction.
38. The passage points to which of the following as a char-
acteristic of trap-jaw ants’ mandibles that prevents the
ants  from  harming themselves with  their  powerful
bite?
F. A hinge prevents the mandibles from snapping
together forcefully.
G. Mandibles with cushioned inner edges provide a
buffer when the mandibles snap shut.
H. A latch mechanism prevents the mandibles from
closing completely.
J. The mandibles begin to decelerate before they
meet.
39. As described in the passage, one benefit of the trap-
jaw ant’s escape jump is that it allows an ant to:
A. land  in  position  to  launch  a  new  attack  on  a 
predator.
B. confuse a predator with a quick, sudden sting.
C. signal to other ants using a predictable movement.
D. point itself in whichever direction it chooses to
escape.
40. When a trap-jaw ant uses the bouncer-defense jump
effectively on an intruder, which creature(s), if any,
will be propelled either out of the nest or in another
direction?
F. The intruder only
G. The attacking ant only
H. The attacking ant and the intruder
J. Neither the attacking ant nor the intruder
END OF TEST 3
STOP! DO NOT TURN THE PAGE UNTIL TOLD TO DO SO.
DO NOT RETURN TO A PREVIOUS TEST.
Passage I
Researchers studied how diet and the ability to smell
food can affect the life span of normal fruit flies (StrainN)
and fruit flies unable to detect many odors (StrainX).
Study 1
Three tubes (Tubes 1−3), each with 15% sugar yeast
(SY) medium (a diet with 15%sugar and 15%killed yeast),
were prepared. Then, 200virgin female StrainN fruit flies
less than 24 hr old were added to each tube. No additional
substance was added to Tube 1. Additional odors from live
yeast were added to Tube 2, and live yeast was added to
Tube 3. The percent of fruit flies alive was determined
every 5days for 75days (see Figure1).
Figure 1
Study 2
Three tubes (Tubes4−6), each with 5% SYmedium (a
diet with 5%sugar and 5%killed yeast), were prepared.
Then, 200 virgin female Strain N fruit flies less than 24 hr
old were added to each tube. No additional substance was
added to Tube 4. Additional odors from live yeast were
added to Tube 5, and live yeast was added to Tube 6. The
percent of fruit flies alive was determined every 5 days for
75days (see Figure2).
Figure 2
days
percent alive
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
65
60
55
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
0 5 5 10
70 75
15% SY medium
15% SY medium + additional odors from live yeast
15% SY medium + live yeast
Key
days
percent alive
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
65
60
55
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
0 5 5 10
70 75
Key
5% SY medium
5% SY medium + additional odors from live yeast
5% SY medium + live yeast
SCIENCE TEST
35 Minutes—40 Questions
DIRECTIONS: There are several passages in this test.
Each passage is followed by several questions. After
reading a passage, choose the best answer to each
question  and  fill  in  the  corresponding  oval  on  your
answer document. You may refer to the passages as
often as necessary.
You are NOT permitted to use a calculator on this test.
GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE.
ACT-1572CPRE
4
4
40
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested