telerik pdf viewer mvc : Copy picture from pdf reader application Library tool html .net wpf online roberts_summary0-part734

Review of research
assessment
Report by Sir Gareth Roberts to the
UK funding bodies
Issued for consultation May 2003
Copy picture from pdf reader - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste picture pdf; copy paste image pdf
Copy picture from pdf reader - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy a picture from pdf; how to copy pdf image to word
1
Contents
Preface: Sir Gareth Roberts
2
Executive summary
4
Figures 1-6
19
Chapter 1 Background to the review
21
Chapter 2 The review process
24
Chapter 3 The evidence base
26
Chapter 4 Our approach
30
Chapter 5 Proposed model
33
Chapter 6 Implementation
57
Annexes
62
A: 
Steering group membership and terms of reference
62
B: 
Policy environment
63
C: 
A guide to the 2001 RAE
67
D: 
Operational review of the 2001 RAE
71
E: 
Analysis of responses to the ‘Invitation to contribute’ to 
the review of research assessment
81
F: 
Assessing research – the researchers’ view
88
G: 
Changes in research assessment practices in other 
countries
91
H: 
Additional costs implicit in the recommendations
95
I: 
Glossary of terms
100
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed.
copy pdf picture; paste image into pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
cut and paste pdf image; how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document
2
Preface
I am immensely grateful to the funding councils for the opportunity to carry out a review of research
assessment. It has been both a great responsibility and a great pleasure.
The recommendations in this report constitute a radical overhaul of the Research Assessment
Exercise (RAE). They do not however represent a wholesale rejection of the RAE and the principles
upon which it was built. All who examine the impact of the RAE upon UK research and its
international reputation must, I think, agree that it has made us more focused, more self-critical and
more respected across the world. It has done this, in large part, by encouraging universities and
colleges to think more strategically about their research priorities.
I have not developed these proposals in a vacuum. They have been canvassed very widely across
the sector and its stakeholders. I am indebted to a great many people who have given up their time
to discuss my ideas and contribute to their development. Over the course of over 50 meetings, I
have been gratified by the positive response of almost all of those I have spoken to.
Nevertheless, I am conscious of one criticism which has been made a number of times. I have
proposed a system which appears more complex than what has gone before. It is a truism that what
is new appears more complex than what is familiar. However, I acknowledge a sense in which these
proposals do sacrifice simplicity for efficiency and fairness.
I believe it is time to move away from a ‘one-size-fits-all’ assessment, to a model which concentrates
assessment effort where the stakes are highest. This would reduce the burden of assessment on
our universities and colleges but it does, inevitably, lead to a system which on paper appears more
complicated.
Throughout the review, I have been careful to respect the autonomy of each funding council and
indeed that of the territories they serve. It is my profound wish that the elements of the UK research
system will continue to grow together as a cohesive unit. However, I have made sure that these
proposals provide sufficient flexibility for each funding body to tailor its funding policy to meet the
needs of each nation.
The funding councils will also need to address the interface between the assessment process
described in this report and other sources of funding for research, in particular their own support for
work with business and the community and for the development of research in subjects without a
research tradition.
This report is being published by the funding councils as a consultation. I am very glad that this is
the case. The research community and its stakeholders have the opportunity not merely to read the
recommendations but to influence the funding councils in deciding whether and how to implement
them. I will watch progress with interest, in the knowledge that consultation can only improve the
proposals.
This report, then, is not the last word. Indeed, even were the consultation to produce no criticism,
there would still be work to do. I have only hinted in the report at some of the technical issues which
a new assessment exercise will have to resolve – problems such as the division of the research
base into subject groupings for assessment (the ‘units of assessment’), the development of proxy
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy pictures from a pdf to word; paste image into pdf preview
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
copy image from pdf reader; how to copy text from pdf image
3
measures to help panels and institutions take decisions on the quality of research, or the
development of templates for my proposed assessment of research competences.
More important, I urge the funding councils to remember that all evaluation mechanisms distort the
processes they purport to evaluate. My team and I have tried to investigate the effects our proposals
will have upon the behaviour of managers in universities and colleges. Once the report is in the
public domain, it will become much easier to explore these behavioural consequences and I urge
the funding councils to do so thoroughly before taking any final decisions.
My acknowledgements, if complete, would exceed the report in length. I have already mentioned
those who have taken the trouble to share their thoughts on early versions of these proposals – too
many to mention by name. They will, I hope, recognise the sincerity of my thanks.
I am indebted also to my excellent steering group, who have supported and challenged me in equal
measure. Both services are acknowledged with thanks.
Finally, I would like to acknowledge the invaluable help I have received from my team based at the
Higher Education Funding Council for England, particularly Tom Sastry, who acted as secretary to
the review and Vanessa Conte, as project manager. I salute their efforts.
Sir Gareth Roberts
Wolfson College, Oxford
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to copy pictures from pdf; cut image from pdf online
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo image in preview without adobe PDF reader component in VB
how to copy an image from a pdf; how to copy an image from a pdf in preview
4
Executive summary
The Research Assessment Exercise
1. 
The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) provides ratings of the quality of research
conducted in universities and higher education colleges in the UK, to inform the selective allocation
of funds in accordance with the quality of the work undertaken.
2. 
The system was designed to maintain and develop the strength and international
competitiveness of the research base in UK institutions, and to promote high quality in institutions
conducting the best research and receiving the largest proportion of grant.
How the system works
3. 
The RAE is essentially a peer review process. In the last exercise in 2001, research in the UK
was divided into 68 subject areas or units of assessment. An assessment panel was appointed to
examine research in each of these areas.
4. 
Higher education institutions were invited to make submissions, in a standard format, to as
many units of assessment as they chose. There was no upper or lower limit on the number of units
an institution could submit to. Nor was there any limit on the number of staff submitted as research
active, although data were published on the proportion of staff submitted as research active.
5. 
In RAE2001 panels produced grades on a seven point scale (1, 2, 3a, 3b, 4, 5 and 5* – five
star)
1
. However, 80% of the researchers whose work was assessed were in submissions receiving
one of the three top grades (4, 5, and 5*), while 55% were included in submissions receiving one of
the top two grades (5 and 5*). The amount of discrimination provided by the exercise is therefore
less  than the length of the rating scale would suggest.
Background to the review
6. 
Following the outcome of the 2001 RAE, the funding bodies decided that the RAE ought to be
reviewed in the light of the following concerns:
a. 
effect of the RAE upon the financial sustainability of research
b. 
an increased risk that as HEIs’ understanding of the system becomes more
sophisticated, games-playing will undermine the exercise
c. 
administrative burden
d. 
the need to properly recognise collaborations and partnerships across institutions and
with organisations outside HE
e. 
the need to fully recognise all aspects of excellence in research (such as pure
intellectual quality, value added to professional practice, applicability, and impact within and
beyond the research community)
f. 
ability to recognise, or at least not discourage, enterprise activities
1
The same seven point grading scale was used in the previous exercise in 1996. Earlier exercises used shorter scales.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
copy and paste images from pdf; how to cut image from pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader component.
how to copy pdf image to word document; how to copy pictures from pdf to word
5
g. 
concern over the disciplinary basis of the RAE and its effects upon interdisciplinarity
and multidisciplinarity
h. 
lack of discrimination in the current rating system, especially at the top end with a
ceiling effect.
7. 
In June 2002 Sir Gareth Roberts, President of Wolfson College, Oxford was asked to review
research assessment on behalf of the UK higher education funding bodies. Sir Gareth’s work has
been supported by a steering group and assisted by officers. This is the report to the funding bodies
by Sir Gareth and his team.
Key points
8. 
In the course of the review, we have reviewed some major strands of evidence:
a. 
420 responses to our public ‘invitation to contribute’
b. 
an operational review of RAE2001 undertaken by Universitas higher education
consultants
c. 
report on international approaches to research assessment (update of 1999 study)
undertaken for the review by the Science Policy Research Unit at the University of Sussex
(‘Report on responses’)
d. 
a programme of nine workshops with practising researchers undertaken for the review
by RAND Europe
e. 
44 informal consultative meetings with key stakeholders
f. 
open public meetings in Sheffield, Birmingham, Edinburgh, London, Cardiff and Belfast.
9. 
A number of themes have emerged strongly from each of these strands:
a. 
the importance of expert peer review
b. 
the need for a clear link between assessment outcomes and funding
c. 
the need for greater transparency, especially in panel selection
d. 
the need to consider carefully the trade-off between comparability of grades and the
flexibility for assessors to develop methods appropriate to their subject
e. 
the need for a continuous rating scale
f. 
the need for properly resourced administration of the RAE
g. 
consistency of practice across panels.
10. There are two main purposes of research assessment: to support the resource allocation
models of the funding councils, and to provide comprehensive and definitive information on the
quality of UK research in each subject area. We do not advocate pursuing one of the purposes of
the RAE to the exclusion of the other. However, we have in most cases come to regard the first
(informing funding) as more important than the second (providing quality information for a wide
variety of stakeholders).
11. This is a pragmatic view driven by the increasing costs of assessment and of research itself.
Assessing research to meet the limited requirements of the funding councils is a demanding enough
task for both the assessors and the assessed. Given the strains on the system, its costs, and the
importance of its decisions for the allocation of public funds, we lean towards the view that the
6
research assessment process should focus upon providing the information the funding councils
require to allocate those funds in a way which is fair, transparent and efficient.
12. We propose retaining many of the key features of the existing process:
a. 
a UK-wide system
b. 
dependence upon expert peer review to identify the best research
c. 
panel members recruited from within the research community (but not necessarily all
UK-based academics)
d. 
peer reviewers informed by performance indicators but not obliged to reflect them in
grading
e. 
an assessment organised on the basis of disciplinary panels
f. 
panels establish their own assessment criteria in consultation with their research
community
g. 
transparency: panel criteria and working methods are published years in advance of
the process
h. 
panels provide information on the quality and volume of research
i. 
a process designed to encourage institutions to make strategic choices about the areas
of research they prioritise
j. 
those who are assessed control their input into the process: submissions are put
together by institutions.
Our recommendations
13. We have taken RAE2001 as our starting point and made our recommendations in relation to
it. Our principal reforms could be summed up as follows:
a. 
the burden of assessment for institutions and assessment panels linked to the amount
of funds the institution is competing for
b. 
separate assessment of competences such as the development of young researchers
c. 
greater transparency, especially in panel selection
d. 
greater involvement of non-UK researchers
e. 
credible structures to ensure consistency of practice between panels.
f. 
flexibility for assessors to develop methods appropriate to their subject
g. 
grade bands abolished in favour of a profile of the research strength of each
submission, providing for a continuous rating scale
h. 
controls on the scores awarded, to prevent grade inflation
i. 
a clear link between assessment outcomes and funding
j. 
a properly resourced administration.
14. A summary chart showing the research assessment process which would be created if our
recommendations were accepted is included as figure 1.
Centrality of expert review
15. Some of us believed, at the outset of the process, that there might be some scope for
assessing research on the basis of performance indicators, thereby dispensing with the need for a
complex and labour-intensive assessment process. Whilst we recognise that metrics may be useful
7
in helping assessors to reach judgements on the value of research, we are now convinced that the
only system which will enjoy both the confidence and the consent of the academic community is one
based ultimately upon expert review. We are also convinced that only a system based ultimately
upon expert judgement is sufficiently resistant to unintended behavioural consequences to prevent
distorting the very nature of research activity.
Recommendation 1
Any system of research assessment designed to identify the best research must be based
upon the judgement of experts, who may, if they choose, employ performance indicators to
inform their judgement.
Frequency of the assessment
16. Research is an activity which requires a stable environment in which to flourish. The merits of
research often become apparent over many years and there is a strong ethic among researchers
which leads them both to strive for and to respect work of the highest quality. All of these factors
strongly suggest a credible (and relatively onerous) expert review assessment conducted at long
intervals.
17. With these considerations in mind, we have seriously considered a significant extension in the
assessment period from between three and five years, to eight or even ten years.
18. In the end, however, we have to be mindful of the right of government, as the ultimate funder
of research, to invest on the basis of up-to-date quality information. We recognise that there is a
need for reliable information on the performance of the research base if government is to compare
its claims for support with those of other public service areas.
19. Therefore we propose only a small increase in the assessment period, to six years. We also
propose that, at the mid-point of the cycle, the funding councils should monitor volume indicators.
The purpose of this monitoring would not be to re-assess the research, but rather to pick up
changes in the level of activity – which might indicate that a department had been closed or its
research activity dramatically scaled back. Where this appeared to have occurred, the funding
council would have the option of investigating further. We would not recommend that the funding
councils make any revisions to grant levels unless there is evidence of a very significant fall-off in
research activity which could only be accounted for by significant disinvestment.
Recommendation 2
a. There should be a six-year cycle.
b. There should be a light-touch ‘mid-point monitoring’.  This would be designed only to
highlight significant changes in the volume of activity in each unit.
c. The next assessment process should take place in 2007-8.
Assessment of research competences
20. Submissions to RAE2001 were expected to contain a statement of the research strategy and
environment (known as RA5). Panels were asked to produce a single grade reflecting not only the
8
quality of research output but also the features which underpin a unit’s performance and its ability to
continue to perform. These features include its staffing policy, its treatment of young researchers,
and long-term financial planning as reflected in that statement.
21. We propose to separate the assessment of these ‘competences’ from the assessment of
research quality in order to make it more visible and credible. The assessment would be based upon
sets of objective criteria related to specific actions. We suggest that these criteria would be grouped
under four headings (see figure 2):
a. 
research strategy (the coherence of an institution’s research strategy including an
assessment of the credibility of its targets for obtaining funding)
b. 
development of researchers, including postgraduate research (PGR) students,
postdoctoral researchers and junior lecturers
c. 
equal opportunities policies and success in putting them into practice (this would relate
to an institution’s policies for ensuring equality of opportunity for all its staff, not just those in
research roles)
d. 
dissemination of research beyond the academic peer group. This would cover an
institution’s policy on encouraging a spectrum of activities, ranging from collaboration with
organisations outside HE, through the use of research to enhance teaching,
2
and work
promoting the public understanding of research topics.
22. It would rest with the funding councils to decide what sanctions to take against an institution
failing the competence assessment. Should they wish to adopt a common approach, we would
propose that an institution failing its assessment against any one of the competences would be
allowed to enter the next research assessment, but would not receive funding on the basis of its
performance in that assessment until it had demonstrated a satisfactory performance. Given a two-
year period between the competences assessment and the main assessment, and a further year
between the assessment and the incorporation of its results into funding formulae, this would
provide the institution with a three-year period in which to improve before sanctions would be
enforced.
Recommendation 3
a. There should be an institution-level assessment of research competences, undertaken
approximately two years before the main assessment.
b. The competences to be assessed should be institutional research strategy, development
of researchers, equal opportunities, and dissemination beyond the peer group.
c. An institution failing its assessment against any one of the competences would be
allowed to enter the next research assessment but would not receive funding on the
basis of its performance in that assessment until it had demonstrated a satisfactory
performance.
2
We gave specific consideration to the use of research to inform teaching. It is self-evident that one of the ways in which
research organisations can attempt to ensure that their work has a positive impact upon the practice of others is by including
it in their own teaching or communicating it in a form which helps others to do the same. Therefore, if we are concerned with
encouraging a broader view of the dissemination of academic research, to exclude links with teaching would seem peculiar.
The QAA might be in a position to comment on the strength of those links.
9
Assessment burden in proportion to reward
23. At present all institutions and units are assessed in the same way. We believe that the full
weight of research assessment ought not to be brought to bear on all research, and that a lighter-
touch process may be appropriate for less research intensive institutions and units with less to gain
or to lose from the assessment process.
24. One crude measure of research intensity is the proportion of an institution’s funding council
grant for teaching (T) and research (R) which is received for research: R/(T+R). It is beyond the
remit of the review to consider whether the funding councils should use this or any other metric as a
means of categorising institutions; and we have certainly not presumed that they will. We have used
it to explore the efficiency of research assessment as it affects institutions that are least dependent
upon funding council research grant to support their activities.
25. In 2002-3 there were 40 out of 132 English HEIs for whom R/(T+R) came to less than 2%.
These institutions received a total of £566 million in teaching funding and only £6.7 million in
research funding. They made 240 submissions to RAE2001, which yielded an average of £27,580 in
funding in 2002-3 compared to an average across the exercise of over £455,000 per submission.
For these institutions, therefore, and for the panels and administrators tasked with their assessment,
the RAE is over 16 times less efficient than the norm.
26. There will be those who argue that research assessment is not only about funding. We
recognise that the assessment of research is a valuable service which institutions use to benchmark
their progress. However, we believe it is increasingly difficult to provide this service where there is
no realistic prospect of funding.
27. We therefore propose a three-track assessment process:
a. 
option of a separate approach for the least research intensive institutions
b. 
assessment by proxy measures against a threshold standard (Research Capacity
Assessment or RCA) for the less competitive departments in the remainder of institutions
c. 
expert review assessment similar to the old RAE for the most competitive departments
(Research Quality Assessment or RQA).
28. A key feature of our proposals is that institutions would be asked to take decisions on the
work they wish to submit for the full RQA at the level of the subject area rather than the individual.
This means that, in submitting to RQA they would forfeit the right to submit staff from that area to the
RCA – and any funding consequent upon RCA results.
Recommendation 4
a. There should, in principle, be a multi-track assessment enabling the intensiveness of the
assessment activity (and potentially the degree of risk) to be proportionate to the likely
benefit.
b. The least research intensive institutions should be considered separately from the
remainder of the HE sector.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested