upload and view pdf in asp net c# : Paste image on pdf preview SDK control project wpf web page winforms UWP Rules%20of%20Unified%20English%20Braille%2020132-part783

Rules of Unified English Braille 
Second Edition 2013 
xxi 
Acknowledgements  
Publication of this second edition of 
The Rules of Unified English Braille
is the result 
of work undertaken by many people over an extended period of time.  
Editing and production of the first edition of this Rulebook was sponsored by the 
following organisations.  I acknowledge and thank: 
•  Royal National Institute of Blind People (UK)  
•  Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children (Australia) 
•  Vision Australia  
•  Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind  
•  Royal Society for the Blind of South Australia  
During the process of compiling and editing this publication I have greatly 
appreciated the hard work and dedication of the many people who have provided 
source material and feedback. Formulation of the braille rules and compilation of 
many of the examples was originally undertaken by members of the UEB Rules 
Committee most capably lead by Phyllis Landon.   
Phyllis has continued to lead the process of documenting and refining the UEB Rules 
and has spent countless hours drafting and wordsmithing text. Now, as Chair of the 
ICEB Code Maintenance Committee, she, along with her Committee, continues to 
give valuable hours of support and guidance to the development of this publication.  
My thanks also go to members of the Rulebook Project Advisory Committee. Lead by 
Bruce Maguire, they provided me with invaluable guidance, encouragement and 
feedback for the production of our first edition and have sustained their support for 
the project in more recent times.   
In particular I acknowledge with true appreciation the constant feedback, careful 
proofing and advice given to me by Phyllis Landon, Leona Holloway, Bill Jolley and 
Kathy Riessen.  Without their careful review of wording, their numerous 
suggestions, additions and corrections, this Rulebook would not serve as the 
invaluable reference tool that readers have come to know and rely upon.  
And finally, a special thank you to my husband John, whose thoughtful assistance 
with the print layout has been truly appreciated. His many suggestions to refine the 
visual look of this document have helped to make a complex set of rules and 
examples appear clear, uncluttered and easily manageable.    
Christine Simpson  
Editor  
Paste image on pdf preview - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copy image from pdf reader; cut and paste pdf image
Paste image on pdf preview - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to cut image from pdf file; copy pdf picture to word
Rules of Unified English Braille 
Second Edition 2013 
xxii 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
how to cut picture from pdf file; copy image from pdf to
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
NET. An independent .NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed. Access
how to cut an image out of a pdf; copy and paste image into pdf
Rules of Unified English Braille 
Second Edition 2013 
xxiii 
About This Book  
The Rules of Unified English Braille
is primarily intended for use by braille 
transcribers, although it is hoped that it will also serve as a key reference for braille 
translation software developers and other braille experts. 
This publication is not a manual for learning braille.  It is a reference that a 
transcriber may use often and a reader of braille may use occasionally for 
clarification. Topics are not in an order which allows the reader to learn the braille 
code.  Good braille knowledge is essential for effective use of this publication. 
The statement of each “braille rule” is followed by useage examples. Cross-
references and notes are also included. The words “Refer to:" indicate text directing 
the reader to related material and the word “Note:” indicates text that serves to 
clarify a point, or to remind the reader of something important. 
Text in square brackets should be considered as an "editorial note”; included for the 
purpose of helping the reader better understand an example or a point being 
illustrated. Text in round brackets is usually part of an example.    
The print version has been prepared using SimBraille font for all braille examples, so 
it does not show the dot locator preceding the symbols under discussion. However, 
in the braille version the dot locator has been added where required.   
Examples in the print version show the text in regular font and then in SimBraille.  
Examples are shown just once in the braille version. Where more than one example 
is placed on the same line, multiple spaces have been inserted for separation. In 
some instances a Transcriber Note has been added to the braille text to ensure that 
the point being illustrated is clear to the braille reader.  
Under the heading “Examples:” readers will see instances of where a particular 
symbols-sequence or contraction is used, followed under the heading “But:” by a 
listing of instances where such symbols-sequences or contractions may not be used.   
Lists of symbols are mostly in braille order (see Section 1.1.2, Introduction). 
Section 11: Technical Material summarises information in 
Unified English Braille 
Guidelines for Technical Material
that constitutes rules rather than guidelines. It is 
presented in a slightly different style from the rest of the Rulebook. Print and braille 
versions of The Guidelines document can be downloaded from http://www.iceb.org. 
Appendix 1 presents the shortforms in alphabetic order, together with their 
associated wordlists. Each shortform wordlist is in two parts: firstly listing words 
which begin with the shortform, and then listing words where the shortform follows 
another syllable or syllables.    
Appendix 2 provides an alphabetic list of all example words used in Section 10 to 
show contraction use.   
Appendix 3 is the complete list of UEB symbols in braille order. It shows, where 
applicable: UEB symbol, print symbol (print edition only), unicode value, symbol 
name, usage and reference. 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net. You may get document preview image from stream object in C#.net.
preview paste image into pdf; paste image into pdf in preview
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file. Export high quality image from PDF document in .NET program. Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF
how to copy an image from a pdf in; paste picture to pdf
Rules of Unified English Braille 
Second Edition 2013 
xxiv 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net. You may get document preview image from stream object in C#.net.
how to copy pdf image to powerpoint; paste image into pdf form
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
copy and paste image from pdf to word; copy paste image pdf
Rules of Unified English Braille 
1:  Introduction 
Second Edition 2013 
Section 1:  Introduction  
1.1 
Definition of braille 
1.1.1  Braille is a tactile method of reading and writing for blind people 
developed by Louis Braille (1809–1852), a blind Frenchman.  The 
braille system uses six raised dots in a systematic arrangement with 
two columns of three dots, known as a braille cell.  By convention, 
the dots in the left column are numbered 1, 2 and 3 from top to 
bottom and the dots in the right column are numbered 4, 5 and 6 
from top to bottom. 
1
●● 
4
2
●● 
5
3
●●
6
1.1.2  The six dots of the braille cell are configured in 64 possible 
combinations (including the space which has no dots present).  The 
63 braille characters with dots are grouped in a table of seven lines.  
This table is used to establish "braille order" for listing braille signs. 
Line 1:  
a b c d e f g h i j
Line 2:  
k l m n o p q r s t
Line 3:  
u v x y z & = ( ! )
Line 4:  
* < % ? : $ ] \ [ w
Line 5:  
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
Line 6:  
/ + # > ' -
Line 7:  
@ ^ _ " . ; ,
Line 1 is formed with characters in the upper part of the cell, using 
dots 1, 2, 4 and 5. 
Line 2 adds dot 3 to each of the characters in Line 1. 
Line 3 adds dots 3 and 6 to each of the characters in Line 1. 
Line 4 adds dot 6 to each of the characters in Line 1. 
Line 5 repeats the dot configurations of Line 1 in the lower part of the 
cell, using dots 2, 3, 5 and 6. 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
An independent .NET framework viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able
pdf cut and paste image; how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET Remove PDF image in preview without adobe
copy picture from pdf to word; how to copy and paste a pdf image
Rules of Unified English Braille 
1:  Introduction 
Second Edition 2013 
Line 6 is formed with characters using dots 3, 4, 5 and 6. 
Line 7 is formed with characters in the right column of the cell, using 
dots 4, 5 and 6. 
1.1.3  An individual may write braille by hand either using a slate and stylus 
to push dots out from the back of the paper working from right to left 
or using a mechanical device called a brailler.  A person may also use 
an embosser to reproduce an electronic braille file.  These methods 
all produce embossed braille on hardcopy paper. 
1.1.4  A person may read an electronic braille file by using a refreshable 
braille display attached to his/her computer.  This employs pins which 
raise and lower to form the braille characters. 
1.1.5  Originally developed to represent the French language, braille has 
been adapted for English and many other languages. 
1.1.6  Braille is used to represent all subject matter, including literature, 
mathematics, science and technology.  Louis Braille developed the 
system which is used worldwide today for representing music. 
1.2 
Principles of Unified English Braille 
1.2.1  Unified English Braille (UEB) is a system of English braille which 
represents all subjects except music. 
1.2.2  The purpose of UEB is to allow the reader to understand without 
ambiguity what symbols are being expressed by a given braille text. 
1.2.3  The primary transcribing rule is to produce braille that, when read, 
yields exactly the original print text (apart from purely ornamental 
aspects). 
1.2.4  A print symbol has one braille equivalent in UEB.  Use the braille sign 
for that print symbol regardless of the subject area. 
1.2.5  In UEB the 64 braille characters including the space are designated as 
being either a prefix or a root.  There are 8 prefixes:  
#
plus the 
braille characters formed from the dots in the right column of the cell, 
that is the characters from Line 7 of the table in section 1.1.2 above.  
The other 56 braille characters are roots. The UEB prefixes are:   
# @ ^ _ " . ; ,
1.2.6  The last two braille characters in the table 
;
and 
,
are special 
prefixes.  A special prefix may be used in combination with another 
special prefix to form a braille sign.  Such braille signs are used only 
as indicators. 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines in VB.NET. Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF control.
copy and paste image from pdf; copying image from pdf to word
Rules of Unified English Braille 
1:  Introduction 
Second Edition 2013 
Example: 
The passage indicators 
;;; 
and  
,,, 
1.2.7  Any other braille sign in UEB is constructed from a root or from a root 
plus one or more prefixes. 
Examples: 
  "s   .s   @.<   ,^/   @#?  
1.3 
Basic signs found in other forms of English braille 
Note:
In the following sections, only braille signs found in both 
English Braille American Edition
and 
British Braille
are listed. 
Contractions 
1.3.1  Other forms of English braille write the wordsigns for "a", "and", 
"for", "of", "the" and "with" unspaced from one another. 
1.3.2  Other forms of English braille use the following contractions which 
are not used in UEB: 
o'c 
o'clock (shortform) 
4
dd (groupsign between letters) 
6
to (wordsign unspaced from following word) 
96
into (wordsign unspaced from following word) 
0
by (wordsign unspaced from following word) 
#
ble (groupsign following other letters) 
-
com (groupsign at beginning of word) 
,n
ation (groupsign following other letters) 
,y
ally (groupsign following other letters) 
Rules of Unified English Braille 
1:  Introduction 
Second Edition 2013 
Punctuation 
1.3.3  Other forms of English braille use the following punctuation signs 
which are not used in UEB: 
7
opening and closing parentheses (round brackets) 
7'
closing square bracket 
0'
closing single quotation mark (inverted commas) 
''' 
ellipsis 
--
dash (short dash) 
---- 
double dash (long dash) 
,7
opening square bracket 
Composition signs (indicators) 
1.3.4  Other forms of English braille use the following composition signs 
(indicators) which are not used in UEB: 
1
non-Latin (non-Roman) letter indicator 
@
accent sign (nonspecific) 
@
print symbol indicator 
.
italic sign (for a word) 
.. 
double italic sign (for a passage) 
General symbols 
1.3.5  Other forms of English braille use the following general symbols 
which are not used in UEB: 
l
pound sign (pound sterling) 
p> 
paragraph sign 
s'
section sign 
4
dollar sign 
99
asterisk 
Rules of Unified English Braille 
1:  Introduction 
Second Edition 2013 
-
end of foot 
-- 
caesura 
^
short or unstressed syllable 
_
long or stressed syllable 
Technical subjects 
1.3.6  Other forms of English braille use special codes to represent 
mathematics and science, computer notation and other technical or 
specialised subjects. 
Rules of Unified English Braille 
1:  Introduction 
Second Edition 2013 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested