Rules of Unified English Braille 
2:  Terminology and General Rules 
Second Edition 2013 
Section 2: Terminology and General Rules   
2.1 
Terminology 
alphabetic:  designating letters of the alphabet, including modified letters, 
ligatured letters and contractions, which stand for letters 
alphabetic wordsign:  any one of the wordsigns in which a letter represents 
a word 
braille cell:  the physical area which is occupied by a braille character 
braille character:  any one of the 64 distinct patterns of six dots, including 
the space, which can be expressed in braille 
braille sign:  one or more consecutive braille characters comprising a unit, 
consisting of a root on its own or a root preceded by one or more 
prefixes (also referred to as braille symbol) 
braille space:  a blank cell, or the blank margin at the beginning and end of 
a braille line 
braille symbol:  used interchangeably with braille sign 
contracted:  transcribed using contractions (also referred to as grade 2 
braille) 
contraction:  a braille sign which represents a word or a group of letters 
final-letter groupsign:  a two-cell braille sign formed by dots 46 or dots 56 
followed by the final letter of the group 
grade 1:  the meaning assigned to a braille sign which would otherwise be 
read as a contraction or as a numeral (Meanings assigned under 
special modes such as arrows are not considered grade 1.) 
grade 1 braille:  used interchangeably with uncontracted 
grade 2 braille:  used interchangeably with contracted 
graphic sign:  a braille sign that stands for a single print symbol 
groupsign:  a contraction which represents a group of letters 
indicator:  a braille sign that does not directly represent a print symbol but 
that indicates how subsequent braille sign(s) are to be interpreted 
initial-letter contraction:  a two-cell braille sign formed by dot 5, dots 45 
or dots 456 followed by the first letter or groupsign of the word 
item:    any one of a precisely-defined grouping of braille signs used primarily 
in technical material to establish the extent of certain indicators, such 
as indices 
Copy picture to pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste image into pdf preview; copy image from pdf acrobat
Copy picture to pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy paste picture pdf; how to copy image from pdf to word
Rules of Unified English Braille 
2:  Terminology and General Rules 
Second Edition 2013 
letters-sequence:  an unbroken string of alphabetic signs preceded and 
followed by non-alphabetic signs, including space 
lower:  containing neither dot 1 nor dot 4 
mode:  a condition initiated by an indicator and describing the effect of the 
indicator on subsequent braille signs 
modifier:  a diacritical mark (such as an accent) normally used in 
combination with a letter 
nesting:  the practice of closing indicators in the reverse order of opening 
non-alphabetic:  designating any print or braille symbol, including the 
space, which is not a letter, modified letter, ligatured letter or 
contraction 
passage:  three or more symbols-sequences 
passage indicator:  initiates a mode which persists indefinitely until an 
explicit terminator is encountered 
prefix:  any one of the seven braille characters having only right-hand dots 
(
@ ^ _ " . ; ,
) or the braille character 
#
print symbol:  a single letter, digit, punctuation mark or other print sign 
customarily used as an elementary unit of text 
root:    any one of the 56 braille characters, including the space, which is not 
a prefix 
shortform:  a contraction consisting of a word specially abbreviated in braille 
standing alone:  condition of being unaccompanied by additional letters, 
symbols or punctuation except as specified in 2.6, the "standing 
alone" rule; used to determine when a braille sign is read as a 
contraction 
strong:  designating contractions (other than alphabetic wordsigns) 
containing dots in both the top and bottom rows and in both the left 
and right columns of the braille cell 
strong character:  designating a braille character containing dots in both the 
top and bottom rows and in both the left and right columns of the 
braille cell, which therefore is physically unambiguous 
symbols-sequence:  an unbroken string of braille signs, whether alphabetic 
or non-alphabetic, preceded and followed by space (also referred to 
as symbols-word) 
terminator:  a braille sign which marks the end of a mode 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
copy images from pdf to word; how to copy an image from a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
copy picture from pdf to word; how to copy images from pdf
Rules of Unified English Braille 
2:  Terminology and General Rules 
Second Edition 2013 
text element:  a section of text normally read as a unit (a single paragraph, 
a single heading at any level, a single item in a list or outline, a 
stanza of a poem, or other comparable unit), but not "pages" or 
"lines" in the physical sense that are created simply as an accident of 
print formatting 
uncontracted:  transcribed without contractions (also referred to as grade 1 
braille) 
upper:  including dot 1 and/or dot 4 
word indicator:  initiates a mode which extends over the next letters-
sequence in the case of the capitals indicator or over the next 
symbols-sequence in the case of other indicators 
wordsign:  a contraction which represents a complete word 
2.2 
Contractions summary 
alphabetic wordsigns:   
but  
can  
do  
every   from   go  
have   just 
knowledge  
like  
more   not  
people   quite   rather 
so  
that  
us  
very   will  
it  
you  
as 
strong wordsigns:   
child   shall   this  
which   out  
still 
strong contractions:  may be used as groupsigns and as wordsigns.  
and  
for  
of  
the  
with 
strong groupsigns:   
ch  
gh  
sh  
th  
wh  
ed  
er  
ou  
ow  
st  
ing  
ar 
lower wordsigns:   
be  
enough  were   his  
in  
was 
lower groupsigns:   
ea  
be  
bb  
con  
cc  
dis  
en  
ff  
gg  
in 
initial-letter contractions:  may be used as groupsigns and as wordsigns. 
•  beginning with dots 45;  
upon   these   those   whose   word 
•  beginning with dots 456;  
cannot   had  
many   spirit   their   world 
•  beginning with dot 5;  
day  
ever   father   here   know   lord  
mother 
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy text from pdf image; how to copy a picture from a pdf file
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
copy and paste image from pdf to pdf; copy and paste images from pdf
Rules of Unified English Braille 
2:  Terminology and General Rules 
Second Edition 2013 
10 
name   one  
part  
question  
right   some 
time   under   young   there   character  
through 
where   ought   work 
final-letter groupsigns: 
•  beginning with dots 46;  
ound   ance   sion  
less  
ount 
•  beginning with dots 56;  
ence   ong  
ful  
tion  
ness   ment   ity 
shortforms:   
about    
above    
according  
across  
after    
afternoon  
afterward  
again    
against   
also  
almost    
already 
altogether  
although  
always    
blind  
braille    
could    
declare   
declaring  
deceive   
deceiving  
either    
friend  
first  
good    
great    
him  
himself   
herself    
immediate  
little  
letter    
myself    
much    
must  
necessary 
neither    
paid    
perceive 
perceiving 
perhaps   
quick    
receive  
receiving  
rejoice    
rejoicing  
said  
such    
today    
together  
tomorrow  
tonight   
itself    
its  
your  
yourself   
yourselves  
themselves  
children   
should    
thyself    
ourselves  
would  
because  
before    
behind    
below  
beneath  
beside    
between  
beyond  
conceive  
conceiving  
oneself    
2.3   Following print 
2.3.1  Follow print when transcribing into braille, including accents, 
punctuation and capitalisation. 
Note:
This provision does not apply to print ornamentation as 
provided for in 2.3.2 below, or to parts of the braille text which are 
added by the transcriber, e.g. preliminary pages, page information 
lines, or transcriber's notes.    
2.3.2  When transcribing, it is preferable to ignore print ornamentation 
which is present only to enhance the appearance of the publication 
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to copy a pdf image into a word document; how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
how to copy pictures from pdf file; how to copy image from pdf file
Rules of Unified English Braille 
2:  Terminology and General Rules 
Second Edition 2013 
11 
and does not impart any useful information.   
Examples of print ornamentation include:   
• different typefaces or fonts for headings  
• the lowercase of letters with accents in a fully capitalised word 
• coloured type used for all example words 
• italics used for all variables in a text 
• small capitals font used for all Roman numerals 
2.3.3  When a facsimile transcription is required, reproduce all aspects of 
print as fully as possible including ornamentation.   
Examples of circumstances when a facsimile transcription may be 
requested are: 
• when the reader is responsible for editing the text 
• when the reader is studying typography 
• when the reader is studying original manuscripts 
2.3.4  In general, do not correct print errors. 
2.4 
Indicators and modes 
2.4.1  The purpose of indicators is to change the meaning of the following 
braille characters or to change an aspect of the following text (e.g. to 
indicate capitals or a special typeface). 
2.4.2  Many braille signs have more than one meaning. 
Examples: 
f
the letter "f"; in numeric mode – digit "6"; contracted (grade 2) 
meaning – the alphabetic wordsign "from" 
in grade 1 mode – arrow indicator; contracted (grade 2) 
meanings – the strong groupsign "ou" and the strong wordsign 
"out" 
8
question mark; opening nonspecific quotation mark; contracted 
(grade 2) meaning – the lower wordsign "his" 
_
vertical solid line segment; line indicator, as in poetry 
"d
in numeric mode – numeric space followed by digit "4"; 
contracted (grade 2) meaning – the initial-letter contraction 
"day" 
.s
Greek letter sigma; contracted (grade 2) meaning – the final-
letter groupsign "less" 
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
how to copy picture from pdf to word; paste picture into pdf preview
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word; copy pdf picture to word
Rules of Unified English Braille 
2:  Terminology and General Rules 
Second Edition 2013 
12 
2.4.3  The reader determines the meaning of a braille sign in several ways:  
• by its spacing (e.g. the vertical solid line segment) 
• by applying the Standing Alone rule (e.g. alphabetic wordsigns) 
• by its position in relation to other signs (e.g. opening nonspecific 
quotation mark, line indicator, final-letter groupsigns) 
• by the mode in effect (e.g. digits, arrow indicator) 
2.4.4  Use an indicator to establish the mode which determines the meaning 
of the braille signs which follow.   
Note:
The list below gives the basic indicators and the modes which 
they set.  It does not include indicators for extended modes (e.g. 
grade 1 word indicator and grade 1 passage indicator), indicators for 
variations (e.g. bold arrow indicator), subsidiary indicators (e.g. 
superposition indicator used in shape mode) or terminators. 
sets shape mode:  
Guidelines for Technical Material,
Part 14, 
Shape Symbols and Composite Symbols 
sets arrow mode:  
Guidelines for Technical Material,
Part 13, 
Arrows 
sets numeric mode and grade 1 mode:  Section 6, Numeric 
Mode  
"3 
opens and sets horizontal line mode:  Section 16, Line Mode, 
Guide Dots  
sets grade 1 mode:  Section 5, Grade 1 Mode 
2.4.5  Use an indicator to change an aspect of the text which follows.   
Note:
The list below gives the basic indicators of this type.   
subscript indicator:  
Guidelines for Technical Material,
Part 7, 
Superscripts and Subscripts 
 
superscript indicator:  
Guidelines for Technical Material,
Part 7, 
Superscripts and Subscripts 
@2 
script symbol indicator:  Section 9, Typeforms   
^2 
bold symbol indicator:  Section 9, Typeforms 
^6 
ligature indicator:  Section 4, Letters and Their Modifiers  
_2 
underlined symbol indicator:  Section 9, Typeforms  
.2 
italic symbol indicator:  Section 9, Typeforms  
Rules of Unified English Braille 
2:  Terminology and General Rules 
Second Edition 2013 
13 
,, 
capitals word indicator:  Section 8, Capitalisation  
2.4.6  The list below gives other indicators. 
cursor indicator:  
Guidelines for Technical Material,
Part 17, 
Computer Notation  
( ) 
general fraction open and close indicators:  
Guidelines for 
Technical Material,
Part 6, Fractions  
< > 
braille grouping opening and closing indicators:  Section 3, 
General Symbols  
@.< @.> 
transcriber's note opening and closing indicators:  
Section 3, General Symbols  
^( 
non-UEB word indicator: Section 14, Code Switching   
line indicator:  Section 15, Scansion, Stress and Tone  
line continuation indicator:  Section 6, Numeric Mode  
""= 
dot locator for "use":  Section 3,  General Symbols  
.= 
dot locator for "mention":  Section 3, General Symbols  
2.4.7  A mode established by a UEB indicator may not extend through a 
switch to another braille code. 
Examples: 
SCHWA /Ə/ OR MID-CENTRAL VOWEL 
,,s*wa "^/5^/ ,,,or mid-c5tral 
v{el,' 
 He cried in despair, je suis vraiment désolé, and fell to his knees. 
.7,he cri$ 9 despair1.' "('3_je 
suis vraiment _d=sol=1,") .7& 
fell to 8 knees4.' 
2.5 
Grades of braille 
Uncontracted (grade 1) braille 
2.5.1  The use of contractions is disallowed by certain rules.  These include: 
Rules of Unified English Braille 
2:  Terminology and General Rules 
Second Edition 2013 
14 
•  Section 4, Letters and Their Modifiers – no contractions following a 
modifier, no contractions before or after a ligature indicator  
•  Section 5, Grade 1 Mode – no contractions within grade 1 mode  
•  Section 6, Numeric Mode – no contractions within grade 1 mode 
when set by a numeric indicator  
•  Section 12, Early Forms of English – no contractions in Old English. 
In technical material these include:  [See 
Guidelines for Technical 
Material:
]   
•  Part 1, General Principles – no contractions in strings of fully 
capitalised letters.   
•  Part 14, Shape Symbols and Composite Symbols – no contractions 
in the description of a transcriber-defined shape. 
•  Part 16, Chemistry – no contractions in letters representing 
chemical elements. 
•  Part 17, Computer Notation – no contractions in a displayed 
computer program. 
2.5.2  Uncontracted (grade 1) braille is different from grade 1 mode.   
2.5.3  Grade 1 mode exists only when introduced by a grade 1 indicator or 
by a numeric indicator.   
2.5.4  Uncontracted (grade 1) braille is a transcription option which may be 
selected for any number of reasons, including: 
• when the pronunciation or recognition of a word would be 
hindered:  Section 10, Contractions  
• in Middle English: Section 12, Early Forms of English 
• in foreign words:  Section 13, Foreign Language 
• in texts for readers who have not learned contracted braille 
• when the spelling of a word is featured, as in dictionary entries 
Note:
Braille authorities and production agencies may establish 
policies for the guidance of transcribers in the use of uncontracted 
(grade 1) braille. 
2.5.5  Although contractions are not used in grade 1 mode, uncontracted 
(grade 1) braille may be employed without the use of grade 1 
indicators. 
Contracted (grade 2) braille 
Note:
The use of the contractions in contracted (grade 2) braille is 
covered in Section 10, Contractions.   
Rules of Unified English Braille 
2:  Terminology and General Rules 
Second Edition 2013 
15 
Note:
UEB contracted braille differs slightly from other forms of 
English contracted braille.  See Section 1.3, Introduction, for basic 
signs found in other forms of English braille. 
Other grades of braille 
Note:
Other grades of braille have been developed.  One of these is 
grade 3 braille which contains several hundred contractions and is 
primarily for personal use.  Another is grade 1½ braille. Employing 
only 44 one-cell contractions, this was the official code of the United 
States from 1918 to 1932. 
2.6 
Standing alone 
2.6.1  A letter or letters-sequence is considered to be "standing alone" if it is 
preceded and followed by a space, a hyphen or a dash.  The dash 
may be of any length, i.e. the dash or the long dash.     
Examples:   
x  
;x
it  
x
which  
:
was  
0
al  
;al
also  
al
e-x-u-d-e  
;;e-x-u-d-e
do-it-yourself  
d-x-yrf
out-and-out  
\-&-\  
5-yrf-678  
#e-;yrf-#fgh
I like x–it works.  
,i l ;x,-x "ws4
his child–this one  
8 *,-? "o
my friend–Fr John  
my fr,-;,fr ,john
th--r  
th--;r
Mme. M—  
,mme4 ;,m",-
–s  
,-;s
—st  
",-st
2.6.2  A letter or letters-sequence is considered to be "standing alone" when 
the following common punctuation and indicator symbols intervene 
between the letter or letters-sequence and the 
preceding
space, 
hyphen or dash: 
•  opening parenthesis (round bracket), opening square bracket or 
opening curly bracket (brace bracket) 
•  opening quotation mark of any kind 
Rules of Unified English Braille 
2:  Terminology and General Rules 
Second Edition 2013 
16 
•  nondirectional quotation mark of any kind 
•  apostrophe [also see Section 2.6.4] 
•  opening typeform indicator of any kind 
•  capitals indicator of any kind 
•  opening transcriber's note indicator 
•  or any combination of these. 
Examples: 
(c  
"<;c   
[can  
.<c 
{af  
_<;af
–(after  
,-"<af   
“do  
8d
‘your  
,8yr
"yr-123  
,7;yr-#abc
'e 'as  
';e 'Z
p
.2;p
people  
^1p
enough  
_15
child-safe
.1*-safe
N  
;,n
Not Like That  
,n ,l ,t
 LITTLE CHILD  
,,ll ,,*
–GREAT  
,-,,grt
OUT OF TOWN  
,,,\ ( t[n,'
[open TN]every  
@.<e  
[open TN]In  
@.<,9 
–“[Be true.]”  
,-8.<,2 true4.>0
But:   
<x, y>  
@<x1 y@>
this/that  
?is_/?at
*from  
"9from
&c  
@&c
Apt. #B  
,apt4 _?,b
 ¶d  
^pd
é  
^/e
ū  
@-u
~s  
@9s
~st  
@9/
2.6.3  A letter or letters-sequence is considered to be "standing alone" when 
the following common punctuation and indicator symbols intervene 
between the letter or letters-sequence and the 
following
space, 
hyphen or dash: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested