upload and view pdf in asp net c# : How to cut picture from pdf file control application utility azure web page winforms visual studio SafeFoodFairFood2-InceptionWorkshopReport2-part838

19 
6. Students: Partners supervising students will be responsible for ensuring that students are 
registered, tuition and stipends are paid, and access is provided to computing facilities. 
Students will submit a short quarterly progress reports to ILRI via their project supervisor. 
7. Data and publications: The cooperation agreements include provisions for Intellectual 
Property Rights, including noting that any data generated by the project are the property of ILRI 
to ensure that they will be made public domain after project staff have had the opportunity to 
generate publications. All publications must acknowledge the support of BMZ. All draft 
publications are to be reviewed by a project scientific review committee, and an authorship 
policy will be agreed. 
8. Field allowances: Each country will propose per diem rates consistent with standard rates 
practiced by the lead institution, as long as those rates reasonably reflect actual costs 
Reporting format 
Name of organisation 
Reporting Period 
Project Coordinator (Leading Scientist) and Project Scientists  
Name the leading scientist stating his/her full address, telephone no., fax and e-mail. Give the 
names of the principal staff members participating in the project (addresses not necessary).  
Collaborating Institutions and Staff  
State the full names of the institutions and main staff members and students involved in the 
project, and the nature of their involvement. State any changes in personnel. 
Activities completed  
Briefly describe the activities carried out during the reporting period, including any un-planned 
activities. Describe the progress against milestones and the deliverables obtained. 
Achievements and constraints  
Summarize the results of ongoing activities; highlight important achievements, methodological 
breakthroughs, experiences and major constraints of project implementation, un-expected side-
effects of project activities; report on the use of results by other scientists, projects and 
beneficiaries; report on feedback from users concerning interim results and implications for 
national agricultural research systems and agricultural research organizations. If objectives, 
outputs or indicators could not be achieved, please state reasons.  
Conclusions for the following reporting period  
State whether outputs are still relevant and achievable, point out issues which require 
adjustments to the work-plan, including comments from in-house peer reviews and/or validation 
of progress by peers. Draw conclusions for the further implementation of the project.  
Publications, papers and reports  
List under this item all relevant documents which constitute new products of the present project 
since the last progress report. Please send copies of the publications, papers and reports to 
SFFF2 project coordinator to be forwarded to BMZ/GIZ.  
How to cut picture from pdf file - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to cut a picture out of a pdf file; how to copy an image from a pdf
How to cut picture from pdf file - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copying image from pdf to word; copy images from pdf
20 
Annex 1: Agenda  
The inception workshop for the project Safe Food Fair Food: From capacity building to implementation 
Objectives: The workshop will focus on team-building, sharing information about partner institutes, planning activities, and administrative arrangements. 
Participants 
Please prepare a small introduction (2-5 slides, 10 minutes) on your partner institution (session 2). 
Day 1: Thursday, April 12, 2012 (room 721, ILRI campus Nairobi) 
Time 
Activity  
Presenter/ facilitator 
8:30 
9:00 
Check-in and coffee/tea 
Diana Oduor, Kristina 
Roesel 
9:00 
9:10 
Opening 
Jimmy Smith, ILRI-DG 
9:10 
9:15 
Objectives and schedule 
Delia Grace 
9:15 
9:20 
Introduction participants 
Session 1:  
Project rationale, approach, 
context 
9:20 
10:20 
Livestock and Fish  
Agriculture for Nutrition and 
Health 
Tom Randolph 
Delia Grace 
10:20 
10:30 
Coffee/tea break 
10:30 
11:30 
Safe Food, Fair Food 1 
Safe Food, Fair Food 2 
Kohei Makita 
Kristina Roesel 
Session 2:  
Partnership analysis 
11:30 
13:00  
Introduction of partners 
Strengths 
Interests 
Contribution towards project 
Bassirou Bonfoh, Peter-
Henning Clausen, Francis 
Ejobi, Alexandra Fetsch, 
Reinhard Fries, Saskia 
Hendrickx, Erastus 
Kang‟ethe, Lusato 
Kurwijila, Kohei Makita, 
Helena Matusse, Kwaku 
Tano-Debrah, Girma 
Zewde 
13:00 
14:00 
Lunch break 
Session 3:  
Detailed planning year 1 
14:00 
14:15 
Metagenomics 
Francesca Stomeo/ Mark 
Wamalwa 
14:15 
15:30 
Rapid integrated 
assessment 
Delia Grace 
15:30 
15:45 
Coffee/tea break 
15:45 
16:30 
Action research 
Delia Grace 
End of workshop day 1 and 
transfer to Segesege 
Guesthouse 
18:00 -21:00 
Pick up from guesthouse for 
Dinner at Fogo Gaucho 
Day 2: Friday, April 13, 2012 (room no. 721, ILRI campus Nairobi) 
Time 
Activity 
Presenter/ facilitator 
8:30 
9:00 
Check-in, per diems, 
coffee/tea 
Diana Oduor 
Session 3 cont‟d: 
Detailed Planning year 1 
9:00 
10:30 
RECs 
Communication 
Delia Grace 
Tezira Lore/ Kristina 
Roesel 
10:30 
11:00 
Friday Morning Coffee at 
ILRI 
Session 4:  
Administrative arrangements 
11:00 
12:30 
CRA, Reporting to 
ILRI/BMZ, financial 
arrangements, student 
support, intellectual property, 
publication agreements 
Kohei Makita 
12:30 
13:00 
Institutional Research Ethics 
Committee (IREC)/ 
Institutional Animal Care and 
Use Committee (IACUC) 
Delia Grace 
13:00 
14:00 
Lunch break 
14:00 
15:00 
A tour of ILRI Nairobi 
facilities and Biosciences 
eastern and central Africa 
(BecA) Hub 
Timothy Kingori 
15:00 
15:15 
Coffee/tea break 
15:15 
16:30 
Review year 1 Action Plan 
Closing session  
Delia Grace 
16:30 
18:00 
Reception at ILRI Enkare 
Club 
All participants and other 
invites from ILRI 
End of workshop day 2 and 
transfer to Segesege 
Guesthouse 
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way? Do you need to cut out certain
copy picture from pdf to word; how to paste a picture in a pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
NET image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF document file page
how to copy pictures from a pdf document; how to copy pdf image to jpg
21 
Annex 2: List of participants  
Safe Food Fair Food: From capacity building to implementation 
12-13 April 2012 at ILRI campus Nairobi (room no. 721) 
Last name 
First name 
Affiliation 
Email 
Bonfoh 
Bassirou 
Centre Suisse de Recherches Scientifiques en Côte d'Ivoire 
(CSRS) 
bassirou.bonfoh@csrs.ci
Clausen 
Peter-
Henning 
Free University of Berlin (FUB), Germany 
peter-henning.clausen@fu-
berlin.de
Ejobi 
Francis 
Makerere University (MU), Uganda 
ejobifrancis@gmail.com
Fetsch 
Alexandra 
Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Germany 
Alexandra.fetsch@bfr.bund.de 
Fries 
Reinhard 
Free University of Berlin (FUB), Germany 
Reinhard@friesconsult.info
fries.reinhard@vetmed.fu-berlin.de 
Grace 
Delia 
International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) 
d.grace@cgiar.org
Hendrickx 
Saskia 
International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) 
s.hendrickx@cgiar.org
Kang'ethe 
Erastus 
University of Nairobi (UoN), Kenya 
mburiajudith@gmail.com
Kurwijila 
Lusato 
Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA), Tanzania 
kurwijila_2000@yahoo.com
Makita 
Kohei 
Rakuno Gakuen University (RGU), Japan/ ILRI 
kmakita@rakuno.ac.jp
Matusse 
Helena 
Ministry of Agriculture, Mozambique (Direcção de Ciências 
Animais) 
helena.matusse@gmail.com   
Roesel 
Kristina 
Free University of Berlin (FUB)/ILRI 
k.rosel@cgiar.org
Stomeo 
Francesca 
Biosciences eastern and central Africa (BecA)-Hub, Kenya 
f.stomeo@cgiar.org
Tano-Debrah  Kwaku 
University of Ghana (UoG) 
ktanode@ug.edu.gh
Wamalwa 
Mark 
Biosciences eastern and central Africa (BecA)-Hub, Kenya 
m.wamalwa@cgiar.og
Zewde 
Girma 
University of Addis Ababa (UoAA), Ethiopia 
girmazewde@gmail.com  
WorldFish were not able to attend but are a partner in the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish as well as the project. 
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
like VB.NET image cropping application to cut out an NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copy picture to pdf; copying images from pdf files
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature, logo, etc. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file.
copy image from pdf to ppt; copy pdf picture to word
22 
Annex 3: CGIAR background information 
and context of the CGIAR Research 
Programs and the Safe Food, Fair Food 
project 
CGIAR is a strategic alliance that unites organizations involved in agricultural research for 
sustainable development with the donors that fund such work. These donors include 
governments of developing and industrialized countries, foundations and international and 
regional organizations.  
The work they support is carried out by the 15 members of the CGIAR Consortium of 
international agricultural research centres, in close collaboration with hundreds of partner 
organizations, including national and regional agricultural research institutes, civil society 
organizations, academia and the private sector. CGIAR is sponsored by the Food and 
Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural 
Development (IFAD), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the World 
Bank. 
CGIAR’s vision
To reduce poverty and hunger, improve human health and nutrition and enhance ecosystem 
resilience through high-quality international agricultural research, partnership and leadership. 
Strategic objectives 
-
Reducing rural poverty 
-
Improving food security 
-
Improving nutrition and health 
-
Sustainably managing natural resources 
In 2008, CGIAR embarked on a change process to improve the engagement between all 
stakeholders in international agricultural research for development - donors, researchers and 
beneficiaries - and to refocus the efforts of the centres on major global development challenges.
A key objective was to integrate the work of the centres and their partners, avoiding 
fragmentation and duplication of effort. 
The CGIAR Consortium was established in April 2010. It is based at the Agropolis campus in 
Montpellier, France. The purpose of the Consortium is to provide leadership to the CGIAR 
system and coordinate activities among the CGIAR centres and other partners, within the 
framework of the Strategic Reference Framework (SRF), to enable them to enhance their 
individual and collective contribution to the achievement of the CGIAR‟s vi
sion. 
The CGIAR Fund was established in January 2010 and is based in Washington DC, USA. It 
aims to harmonize the efforts of donors to contribute to agricultural research for development, 
increase the funding available by reducing or eliminating duplication of effort among the centres 
and promote greater financial stability. 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Enable users to insert images to PDF file in ASPX webpage project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy image from pdf to word; cut and paste pdf image
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Powerful PDF image editor control, compatible with .NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
how to copy pictures from pdf; cut and paste image from pdf
23 
The 15 CGIAR centres  
-
Africa Rice 
-
Bioversity International 
-
International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT ) 
-
Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) 
-
International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) 
-
International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) 
-
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 
-
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) 
-
International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) 
-
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) 
-
International Potato Center (CIP) 
-
International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) 
-
International Water Management Institute (IWMI) 
-
World Agroforestry Centre 
-
WorldFish 
The CGIAR Research Programs 
CGIAR Research Programs are multi-center, multi-partner initiatives built on three core 
principles: impact on the CGIAR's four system-level objectives; making the most of the centers' 
strengths; and strong and effective partnerships. 
The following research programmes have now been approved:  
http://www.cgiarfund.org/cgiarfund/research_portfolio.  
ILRI leads the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish and one of four components of 
the CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health (which is led by the 
International Food Policy Research Institute). 
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
getting an image / picture / photo with image capturing device, in general, people will perform some editing or processing functions on source image file.
paste image into pdf in preview; copy images from pdf to word
24 
CGIAR Research Program on Livestock & Fish 
The purpose of the program is to increase the productivity of small-scale livestock and fish 
farming in selected developing countries to enhance the nutrition and increase the incomes of 
poor and hungry households. 
The Strategy: Focus locally, impact globally. 
Why focus on farm animals? Because Livestock + fish = big opportunities for the poor! 
High demand: increasing demand for animal-source foods in developing countries is a 
big opportunity for smallholders, who can raise their incomes by meeting that demand. 
Projected increase in demand for animal foods to 
2020, % per year (Delgado et al, 1999) 
Highly nutritious: animal-source foods are critical for malnourished people, especially 
women and children. 
Highest value:  
-
Meat, milk and fish are generally the highest value agricultural products globally.  
-
Nearly 1 billion (70%) of the world‟s 1.4 billion extremely poor people depend on 
livestock. 
-
Two-
thirds of the world‟s livestock keepers are rural wom
en. 
-
Over 100 million landless people keep livestock. 
-
400 million people in Africa and South Asia depend on fish for most of their 
animal protein. 
What is new about this research program? 
Takes a „value chain‟ approach
; research is focused on value chains to generate big and 
measurable impacts with: 
-
R&D investments and efforts catalysed 
-
Both development and private agencies incorporated in productive partnerships. 
-
Scientific expertise and resources shared across platforms. 
Select most promising value chains to work with 
-
Pigs in Vietnam and Uganda  
-
Goats and sheep in Mali and Ethiopia 
-
Aquaculture in Uganda (? Egypt?) 
-
Dairying in Tanzania and India 
-
Dual-purpose cattle in Nicaragua 
Embeds impact pathways directly in the research 
Developed 
countries 
Developing 
countries 
Milk 
0.2 
1.8 
Meat 
0.5 
1.7 
Fish 
0.0 
0.6 
Cereals  0.3 
0.4 
25 
To help these value chains perform better, the program will identify address key constraints and 
opportunities, improve institutional arrangements and capacities, and support the establishment 
of enabling pro-poor policy and institutional environments.  
Expected impacts over the next 10 years 
Dairy and pigs for better incomes 
High potential: we can double productivity and livestock incomes of 100,000 households in each 
country (50,000 in Central America) 
Aquaculture for better nutrition 
High potential: we can increase the supply of fish by 615,000 tonnes per year in Egypt; 11,000 
tonnes per year in Uganda (doubling supplies there). 
Goats and sheep for better livelihoods 
Medium potential: we can increase national meat production by 5000 tonnes per year; doubling 
livestock incomes in 70,000 households in each country. 
For more information visit http://livestockfish.cgiar.org  
CGIAR Partners: ICARDA, WorldFish, ILRI, CIAT 
26 
CGIAR Research Program on Agriculture for Improved Nutrition and Health  
The vision:  
Accelerate the progress in improving agriculture, nutrition, and health for effective and 
sustainable development. 
Despite the recognition of the positive and negative impacts of agriculture, links between the 
agriculture, nutrition, and health communities remain weak and much is still unknown about the 
different types of trade-offs associated with various agricultural development decisions and their 
potential impacts on nutrition and health.  
The strategy:  Work where agriculture intersects with health and nutrition 
The research program will work at the interface of the agriculture, health, and nutrition sectors to 
provide evidence-
based research and enhance agriculture‟s capacity to catalyze nutrition and 
health benefits while reducing health risks.  
What is new about this research program? 
The systematic view of how agriculture, health, and nutrition interact globally, nationally, 
and locally and address gaps in the knowledge of these relationships 
It will develop a strong body of evidence based on rigorous research to help decision 
makers choose options and evaluate trade-offs 
It will foster effective approaches and partnerships to improve nutrition and health across 
sectoral boundaries while factoring in cross-cutting issues such as gender, institutions, 
and the environment.  
The program is organized around five components encompassing nutritional solutions, 
health and disease, and delivery systems and policy: 
5. Policy-and decisionmaking
ng
4. Integrated programs
s
Integration of Agriculture, Health, and Nutrition 
Nutrition
Health
Agriculture
Maximize 
nutritional benefits
Minimize 
health risks
Gender, capacity, institutions, technologies, environment
ronment
1. Nutrition-sensitive    
value chains
2. Biofortification
3. Control of agriculture-
-
associated diseases
Behavior and social change
ge
27 
1.  Nutrition-sensitive value chains  
Goal: Increase demand for and access to nutritious foods by identifying and using leverage 
points to improve nutrition through the value chain. 
2.  Biofortification  
Goal: Develop and release new varieties of carefully selected staple crops with enhanced bio-
available nutrients to improve nutrition for millions of people. 
3.  Control of agriculture-associated diseases  
Goal: Control and mitigate agriculture-associated diseases (including food- and water-borne, 
zoonotic, and occupational-related diseases) in order to enhance environmental sustainability, 
reduce poverty, increase food security, and contribute to the health of poor communities. 
4.  Integrated agriculture, health, and nutrition programs  
Goal: Accelerate progress in improving health and nutrition by exploiting the synergies between 
agriculture, health, and nutrition in development programs implemented at the community level. 
5.  Policy- and decision making across agriculture, health, and nutrition  
Goal: Synthesize and prioritize knowledge, evidence, and approaches to support better cross-
sectoral policymaking and decision making. 
For more information see: http://www.ifpri.org/book-8125/ourwork/division/agriculture-improved-
nutrition-and-health-crp4 
and http://mahider.ilri.org/bitstream/handle/10568/10628/IssueBrief_10.pdf?sequence=6  
CGIAR Partners: IFPRI, ILRI, Bioversity International, CIAT, CIMMYT, CIP, ICARDA, World 
Agroforestry Centre, ICRISAT, IITA, WorldFish, IWMI 
28 
Safe foods in informal markets (Safe Food, Fair Food) 
Led by ILRI and funded by BMZ/GIZ 
Why animal source foods matter 
In poor countries, livestock and fish feed billions. In East Africa, for example, livestock 
provide poor people with one tenth of their energy and one quarter of their protein 
needs. Fish account for more than half of the animal protein intake for the 400 million 
poorest people in Africa and South Asia. 
Meat, milk, eggs and fish are important sources of the micro-nutrients and high quality 
proteins essential for growth and important for child growth and cognitive function as well 
as better pregnancy outcomes for women and reduced illness for all. 
Production and marketing of livestock and fish earns money for farmers, traders and 
sellers, many of them women.  
On the other hand, excessive amounts of animal source food have been linked to heart 
disease and production. Animal source foods are also important sources of biological 
and chemical hazards that cause sickness and death.  
Why informal markets matter 
Most of the meat, milk eggs, and fish produced in developing countries is sold in traditional, 
domestic markets, lacking modern infrastructure and escaping effective food safety regulation 
and inspection. By „informal markets‟ we mean:
Markets where many actors are not licensed and do not pay tax (e.g. street foods, 
backyard poultry, pastoralist systems) 
Markets where traditional processing, products and retail prices predominate (e.g. wet 
markets, milk hawking system, artisanal cheese production) 
Markets which escape effective health and safety regulation (most domestic food 
markets in developing countries). 
Informal markets 
a history of neglect and unbalanced interest 
Much attention has been paid to the role of informal markets in maintaining and transmitting 
diseases but little to their role in supporting livelihoods and nutrition. Undoubtedly hazards exist 
in informal milk and meat including pathogens such as diarrhoea-causing Escherichia coli
Salmonella and tapeworm cysts; SARS came from, and avian influenza is maintained in the wet 
markets of South East Asia. Concerns over informal food has been heightened by the landmark 
Global Burden of Disease studies (WHO) which found that diarrhoea is among the most 
common causes of sickness and death in poor countries. Most of this is caused by 
contaminated food and water, and around half is linked to animal pathogens (zoonoses) or 
animal source foods. 
Food borne illness and animal disease and animal disease is of growing concern to consumers 
and policymakers alike. Consumers respond to scares by stopping or reducing purchases with 
knock-on effects on smallholder production and wet market retail. Policy makers often respond 
to health risk by favouring industrialisation and reducing smallholder access to markets. These 
changes are often based on fear not facts. Without evidence of the risk to human health posed 
by informally marketed foods or the best way to manage risks while retaining benefits, the food 
eaten in poor countries in neither safe nor fair. 
What we have learned about food safety in informal markets 
The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and partners have been conducting 
research on food in informal markets over the last ten years. Some of our findings from past 
research with implications for future include: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested