upload and view pdf in asp net c# : Copy paste picture pdf SDK Library project winforms asp.net wpf UWP Sandler%20Clitics_992-part876

21
Assuming that the many-to-one associations of the lexical signs
shown in the figures above must conflate at some stage (Sandler 1993b for
American Sign Language, following insights in McCarthy 1986), we may
represent the phonetic form of the coalesced words schematically as shown
here in (18).     
(18)
h2x    h2x    h2x
|         |         |
a         b       c
|          |        |
L        M      L
|          |        |
a         b      d
|          |        |
h1x   h1x   h1y
In (18), a,b, c and d stand for conflated bundles of location features, the two
hands  are represented as h1 (dominant) and h2 (nondominant), and x and
y stand for hand configuration features.  The two hands are released from
the lexical double-handed relation shown above in figure (14a), now
enabling them to be characterized by different handshape features, and to
articulate different locations and movements in this postlexical process.
Over the first two LM timing slots (approximately), both hands articulate
the same location, movement, and hand configuration features.  On the last
timing slot, each hand articulates a different bundle of location and hand
configuration features.   This is a clear violation of the Symmetry
constraint.
Only double-handed signs, in which both hands articulate the
syllable nucleus (movement), may be the host in this type of cliticization.
The important thing to notice in the representation is that the coalesced
sign is monosyllabic, consisting of three timing units, of which the second
is the movement nucleus.  The cliticized form, then, is obeying a constraint
on optimal prosodic word structure:  Monosyllabicity.  Such forms occur
postlexically but not lexically, as discussed in section 2.2.  The explanation
suggested here is that the constraints SYM and MONOSYL have the opposite
Copy paste picture pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copy image from pdf to word; copy image from pdf to
Copy paste picture pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy and paste images from pdf; copy image from pdf reader
22
ranking lexically and postlexically.   Lexically, the ranking appears to be
SYM > MONOSYL
21
; postlexically, it is  MONOSYL > SYM.  
The phonetics of this process would be impossible in spoken
language: the corresponding situation would require two tongues to
articulate two independent articulations, plus the ability to perceive the
two different places of articulation simultaneously.  However, spoken
language  prosodic equivalents have been widely attested, in which a
function word loses its syllabic status, and forms a single prosodic unit with
its host.
Another sign-language  particular phenomenon offers a unique type
of evidence that the cliticized form is a single prosodic word in the mind of
the signer.   The phenomenon is mouthing of Hebrew words.   In ISL, signers
sometimes mouth the Hebrew translation of selected words in a sentence.
Certainly not all words are mouthed -- this would be impossible if only for
the reason that the syntactic and morphological structures of the two
languages are vastly different, so that mouthing of all words would be like
producing two different languages at the same time.  Rather, only some
words are mouthed, according to a system that is not yet well understood, in
which the choice of words is apparently based on semantic, syntactic, and
possibly prosodic grounds.  Normally, the timing of the mouthing coincides
with the signing of the corresponding sign language word:  
Xanut
(‘shop’)
is mouthed over the same time span during which the the sign is produced,
as can be seen (by lipreaders) in illustration (16a,b). While the mouthing is
less clearly discernable in our picture of the cliticzed form (17a,b) than it is
in the actual spontaneous data, the cliticized forms involve mouthing of
only the word for ‘shop’ (and not the Hebrew word corresponding to the
clitic, ‘there’ -- 
Sam 
in Hebrew), and the timing of the mouthing of ‘shop’
spans the duration of the host plus clitic together (i.e., of ‘shop there’).  In
the vast majority of coalesced forms in our corpus (14 out of 19), the signers
used mouthing, and in every case, they mouthed the Hebrew translation of
21
In ASL compounds consisting of one double-handed sign and one one-
handed member, two different forms may result.  The one-handed sign may
become double-handed, or the double-handed sign may drop the
nondominant hand (Sandler 1993c).  These forms attest to the high rank of
SYM in the ASL lexicon.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
copy images from pdf to word; how to copy an image from a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
paste image in pdf preview; how to copy an image from a pdf
23
the host word only, and the timing span of this mouthing clearly extended
over both the host plus the clitic.
22
To sum up, there are two kinds of evidence that coalescence yields a
form that resembles a single word.  The first kind of evidence shows that
the cliticized forms share prosodic characteristics with optimal prosodic
words.   Although faithfulness to the input would require disyllabicity, the
coalesced forms are monosyllabic, the optimal form of the word in sign
languages.  These cliticized forms do, however, violate the Symmetry
Constraint, which is apparently undominated in the lexicon.  The second
type of evidence shows that the host plus clitic together are a single word
in the mind of the signer:  only the host word is mouthed, and its span is the
whole form, host plus clitic. We now turn to the second cliticization process.
3.2.  Dominant  Handshape Assimilation
The second process is complementary to the first in terms of its
prosodic position.  It occurs where the host and clitic are in a prosodically
weak position within the phonological phrase, usually at the beginning.
In this process, the cliticizing pronoun retains its movement, but is
weakened by losing its handshape and assimilating the handshape of its
host.
23
One reason for claiming that this process is cliticization, rather
than simply phonological assimilation, is that it occurs between subject
pronouns and the following verbs, a typical syntactic relation in
cliticization.
24
Another reason is that systematic assimilation of handshape
features has not been reported between words except in the case of
pronouns.     Handshape assimilation can occur in compounds, however, in
both ASL (Sandler 1987, 1989) and in ISL.  But in compounds, additional
constraints are obeyed.   First, orientation assimilates together with
handshape (Sandler, ibid., for ASL), and second,  handshape assimilations
in compounds tend to cooccur with segmental deletions that result in
monosyllabicity.     In the clitic assimilation, orientation does not assimilate
22
The mouthing patterns are a nice example of the way in which borrowed
material from a spoken language is reinterpreted, essentially becoming
part of the sign language.  Thanks to Mark Aronoff for this observation.
23
Handshape assimilation between pronouns and verbs is reported to occur
in ASL as well (Liddell and Johnson, 1989; Corina and Sagey, 1989; and
Wilbur, to appear).
24
In our data, all examples were first person pronouns, but this is an
artifact of the elicitation sentences, since it is unfelicitous to use personal
pronouns other than first person in out of the blue contexts.
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo or all image objects from PDF document in .NET
how to copy pictures from pdf to word; how to cut pdf image
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
copying image from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint
24
together with handshape
25
, and no segmental deletion within the host
occurs either, so that the resulting host plus clitic forms are disyllabic.  The
effect of the process is to weaken the pronoun by removing the  contrast
between its handshape and that of its host.  The pronoun is usually a
proclitic but may also be an enclitic if the basic word order is deviated
from, provided host and clitic are not in a prosodically strong position.  If
the personal pronoun exceptionally follows the verb but in a prosodically
strong position, then coalescence may result -- there is one such example
in our corpus.
Figure (19) shows the first person subject pronoun in citation form,
and figure (20a,b,c) shows the cliticized first person pronoun followed by
the verb whose handshape it assimilated -- I READ, from a sentence
meaning, ‘I read the story fast’.
26,
(19) I (citation form)
25
The fact that orientation assimilates with handshape in compounds
motivates a hierarchical representation of these two categories, such that
handshape dominates orientation, as shown in figure (3) (Sandler 1987,
1989).   Apparently, the features which are hierarchically organized in the
lexicon get linearized at some point, allowing handshape to assimilate
without orientation.  Note that the coalescence process also requires
collapse of the feature geometric representation:   compare figure (14a)
with figure (18).  Such linearization is independently motivated in Sandler
(1993b).
26
The facial expression in figures (20a,b,c) accompanies the meaning,
‘fast’.    Facial expression in ISL is argued in Nespor and Sandler (to apear)
to correspond to intonation.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
how to paste a picture into a pdf; how to cut pdf image
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on IIS
Copy according dll files listed below under RasterEdge.DocImagSDK/Bin directory and paste to Xdoc.HTML5 ViewerDemo/Bin folder. (see picture).
how to copy pictures from pdf; copy and paste image into pdf
25
(20a) I (clitic)
(20b) READ (beginning) (20c) READ (end)
In figure (19), the handshape of the pronoun in isolation is an extended
index finger.  In (20a), the handshape is ‘V’, or the index and middle
fingers extended and separated – the same handshape as in the host, READ,
shown in (20b,c).    In figure (2oa), the nondominant hand (h2) is already
in its position as place of articulation for the host, READ.  This type of
spreading of the nondominant hand is analyzed in Nespor and Sandler
(1997,to appear) as an external sandhi rule whose domain is the
phonological phrase.  It is not related to cliticization.  Rather, it is the
handshape assimilation on the dominant hand that is of interest here.
While the clitic in this process is always a pronoun, the host is
occasionally  syntactically idiosyncratic, suggesting  prosodic restructuring
(Nespor and Vogel 1986).  An example of this is the sequence TWELVE-I,
where the consultant signed the sentence number and, rather than making
the usual intonational phrase break, began to sign the sentence as part of
the same prosodic constituent as the sentence number.  One can easily
imagine an equivalent in a spoken language elicitation like this one, where
saying the sentence number is very redundant by the time you get to
number twelve, and the speaker runs the sentence number into the first
intonational phrase of the example.
Like the coalescence process discussed in Section 3.1.,  which seems
to obey a monosyllabicity constraint, this process is also seen as obeying a
constraint on the prosodic word, the Selected Fingers constraint, discussed
in connection with lexicalized compounds in Section 2.2.  If, as suggested
there, this constraint holds on the domain of the prosodic word, it offers
insight into assimilation under cliticization.    In particular, assimilation
obeys a constraint on prosodic word form.  The cliticized form is disyllabic,
however, since two movements are articulated in succession -- that of the
clitic and that of the host.  Thus the monosyllabicity constraint is violated,
C# Raster - Modify Image Palette in C#.NET
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB is used to reduce the size of the picture, especially in
how to copy an image from a pdf in; copy pictures from pdf to word
C# Word - Document Processing in C#.NET
Open(docFilePath); //Get the main ducument IDocument doc = document.GetDocument(); //Document clone IDocument doc0 = doc.Clone(); //Get all picture in document
copy image from pdf to powerpoint; copy image from pdf
26
indicating that the SFC dominates the Monosyllable Constraint in creating
these forms: SF > MONOSYL.  The data on fingerspelled borrowing in Section
2.2. indicate that at the lexical level, the ranking of the monosyllabicity
constraint and the selected finger constraint is the opposite:  MONOSYL> SF.
The main points of this analysis are that the words of sign languages
obey output constraints on their prosodic structure, and that those
constraints are active both lexically and postlexically, although their
effects are somewhat different at each level.
27
These theoretical points –-
and their relation to more traditional phonological rules -- are discussed in
the following section.
4.
Constraints and levels.
The effects of cliticization can be described either in terms of
phonological processes or in terms of constraints.   If the two were merely
notational variants of each other, then either would do.  But, as the
exposition in Section 3 has shown, analyzing the phenomena described
here in terms of constraint interaction is more explanatory.     Therefore,
such an analysis is preferable.
If we look at coalescence as a process as shown in (21), occurring
perhaps by association to a template, with some other rules to ensure just
the right kind of linearization of features, etc., this would give the correct
result.  But that type of rule formulation alone would imply that the fact
that the output has the optimal monosyllabic form of a prosodic word is a
coincidence.
(21)      LML + LML    --->   LML
Similarly, if we view handshape assimilation merely as a process like that shown
in (22) (as in Sandler 1987, 1989), we miss the generalization that prosodic words
optimally have only one handshape. Figure (22) shows a schematic representation
of the assimilation in phonological form.  The handshape is represented as the
features (F) of the Selected Fingers (SF) node.
27
Evaluation of constraints in two stages has also been proposed for spoken
languages  (Kenstowicz 1994, Booij 1997).  However, in those studies, the
arguments adduced for this evaluation favor ordering of evaluation (i.e.,
lexical before postlexical), and not re-ranking.
27
(22)
1
2
o SF                                o  SF
HC
HC
     M     L
      M      L
To account for these phenomena, I have proposed constraints on the
prosodic word, such as Monosyllabicity  and the SF constraint,  and allow
them to operate both lexically and postlexically.  This is attested in spoken
languages, and, according to Booij (1994), is expected in a theory in which
rules apply wherever they can.   If we take this approach, then we have an
explanation for why cliticization should involve just these sorts of
processes:  at the level of the grammar where morphosyntactic words
combine, hosts plus cliticizing pronouns are ‘trying’ to reduce to a single
prosodic word.  I hasten to note that more constraints and interactions must
be motivated in order to ensure precisely the attested surface forms without
rules.  Given the complexity of the data and the fact that constraints are
intended to be universal (at least within a language modality), much more
work must be done.  However, the Monosyllabicity, Selected Finger, Place,
and Symmetry constraints are already well motivated in ASL research,
though they have variously been characterized as rules, conditions, or
tendencies, and their domains have been proposed to be  the ‘sign’
(morphosyntactic word?), the morpheme, or the syllable.  The present
analysis proposes specific constraints, the prosodic word domain
28
, and
particular interactions which together are hoped to offer the beginning of
an explanation of the phenomena under investigation.
5.  Unresolved issues
Two different constraint rankings, both postlexical, are required by
this analysis of the two types of clitics, a point noted by a reviewer of this
article.  In coalescence, MONOSYL outranks SF,  since the surface forms
28
See also Brentari (to appear) for a treatment of the prosodic word in ASL.
28
involve two different SF specifications on the dominant hand but only one
syllable, while in assimilation, SF outranks MONOSYL, since the surface
forms are just the opposite.  This of course requires some explanation, and,
as I have suggested, the explanation is thought to lie in the relative
prominence of different positions within larger prosodic constituents. A
constraint based explanation would require motivation of phrase-level
constraints and their interaction with word-level phenomena.   At this
point in my understanding, such an analysis would be ad hoc, and I
therefore leave it to future research.   Another question is why the
assimilation clitics retain their syllabicity although they are in a
nonprominent  position.
29
 I have suggested that the phrase-final pronouns
coalesce because the are in a prosodically prominent position but cannot
get phrase level stress by themselves.  Apparently, there is no need for
pronouns to coalesce with the syllable of the host when they are in a
prosodically weak position.  They remain syllabic, but weakly stressed.
Clearly, this important question deserves a more detailed answer, and I
leave that to future investigation as well.
As the topic of this volume is the phonological word, it is relevant to
address the question of what type of constituent is formed by cliticization:
prosodic (or phonological) words, or clitic groups.    A distinction between
these two was motivated in Nespor and Vogel (1986), but  the existence of
the clitic group has since been called into question.  One might say that the
coalescence and assimilation phenomena involve constraints and rankings
whose domain is the clitic group, since the precise behavior of these forms
does not seem to be occur in any other domain.  But, as we have seen,
conclusive evidence distinguishing morphosyntactic words, prosodic
words, and clitic groups in any sign language is not yet at hand.  What the
present investigation has shown is this:    there are constraints on well-
formed words in sign languages which are essentially prosodic in  nature
(see also Brentari 1990, to appear), and that the cliticized constructions
obey some of them.  That is, it is not just any constraints that determine the
form of these constructions, but rather constraints that make these forms
similar in particular ways to well-formed prosodic words of the language.
29
This question was raised by Laura Downing (p.c.).
29
6.  Conclusion:  What is really universal?
Words are often pronounced differently in connected speech than
they are in isolation (Kaisse 1985).  These differences are constrained by
both syntactic and phonological factors.   Syntactic domains themselves
have prosodic properties associated with them -- primarily, rhythmic and
intonational patterns.   All of these elements interact with each other
systematically in language in such a way as to enhance communication.
This study has presented an example of such interaction in a
language in a different physical modality.   The constraints on the
phonological forms of the words of Israeli Sign Language were shown to
have an effect when words are joined together in connected signing as
well.  In particular, cliticization is seen as imperfect prosodic word
formation in connected signing.   In the course of the investigation,
evidence was provided to show that a sign language bears interesting
similarities to spoken languages at the interface between phonology and
syntax.   As always, though, research on sign language presents interesting
challenges too.   In particular, it raises the question:   What is universal in
phonology?
Languages in both modalities have duality of patterning, i.e., a
phonological level that is distinct from the meaningful level.   Both have
complex words that are formed in a systematic and conventional way.
Phonological form often changes in response to morphological operations
in both modalities.  The present study shows that the words of sign
language, like those of spoken language, conform to certain well-
formedness constraints, and that some of the same constraints are also
active when words combine in sentences, resulting in a change of
phonological form vis a vis the input at this level as well.
Yet some things are different. The constraints of OT, for example, are
intended to belong to a universal set, perhaps available to the child at birth.  But
clearly, sign language constraints are different.   Where spoken languages have
modality-specific constraints on syllable structure such as NO CODA or feature
spreading constraints such as PAL, sign languages have constraints such as
MONOSYL and SYM, and a different set of features.   These differences are not
trivial, as they show that some constraints are universal only within a particular
modality, raising the following fundamental questions:    Are children genetically
equipped with the full bag of constraints for both modalities?  Or is it more
30
reasonable to hypothesize that the constraints arise through experience in
response to production and perception pressures of the modality in which the
language is transmitted?
One might expect more general families of constraints such as ALIGN or OCP
to bridge the two modalities, but whether this is the case, and whether such
families really behave the same way in the two modalities, are empirical
questions.   When we can answer questions such as these, we will understand a
good deal more about human language than we would if these questions never
arose.   It is only through comparative investigations of the two natural human
language modalities, spoken and signed, that these important questions can be
raised.
References
Anderson, Stephen R.  1992. 
Amorphous 
Morphology.
Cambridge: Cambridge
University  Press
Aronoff, Mark, Irit Meir and Wendy Sandler.  In preparation.  Words in Space:
Morphological Characteristics  of Sign Languages.
Battison, Robbin. 1978. 
Lexical 
Borrowing 
in 
American 
Sign 
Language. 
Silver
Spring:   Linstok Press
Booij, Geert. 1994.  Lexical phonology: a review.  
Lingua 
Stile 
a. 
XXIX
.
525-554.
Booij, Geert. 1997.  Non-derivational and lexical phonology.  In 
Derivations 
and
Constraints 
in 
Phonology
,  I. Rocca, ed.,  Oxford: Clarendon Press.  261-288.
Brentari, 
Diane.   1990.  
Theoretical 
Foundations 
of 
ASL 
Phonology.
PhD
dissertation. University of Chicago.
Brentari, Diane.   1993.  Establishing a sonority hierarchy in American Sign
Language: The use of simultaneous structure in phonology.  
Phonology
10.2.  
281-308.
Brentari, Diane. 1995.  Sign language phonology: ASL, in J. Goldsmith, ed., 
The
Handbook 
of 
Phonological 
Theory. 
Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell.
Brentari, Diane.  In press.  
Prosodic 
Model 
of 
Sign 
Language 
Phonology.
Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Brentari, Diane and John Goldsmith. 1993. Secondary licensing and the
nondominant hand in ASL phonology . in G. Coulter, ed.  19-41.
Corina, David. 1990a.  Reassessing the role of sonority in syllable  structure:
Evidence from a visual-gestural language.   In 
Parasession 
on 
the 
Syllable
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested