upload pdf file in asp.net c# : How to copy pictures from a pdf file Library application API .net html azure sharepoint sat-prep-book-stu1-part914

SAT Preparation Booklet
11
The passage begins with Mr. Pontellier “in an excellent
humor,” having just returned after a night away from
home. He becomes less happy, however, when his wife is
too sleepy to talk with him, and when he discovers that his
son Raoul “had a high fever and needed looking after.”
Subsequently, he lectures his wife about their family roles
and responsibilities, finishes his cigar, and goes to bed. The
next morning, Mr. Pontellier has “regained his composure”
and is “eager to be gone, as he looked forward to a lively
week”away from his family at work.
(A) and (E) are not correct because Mr. Pontellier
gets upset the one time that he is “attending to” his
sons, and he has forgotten to send them the treats
that he had promised.
(B) is not correct because Mr. Pontellier is
described as neither happy nor unhappy while he
smokes; there are other occasions in the passage
when he is “happier.”
(C) is not correct because the passage never shows
Mr. Pontellier making up with his wife after their
argument.
(D) is the correct answer based on the description
of a happy Mr. Pontellier at the beginning and the
end of the passage, when “he has been away from
home or is about to leave home.”
Correct answer: (D) / Difficulty level: Medium
Questions 10-13 are based on the following passages.
These two passages were adapted from autobiographical
works. In the first, a playwright describes his first visit to a
theater in the 1930’s; in the second, an eighteenth-century
writer describes two visits to theaters in London.
Passage 1
I experienced a shock when I saw a cur-
tain go up for the first time. My mother had
taken me to see a play at the Schubert
Theater on Lenox Avenue in Harlem in New
York City. Here were living people talking to
one another inside a large ship whose deck
actually heaved up and down with the swells
of the sea. By this time I had been going to
the movies every Saturday afternoon
—Charlie Chaplin’s little comedies, adven-
ture serials, Westerns. Yet once you knew
how they worked, movies, unlike the stage,
left the mind’s grasp of reality intact since
the happenings were not in the theater
where you sat. But to see the deck of the
ship in the theater moving up and down,
and people appearing at the top of a ladder
or disappearing through a door—where did
they come from and where did they go?
Obviously into and out of the real world of
Lenox Avenue. This was alarming.
And so I learned that there were two
kinds of reality, but that the stage was far
more real. As the play’s melodramatic story
developed, I began to feel anxious, for there
was a villain on board who had a bomb and
intended to blow everybody up. All over the
stage people were looking for him but he
appeared, furtive and silent, only when the
searchers were facing the other way. They
looked for him behind posts and boxes and
on top of beams, even after the audience
had seen him jump into a barrel and pull
the lid over him. People were yelling, “He’s
in the barrel,” but the passengers were deaf.
What anguish! The bomb would go off any
minute, and I kept clawing at my mother’s
arm, at the same time glancing at the the-
ater’s walls to make sure that the whole
thing was not really real. The villain was
finally caught, and we happily walked out
onto sunny Lenox Avenue, saved again.
Passage 2
I was six years old when I saw my first
play at the Old Drury. Upon entering the
theater, the first thing I beheld was the green
curtain that veiled a heaven to my imagina-
tion. What breathless anticipations I
endured! I had seen something like it in an
edition of Shakespeare, an illustration of the
tent scene with Diomede in Troilus and
Cressida. (A sight of that image can always
bring back in a measure the feeling of that
evening.) The balconies at that time, full of
well-dressed men and women, projected
over the orchestra pit; and the pilasters*
reaching down were adorned with a glister-
ing substance resembling sugar candy. The
orchestra lights at length rose. Once the bell
sounded. It was to ring out yet once again—
and, incapable of the anticipation, I reposed
my shut eyes in a sort of resignation upon
my mother’s lap. It rang the second time.
The curtain drew up—and the play was
Artaxerxes! Here was the court of ancient
Persia. I took no proper interest in the
action going on, for I understood not its
import. Instead, all my feeling was absorbed
in vision. Gorgeous costumes, gardens,
palaces, princesses, passed before me. It was
all enchantment and a dream.
After the intervention of six or seven
years I again entered the doors of a theater.
That old Artaxerxes evening had never done
ringing in my fancy. I expected the same
feelings to come again with the same occa-
sion. But we differ from ourselves less at
sixty and sixteen, than the latter does from
six. In that interval what had I not lost! At
six I knew nothing, understood nothing,
discriminated nothing. I felt all, loved all,
Line
5
10
15
20
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
25
30
35
40
How to copy pictures from a pdf file - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; how to copy text from pdf image to word
How to copy pictures from a pdf file - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy image from pdf to word; copy picture to pdf
wondered all. I could not tell how, but I had
left the temple a devotee, and was returned a
rationalist. The same things were there
materially; but the emblem, the reference,
was gone. The green curtain was no longer a
veil, drawn between two worlds, the unfold-
ing of which was to bring back past ages, but
a certain quantity of green material, which
was to separate the audience for a given time
from certain of their fellows who were to
come forward and pretend those parts. The
lights—the orchestra lights—came up a
clumsy machinery. The first ring, and the
second ring, was now but a trick of the
prompter’s bell. The actors were men and
women painted. I thought the fault was in
them; but it was in myself, and the alteration
which those many centuries—those six
short years—had wrought in me.
* Pilasters are ornamental columns set into walls.
Sample Questions
Following are four sample questions about this pair of
related passages. In the test, some questions will focus on
Passage 1, others will focus on Passage 2, and about half or
more of the questions following each pair of passages will
focus on the relationships between the passages.
Some questions require you to identify shared ideas or simi-
larities between the two related passages.
10. The authors of both passages describe
(A) a young person’s sense of wonder at first 
seeing a play
(B) a young person’s desire to become a 
playwright
(C) the similarities between plays and other art forms
(D) how one’s perception of the theater may 
develop over time
(E) the experience of reading a play and then 
seeing it performed
To answer this question, you have to figure out what these
two passages have in common. The subject of Passage 1 is 
a child’s first visit to see a play performed in a theater, and
how captivated he was by the entire experience. Passage 2
describes two different visits to the theater; at age six the
child is entranced by the spectacle of the performance but,
“after the intervention of six or seven years,”the older and
now more knowledgeable child is not so impressed. (A) is
the correct answer because all of Passage 1 and the first
half of Passage 2 describe “a young person’s sense of won-
der at first seeing a play.”
(B) is wrong; even though the introduction to
these passages reveals that one of the authors is a
“playwright,”there is no mention in either passage
of a “desire to become a playwright.”
(C) is wrong because Passage 1 mentions differ-
ences rather than “similarities”between plays and
movies, and Passage 2 does not mention any “other
art forms”at all.
(D) is wrong because only Passage 2 discusses “how
one’s perception of the theater may develop over
time”—this subject is unmentioned in Passage 1.
(E) is wrong because there is no reference in either
passage to “the experience of reading a play.”
Correct answer: (A) / Difficulty level: Easy
Some questions assess your comprehension of information
that is directly stated in a passage.
11. The “happenings”mentioned in line 14 refer to the
(A) work undertaken to produce a movie
(B) events occurring in the street outside the theater
(C) fantasies imagined by a child
(D) activity captured on the movie screen
(E) story unfolding on the stage
To answer this question correctly, you have to understand
lines 11–15, a rather complex sentence that makes an
important distinction in Passage 1. The author indicates
that, unlike plays, movies leave “the mind’s grasp of reality
intact,”because the “happenings”in a movie are not occur-
ring in the actual theater. Instead, images are projected on
a screen in the theater. Thus (D) is the correct answer; the
word “happenings”refers to the “activity captured on the
movie screen.”
(A) and (B) are wrong because, when you insert
them in place of the word “happenings,”the sen-
tence in lines 11-15 makes no sense.
(C) is wrong; even if the movies being referred to
include “fantasies” in them, they are not “imagined
by a child”but are actually projected on the movie
screen.
(E) is wrong because, in line 14,“happenings”
refers to the “story unfolding” in a mo
v
ie
,not “on
the stage.”
Correct answer: (D) / Difficulty level: Medium
You may be asked to recognize the author’s tone or attitude in
a particular part of a passage, or in the passage as a whole.
12. In the final sentence of Passage 2 (“I thought . . . in
me”), the author expresses
(A) exultation (B) vindication (C) pleasure
(D) regret
(E) guilt
Even though this question focuses on a single sentence, you
must understand the context in which the statement
occurs in order to determine the feeling expressed by the
author. In the second paragraph of Passage 2, the author
states that the experience of attending a play at age 12 or
13 was much different than at age 6.“The same things were
there materially”in the theater, but the older child knew
SAT Preparation Booklet
12
85
90
95
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
application. In addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file.
paste image on pdf preview; paste picture into pdf preview
VB Imaging - VB Code 93 Generator Tutorial
for developers to create and write Code 93 linear barcode pictures on PDF documents, multi create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the VB
how to cut an image out of a pdf; how to copy image from pdf file
SAT Preparation Booklet
13
much more than the younger one about what was going
on. Ironically, this increased knowledge actually decreased
the author’s pleasure in attending the play.“In that interval
what had I not lost,” the author exclaims in line 78. Where
the younger child saw nobles in “the court of ancient
Persia,” the older child saw “men and women painted.”
Thus the final sentence of Passage 2 expresses “regret”con-
cerning the changes that “those many centuries—those six
short years—had wrought”in the author. (D) is the correct
answer.
(A) and (C) are incorrect because the author does
not feel “exultation”about or take “pleasure” in the
“alteration” that has occurred; on the contrary, the
author laments it.
(B) is incorrect because there is no expression of
“vindication” in the final sentence; the author is
not trying to justify, support, or defend the experi-
ences described in the passage but rather explain
the changes that have occurred due to the passage
of time.
(E) is incorrect because, even though the final sen-
tence states that the “fault”was not in the actors
but in the now more knowledgeable child, the
author feels no “guilt”about the change. There is
no way to avoid the passage of time (and the learn-
ing that goes along with it). Aging is not the child’s
“fault,” but the loss of a youthful sense of wonder
and innocence can still cause regret.
Correct answer: (D) / Difficulty level: Hard
Some questions require you to determine and compare the
primary purpose or main idea expressed in each passage.
13. Which of the following best describes the 
difference between Passages 1 and 2 ?
(A) Passage 1 remembers an event with fondness,
while Passage 2 recalls a similar event with 
bitter detachment.
(B) Passage 1 considers why the author responded 
to the visit as he did, while Passage 2 supplies 
the author’s reactions without further analysis.
(C) Passage 1 relates a story from a number of
different perspectives, while Passage 2 
maintains a single point of view.
(D) Passage 1 treats the visit to the theater as a 
disturbing episode in the author’s life, while 
Passage 2 describes the author’s visit as joyful.
(E) Passage 1 recounts a childhood experience,
while Passage 2 examines how a similar 
experience changed over time.
This question asks you to do two things: first, understand
the overall subject or purpose of each passage; second, rec-
ognize an important “difference between”the two. The cor-
rect answer is (E) because the entire first passage does
indeed tell the story of a particular “childhood experi-
ence”—a trip to the theater—while the second passage
describes two different trips to the theater and how the
“experience changed over time.”
(A) is wrong because there is neither bitterness
nor “detachment”in Passage 2. In fact, the first 
paragraph of Passage 2 expresses excitement 
and “enchantment,”and the second paragraph
expresses disappointment and regret.
(B) is wrong because Passage 2 includes a great
deal more than just “the author’s reactions” to 
visiting the theater; most of the second paragraph
provides “further analysis”of what had changed
and why the reactions to the two visits were so 
different.
(C) is wrong because it r
e
v
e
r
ses
the two narrative
approaches in this pair of passages. Passage 1
“maintains a single point of view,” that of the
youthful first-time theatergoer, whereas the author
of Passage 2 presents at least two “different per-
spectives,” that of the enchanted six year old and of
the older child returning to the theater.
(D) is wrong because the author of Passage 1 does
not find his first visit to the theater “disturbing” in
a negative way. Although he feels “shock”when the
curtain goes up and anxiety during the play, these
responses merely indicate how effective and “real”
the performance was for him. In the end, the child
and his mother walked “happily” out of the theater.
Correct answer: (E) / Difficulty level: Easy
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Load Images from File / Stream in .
Now you can freely copy the VB.NET sample this VB.NET imaging library with pictures of your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copy and paste images from pdf; copy image from pdf preview
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
image recognition for scanned documents and pictures in C#. You can directly copy demos to your .NET application Png, Bmp, ) and output to text or PDF file.
paste image into pdf acrobat; copy image from pdf to word
SAT Preparation Booklet
14
The Math Section
The math section of the SAT contains two types of
questions:
standard multiple-choice (44 questions)
student-produced response questions that provide
no answer choices (10 questions)
Some questions are like the questions in math textbooks.
Others ask for original thinking and may not be as familiar
to you.
Calculator Policy
We recommend that you bring a calculator to use on the
math section of the SAT. Every question on the test can be
solved without a calculator; however, using a calculator on
some questions may be helpful to you. A scientific or
graphing calculator is recommended.
Acceptable Calculators
Calculators permitted during testing are:
graphing calculators
scientific calculators
four–function calculators (not recommended)
If you have a calculator with characters that are 1 inch or
higher, or if your calculator has a raised display that might
be visible to other test-takers, you will be seated at the dis-
cretion of the test supervisor.
You will not be allowed to share calculators. You will be
dismissed and your scores canceled if you use your calcula-
tor to share information during the test or to remove test
questions or answers from the test room.
Unacceptable Calculators
Unacceptable calculators are those that:
use QWERTY (typewriter-like) keypads
require an electrical outlet
“talk”or make unusual noises
use paper tape
are electronic writing pads, pen input/stylus-driven
devices, pocket organizers, cell phones, power-
books, or handheld or laptop computers
Approaches to the 
Math Section
Familiarize yourself with the directions ahead of
time. Also learn how to complete the grids for 
student-produced response questions.
Ask yourself the following questions before you
solve each problem: What is the question asking?
What do I know?
Limit your time on any one question. All questions
are worth the same number of points. If you need
a lot of time to answer a question, go on to the
next one. Later, you may have time to return to the
question you skipped.
Keep in mind that questions are generally arranged
from easy to hard. Within any group of ques-
tions—for example, the multiple-choice questions
—the easier ones come first and the questions
become more difficult as you move along.
Don't make mistakes because of carelessness. No
matter how frustrated you are, don't pass over
questions without at least reading them, and be
sure to consider all the choices in each question. If
you're careless, you could choose the wrong
answers even on easy questions.
Work out the problems in your test booklet. You
will not receive credit for anything written in the
booklet, but you will be able to check your work
easily later.
Eliminate choices. If you don't know the correct
answer to a question, try eliminating wrong choic-
es. It's sometimes easier to find the wrong answers
than the correct one. On some questions, you can
eliminate all the incorrect choices. Draw a line
through each choice as you eliminate it until you
have only the one correct answer left.
Keep in mind that on student-produced response
(grid-in) questions you don’t lose points for wrong
answers. Make an educated guess if you don't know
the answer.
For student-produced response questions, always
enter your answer on the grid. Remember: for grid-
in questions only answers entered on the grid are
scored. Your handwritten answer at the top of the
grid isn't scored. However, writing your answer at
the top of the grid may help you avoid gridding
errors.
Important: For grid-in questions only answers
entered on the grid are scored. Your hand-
written answer at the top of the grid is 
not
scored.
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
for developers to create and write Code 93 linear barcode pictures on PDF documents, multi create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the C#
how to copy picture from pdf; copy picture from pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
and whether to burn it to the pictures to make Please feel free to copy them to your program provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy images from pdf to word; copy pictures from pdf to word
SAT Preparation Booklet
15
MATH REVIEW
MATHEMATICS CONTENT
For the new SAT, the mathematics content level of the test
will be raised to include more advanced topics. The follow-
ing math concepts will be covered beginning with the
March 2005 test.
Number and Operation
Arithmetic word problems (including percent,
ratio, and proportion)
Properties of integers (even, odd, prime numbers,
divisibility, etc.)
Rational numbers
Logical reasoning
Sets (union, intersection, elements)
Counting techniques
Sequences and series (including exponential
growth)
Elementary number theory
Algebra and Functions
Substitution and simplifying algebraic expressions
Properties of exponents
Algebraic word problems
Solutions of linear equations and inequalities
Systems of equations and inequalities
Quadratic equations
Rational and radical equations
Equations of lines
Absolute value
Direct and inverse variation
Concepts of algebraic functions
Newly defined symbols based on commonly used
operations
Geometry and Measurement
Area and perimeter of a polygon
Area and circumference of a circle
Volume of a box, cube, and cylinder
Pythagorean Theorem and special properties of
isosceles, equilateral, and right triangles
Properties of parallel and perpendicular lines
Coordinate geometry
Geometric visualization
Slope
Similarity
Transformations
Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability
Data interpretation
Statistics (mean, median, and mode)
Probability
ARITHMETIC AND 
ALGEBRAIC CONCEPTS
Integers: . . . , -4, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, . . .
(Note: zero is neither positive nor negative.)
Consecutive Integers: Integers that follow in
sequence; for example, 22, 23, 24, 25. Consecutive
integers can be more generally represented by n,
,
,
,. . .
Odd Integers: . . . , -7, -5, -3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7, . . . ,
,. . . where  is an integer
Even Integers: . . . , -6, -4, -2, 0, 2, 4, 6, . . . , ,
.. . , where  is an integer (Note: zero is an even 
integer.)
Prime Numbers: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, . . .
(Note: 1 is not a prime and 2 is the only even prime.)
Digits: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
(Note: the units digit and the ones digit refer to the
same digit in a number. For example, in the number
125, the 5 is called the units digit or the ones digit.)
Percent
Percent means hundredths, or number out of 100. For
example, 40 percent means 
or 0.40 or  .
Problem 1: If the sales tax on a $30.00 item is
$1.80, what is the sales tax rate?
Solution:
is the sales tax rate.
Percent Increase / Decrease
Problem 2: If the price of a computer was
decreased from $1,000 to $750, by what percent was the
price decreased?
Solution: The price decrease is $250. The percent
decrease is the value of n in the equation 
.
The value of n is 25, so the price was decreased by 25%.
Note:
;
.
n
100
decrease
original
n
100
increase
original
n
100
250
1,000
n= 6
, 6
so %
$ .
$ .
180
100
30 00
=
×
n
2
5
40
100
k
2k
k
2
k +1
n+ 3
n+ 2
n+ 1
C# Imaging - C# MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
Create high-quality MSI Plessey bar code pictures for almost Copy C#.NET code below to print an MSI a document file, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF and TIFF
how to copy picture from pdf file; copying image from pdf to word
C# Imaging - Scan RM4SCC Barcode in C#.NET
you can easily detect & decode RM4SCC barcode from scanned documents and pictures in your Steps to Read/Scan Data Matrix from Image/PDF/TIFF/Office File.
how to copy pdf image to jpg; copying images from pdf files
SAT Preparation Booklet
16
MATH REVIEW
Average
An average is a statistic that is used to summarize data.
The most common type of average is the arithmetic mean.
The average (arithmetic mean) of a list of n numbers is
equal to the sum of the numbers divided by n.
For example, the mean of 2, 3, 5, 7, and 13 is equal to
When the average of a list of n numbers is given, the sum
of the numbers can be found. For example, if the average
of six numbers is 12, the sum of these six numbers is 
The median of a list of numbers is the number in the mid-
dle when the numbers are ordered from greatest to least or
from least to greatest. For example, the median of 3, 8, 2, 6,
and 9 is 6 because when the numbers are ordered, 2, 3, 6, 8,
9, the number in the middle is 6. When there is an even
number of values, the median is the same as the mean of
the two middle numbers. For example, the median of 6, 8,
9, 13, 14, and 16 is the mean of 9 and 13, which is 11.
The mode of a list of numbers is the number that occurs
most often in the list. For example, 7 is the mode of 2, 7, 5,
8, 7, and 12. The numbers 2, 4, 2, 8, 2, 4, 7, 4, 9, and 11
have two modes, 2 and 4.
Note: On the SAT, the use of the word average refers to the
arithmetic mean and is indicated by “average (arithmetic
mean).” The exception is when a question involves average
speed (see problem below). Questions involving median
and mode will have those terms stated as part of the ques-
tion’s text.
Average Speed
Problem: José traveled for 2 hours at a rate of 70
kilometers per hour and for 5 hours at a rate of 60 kilome-
ters per hour. What was his average speed for the 7-hour
period?
Solution: In this situation, the average speed is
The total distance is 2 hr 
+ 5 hr 
= 440 km.
The total time is 7 hours. Thus, the average speed was
kilometers per hour.
62
6
7
440
7
km
hr
60
km
hr
70
km
hr
total distance
total time
12 6
72
× or .
2 3 5 7 13
5
6
+ + + +
=
Note: In this example, the average speed is not the average
of the two separate speeds, which would be 65 kilometers
per hour.
Factoring
You may need to apply these types of factoring:
Probability
Probability refers to the chance that a specific outcome can
occur. It can be found by using the following definition
when outcomes are equally likely:
For example, if a jar contains 13 red marbles and 7 green
marbles, the probability that a marble selected from the jar
at random will be green is
If a particular outcome can never occur, its probability is 0.
If an outcome is certain to occur, its probability is 1. In
general, if p is the probability that a specific outcome will
occur, values of p fall in the range 
.Probability
may be expressed as either a decimal or a fraction.
Functions
A function is a relation in which each element of the
domain is paired with exactly one element of the range. On
the SAT, unless otherwise specified, the domain of any
function  is assumed to be the set of all real numbers 
for which 
is a real number. For example, if
,the domain of
is all real numbers
greater than or equal to  . For this function, 14 is paired
with 4, since 
.
Note: the 
symbol represents the positive, or principal,
square root. For example,
,not ± 4.
Exponents
You should be familiar with the following rules for 
exponents on the SAT.
16
=4
f 14
14 2
16
4
(
)
=
+ =
=
−2
f
f x
x
( )
=
+2
f x
( )
x
f
0
1
p≤
7
7 13
7
20
035
+
=
or .
Number of ways that a specific outcome can occur
Total number of possible outcomes
2
5
3
2
1
3
2
x
x
x
x
+
− =
(
)
+
(
)
x
x
x
x
x
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
+
+ =
+
(
)
+
(
)
=
+
(
)
x
x
x
2
1
1
1
− =
+
(
)
(
)
x
x
x x
2
2
2
+
=
+
(
)
C# Imaging - Scan ISBN Barcode in C#.NET
which can be used to track images, pictures and documents BarcodeType.ISBN); // read barcode from PDF page Barcode from PowerPoint slide, you can copy demo code
how to copy image from pdf to word document; cut picture pdf
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
about the issue of how to draw pictures or write Copy the demo codes and run your project to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy pictures from a pdf file; copying a pdf image to word
SAT Preparation Booklet
17
MATH REVIEW
For all values of
:
For all values of
For example,
Note: For any nonzero number 
Sequences
Two common types of sequences that appear on the SAT
are arithmetic and geometric sequence.
An arithmetic sequence is a sequence in which successive
terms differ by the same constant amount.
For example: 3, 5, 7, 9, . . . is an arithmetic sequence.
A geometric sequence is a sequence in which the ratio of
successive terms is a constant.
For example: 2, 4, 8, 16, . . . is a geometric sequence.
A sequence may also be defined using previously defined
terms. For example, the first term of a sequence is 2, and
each successive term is 1 less than twice the preceding
term. This sequence would be 2, 3, 5, 9, 17, . . .
On the SAT, explicit rules are given for each sequence. For
example, in the geometric sequence above, you would not
be expected to know that the 5th term is 32 unless you
were given the fact that each term is twice the preceding
term. For sequences on the SAT, the first term is never
referred to as the zeroth term.
Variation
Direct Variation: The variable  is directly proportional
to the variable  if there exists a nonzero constant  such
that 
.
Inverse Variation: The variable  is inversely proportional
to the variable  if there exists a nonzero constant  such
that 
x
k
y
xy k
=
=
or
.
k
y
x
y
= kx
k
x
y
x,x
0
=1
x
x
2
3
3 2
=
x
x
a
b
b a
=
x
a
a
=
1
x
y
x
y
a
a
a
=
x
x
x
a
b
a b
=
ab x
y
, ,
≠ ,
0 ≠
0:
xy
x
y
a
a
a
(
)
=
x
x
a
b
ab
(
)
=
x
x
x
a
b
a b
=
+
ab x y
, , ,
Absolute Value
The absolute value of is defined as the distance from 
to zero on the number line. The absolute value of is
written in the form
.For all real numbers  :
For example:
GEOMETRIC CONCEPTS
Figures that accompany problems are intended to provide
information useful in solving the problems. They are
drawn as accurately as possible EXCEPT when it is stated
in a particular problem that the figure is not drawn to
scale. In general, even when figures are not drawn to scale,
the relative positions of points and angles may be assumed
to be in the order shown. Also, line segments that extend
through points and appear to lie on the same line may be
assumed to be on the same line. The text “N
ot
e:
Figure not
drawn to scale”is included with the figure when degree
measures may not be accurately shown and specific lengths
may not be drawn proportionally. The following examples
illustrate what information can and cannot be assumed
from figures.
Example 1:
Since 
and 
are line segments, angles 
and
are vertical angles. Therefore, you can conclude that
.Even though the figure is drawn to scale, you
should NOT make any other assumptions without addi-
tional information. For example, you should NOT assume
that 
or that the angle at vertex  is a right
angle even though they might look that way in the figure.
E
AC
=CD
x
= y
DCE
ACB
BE
AD
2
2
2
0
2
2
2
0
0
0
=
>
=
− <
=
,
,
since
since
x
x
x
x
x
=
<
,
,
if
if
0
0
x
x
x
x
x
SAT Preparation Booklet
18
MATH REVIEW
Example 2:
N
ot
e:
Figure not drawn to scale
A question may refer to a triangle such as 
above.
Although the note indicates that the figure is not drawn to
scale, you may assume the following:
and 
are triangles.
is between  and  .
, , and  are points on a line.
The length of
is less than the length of
.
The measure of angle 
is less than the meas-
ure of angle 
.
You may not assume the following:
The length of
is less than the length of
.
The measures of angles 
and 
are equal.
The measure of angle 
is greater than the
measure of angle 
.
Angle 
is a right angle.
Geometric Skills and Concepts
Properties of Parallel Lines
1. If two parallel lines are cut by a third line, the
alternate interior angles are congruent. In the 
figure above,
c
x
w
d
=
=
and
m
k
a° b°
c° d°
w° x°
y° z°
ABC
DBC
ABD
BDA
BAD
DC
AD
ABC
ABD
AC
AD
C
D
A
C
A
D
DBC
ABD
ABC
2. If two parallel lines are cut by a third line, the cor-
responding angles are congruent. In the figure,
3. If two parallel lines are cut by a third line, the sum
of the measures of the interior angles on the same
side of the transversal is 180°. In the figure,
Angle Relationships
1. The sum of the measures of the interior angles of a
triangle is 180°. In the figure above,
2. When two lines intersect, vertical angles are 
congruent. In the figure,
3. A straight angle measures 180°. In the figure,
4. The sum of the measures of the interior angles of a
polygon can be found by drawing all diagonals of
the polygon from one vertex and multiplying the
number of triangles formed by 180°.
Since the polygon is divided into 3
triangles, the sum of
the measures of the angles is 
 180°, or 540°.
Unless otherwise noted in the SAT, the term “polygon” will
be used to mean a convex polygon, that is, a polygon in
which each interior angle has a measure of less than 180°.
A polygon is “regular” if all sides are congruent and all
angles are congruent.
×
z
z
=
+
=
130
50 180
because
y= 50
x
x
=
+
+
=
70
60 50
180
because
60°
50°
c w
d
x
+
=
+
=
180
180
and
a
w
c
y b
x
d
z
=
=
=
=
,
,
and
SAT Preparation Booklet
19
MATH REVIEW
Side Relationships
1. Pythagorean Theorem: In any right triangle
,
where c is the length of the longest
side and a and b are the lengths of the two 
shorter sides.
To find the value of
,use the
Pythagorean
Theorem.
2. In any equilateral triangle, all sides are congruent
and all angles are congruent.
Because the measure of
the unmarked angle is
60°, the measures of all
angles of the triangle are
equal; and, therefore, the
lengths of all sides of the
triangle are equal:
3. In an isosceles triangle, the angles opposite con-
gruent sides are congruent. Also, the sides opposite
congruent angles are congruent. In the figures
below,
.
4. In any triangle, the longest side is opposite the
largest angle, and the shortest side is opposite the
smallest angle. In the figure below,
.
5. Two polygons are similar if and only if the lengths
of their corresponding sides are in the same ratio
and the measures of their corresponding angles are
equal.
a
b
c
<
<
a
b
x
y
=
=
and
x
= y
=10
x
x
x
x
2
2
2
2
2
3
4
9 16
25
25
5
=
+
= +
=
=
=
x
a
b
c
2
2
2
+
=
If polygons 
and 
are similar and 
and 
are corresponding sides, then
Note:
means the line segment with endpoints  and
,
means the length of
.
Area and Perimeter
Rectangles
Area of a rectangle =
Perimeter of a rectangle 
Circles
Area of a circle = 
(where r is the radius)
Circumference of a circle = 
(where  is the 
diameter) 
Triangles
Area of a triangle = 
Perimeter of a triangle = the sum of the lengths of the
three sides
The sum of the lengths of any two sides of a triangle must
be greater than the length of the third side.
Volume
Volume of a rectangular solid (or cube) = 
( is the length, w is the width, and h is the height)
Volume of a right circular cylinder = 
(r is the radius of the base, and h is the height)
Be familiar with what formulas are provided in the
Reference Information with the test directions. Refer to
the test directions in the sample test in this publication.
π
r h
2
× w ×h
1
2
base
altitude
×
(
)
d
2
π
π
r
= d
π
r
2
=
+
(
)
=
+
2
2
2
w
w
length
width =
×
 ×w
AF
AF
F
A
AF
AF
GL
BC
HI
x
x
HI
=
=
=
=
= =
10
5
2
1
18
9
. Therefore,
.
GL
AF
GHIJKL
ABCDEF
SAT Preparation Booklet
20
MATH REVIEW
Coordinate Geometry
1. In questions that involve the  and 
to the right of the 
are positive 
and 
to the left of the 
are negative.
Similarly,
above the 
are positive
and
below the 
are negative. In an
ordered pair 
,the 
is written
first. For example, in the pair 
,the
is 
and the 
is 3.
2. Slope of a line 
A line that slopes upward as you go from left to
right has a positive slope. A line that slopes down-
ward as you go from left to right has a negative
slope. A horizontal line has a slope of zero. The
slope of a vertical line is undefined.
Parallel lines have the same slope. The product 
of the slopes of two perpendicular lines is  ,
provided the slope of each of the lines is defined.
For example, any line perpendicular to line 
above has a slope of .
4
3
−1
Slopeof  =
− −
− −
= −
1
2
2 2
3
4
( )
Slope of PQ =
=
4
2
2
=
=
rise
run
changein -coordinates
change in
n
y
x
--coordinates
y-coordinate
−2
x-coordinate
(
)
2,3
x-coordinate
x,y
(
)
x-axis
y-values
x-axis
y-values
y-axis
x-values
y-axis
x-values
y-axes,
x-
1
1
x
(–2, 3)
y
O
The equation of a line can be expressed as
,where  is the slope and  is the
intercept. Since the slope of line  is 
,
the equation of line  can be expressed
as 
.Since the point 
is on
the line,
must satisfy the equa-
tion. Hence,
and the equa-
tion of line  is 
.
3. The equation of a parabola can be expressed 
as 
where the vertex of the
parabola is at the point 
and 
.If
,the parabola opens upward; and if
,
the parabola opens downward.
The parabola above has its vertex at 
.
Therefore,
and 
.The equation can
be represented by 
.Since the
parabola opens downward, we know that 
.
To find the value of a, you also need to know
another point on the parabola. Since we know the 
parabola passes through the point 
must satisfy the equation. Hence,
.Therefore, the 
equation for the parabola is
.
y
x
=−
+
(
)
+
1
3
2
4
2
1
1 2
4
1
3
2
=
+
(
)
+
= −
a
, soa
x
y
=
=
1
1
and
1, 1,
(
)
a< 0
y
ax
=
+
+
(
2)
4
2
k = 4
h= −2
(
)
2, 4
x
O
y
(–2, 4)
(1, 1)
a< 0
a> 0
a≠ 0
h, k
(
)
y a x h
k
=
(
)
+
2
y
x
=−
3
4
1
2
1
3
2
1
2
=
+
= −
b
, sob
x
y
= −
=
2
1
and
(
)
2,1
y
x b
= −
+
3
4
3
y-
b
m
y mx b
=
+
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested