upload pdf file in asp.net c# : How to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint Library control component .net web page winforms mvc sat-prep-book-stu6-part919

SECTION 6 
Time — 25 minutes 
18 Questions 
Turn to Section 6 (page 6) of your answer sheet to answer the questions in this section. 
Directions:  This section contains two types of questions. You have 25 minutes to complete both types. For questions 1-8,  
solve each problem and decide which is the best of the choices given. Fill in the corresponding circle on the answer sheet. You 
may use any available space for scratchwork. 
1.  The figure above shows five lines. If 
|| m, which of 
the following is NOT equal to 90 ? 
(A) 
(B)  s 
(C)  t 
(D)  u 
(E)  v 
2. Which of the following is divisible by 3 and by 5 but is 
not
divisible by 10 ? 
(A)  30 
(B)  35 
(C)  40 
(D)  45 
(E)  60 
SAT Preparation Booklet
61
How to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
preview paste image into pdf; how to copy images from pdf to word
How to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste jpg into pdf; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document
t
0
1
2
3
f (t)   −1 
3. The table above gives values of the function f for 
several values of t. If the graph of f is a line, which  
of the following defines  f (t ) ? 
(A)  ( )
1
f t
t
(B)  ( )
1
f t
t
(C)  ( ) 2
1
f t
t
(D)  ( ) 2
1
f t
t
(E)  ( ) 1 2
f t
t
4. In the figure above, the intersection of ray 
and  
ray 
is 
(A)  Segment 
AC
(B)  Segment 
AB
(C)  Ray 
(D)  Ray 
(E)  Line 
5. According to the graph above, if there are 6,000 
registered voters aged 60 and over in Washington 
County, how many registered voters are under the  
age of 30 ? 
(A)  1,000 
(B)  2,000 
(C)  3,000 
(D)  4,000 
(E)  5,000 
6. Based on the graph of the function f above, what are 
the values of x for which f(x) is positive? 
(A)  2
x 1
or 8
10
x
(B)  2
x 1
or 4
x 8
(C)    1
x 4
or 8
10
x
(D)  2
10
x
(E)    1
x 8
7. Bernardo drives to work at an average speed of 50 
miles per hour and returns along the same route at  
an average speed of 25 miles per hour. If his total  
travel time is 3 hours, what is the total number of  
miles in the round-trip? 
(A)  225 
(B)  112.5 
(C)  100 
(D)  62.5 
(E)  50 
8. If x and y are integers such that x
2
64
and 
y
3
64
, which of the following could be true? 
I.  x
8
II. 
y
4
III. x
y
4
(A)  I only 
(B)  II only 
(C)  I and III only 
(D)  II and III only 
(E)  I, II, and III 
SAT Preparation Booklet
62
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
copying image from pdf to powerpoint; cut picture pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
cut and paste image from pdf; copy image from pdf reader
9.  When a certain number is multiplied by 
1
4
and the 
product is then multiplied by 32, the result is 60. What 
is the number? 
10. What is the greatest integer value of x for  
which 2
20
0
<
SAT Preparation Booklet
63
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
copy pdf picture to powerpoint; paste image into preview pdf
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy pictures from a pdf file; paste image in pdf file
11. An object thrown upward from a height of h feet with 
an initial velocity of v feet per second will reach a 
maximum height of 
h
v
2
64
feet. If the object is 
thrown upward from a height of 6 feet with an initial 
velocity of 32 feet per second, what will be its 
maximum height, in feet? 
12. The three angles of a triangle have measures of x
, 
2x
, and , where x
55. If x and y are integers, 
what is one possible value of y ? 
CARMEN’S EXPENSES
Meals 
Hotel 
Total 
Wednesday 
$30   
Thursday 
$25   
Friday 
$26   
Total 
$291 
13. The incomplete table above is an expense sheet for 
Carmen’s business trip. If her hotel expenses were  
the same each day, what were her total
expenses for 
Friday, in dollars? (Disregard the $ sign when gridding 
your answer.) 
14. In ABC
C
above, AC
5, PC
3, and 
BP
4 3. What is the length of 
AB? 
SAT Preparation Booklet
64
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
copy images from pdf file; paste image on pdf preview
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copy and paste images from pdf; how to copy pictures from pdf in
15. On Monday morning Mr. Smith had a certain amount 
of money that he planned to spend during the week. On 
each subsequent morning, he had one fourth the amount 
of the previous morning. On Saturday morning, 5 days 
later, he had $1. How many dollars did Mr. Smith 
originally start with on Monday morning? (Disregard 
the $ sign when gridding your answer.) 
16. The median of a list of 99 consecutive integers is 60. 
What is the greatest integer in the list? 
17. When the positive integer m is divided by 5, the 
remainder is 3. What is the remainder when 20m is 
divided by 25? 
18. The figure above shows three squares with sides of 
length 5, 7, and x, respectively. If A, B, and C lie 
on line 
, what is the value of x ? 
ST O P  
If you finish before time is called, you may check your work on this section only. 
Do not turn to any other section in the test. 
SAT Preparation Booklet
65
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Powerful PDF image editor control, compatible with .NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
paste image into pdf preview; paste picture to pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link Visual Studio .NET PDF image editor control, compatible Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
copy pdf picture; how to copy text from pdf image
SECTION 7 
Time — 25 minutes 
24 Questions 
Turn to Section 7 (page 6) of your answer sheet to answer the questions in this section. 
Directions:
For each question in this section, select the best answer from among the choices given and fill in the corresponding 
circle on the answer sheet. 
Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank 
indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath  
the sentence are five words or sets of words labeled A 
through E. Choose the word or set of words that, when 
inserted in the sentence, best
fits the meaning of the 
sentence as a whole. 
Example: 
Hoping to ------- the dispute, negotiators proposed  
a compromise that they felt would be ------- to both  
labor and management. 
(A)  enforce . . useful 
(B)  end . . divisive 
(C)  overcome . . unattractive 
(D)  extend . . satisfactory 
(E) resolve . . acceptable                   
1.  The success of Notes of a Native Son ------- author 
James Baldwin as one of the most ------- essayists of 
his time. 
(A)  buoyed . . irrelevant 
(B)  established . . prominent 
(C)  surrendered . . prolific 
(D)  decried . . cynical 
(E)  categorized . . mundane 
2.  In many parts of the world, people use rice as a central 
rather than a ------- part of their daily diets. 
(A) pivotal   (B)  ritualistic    (C)  salient 
(D)  supplementary   (E)  solemn 
3.  Victor gained a reputation for being a ------- because  
he constantly bullied other children. 
(A) bungler    (B)  ruffian    (C) stickler 
(D)  daredevil   (E)  naysayer 
4.  Paradoxically, the senator was both a ------- and  
-------:  she publicly defended the rights and wisdom  
of the people, but she often spoke with a disdainful  
air of superiority. 
(A)  demagogue . . a maverick 
(B)  conservative . . an anarchist 
(C)  populist . . an elitist 
(D)  moderate . . a reactionary 
(E)  partisan . . a snob 
5.  The geologist speculated that eons ago, before the area 
was -------, the present-day island was actually a hilltop 
in a vast forest. 
(A) inundated    (B) situated    (C) rejuvenated 
(D)  supplanted    (E) excavated 
SAT Preparation Booklet
66
The passages below are followed by questions based on their content; questions following a pair of related passages may also  
be based on the relationship between the paired passages. Answer the questions on the basis of what is stated
or implied
in the 
passages and in any introductory material that may be provided. 
Questions 6-9 are based on the following passages. 
Passage 1 
Any wildlife biologist can tell you how many deer  
a given area can support—how much browse there is  
for the deer to eat before they begin to suppress the 
reproduction of trees, before they begin to starve in  
the winter. Any biologist can calculate how many  
wolves a given area can support too, in part by  
counting the number of deer. And so on, up and  
down the food chain. It’s not an exact science, but  
it comes pretty close—at least compared to figuring  
out the carrying capacity of Earth for human beings,  
10 
which is an art so dark that anyone with any sense  
stays away from it. 
Passage 2 
Estimates of the number of humans that Earth can 
sustain have ranged in recent decades from fewer than  
a billion to more than a trillion. Such elasticity is prob- 
15 
ably unavoidable, since “carrying capacity” is essentially  
a subjective term. It makes little sense to talk about carry- 
ing capacity in relationship to humans, who are capable of 
adapting and altering both their culture and their physical 
environment, and can thus defy any formula that might 
20 
settle the matter. The number of people that Earth can 
support depends on how we on Earth want to live, on  
what we want to consume, and on what we regard as  
a crowd. 
6.  Both passages support which of the following con- 
clusions about Earth’s carrying capacity for humans? 
(A)  It is routinely underestimated by biologists. 
(B)  It cannot be easily determined, given numerous 
variables and unknowns. 
(C)  It has only recently become the subject of 
considerable scientific debate. 
(D)  It is a valuable concept despite its apparent 
shortcomings. 
(E)  It has increased as a result of recent technolog- 
ical innovations. 
7.  The author of Passage 1 refers to “Any wildlife 
biologist” in line 1 and “Any biologist” in line 5  
to emphasize the point that 
(A)  a particular type of calculation can be made  
with great confidence 
(B)  scientific findings often meet with resistance  
from the general public 
(C)  certain beliefs are rarely questioned by scientists 
(D)  most biologists are concerned with issues related 
to wildlife mortality 
(E)  all biologists must be skilled at applying mathe- 
matical formulas 
8.  Both authors would agree that the “Estimates”  
(Passage 2, line 13) are 
(A)  overly generous 
(B)  largely undocumented 
(C)  often misunderstood 
(D)  politically motivated 
(E)  essentially unreliable 
9.  Which of the following best describes the relationship 
between the two passages? 
(A)  Passage 1 offers a hypothesis that is explicitly 
refuted in Passage 2. 
(B)   Passage 1 describes a popular misconception  
that is exemplified by Passage 2. 
(C)  Passage 2 presents an argument that elaborates  
on a point made in Passage 1. 
(D)  Passage 2 defends a position that is attacked  
in Passage 1. 
(E)  Passage 2 provides an anecdote that confirms  
the theory advanced in Passage 1. 
Line
SAT Preparation Booklet
67
Questions 10-15 are based on the following passage. 
The passage below is excerpted from the introduction to a 
collection of essays published in 1994. 
My entry into Black women’s history was serendipitous. 
In the preface to Black Women in America:  An Historical 
Encyclopedia, I recount the story of exactly how Shirley 
Herd (who, in addition to teaching in the local school sys- 
tem, was also president of the Indianapolis chapter of the 
National Council of Negro Women) successfully provoked 
me into changing my research and writing focus. Although 
I dedicate this volume to her and to her best friend, fellow 
club woman and retired primary school teacher Virtea 
Downey, I still blush at the fact that I went to graduate 
10 
school to become a historian in order to contribute to the 
Black Struggle for social justice and yet met her request to 
write a history of Black women in Indiana with condescen- 
sion. I had never even thought about Black women as his- 
torical subjects with their own relations to a state’s history, 
15 
and I thought her invitation and phone call extraordinarily 
intrusive. Only later did I concede how straightforward  
and reasonable had been her request to redress a historical 
omission. Black women were conspicuous by their absence.  
None of the social studies texts or state histories that Herd 
20 
and Downey had used to teach their students made mention 
of the contributions of Black women. Since historians had 
left them out, Herd reasoned, only a “real” historian could 
put them in, and since I was the only tenured* Black woman  
historian in the state of Indiana at that time, the task was 
25 
mine. 
Herd rejected my reservations and completely ignored 
my admonitions that she could not call up a historian and 
order a book the way you drive up to a fast-food restaurant 
and order a hamburger. In spite of my assertions of igno- 
30 
rance about the history of Black women in Indiana and my 
confession of having never studied the subject in any his- 
tory course or examined any manuscript sources pertaining 
to their lives, Herd persevered. Black women, as historical 
subjects and agents, were as invisible to me as they had 
35 
been to school textbook writers. 
Undaunted by my response, Herd demanded that I con- 
nect (thankfully without perfect symmetry) my biology  
and autobiography, my race and gender, my being a Black 
woman, to my skill as a historian, and write for her and for 
40 
the local chapter members of the National Council a history 
of Black women in Indiana. I relented and wrote the book, 
When the Truth Is Told:  Black Women’s Culture and 
Community in Indiana, 1875-1950, as requested. In the 
process, I was both humbled and astounded by the array of 
45 
rich primary source materials Herd, Downey, and the other 
club women had spent two years collecting. There were 
diaries, club notes, church souvenir booklets, photographs, 
club minutes, birth, death, and marriage certificates, letters, 
and handwritten county and local histories. Collectively  
50 
this material revealed a universe I never knew existed in 
spite of having lived with Black women all of my life . . . 
and being one myself. Or perhaps more accurately, I knew 
a universe of Black women existed. I simply had not envi- 
sioned its historical meaning. 
55 
* tenure:  a permanent position, often granted to a teacher after a specified 
number of years of demonstrated competence 
10. The primary purpose of the passage is to show how  
the author 
(A)  discovered Black women’s history when she  
was in graduate school 
(B)  became a historian to help Black people in 
America achieve social justice 
(C)  developed her research skills by undertaking  
a challenging project 
(D)  became a more renowned scholar due to the 
influence of two interesting individuals  
(E)  came to view Black women as a worthy sub- 
ject for historical analysis 
11. The first sentence indicates that the author’s  
“entry” (line 1) was 
(A)  troublesome but worthwhile 
(B)  challenging but rewarding 
(C)  fortunate and inevitable 
(D)  unexpected but agreeable 
(E)  startling and provocative 
12. The author initially responded to Herd’s request “with 
condescension” (lines 13-14) because the author 
(A)  knew that Herd had not been to graduate school 
(B)  believed that historians should avoid controver- 
sial projects 
(C)  had too many other projects requiring her 
attention 
(D)  rejected Herd’s contention that such a history 
would address the Black struggle for social 
justice 
(E)  viewed Herd’s request as irrelevant and 
presumptuous 
13. The comparison in lines 27-30 (“Herd . . . hamburger”) 
primarily demonstrates the author’s belief that 
historians 
(A)  do not usually accept pay for their work 
(B)  are frequently unassuming about their profession 
(C)  do not generally undertake projects on request 
(D)  spend a comparatively long time on their projects 
(E)  do not generally interact with members of the 
public 
Line
SAT Preparation Booklet
68
14. Lines 30-34 (“In spite . . . persevered”) suggest that the 
author believed that 
(A)  her lack of scholarly training on this topic was a 
reason to be embarrassed 
(B)  primary source materials on this subject would be 
difficult to find 
(C)  historians should conduct research in the areas in 
which they have expertise 
(D)  the lives of Black women in Indiana were histori- 
cally interesting and complex 
(E)  Herd wanted her to conduct research on a topic of 
general interest 
15. The last two sentences (“Or perhaps . . . meaning”) 
primarily indicate that the author 
(A)  knew that Black women contributed to society, 
but she did not understand the significance of 
their contributions 
(B)  believed that the diversity of Black women’s 
experiences would make them difficult to  
write about 
(C)  assumed that because Black women are not 
frequently studied by historians, they would  
not be an acceptable topic for a book 
(D)  believed that Black women wield political  
power only in contemporary times 
(E)  was aware of the diversity of Black women’s 
lives, but was not willing to write about them 
SAT Preparation Booklet
69
Questions 16-24 are based on the following passage. 
This passage, from a short story published in 1978, 
describes a visit to a planetarium, a building in which 
images of stars, planets, and other astronomical 
phenomena are projected onto a domed ceiling. 
Inside, we sat on wonderfully comfortable seats that 
were tilted back so that you lay in a sort of a hammock, 
attention directed to the bowl of the ceiling, which soon 
turned dark blue, with a faint rim of light around the edge. 
There was some splendid, commanding music. The adults 
all around were shushing the children, trying to make them 
stop crackling their potato chip bags. Then a man’s voice, 
an eloquent professional voice, began to speak slowly, out 
of the walls. The voice reminded me a little of the way 
radio announcers used to introduce a piece of classical 
10 
music or describe the progress of the Royal Family to 
Westminster Abbey on one of their royal occasions.  
There was a faint echo-chamber effect. 
The dark ceiling was filled with stars. They came out 
not all at once but one after another, the way stars really  
15 
do come out at night, though more quickly. The Milky  
Way galaxy appeared, was moving closer; stars swam  
into brilliance and kept on going, disappearing beyond  
the edges of the sky-screen or behind my head. While the 
flow of light continued, the voice presented the stunning 
20 
facts. From a few light-years away, it announced, the Sun 
appears as a bright star, and the planets are not visible. 
From a few dozen light-years away, the Sun is not visible, 
either, to the naked eye. And that distance—a few dozen 
light-years—is only about a thousandth part of the distance 
25 
from the Sun to the center of our galaxy, one galaxy, which 
itself contains about two hundred billion stars. And is, in 
turn, one of millions, perhaps billions, of galaxies. Innu- 
merable repetitions, innumerable variations. All this  
rolled past my head, too, like balls of lightning. 
30 
Now realism was abandoned, for familiar artifice.  
A model of the solar system was spinning away in its ele- 
gant style. A bright bug took off from the Earth, heading 
for Jupiter. I set my dodging and shrinking mind sternly  
to recording facts. The mass of Jupiter two and a half  
35 
times that of all the other planets put together. The Great 
Red Spot. The thirteen moons. Past Jupiter, a glance at  
the eccentric orbit of Pluto, the icy rings of Saturn. Back  
to Earth and moving in to hot and dazzling Venus. Atmo- 
spheric pressure ninety times ours. Moonless Mercury 
40 
rotating three times while circling the Sun twice; an odd 
arrangement, not as satisfying as what they used to tell us
—that it rotated once as it circled the Sun. No perpetual 
darkness after all. Why did they give out such confident 
information, only to announce later that it was quite wrong? 
45 
Finally, the picture already familiar from magazines:  the 
red soil of Mars, the blooming pink sky. 
When the show was over I sat in my seat while children 
clambered over me, making no comments on anything they 
had just seen or heard. They were pestering their keepers 
50 
for eatables and further entertainments. An effort had been 
made to get their attention, to take it away from canned 
drinks and potato chips and fix it on various knowns and 
unknowns and horrible immensities, and it seemed to have 
failed. A good thing, too, I thought. Children have a natural 
55 
immunity, most of them, and it shouldn’t be tampered with. 
As for the adults who would deplore it, the ones who pro- 
moted this show, weren’t they immune themselves to the 
extent that they could put in the echo-chamber effects,  
the music, the solemnity, simulating the awe that they 
60 
supposed they ought to feel? Awe—what was that sup- 
posed to be? A fit of the shivers when you looked out  
the window? Once you knew what it was, you wouldn’t  
be courting it. 
16. Which best describes the overall structure of the 
passage? 
(A)  Narrative description followed by commentary 
(B)  Reminiscence followed by present-day 
application 
(C)  An account of a problem followed by a suggested 
solution 
(D)  A generalization followed by specific examples 
(E)  A discussion of opposing viewpoints followed  
by an attempt to reconcile them 
17. Lines 5-7 (“The adults . . . bags”) primarily illustrate 
the children’s feelings of 
(A)  helplessness 
(B)  restlessness 
(C)  awe 
(D)  anticipation 
(E)  irritation 
18. In line 11, “progress” most nearly means 
(A)  evolution 
(B)  improvement 
(C)  prosperity 
(D)  promotion 
(E)  advance 
19. The first paragraph of the passage establishes  
a mood of 
(A)  jaded dismissal 
(B)  nervous apprehension 
(C)  dramatic anticipation 
(D)  initial concern 
(E)  mundane routine 
Line
SAT Preparation Booklet
70
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested