upload pdf file in asp.net c# : Paste image into pdf preview control Library system azure asp.net windows console sd_bp_070-part967

By Mike Casey, Indiana University and 
Bruce Gordon, Harvard University
Best Practices for Audio Preservation
SOUND  
DIRECTIONS
Paste image into pdf preview - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copy image from pdf preview; how to copy pictures from a pdf
Paste image into pdf preview - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste image into preview pdf; how to paste a picture into a pdf document
ii
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
SOUND DIRECTIONS
BEST PRACTICES FOR AUDIO PRESERVATION
By Mike Casey, Indiana University and Bruce Gordon, Harvard University
Contributing Writers: David Ackerman, Virginia Danielson, Jon Dunn, Jim Halliday,
Daniel Reed, Jenn Riley, and Ronda Sewald
Edited by Mike Casey and Bruce Gordon
Copyright 2007, Trustees of Indiana University
Copyright 2007, President and Fellows of Harvard University
All or part of this document may be photocopied and/or distributed for noncommercial 
use without written permission provided that appropriate credit is given to both Sound 
Directions and the authors. 
This publication was created with support from the National Endowment for the 
Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this 
publication do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
http://www.dlib.indiana.edu/projects/sounddirections/bestpractices2007/
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. An independent .NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control
how to copy pdf image; paste image into pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
how to copy an image from a pdf to word; copy image from pdf preview
iii
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
Contents
Acknowledgements .......................................................................................................vii
Indiana University Sound Directions Staff ......................................................................vii
Harvard University Sound Directions Staff .....................................................................vii
1 The Sound Directions Project ..........................................................................................1
1.1 Project History and Goals ..........................................................................................1
1.2 Introduction to Institutions .........................................................................................3
1.2.1 Indiana University  .................................................................................................3
1.2.2 Harvard University  ................................................................................................4
1.3 Standards and Best Practices ......................................................................................5
1.3.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................5
1.4 Overview of this Publication .....................................................................................8
2 Personnel and Equipment for Preservation Transfer .........................................................9
2.1 Preservation Overview ...............................................................................................9
2.2 Recommended Technical Practices ..........................................................................14
2.2.1 Personnel for Preservation Transfer Work ..............................................................14
2.2.1.1 Best Practices ....................................................................................................14
2.2.1.2 Rationale ...........................................................................................................14
2.2.1.3 Staff at Indiana and Harvard  .............................................................................14
2.2.2 Studio Signal Chain for Archival Preservation .......................................................16
2.2.2.1 Best Practices ....................................................................................................16
2.2.2.2 Rationale ...........................................................................................................16
2.2.2.3 Preservation Studio at the IU Archives of Traditional Music ................................17
2.2.2.4 Preservation Studios at the Harvard College Library’s Audio Preservation  
Services (HCL-APS) ........................................................................................................22
2.2.3 Analog Playback ...................................................................................................24
2.2.3.1 Best Practices ....................................................................................................24
2.2.3.2 Analog Playback at Harvard and Indiana ...........................................................24
2.2.3.3 Playback Problems ............................................................................................29
2.2.4 Conversion ...........................................................................................................31
2.2.4.1 Best Practices ....................................................................................................31
2.2.4.2 Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog Conversion at Harvard and Indiana .....31
3 Digital Files ...................................................................................................................33
3.1 Preservation Overview .............................................................................................33
3.2 Recommended Technical Practices ..........................................................................38
3.2.1 Target Preservation Format ....................................................................................38
3.2.1.1 Best Practices ....................................................................................................38
3.2.1.2 Rationale ...........................................................................................................38
3.2.1.3 Background   .....................................................................................................39
3.2.1.4 Use of the BWF <bext> Chunk at Indiana ..........................................................39
3.2.1.5 Use of the BWF <bext> Chunk at Harvard .........................................................42
3.2.1.6 Institutional Comparison of <bext> Chunk Field Use .........................................44
3.2.2 Digital File Types and Uses for Preservation ..........................................................45
3.2.2.1 Best Practices ....................................................................................................45
3.2.2.2 Rationale ...........................................................................................................45
3.2.2.3 File Types and Uses at Indiana ...........................................................................45
3.2.2.4 File Types and Uses at Harvard ..........................................................................50
3.2.3 Local Filenames ....................................................................................................52
3.2.3.1 Best Practices ....................................................................................................52
Contents
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able to zoom and crop image and achieve image resizing. Merge several images into PDF.
how to copy a picture from a pdf; how to paste a picture into a pdf document
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
paste image into pdf in preview; paste image into pdf reader
iv
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
3.2.3.2 Rationale ...........................................................................................................52
3.2.3.3 Filenames at the IU Archives of Traditional Music ..............................................52
3.2.3.4 Filenames at Harvard .........................................................................................57
3.2.4 File Data Integrity .................................................................................................58
3.2.4.1 Best Practices ....................................................................................................58
3.2.4.2 Rationale ...........................................................................................................58
3.2.4.3 Background    ....................................................................................................58
3.2.4.4 Redundancy Checks at Harvard and Indiana .....................................................59
4 Metadata .......................................................................................................................60
4.1 Preservation Overview  ............................................................................................60
4.2 Recommended Technical Practices ..........................................................................61
4.2.1 Best Practices .......................................................................................................61
4.2.2 Rationale ..............................................................................................................61
4.2.3 Background ..........................................................................................................62
4.2.3.1 Descriptive Metadata .........................................................................................62
4.2.3.2 Technical Metadata   ..........................................................................................62
4.2.3.3 Digital Provenance Metadata (digiprov) .............................................................63
4.2.3.4 Structural Metadata ...........................................................................................63
4.2.4 Metadata at Harvard .............................................................................................69
4.2.4.1 Preservation Metadata Documents and Their Creation .......................................69
4.2.5 Metadata at Indiana ..............................................................................................82
4.2.5.1 Audio Technical Metadata Collector (ATMC) ......................................................82
4.2.5.2 Technical Metadata ............................................................................................82
4.2.5.3 Digital Provenance Metadata .............................................................................83
4.2.5.4 Structural Metadata ...........................................................................................86
5 Storage ..........................................................................................................................91
5.1 Preservation Overview .............................................................................................91
5.2 Recommended Technical Practices ..........................................................................92
5.2.1 Local, Interim Storage ...........................................................................................92
5.2.1.1 Best Practices ....................................................................................................92
5.2.1.2 Rationale ...........................................................................................................92
5.2.1.3 Local, Interim Storage at the Indiana University Archives of Traditional Music ...93
5.2.1.4 Local Storage Supplementing Preservation Storage at Indiana University ATM ...94
5.2.1.5 Local, Interim Storage at Harvard .......................................................................96
5.2.2 Long-Term Preservation Storage ............................................................................97
5.2.2.1 Best Practices ....................................................................................................97
5.2.2.2 Rationale ...........................................................................................................97
5.2.2.3 Long-Term Preservation Storage at Harvard ........................................................97
5.2.2.4 Long-Term Preservation Storage at Indiana ........................................................99
6 Preservation Packages and Interchange .......................................................................102
6.1 Preservation Overview ...........................................................................................102
6.2 Recommended Technical Practices ........................................................................103
6.2.1 Preservation Packages .........................................................................................103
6.2.1.1 Best Practices ..................................................................................................103
6.2.1.2 Rationale  ........................................................................................................103
6.2.1.3 Preservation Packages at Harvard  ....................................................................104
6.2.1.4 Preservation Package Technical Practices at Indiana .........................................106
6.2.2 Interchange  .......................................................................................................108
6.2.2.1 Background .....................................................................................................108
6.2.2.2 Interchange at Indiana  ....................................................................................110
6.2.2.3 Interchange at Harvard  ...................................................................................110
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file. Export high quality image from PDF document in .NET program. Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF
how to cut a picture out of a pdf; copy and paste image from pdf to word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document; copy pdf picture
v
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
7 Audio Preservation Systems and Workflows ................................................................113
7.1 Preservation Overview ...........................................................................................113
7.2 Recommended Technical Practices ........................................................................115
7.2.1 Selection for Preservation ...................................................................................115
7.2.1.1 Best Practices ..................................................................................................115
7.2.1.2 Rationale .........................................................................................................115
7.2.1.3 Selection at Indiana  ........................................................................................115
7.2.1.4 Selection at Harvard ........................................................................................116
7.2.2 Quality Control and Quality Assurance ..............................................................117
7.2.2.1 Best Practices ..................................................................................................117
7.2.2.2 Rationale .........................................................................................................117
7.2.2.3 Background .....................................................................................................117
7.2.2.4 Quality Control at Indiana  ..............................................................................118
7.2.2.5 Quality Control at Harvard ..............................................................................121
7.2.3 Audio Preservation Systems and Workflows ........................................................122
7.2.3.1 Best Practices ..................................................................................................122
7.2.3.2 Rationale .........................................................................................................122
7.2.3.3 Audio Preservation System at Indiana  .............................................................122
7.2.3.4 Workflow at Indiana  .......................................................................................128
7.2.3.5 Workflow at Harvard  ......................................................................................140
8 Summary of Best Practices ..........................................................................................156
Personnel and Equipment for Preservation Transfer ......................................................156
Digital Files .................................................................................................................156
Metadata .....................................................................................................................157
Storage ........................................................................................................................158
Preservation Packages and Interchange ........................................................................158
Audio Preservation Systems and Workflows .................................................................158
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net. You may get document preview image from stream object in C#.net.
copy image from pdf to; how to copy pictures from pdf
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
how to copy images from pdf; copy images from pdf
vi
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF
how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word; how to copy pdf image to word document
vii
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
SOUND DIRECTIONS ADVISORY BOARD
Peter Alyea, Digital Conversion Specialist, M/B/RS, Library of Congress
Adrian Cosentini, Audio/Preservation Manager, The New York Philharmonic 
Carl Fleischhauer, Project Coordinator, Office of Strategic Initiatives, Library of Congress
Chris Lacinak, President, AudioVisual Preservation Solutions
Clifford Lynch, Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information 
George Massenburg, President, GML, LLC
INDIANA UNIVERSITY SOUND DIRECTIONS STAFF
Co-Principal Investigator 
Daniel B. Reed, Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology and
Director, ATM  
Project Manager  
Mike Casey, Associate Director for Recording Services,  
ATM 
DLP Project Coordinator  
Jon Dunn, Associate Director for Technology, Digital   
Library Program
Project Metadata Specialist   Jenn Riley, Metadata Librarian, Digital Library Program  
Repository Specialist   
Ryan Scherle, Programmer/Analyst, Digital Library Program 
Project Librarian  
Suzanne Mudge, ATM Librarian
Project Archivist  
Marilyn Graf, ATM Archivist
Project Audio Engineer   
Paul Mahern
Project Programmer    
James Halliday
Project Assistant   
Ronda Sewald
HARVARD UNIVERSITY SOUND DIRECTIONS STAFF
Co-Principal Investigator  
Virginia Danielson, Richard F. French Librarian, Loeb
Music Library and Curator, AWM
Lead Project Engineer   
David Ackerman, Audio Preservation Engineer 
Archivist,  
Intellectual Access Specialist  Sarah Adams, Keeper of the Isham Memorial Library                                                      
Consultant for Cataloging 
Candice Feldt, Senior Music Cataloger, Loeb Music Library
Consultant 
Stephen Abrams, Digital Library Program Manager
Consultant 
Robin Wendler, Metadata Analyst
Project Audio Engineer  
Bruce Gordon
Project Programmer    
Robert La Ferla
Project Assistant 
Donna Guerra
viii
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
A Note to Readers:
Each chapter in this document (other than the first) is divided into two major parts: 
a preservation overview that summarizes key concepts for collection managers and 
curators, followed by a section intended for audio engineers, digital librarians, and 
other technical staff that presents recommended technical practices while summarizing 
our findings and experience. Collection managers will find many parts of the technical 
sections useful but, in some cases, may need to engage the audio engineering or 
digital library communities for assistance in understanding technical topics. Similarly, 
technical staff may benefit from the broad perspective of the preservation overviews 
but may want to consult with collection management about the implications of the 
general principles in these sections for their daily work. 
For the purposes of this publication, “Harvard” refers to the Harvard College Library 
Audio Preservation Services and the Archive of World Music in the Loeb Music Library. 
“Indiana” and “IU” refer to the Archives of Traditional Music and/or the Digital Library 
Program. Because both universities are large and complex, this publication cannot and 
does not represent all audio digitization activities throughout these institutions.   
The Sound Directions project would like to thank Chris Lacinak and Carl Fleischhauer for 
detailed technical review of the draft.
Indiana University would like to thank George Blood, Safe Sound Archive, and Jeff Brown, 
ClairAudia, for technical review of ATM draft sections; Eric Jacobs for supplemental text 
on disc transfers; Richard L. Hess, Vignettes Media; the College of Arts and Sciences, the 
College IT Office (CITO), University Information Technology Services (UITS), the Faculty 
Research Support Program (FRSP), and N. Brian Winchester of the Center for the Study of 
Global Change, all at Indiana University; Metric Halo; and Benchmark Media Systems.
Harvard University would like to thank Nancy Cline, Roy E. Larson Librarian of the Harvard 
College Library and Susan Lee, Associate Librarian for Planning and Administration, for 
generous moral and material support and advice; Jan Merrill-Oldham, Malloy-Rabinowitz 
Preservation Librarian, for continuous support and advocacy of our programs; Tracey 
Robinson, Head of Information Systems, for graciously granting extraordinary requests; 
and iZotope, Inc., for the use of their scriptable software Resampler and MBITPlus.
A Note to Readers:
Each chapter in this document (other than the first) is divided into two major 
parts: a preservation overview that summarizes key concepts for collection 
managers and curators, followed by a section intended for audio engineers, 
digital  librarians,  and  other  technical  staff  that  presents  recommended 
technical practices while summarizing our findings and experience. Collection 
managers will find many parts of the technical sections useful but, in some 
cases, may need to engage the audio engineering or digital library communities 
for assistance in understanding technical topics. Similarly, technical staff may 
benefit from the broad perspective of the preservation overviews but may want 
to consult with collection management about the implications of the general 
principles in these sections for their daily work.
For the purposes of this publication, “Harvard” refers to the Harvard College 
Library Audio Preservation Services and the Archive of World Music in the 
Loeb Music Library at Harvard University. “Indiana” and “IU” refer to the 
Archives of Traditional Music and/or the Digital Library Program at Indiana 
University. Because both universities are large and complex, this publication 
cannot and does not represent all audio digitization activities throughout 
these institutions.
1
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
1 The Sound Directions Project
1.1 Project History and Goals
S
ound archives have reached a critical point in their history marked by the simultaneous 
rapid  deterioration of unique  original  materials,  the  development  of  expensive  and 
powerful new digital technologies, and the consequent decline of analog formats and media. 
It is clear to most sound archivists that our old analog-based preservation methods are no 
longer viable and that new strategies must be developed in the digital domain. Motivated 
by these concerns, in February 2005 the Indiana University Archives of Traditional Music 
(ATM) and the Archive of World Music (AWM) at Harvard University began Phase 1 of Sound 
Directions: Digital Preservation and Access for Global Audio Heritage—a joint technical 
archiving project with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities Preservation 
and Access Research and Development program. The goals of Phase 1 of Sound Directions 
were to: a) create best practices and test emerging standards for digital preservation; b) 
establish, at each university, programs for digital audio preservation that enable us to continue 
this work into the future and which produce interoperable results; and c) preserve critically 
endangered, highly valuable, unique field recordings of extraordinary interest.
1
Although the results of our research and development apply to preservation work with all 
types of audio recordings, the Sound Directions partner institutions focused their preservation 
activity on field recordings—carriers of unique, irreplaceable and historically significant 
cultural heritage. As caretakers of these collections we must solve the problem of preserving 
audio resources accurately, reliably, and for the very long term; at the same time we must 
make our resources readily accessible to those who most need them. These issues have been 
the subject of work, discussion and study at a number of national agencies and institutional 
archives, including the Council on Library and Information Resources, the American Folklife 
Center, the Library of Congress Digital Audio-Visual Prototyping Project,
2
the AWM and the 
ATM. Most of us are now approaching audio digitization in similar, deliberately cooperative 
ways. Yet,  there  are few  published  standards  or  best  practices  for  audio  preservation. 
Committees of the Audio Engineering Society (AES) and the International Association of 
Sound and Audiovisual Archives (IASA) have written detailed standards and best practices for 
some, but not all, parts of the audio digitization process. Particularly in the digital part of the 
preservation chain, best practices are either high-level or non-existent and are not intended 
to reflect the detail, richness, and experience of real world projects. Sound Directions was 
created in part because of our conviction that the development of best practices and standards 
in many areas of the preservation chain was the essential next step to insure the preservation 
1 Sound Directions has from its inception been conceived as a multi-phased project addressing both preservation 
of and access to field recordings in the digital domain. In June 2007 the ATM and AWM embarked on an 18-month 
“Preservation Phase” of the project, again with funding from NEH, through which we will realize the results of 
our Phase 1 research and development by putting our new digital preservation systems to work preserving and 
making accessible a substantial number of highly endangered field recordings. A future phase of Sound Directions 
will focus on the development of online access systems for archival field collections.
 The  LC  website  for  this  project  is  at: http://www.loc.gov/rr/mopic/avprot/avprhome.html.  Both  Sound 
Directions institutions tracked this project which ended in 2004. In some ways we think that our project 
has pushed forward some of  the issues that the Prototyping  Project raised or began  addressing. See Carl 
Fleischhauer, “The Library of Congress Digital Audio Preservation Prototyping Project” (paper presented at the 
symposium Sound Savings: Preserving Audio Collections, Austin, TX, July 24-26, 2003). Also available online:  
http://www.arl.org/preserv/sound_savings_proceedings/Digital_audio.shtml. Harvard University contributed to 
the development of the Prototyping Project’s technical and digital provenance metadata schemas. 
2
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
of fragile and deteriorating audio recordings representing irreplaceable cultural heritage.
3
In CLIR’s Folk Heritage Collections in Crisis, sound preservation consultant Elizabeth Cohen 
writes, “the development of successful preservation strategies will require the cooperation of 
computer scientists, data storage experts, data distribution experts, fieldworkers, librarians, 
and folklorists.”
4
Sound Directions was conceived and organized based on the fundamental 
principle that such collaboration is essential to the task of preserving audio collections in 
today’s world. Collaboration occurred in this project for two primary reasons: first, in the 
digital domain the expertise and facilities required for audio preservation are distributed 
across multiple agents and agencies; second, sharing information with others in the global 
community of sound archivists improves our work and helps us achieve the standardization 
that is essential to any effective preservation system. 
Collaboration  occurred  within  each  institution,  between  the  institutions,  and  between 
Sound Directions and the broader community of sound archivists and specialists around the 
world. At both Harvard and Indiana, this project involved multiple administrative units and 
staff including archive administrators/curators, audio engineers, librarians of various sorts 
(including digital library specialists), computer programmers, digital data managers/storage 
specialists, subject specialists, and others. Thus, a great deal of inter-professional collaboration 
was required at each respective university. At a higher yet still fundamental level, Indiana and 
Harvard staff collaborated as well, acting upon our belief that it should be possible for different 
institutions to work within their differing workflows and physical settings and still attain 
preservation through the production of interoperable results. As archives within very different 
sorts of universities—one public and one private—and with quite different histories, staffing, 
equipment and workflows, we collaborated throughout the process, at times approaching 
aspects of our work differently, but always operating with shared goals and toward sharable 
end results.  Communication with the Sound Directions Advisory Board enabled us to engage 
yet a broader community of relevant specialists, including national leaders in the fields of 
archival audio preservation, digital libraries and information management. Members of the 
Advisory Board reviewed a draft of this publication. Collaboration with Advisory Board 
members was supplemented by consultation of additional experts, including archivists and 
audio engineers in the U.S., Canada, and Europe, whose willingness to share information 
and advice brought a still broader collaborative network to bear on Sound Directions work.  
Also motivating our collaborative approach was our desire to render the information generated 
through our work generalizable to other institutions who want to use the project’s innovations 
but cannot redesign their audio studios nor completely alter their staffing situations in order 
to do so. Working together and in step with our broader community of collaborators, Indiana 
and Harvard have developed methods and best practices that are largely system-independent, 
that can be adopted by other institutions without overhauling their existing operations.
The Sound Directions project produced four key results: this publication of our findings and 
3 The recordings chosen as test cases for Sound Directions were drawn from the rich, outstanding, and unique 
ethnographic field collections of the Archives of Traditional Music at Indiana University and the Archive of World 
Music at Harvard University. Field collections were selected based on the following criteria: a) research and 
cultural value; b) preservation needs; and c) recording format (in order to test the transfer of a range of formats 
for this research and development project). At Harvard, selected collections included historic field recordings 
from Egypt, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India—unique documents of cultural history from regions of 
tremendous interest to Americans today. At Indiana, selected collections included critically important cultural 
materials such as music of Iraqi Jews in Israel, music from pre-Taliban Afghanistan, music related to the world’s 
longest-running civil war in Sudan, and African-American protest songs from the 1920s through the 1940s.
4 Elizabeth Cohen, “Preservation of Audio,” in Folk Heritage Collections in Crisis (Washington, DC: Council on 
Library and Information Resources, 2001), 26. Also available online: 
http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub96/pub96.pdf.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested