upload pdf file in asp.net c# : Copy paste image pdf SDK control API .net azure html sharepoint sd_bp_071-part968

3
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
best practices, the development of much needed software tools for audio preservation, the 
creation or further development of audio preservation systems at each institution, and the 
preservation of a number of critically endangered and highly valuable recordings. All of 
the above are detailed in this publication, which we believe provides solid grounding for 
institutions pursuing audio preservation either in-house or in collaboration with an outside 
vendor. For institutions actively engaged in preservation transfer work themselves, the project 
created a number of software tools that may be placed into service. The development of 
these tools reflects both the starting points in this project and the different interests of the two 
institutions. Harvard University’s experience with the vast quantities of metadata required 
for preservation led them to design and develop the Harvard Sound Directions Toolkit. The 
toolkit is a suite of forty open-source, scriptable, command line interface, audio preservation 
software tools that streamline workflow, reduce labor costs, and reduce the potential for 
human error in the creation of preservation metadata and in the encompassing preservation 
package. Harvard also produced Audio Object Manager for audio object metadata creation 
and Audio Processing XML Editor (APXE) for collection of digital provenance metadata. To aid 
selection for preservation, Indiana University developed the Field Audio Collection Evaluation 
Tool (FACET), which is a point-based, open-source software tool for ranking field collections 
for the level of deterioration they exhibit and the amount of risk they carry. Indiana also 
developed the Audio Technical Metadata Collector (ATMC) software for collecting and storing 
technical and digital provenance metadata for audio preservation. Harvard and Indiana are 
making their software tools freely available to the preservation community beginning in the 
fall of 2007, with the exception of ATMC, Audio Object Manager, and APXE, all of which 
will be released later after further development. A download link for these tools will be 
posted on the Sound Directions website. Many of the tools are referenced throughout this 
document, and a complete listing of the Harvard Sound Directions Toolkit can be found in 
Appendix 5 where each tool is described, and its use and options are listed. A user’s guide 
for the current version of ATMC, with details on each metadata element, can be found in 
Appendix 1. All of these tools are key ingredients in the audio preservation systems at each 
institution, contributing to the enduring preservation of the recordings that are processed by 
these systems. If we have done our work well, these recordings will speak for our efforts far 
into the future.
1.2 Introduction to Institutions
1.2.1 Indiana University 
The Archives of Traditional Music (ATM)
5
fosters the educational and cultural role of Indiana 
University through the preservation and dissemination of the world’s music and oral 
traditions. One of the largest and oldest university-based ethnographic sound archives in 
the United States, the ATM’s holdings cover a wide range of cultural and geographical areas, 
and include commercial and field recordings of vocal and instrumental music, folktales, 
interviews, and oral history, as well as videotapes, photographs, and manuscripts. The ATM 
seeks to fulfill its mission through appropriate acquisitions and by cataloging and preserving 
its collections for use by educators, researchers, and interested members of the public, 
including the people from whom the material was collected. The ATM’s collections and 
library contribute to the research and teaching activities of Indiana University, especially 
the Departments of Folklore and Ethnomusicology, Anthropology, Linguistics; the School 
of Music; and the interdisciplinary area studies programs that are associated with them. It 
also serves as a research, teaching, and training center for the IU Ethnomusicology Program. 
Founded in 1948, the ATM has been a recognized leader in the sound archiving community, 
5 Indiana University, Archives of Traditional Music. http://www.indiana.edu/~libarchm/.
Copy paste image pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy pdf image to powerpoint; how to copy images from pdf file
Copy paste image pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste image into pdf preview; copy image from pdf reader
4
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
developing in step with technological and theoretical advances in ethnographic research 
and recorded sound.  
At IU, the ATM’s primary partner in this project, the IU Digital Library Program (DLP)
6
is 
dedicated to the selection, production, and maintenance of a wide range of high quality 
networked resources for scholars and students at Indiana University and elsewhere, and 
supports digital library infrastructure for the university. The DLP is a collaborative effort of 
the Indiana University Libraries, the Office of the Vice President for Information Technology, 
and IU’s research faculty with leadership from the School of Library and Information Science 
and the School of Informatics. The DLP’s current facilities include the Digital Media and 
Image Center (containing equipment for image, audio, and video capture), the Electronic 
Text Development Center (supporting creation of scholarly electronic texts), and an extensive 
server infrastructure for support of digital projects, with life-cycle replacement funding for 
hardware and software.  DLP staff provides expertise in planning, creating, and maintaining 
digital projects.  
1.2.2 Harvard University 
The Archive of World Music (AWM) and its technological partner, Harvard College Library 
Audio Preservation Services (HCL-APS), are both units of the Loeb Music Library
7
which, in 
turn, is a component of the Harvard College Library that serves the Faculty of Arts and Sciences 
at Harvard. The Archive of World Music was established in 1976 and, with the appointment 
in 1992 of Kay Kaufman Shelemay as Harvard’s first senior professor of ethnomusicology, the 
Archive moved to the Music Library to become one of its special collections. It is devoted 
to the acquisition of archival field recordings of musics worldwide as well as to commercial 
sound recordings, videos, and DVDs of ethnomusicological interest. The AWM developed 
the HCL-APS, a state-of-the-art facility which was an early leader, and continues to provide 
leadership, in the application of digital technologies to archival audio practice.  
Over the past five years HCL-APS has moved toward joining its counterpart, the Harvard 
College Library Digital Imaging Group (HCL-DIG) in providing top quality service and 
advice for digitizing media. Both work closely with the Harvard University Library Office 
for Information Systems on matters of building robust infrastructure and sustainable tools for 
creating and preserving digital objects via the Digital Repository Service. 
The Harvard University Office for Information Systems (OIS)
8
coordinates all of the Library’s 
online catalogs (HOLLIS, its MARC catalog, OASIS for finding aids, VIA for visual images, and 
so forth) as well as the highly regarded Library Digital Initiative (LDI), the Digital Repository 
Service, and innumerable tools that sustain and support online resources. Led by Dale 
Flecker and Tracey Robinson, OIS is home to nationally recognized experts who advised 
Sound Directions. The Library Digital Initiative in some aspects parallels IU’s Digital Library 
Program. Its mandate is to create the technical infrastructure to support the acquisition, 
organization, delivery, and archiving of digital library materials, provide experts to advise 
the community on key issues in the digital environment and enrich the Harvard University 
Library collections with a significant set of digital resources.
6 Indiana University, Digital Library Program. http://www.dlib.indiana.edu/.
7 Harvard University, Loeb Music Library. http://hcl.harvard.edu/loebmusic/.
8 Harvard University Library, Office for Information Services. http://hul.harvard.edu/ois/.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
how to copy pictures from a pdf file; paste image into preview pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
cut image from pdf online; how to copy a picture from a pdf file
5
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
1.3 Standards and Best Practices
1.3.1 Introduction
It is critical that audio preservation systems use technologies, formats, procedures, and 
techniques that conform to internationally-developed standards and best practices. These 
are typically developed by technical experts and, if competently implemented, ensure that 
the output of a preservation system is high-quality. Standards and best practices also provide 
a philosophical and ethical foundation for preservation work by outlining expectations and 
goals for the output of a preservation system along with acceptable means to achieve them. 
Standards-based technologies will presumably be usable longer, fostering sustainability, and 
are more likely to generate products that are interoperable. Finally, “non-standard formats, 
resolutions and versions may not include preservation pathways that will enable long term 
access and future format migration.”
9
In this sense we place ourselves all in the same boat by 
adhering to standards, increasing the likelihood that strategies for migration and access will 
be developed when it is time to move to new technologies. 
Formal standards in preservation-related areas are assessed and ratified by bodies such as 
the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the National Information Standards 
Organization (NISO), the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and others. Standards crucial 
to audio preservation are also developed by organizations such as the Audio Engineering 
Society (AES), the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), the Library of Congress, the Digital 
Library Federation (DLF) and others that may not be official national or international standards 
organizations in the strictest sense, but are charged by various constituencies with providing 
leadership in this area. The publication of best or recommended practices provides guidance 
in areas where standards do not yet exist or may never be created. Best practices may also 
provide strategies, procedures or work plans necessary to successfully implement a standard 
that has been formally adopted. The Sound Directions project has implemented and tested 
the standards and best practices described below.
9 International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 04 Guidelines 
on the Production and Preservation of Digital Audio Objects: Standards, Recommended Practices, and Strategies 
(Aarhus, Denmark: International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives, Technical Committee, 2004), 
6. 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
how to cut image from pdf; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page. Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point (50F, 100F).
how to copy image from pdf to word; how to copy images from pdf to word
6
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
1.3.2 IASA-TC 03: The Safeguarding of the Audio Heritage: Ethics, Principles 
and Preservation Strategy, Version 3, December 2005 
TC  04:  Guidelines  on the  Production and  Preservation of  Digital Audio 
Objects
10
IASA-TC 03 provides an overview of key audio preservation topics including selection, 
preservation transfer,  digital archiving basic principles, preservation metadata, format 
priorities for transfer, and others. 
IASA-TC 04 is an important high-level recommended practices document for the preservation 
of audio in the digital domain. This publication includes detailed recommendations for 
signal extraction from analog sources, equipment in the digital preservation chain, sample 
rate and bit depth, characteristics of Preservation Master Files, target preservation file format, 
guidelines for storage, and others.  
In effect, best practices developed during Phase 1 of Sound Directions put into action both 
TC 03 and TC 04 principles, using them to produce detailed practices and procedures as 
reported in this document.
1.3.3 Capturing Analog Sound for Digital Preservation: Report of a Roundtable 
Discussion of Best Practices for Transferring Analog Discs and Tapes. NRPB, 
CLIR, LC
11
This report summarizes discussions and recommendations from a meeting of audio preservation 
engineers that was organized by the Council on Library and Information Resources and the 
Library of Congress under the auspices of the National Recording Preservation Board. The 
heart of this document is its detailed discussion of issues relating to the analog playback 
of both discs and tapes. David Ackerman of Harvard University and three members of the 
Sound Directions Advisory Board—Chris Lacinak, George Massenburg, and Peter Alyea—
were invited to participate in this meeting. 
1.3.4 Broadcast Wave Format (BWF or BWAV)
12
The Broadcast Wave Format, based on the Microsoft WAVE audio file format, was introduced 
by the EBU in 1996 to allow files to be exchanged between the increasing number of digital 
audio workstations used in radio and television production. Broadcast Wave is a special type 
of WAVE file that may contain basic metadata (residing with the file itself) about its audio 
content, and carries a sample-accurate time stamp that can be used to place related files in the 
proper sequence. BWF is not a destination for the extensive metadata that must be collected 
10 IASA-TC 04 is available through the website of the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives 
at http://www.iasa-web.org/ or in the US through Nauck’s Vintage Records: http://78rpm.com/ International 
Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 03 The Safeguarding of the Audio 
Heritage: Ethics, Principles and Preservation Strategy, ver. 3 ([Budapest]: International Association of Sound and 
Audiovisual Archives, Technical Committee, December 2005). Also available online: http://www.iasa-web.org/
IASA_TC03/IASA_TC03.pdf.
11 Council on Library and Information Resources and Library of Congress, Capturing Analog Sound for Digital 
Preservation: Report of a Roundtable Discussion of Best Practices for Transferring Analog Discs and Tapes, CLIR 
publication no. 137 (Washington, DC: Council on Library and Information Resources and Library of Congress, 
2006). Also available online: http://www.clir.org/PUBS/reports/pub137/pub137.pdf.
12 European Broadcasting Union, “BWF – A Format for Audio Data Files in Broadcasting,” ver. 1, Tech 3285 
(Geneva: Switzerland: European Broadcasting Union, July 2001), 
http://www.ebu.ch/CMSimages/en/tec_doc_t3285_tcm6-10544.pdf.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
copy a picture from pdf to word; how to copy image from pdf to word document
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. C#.NET Example: Convert One Image to PDF in Visual C# .NET Class.
how to cut a picture from a pdf document; copy image from pdf to pdf
7
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
during digital preservation projects. The Broadcast Wave Format itself has become a de facto 
standard in the audio world. In addition to its widespread use in Europe and Australia, it is 
specifically recommended by IASA, AES, and the National Academy of Recording Arts and 
Sciences as the target format for audio preservation.
13
1.3.5 AES31-3-1999
14
Published by the Audio Engineering Society in 1999, AES31 is an international standard 
designed to enable simple interchange of audio files and projects between workstations. Part 
3 includes a format for the communication of edit decision lists, called Audio Decision Lists 
(ADLs) in the standard, using ASCII text that is human-readable but also may be parsed by 
software. 
AES31-3 is used in archival work to model the relationship between the source recording 
and resulting digital files. It provides a standard way to link the various files that are created, 
sometimes through multiple stops and starts during transfer of a deteriorating source, thereby 
reconstructing the source recording. Without it, future researchers are left with one engineer’s 
interpretation of the edit points. This standard may also be used for the collection of marker 
information, or cue points, based on the start and stop times of performances in a digital file. 
As of this writing, this is not officially supported by the standard, but the data may reside in 
an ADL in a proprietary section depending on a manufacturer’s implementation. AES31-3 
is under revision to include this marker information as an official part of the standard, with 
public release expected soon along with eventual adoption by software manufacturers. 
1.3.6 AES SC-03-06 Working Group on Digital Library and Archive Systems, 
Task Group SC-03-06-A Metadata Harmonization
This emerging standard, developed in consultation with the Library of Congress by the AES 
in a working group chaired by Harvard’s David Ackerman, guides the collection of technical 
metadata for audio objects, including the source recording and file derivatives, as well as the 
digitizing process. Mike Casey from Indiana University and Sound Directions board member 
Chris Lacinak are active participants in this working group. The standard was implemented 
during Phase 1 of Sound Directions for the first time in a real world project. Both Indiana 
University and Harvard University have developed software for the collection of technical 
metadata using this standard.
1.3.7 Open Archival Information System (OAIS)
15
The Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Reference Model, ISO standard 14721:2003, is 
a conceptual framework for an archival system dedicated to preserving and maintaining access 
to digital information over the long term. It describes the environment in which an archive 
resides, the functional components of the archive itself, and the information infrastructure 
13 See IASA, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 04, 7. See also The Recording Academy, Producers & 
Engineers Wing and Audio Engineering Society, Technical Committee on Studio Practices and Production, 
“Recommendation for Delivery of Recorded Music Projects,” AES Technical Council Document AESTD 
1002.1.03-10; 030930 rev 33 (New York: Audio Engineering Society, 2003),  
http://www.aes.org/technical/documents/AESTD1002.1.03-10_1.pdf.
14 Available through: Audio Engineering Society, Standards Committee, “Standards in Print,”  
http://www.aes.org/publications/standards/.
15 Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems, Reference Model for an Open Archival Information System 
(OAIS), CCSDS 650.0-B-1 Blue Book January 2002 (Washington, DC: CCSDS Secretariat, 2002). Also available 
online: http://public.ccsds.org/publications/archive/650x0b1.pdf.
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit
copy images from pdf to powerpoint; how to paste a picture into a pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL.
paste jpeg into pdf; copy pdf picture to powerpoint
8
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
supporting the archive’s processes. Due in part to endorsement by OCLC and RLG, the OAIS 
Reference Model is used by many libraries, archives, and other cultural heritage institutions 
as a means of defining their own digital preservation infrastructure. Indiana and Harvard are 
using OAIS concepts in implementing their digital library object repository systems. 
1.3.8 Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS)
16
The Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS), developed as an initiative of 
the Digital Library Federation and maintained by the Library of Congress, specifies an XML 
document format for packaging metadata necessary for both management of digital library 
objects within a repository and exchange of such objects between repositories, or between 
repositories and their users. A METS document is capable of wrapping together all of the 
descriptive, administrative, and structural metadata for a digital object in many versions, plus 
references to the object’s data files, or optionally, inclusion of the data files themselves. METS 
is frequently used as the wrapper format for OAIS Submission Information Packages (SIPs), 
Archival Information Packages (AIPs), or Dissemination Information Packages (DIPs).  
1.4 Overview of this Publication
Our purpose in writing this publication is to present the results of research and development 
carried out by the Sound Directions project with funding from the National Endowment for 
the Humanities in the U.S. Our work has naturally led to some conclusions that are detailed 
and highly technical along with others that are more general. Both are presented here, in 
separate sections of each chapter as discussed in the note to readers above. 
The work undertaken by the Sound Directions project focused largely on what happens after 
analog-to-digital conversion. We report on our experience with pre-conversion parts of the 
preservation chain, and even offer a few recommended technical practices, but have not 
attempted to be exhaustive in these areas. The heart of our work begins with the creation 
of digital files and continues to long-term preservation storage. This fills a sizeable gap in 
the audio preservation field as there are no best practices documents that address this part 
of the preservation pathway in detail. Our aim was to use our real world project to add 
specificity to the best practices that do exist, as well as to develop best practices in areas 
where they have not yet been established. These are presented by topic at the beginning of 
the recommended technical practices section in each chapter and as a group in Chapter 8. 
Sound Directions best practices are based on general principles either widely recognized 
by the audio preservation community or, in a few cases, newly proposed by our project. 
While tools, formats, and practices will change over time as our field evolves, these basic 
principles should remain constant. In some areas that are either out of our scope (analog 
playback, management of preservation repositories, for example) or are necessarily specific 
to individual institutions (workflow) we have not developed detailed best practices but report 
on our own operations, which can be used as a starting point for institutions developing 
audio preservation systems. 
We invite you to continue this conversation on audio preservation issues. Questions, 
comments,  and  suggestions  may  be  emailed  to  the  Sound  Directions  project  at 
soundir@indiana.edu.
16 Library of Congress, “METS: Metadata Encoding & Transmission Standard” (12 July 2007),  
http://www.loc.gov/standards/mets/
9
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
2 Personnel and Equipment for Preservation Transfer
2.1 Preservation Overview
I
f the primary goal of preservation transfer work is the creation of a surrogate that is an 
accurate, authentic, and very high quality representation of the original, then both the 
equipment in the preservation system and the personnel operating it are of key importance. 
Best practices documents provide guidance for a preservation studio’s signal chain and 
personnel, analog playback, and analog-to-digital conversion, as discussed below. In some 
cases this guidance is specific, while in others it is necessary to apply the knowledge of an 
audio engineer to derive particular practices from general statements.
Personnel for Preservation Transfer
Familiarity with obsolete media, its historically accepted qualities and characteristics, its 
production techniques, playback equipment calibration and equipment maintenance is 
essential for solid preservation transfer. Such familiarity is in decline. The sophisticated 
technical equipment used in preservation studios must be operated by appropriately trained 
personnel. IASA-TC 03 and TC 04, in addition to stating that equipment must be optimally 
adjusted and maintained, suggest that playback “requires knowledge of the historic audio 
technologies and a technical awareness of the advances in replay technology.”
17
Fragile audio carriers are damaged by the stress of repeated and inexpert playback attempts and 
lack of timely intervention in the face of playback problems. The CLIR/LC report, “Capturing 
Analog Sound,” addresses this directly, suggesting that “there are many areas in which a 
trained ear and years of experience are by far the most important tools….in some archives, 
frag ile audio recordings are being handled, played, and transferred for digital preservation 
by staff who have limited experience working with audio recordings or little knowledge 
about the sonic character istics and weaknesses of various audio formats.” This report strongly 
recommends, “audio preservation transfers be done by trained and experienced audio 
engineers.”
18
Professional audio experience, musical knowledge, and the ability to verify or confute their 
human perceptions with precise measurement, make audio engineers and technicians, rather 
than automated systems or untrained students, the best candidates for recognizing playback 
problems and intervening during archival transfers. In addition, engineers and technicians 
are equipped with the necessary critical listening skills to ensure that not only playback, but 
also the performance of the studio signal chain itself, is optimal.
Ideally, an audio preservation workflow would also involve the services of a specialized 
programmer. Software that automates the mechanistic aspects of the work (such as metadata 
entry) cuts costs, saves time and reduces the opportunity for human error.
Preservation Studios  
Best practices documents contain few specific recommendations for the signal chain in a 
preservation studio. IASA-TC 04 stipulates: “The combination of reproduction equipment, 
signal cables, mixers and other audio processing equipment should have specifications 
17 IASA, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 03, 6; IASA, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 04, 3.
18 CLIR, “Capturing Analog Sound,” 4 and 15.   
10
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
that equal or exceed that of digital audio at the specified sampling rate and bit depth. The 
quality of the replay equipment, audio path, target format and standards must exceed that 
of the original carrier.”
19
The CLIR/LC report discusses the need for accurate monitoring 
systems to evaluate quality as well as test equipment to evaluate potential problems.
20
In 
addition, the characteristics of the room used for preservation transfer work must be carefully 
considered. 
From recommendations such as these, basic audio engineering principles, and experience, 
we deduce the following:  
The room in which we monitor transfers can be thought of as an unavoidable lens 
 
through which the audio content is experienced. Preservation transfer work is best 
undertaken in a studio designed as a critical listening space. A critical listening space 
should have an ambient noise level well below that of the quietest sound we wish 
to audition when listening at a safe, comfortable, non-fatiguing playback level.
21
The 
room should not distort the frequency spectrum of interest, the accuracy of the sonic 
images, the sense of space, or the timing of the audio content
If a critical listening space is not possible, then the studio must at least be free from 
 
ambient noise, it must be removed from other work areas and traffic, and its acoustic 
weaknesses should be well understood. Knowing the acoustic weaknesses of the room 
informs one of the aspects of the sound that can be reliably analyzed by ear and those 
aspects that cannot. This is vital for the engineer who must be able to make accurate 
judgments during transfer and when selecting and aligning equipment
All signal chain components must be professional-quality
 
The most direct and clean signal path must be used from source to destination. Signal 
 
chain components that are not used for preservation transfer work should be removed 
to prevent additional noise from entering the system
The studio should include test/calibration equipment to test and monitor the transfer 
 
chain itself for noise as well as to test individual components for performance. During 
transfer, the test/calibration equipment shall not be inserted between the playback 
machine and the recorder
The studio should include a monitoring chain that enables the engineer to monitor 
 
the signal directly from both the playback machine and after the analog-to-digital 
converter to verify the quality of the converted signal
In the digital age, preservation studio signal chain components feed the audio signal 
into a computer where the audio content is recorded and further processed in the digital 
domain. The computer-based audio workstation, called a digital audio workstation or DAW, 
historically required dedicated hardware to efficiently process the audio signal. Integrated, 
turnkey systems with proprietary hardware and software specifically designed for digital audio 
processes were commonly used. In recent years, as the processing power on the average 
desktop computer has increased, these systems have declined considerably in popularity. 
A standard desktop computer can now handle multiple channels of audio, at least in terms 
of processing power and memory, although dedicated systems may have advantages for 
applications that require significant signal processing. It is no longer necessary to invest in 
19 IASA, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 04, 8. 
20 CLIR, “Capturing Analog Sound,” 25.
21 An example of one room characteristic that must be addressed is noise level. Richard Warren’s storage document 
published in the ARSC Journal recommends a Noise Criteria-level of 20-25 dB for critical listening areas. More 
generally, he also calls for consideration of the “proper acoustical conditions to prevent the room from distorting 
the sounds to be studied.” Richard Warren, Jr., “Storage of Sound Recordings,” ARSC Journal 24, no. 2 (1993), 
137. Readers are also directed to the publications of the Audio Engineering Society for detailed information on the 
characteristics of audio studios. 
11
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
expensive proprietary, dedicated systems for audio preservation transfer work. If this work 
is relatively simple, emphasizing signal capture without much downstream manipulation, 
using a carefully designed desktop audio methodology with what is sometimes called a 
host-based or native audio processing system is a valid approach. Both native and dedicated 
hardware/software systems are viable options for audio preservation.
22
Analog Playback
Although all points along the preservation chain are important, audio preservation engineers 
generally agree that playback of analog source recordings is a particularly key juncture at 
which, if not performed optimally, the quality of the end product will be lessened. According 
to IASA-TC 04 “any transfer should attempt to extract the optimal signal from the original 
[as] the original carrier may deteriorate, and future replay may not achieve the same quality, 
or may in fact become impossible, and secondly, signal extraction is such a time consuming 
effort that financial considerations call for optimization at the first attempt.”
23
No amount of 
effort or expense in the remainder of the signal chain can recover information that was not 
retrieved from the analog original at the moment of playback. TC 04, as well as the CLIR/LC 
report “Capturing Analog Sound,” provides detailed best practices for the playback of analog 
recordings.
Both the abilities of staff and the equipment used greatly impact the success of the analog 
playback stage. The engineer must understand how field recordings carried on obsolete, 
deteriorating historic formats may be optimally reproduced despite degradation, taking into 
account specific characteristics of both the individual recording and the format itself. The 
engineer must also align, calibrate, and verify the performance of the playback machine, 
which itself must be able to reproduce the recording at the highest fidelity possible. 
The analog playback stage must utilize the highest quality copy of the content that is available. 
For recordings made in the field this is usually, although not always, the original recording. 
In some cases the original may have deteriorated to the point that a first copy is the highest 
quality carrier of the content. Locating and identifying the best copy in existence, even if it 
resides in another archive, will enable the judicious use of preservation resources, prevent 
duplication of effort, and result in carrying the highest quality version forward into the future. 
In order to enable future re-consultation for the purpose of assessing past work, analyzing 
secondary information such as notes on a container, or other reasons, all original recordings 
should be retained.
24
Conversion
If analog playback is one exceptionally key juncture in a preservation system, then analog-
to-digital (A/D) conversion is the other. Choices made in both of these areas can dramatically 
and permanently affect the fidelity of the audio signal that is carried in the digital domain 
into the future. Ken Pohlmann, in a paper published by CLIR states that “errors introduced by 
the A/D converter will accompany the audio signal throughout digital
22 This discussion is largely from Francis Rumsey, Desktop Audio Technology: Digital Audio and MIDI Principles 
(Oxford; England, Burlington, MA: Focal Press, 2004), 2 and 156.
23 IASA, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 04, 11.
24 See IASA, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 03, 7; IASA, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 04, 11; and International 
Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives, Editorial Group, Task Force to Establish Selection Criteria of 
Analogue and Digital Audio Contents for Transfer to Data Formats for Preservation Purposes (Hungary, October 
2003), 5. Also available online: http://www.iasa-web.org/taskforce/taskforce.pdf.
12
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
processing and storage and, ultimately, back into its analog state.”
25
The technical quality 
of the audio signal can never be made better once converted. IASA-TC 04 suggests that the 
converter “is the most critical component in the digital preservation pathway.”
26
Best practices documents all recommend a professional-quality stand-alone (external) A/D 
converter rather than one incorporated into the computer’s sound card with its low cost 
circuitry subject to the electrical noise inside the computer.
27
IASA-TC 04 includes minimum 
specifications for such a converter, although it is often difficult to match specifications to the 
information provided by any given manufacturer. Pohlmann suggests both measurement and 
listening tests before purchase but also counsels seeking expert advice, perhaps recognizing 
that most archives are not capable of conducting scientifically valid tests in either of these 
areas. It may be necessary to engage the audio engineering community as there does appear 
to exist an informal, short list of converters that engineers believe are of high-enough quality 
for preservation transfer work. These tend to range in price from around $1,000 to $10,000 
and more. 
Both the IASA and Pohlmann documents assert that audio transparency—neither adding 
to nor subtracting from the audio signal present on the analog original—is the most 
important characteristic for a converter used for preservation transfer. Most converters are 
not transparent, only the best approach transparency, and the differences are apparently 
audible to some audio engineers, although they may be subtle.
28
However, some feel there 
may be diminishing returns in analyzing perceivable improvement in quality versus increase 
in price, especially with professional-quality devices. The performance of A/D converters, 
many of which use the same brand of converter chip, often relies on other factors such as 
how well the analog input stage is implemented and the design of the circuitry supporting 
the chip.
29
The characteristics of digital conversion are established at the A/D converter with the choice 
of sampling rate and word length or bit depth. The audio CD was established with a sampling 
rate of 44.1 kHz at a bit depth of 16. This combination is now almost universally considered 
inadequate for audio preservation of analog recordings. There is currently wide agreement 
on bit depth for preservation transfer of analog sources with 24 bits recommended. A well-
designed converter operating at 24 bits will provide a noise floor at the limits of audibility 
and capture enough dynamic range to make level setting less critical. It will also provide a 
longer word length to allow for some types of downstream processing stages (of derivative 
files) that may decrease useful word length.
30
There is less agreement on sampling rate and this topic remains somewhat controversial. 
IASA-TC 04, the CLIR/LC document, the Pohlmann article on converters, along with other 
25 Ken C. Pohlmann, “Measurement and Evaluation of Analog-to-Digital Converters Used in the Long Term 
Preservation of Audio Recordings” (roundtable discussion, “Issues in Digital Audio Preservation Planning and 
Management,” Washington, DC, March 10-11, 2006). Also available online: 
http://www.clir.org/activities/details/AD-Converters-Pohlmann.pdf.
26 IASA, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 04, 6.
27 An external converter is recommended by IASA, Technical Committee, IASA-TC 04, 6 and Pohlmann, 
“Measurement and Evaluation of Analog-to-Digital Converters,” 8 and 12. It is also recommended in Rumsey, 
“Desktop Audio Technology,” 13. 
28 See Pohlmann, “Measurement and Evaluation of Analog-to-Digital Converters,” 2 and IASA, Technical 
Committee, IASA-TC 04, 6.
29 See Pohlmann, “Measurement and Evaluation of Analog-to-Digital Converters,” 6 for example. 
30 See Pohlmann, “Measurement and Evaluation of Analog-to-Digital Converters,” 3-4 for reasons to digitize at 
24 bit.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested