upload pdf file in asp.net c# : Copy images from pdf Library software class asp.net wpf web page ajax sd_bp_073-part976

23
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
For the transfer of digitally-recorded, tape-based media such as DAT, the AES/EBU digital 
audio output of the DAT player is connected directly to one of the AES/EBU inputs of the 
Prism AD-2 which is set in D-D mode and receives synchronization from the incoming digital 
audio signal. The remainder of the signal chain after the AD-2 is as previously mentioned.
Figure 2: Harvard College Library Audio Preservation Services preservation studio signal chain
Copy images from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copying image from pdf to word; how to cut image from pdf file
Copy images from pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy picture to pdf; how to cut image from pdf
24
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
2.2.3 Analog Playback
2.2.3.1 Best Practices
The Sound Directions project did not attempt to define best practices for analog playback 
since this topic is covered in detail in both IASA-TC 04 and the CLIR/LC report entitled 
“Capturing Analog Sound for Digital Preservation.”
41
Rather, we committed to reporting on 
the equipment, procedures, and techniques that we used in order to create a case study of 
how two sound archives are able to meet both audio engineering and audio preservation 
standards and follow best practices. Our report will focus on a few specific areas not covered 
in the above works in which we gained knowledge that was new to us.
2.2.3.2 Analog Playback at Harvard and Indiana
In general, the Sound Directions audio engineers follow all of the recommended practices for 
analog playback in both IASA-TC 04 and the CLIR report, as well as basic audio engineering 
practices, including
aligning tape machines using Magnetic Reference Laboratory (MRL) calibration tapes;
 
inspecting the source tape for preservation problems;
 
adjusting azimuth (using program material as there are rarely test tones available);
 
determining track configurations by listening and by using a magnetic viewer;
 
42
determining tape thickness using a thickness gauge with enough precision to measure 
 
either mils or micrometers;
43
in the absence of test tones, setting levels by previewing tapes (without preservation 
 
problems) to determine the average level recorded on the tape;
assessing the playback eq curve required, if any, as recommended in IASA-TC 04;
 
storing the tape in played position, tails out if it is recorded in one direction or heads 
 
out if recorded in two directions in order to evenly pack the tape winds.
The above is a partial list focusing on tape transfers; further details may be found in the 
publications cited above.
The Preservation Studios at Indiana and Harvard contain similar and, in many cases, the 
same playback equipment, as detailed below.
2.2.3.2.1 Tape
The ATM at IU uses the following quarter-inch open reel tape machines for preservation 
transfer work:
Studer A810 full-track playback head, 3.75 ips to 30 ips
 
Studer A810 half- and quarter-track 2-channel playback heads, 3.75 ips to 30 ips
 
Revox B77 MKII half- and quarter-track playback heads, 0.938 (15/16) ips and 1.875 (1 7/8) ips
 
41 CLIR, “Capturing Analog Sound.”
42 Arnold B-1022 Magnetic Viewer. Plastiform Division of Arnold. 1000 E. Eisenhower Ave, Norfolk, NE 68702-
1567. 402-371-6100 ext. 176. 
43 An example of a thickness gauge is the Mitutoyo dial caliper No. 7326S, which is calibrated in mils. This 
device, along with others, may be purchased from Precision Graphic Instruments, Inc. 1-800-280-6562. 
http://pgiinc.com. HCL-APS uses an inch-micrometer whose thimble is divided into .001-inch (1 mil) graduations 
and has a vernier scale with graduations in tenths of a mil.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Please refer to below listed demo codes. VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
copy image from pdf acrobat; extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Able to extract vector images from PDF. Extract all images from whole PDF or a specified PDF page. C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
paste picture into pdf; how to copy pictures from pdf to word
25
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
The HCL-APS uses the following quarter-inch open reel tape machines:
Ampex ATR-102 half- and quarter-track, 4-speed with vari-speed controller
 
Studer A807 3-speed with full-track, half-track/two-track, and quarter-track head 
 
stacks
Otari 5050-B MK III half- and quarter-track used only in conjunction with an Eventide 
 
Harmonizer as controller for playback of 1.875 ips tapes
Very few quarter-inch open reel tape machines are manufactured today and archives typically 
must use older units for preservation transfer work. The condition of older playback machines 
must be carefully assessed and they are likely to need repair work. Both of the ATM’s 
Studers were refurbished by ATR Services to bring them up to their original performance 
specification.
44
In addition, the playback heads on professional-quality open reel machines 
are usually optimized for the professional tape playback speeds of 15 and 30 ips. The 
holdings of sound archives are often recorded at slower speeds, particularly 3.75 and 7.5 
ips. For example, we estimate that roughly 55-60% of the Archives of Traditional Music’s 
open reel holdings are recorded at 7.5 ips, 25-30% at 3.75 ips, around 5% at 1.875 ips, a 
handful at both 0.938 ips and 15 ips, and none at 30 ips. It became obvious that this was 
a problem when aligning the machines at 3.75 ips. Above 2 kHz each machine was down 
anywhere from 1 to 5 dB from 0 VU, with -4 dB typical, depending on the specific machine, 
channel, and frequency. This is not acceptable performance for preservation work, so we 
arranged through JRF Magnetic Sciences to have custom playback heads with smaller head 
gaps manufactured by Flux Magnetics.
45
Typical head gap length is 120 microinches. The 
gap on the custom heads is 80 microinches and the lamination thickness is thinner, making 
them more responsive to high frequencies at slower speeds. By modifying the machine’s 
playback equalizers we shifted the transition frequency (above which the high frequency 
reproduction adjustment is made when aligning the machines), moving it down to 3.15 kHz. 
With these two changes our tape machines are now flat to about 10 kHz and up less than 1 
dB at higher frequencies when operating at the slower speeds. 
Both the ATM and HCL-APS use Tascam 122 MKIII cassette tape machines for preservation 
work. While we like the idea of using the currently popular Nakamichi Dragons for this work 
because they adjust for azimuth automatically, neither institution yet owns one. We have 
found it quite easy to adjust azimuth on the Tascam machines while the tape is playing, using 
the screw located at the lower left of the head assembly.
The original performance specifications, and in some cases procedures for calibration, for 
most equipment can be found in the operations or repair manuals. These documents are 
indispensable to preservation studios.
2.2.3.2.2 Field discs
Both the ATM and the HCL-APS use a Technics SP-15 Direct Drive Turntable with an SME 
Tonearm for playback of field discs. Both also have Technics SL-1200 Direct Drive Turntables 
for playback of 45 rpm and 33.33 rpm LP discs. The ATM purchased a number of differently 
shaped and sized custom styli from Expert Stylus in the U.K. to optimize the interface with 
both the size and individual wear pattern of any given disc.
46
Similarly, HCL-APS also has a 
wide selection of styli from which to choose. For general cleaning of discs that can tolerate 
cleaning, both institutions use a Keith Monks record-cleaning machine with the appropriate 
44 ATR Services. http://www.atrservice.com/
45 JRF Magnetic Sciences. http://www.jrfmagnetics.com/.
46 Expert Stylus Company. Omega House. 50 Harriotts Lane. Ashtead. Surrey KT21 2QB. United Kingdom and 
Northern Ireland. info@expertstylus.co.uk.
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Able to extract images from PDF in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET project. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint; paste picture to pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. The
copy picture from pdf reader; how to copy pdf image to word
26
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
cleaning solution.
This is a fairly typical disc setup for archives. With the current popularity of vinyl LP’s amongst 
some audiophiles there is a large selection of high-end disc-related equipment available. 
While some of this gear may well be higher-quality, most of it is prohibitively expensive for 
archives and does not enable playback of discs that were recorded at 78 rpm or are larger 
than twelve inches.
At Indiana, discs requiring a playback equalization curve (many field discs do not) are 
transferred both with and without the curve at the same time in one pass, and both files 
are preserved to maintain maximum flexibility into the future. The signal through the flat 
setting of the KAB preamp generates the Preservation Master File. The signal is also routed 
through an Owl 1 preamp using a playback curve and this file becomes a Preservation 
Master  -Intermediate as discussed in Chapter 3, below. There is some disagreement among 
preservation engineers on whether a disc that needs a playback equalization curve should 
be transferred flat with the curve added later (either in the digital domain or by looping 
back through an analog device, both of which currently have technical disadvantages), or 
whether the engineer should choose the curve and apply it in the analog domain during the 
transfer. This latter course has the disadvantage of relying on both the engineer’s choice and 
the curves available in the preamp. The CLIR/LC report recommends transferring flat if the 
specific playback curve is unknown, which is nearly always the case with ATM field discs. 
Our procedure, which we find easy to implement, accomplishes both at the same time. We 
define the unequalized version as the primary preservation object and the equalized version 
as an optimized stand-in for the Preservation Master File. 
To further our skills in playing field discs, and to develop a specific playback and transfer 
methodology, IU consulted with disc expert Eric Jacobs of The Audio Archive.
47
From Jacobs 
we learned procedures for using a microscope as a diagnostic tool, both for examining 
problems on discs and to aid in the selection of a stylus.
48
We also acquired procedures for 
turntable setup. In addition, Jacobs provided us with techniques for cleaning lacquer discs, 
including a cleaning solution that he developed based on researching existing mixtures used 
in sound archives. 
Here are the basic procedures used to transfer discs at Indiana:
A. Assessment
Identify disc coating and base materials.
1. 
Evaluate the condition of the disc. Cotton gloves are worn when handling lacquer 
2. 
discs in particular as acidic fingerprints can cause imprints in the nitrocellulose, 
leading to increased noise and local chemical reactions.
Decide whether cleaning is appropriate to the condition of the disc and the materials 
3. 
it is made of.
Decide whether to transfer first, then clean, or vice-versa. It the disc is showing 
4. 
47 The Audio Archive. http://www.theaudioarchive.com/.
48 The microscope is a used, rebuilt Nikon SMZ-2B stereo microscope with WF 15x eyepieces focus block, a 
boom stand, 10mm/100 div scale reticle, new 2X SMZ Aux lens, new 21v 150w fiber optic illuminator, new 
annular ring light guide, calibration certification for scope, metric stage micrometer 1mm/100Div for checking 
reticle. It was purchased from Bi Optic. www.biopticinc.com.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C#.NET Project DLLs for Conversion from Images to PDF in C#.NET Program. C# Example: Convert More than Two Type Images to PDF in C#.NET Application.
copy and paste image from pdf; copy and paste images from pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#
copy image from pdf; copy paste image pdf
27
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
signs of deterioration it will be transferred first, then cleaned (if possible) and re-
transferred.
B. Cleaning
Discs are cleaned and rinsed by hand using brushes obtained from the Disc Doctor, 
1. 
then rinsed and vacuumed dry using a Keith Monks record cleaning machine. Discs 
may be rinsed twice on the record cleaning machine, especially lacquers with 
significant palmitic acid on the disc surface, to eliminate any remaining contaminants 
as well as cleaning solution residue.
Each disc size and surface material has its own set of brushes for cleaning.
2. 
Lacquer (nitrocellulose laminate) discs are cleaned using a solution that is 0.25 
3. 
parts Tergitol 15-S-3, 0.25 parts Tergitol 15-S-9, 98.5 parts deionized water, and 
1 part clear ammonia. The ammonia is an optional palmitic acid solvent used on 
lacquers only. The advantage of the ammonia is that it minimizes the amount of 
mechanical scrubbing required to remove palmitic acid as well as minimizes the 
amount of exposure of the laminate to water, as water can cause the laminate to 
swell and delaminate. Discs with a compromised lacquer layer (i.e. cracks or signs of 
delamination) should not be cleaned with an aqueous solution as this will accelerate 
delamination.
Lacquer discs receive a final rinse with a solution that is 99.75 parts deionized water and 
4. 
0.25 parts Disc Doctor solution. The Disc Doctor solution is used to lower the surface 
tension, allowing water to push down into the grooves for more thorough rinsing.  
Aluminum discs are sometimes cleaned with Isopropyl alcohol applied with lint-free 
5. 
Kimwipes. This is not very effective in our experience, but we have not yet found 
anything more effective.
C. Turntable Setup
The following alignments are done for each disc or for each collection of discs depending on 
the variations within a collection.
Height adjustment or vertical tracking angle (VTA): The tonearm assembly (tonearm, 
1. 
cartridge, and stylus) is placed near the center of the disc in playback position. The 
height of the tonearm at the pivot is then adjusted so that the tonearm is parallel to 
the disc surface from the cartridge to the outside edge of the disc. This adjustment 
results in the stylus being perpendicular to the disc surface for optimal frequency 
response and minimal distortion.
Longitudinal balance and vertical tracking force (VTF): It is important to begin 
2. 
with a neutral longitudinal balance before setting tracking force. This is achieved 
by moving the rider weight to the null position and adjusting the main balance 
weight along the tone-arm extension until the arm floats just above bare contact 
with the disc. Once balance is achieved we set the tracking force to around 
2.5 to 3.5 grams. This is just a starting position and may change once we listen 
to the playback. We have found that too little tracking force can affect the 
sound quality and too much tracking force can cause damage to softer surface 
materials. Also, too much VTF can compress the dynamics of the audio signal. 
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
NET component for batch converting tiff images to PDF RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. Please copy the following C#.NET demo code to have a quick evaluation of our XDoc
paste picture pdf; copy image from pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Professional .NET library and Visual C# source code for creating high resolution images from PDF in C#.NET class. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
copy pdf picture to powerpoint; how to copy pictures from a pdf to word
28
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
Anti-skate: The anti-skate is set equal to the amount of vertical tracking force used. 
3. 
3.5 grams of tracking force will result in a setting of 3.5 for anti-skate. If there are 
skips or other tracking problems with the disc the anti-skate may be set lower (to help 
move the stylus forward) or higher (to help hold the stylus back) than the tracking 
force. The angle of the anti-skate thread is set to a 90° angle at the outer groove of the 
disc on the Technics SP-15 turntable. Note that the skating force is greater at the outer 
grooves than the inner groove due to the fact that the groove velocity is higher at the 
outer grooves, so there is more friction force (which generates the later anti-skating 
force). Setting the anti-skate thread at a 90° angle at the outer groove maximizes the 
anti-skate force where it is most needed.
Horizontal alignment (Zenith): The next step is measuring the horizontal tracking 
4. 
angle (HTA) and selecting an alignment curve that minimizes distortion The specific  
horizontal tracking angle controls the distortion profile created from tracking angle 
errors that result from the various alignment curves that place the null points—or points 
of no distortion—in various places on the disc. We use the Baerwald alignment curve 
because it distributes the tracking distortion equally over the entire disc (whereas the 
Lofgren alignment minimizes tracking distortion in the middle groove region at the 
expense of higher distortion at the inner and outer grooves)
Horizontal alignment is 
calculated by measuring the distance from the spindle to the innermost groove and 
the spindle and the outermost groove. A tool developed by Eric Jacobs enables us 
to determine from these measurements the proper distance from the spindle to the 
tonearm pivot for the best Baerwald Alignment, yielding the least amount of total 
distortion.
49
Cartridge azimuth: We adjust the cartridge azimuth by placing a small mirror on the 
5. 
turntable and resting the stylus on it. When viewed in this way any departure from 
vertical is accented and easily visible. If any discrepancy is perceived we adjust until 
proper azimuth is achieved.
D. Preamp Setup
All discs are recorded stereo into Preservation Master Files, making use of a stereo 
1. 
cartridge to capture the signal from both groove walls. For mono discs, the signal 
is converted to mono in a Production Master File, providing some intrinsic noise 
reduction as the recorded signal is doubled while noise that exists in only one 
channel is not. 
For noise reduction to be maximized when converting to mono, both groove walls 
2. 
must be recorded at exactly the same level. Levels are matched by placing the KAB 
preamp in mono, engaging the vertical switch, and adjusting the balance for the least 
amount of audible program material. This technique makes use of the fact that in 
vertical mode the left and right channels are placed 180° out of phase. This channel 
balancing is done for each disc, after which the preamp is switched back to stereo 
and lateral for transfer.
49 For further information see embedded PDF file from: Michael Fremer, 21st Century Vinyl: Michael Fremer’s 
Practical Guide to Turntable Set-Up (DVD. Musicangle.com, 2006). PDF file is also available online at: 
http://www.musicdirect.com/products/featured/img/FREMER/VFREMERSETUPDVD/21stCenturyVinyl.pdf
29
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
E. Groove Examination
Disc grooves are inspected using a microscope with a built-in reticle to help determine 
1. 
proper stylus size and to identify potential tracking problems such as collapsed groove 
walls and cross-cut grooves. In addition, the use of the microscope can identify 
sources of groove noise due to groove wear as well as sources of playback distortion 
due to a poor pressing or worn stamper, thus setting expectations for the quality of 
the source material and ultimately the transfer. 
The distance between the top of the groove walls and the distance between the 
2. 
bottom of the groove walls is measured in micrometers (also known as microns or 
1/1000 mm). The resulting numbers are entered into a stylus calculator designed 
by Eric Jacobs, which provides a stylus size that will fit perfectly into the grooves. 
Although we always listen to different styli, we find that this calculation quickly 
places us close to or at the best stylus size, minimizing the number of times we 
must play sections of the disc. It is, however, important to note that an over- or 
undersized stylus sometimes yields better results for discs that have suffered groove 
wall damage. 
F. Tracking Problems
Engineers who transfer discs all have their own bag of tricks for dealing with skips or other 
tracking problems. A few that we have found useful include
adding more, or less, anti-skate to counter-balance the direction that the stylus jumps 
 
from a skip; 
using more, or less, tracking force to keep the stylus in the grooves. One convenient 
 
way to do this that we learned from Jacobs is to temporarily place small M5 washers 
that weigh about 0.25 gram each on the headshell. This enables the engineer to hear 
the effect of extra force quickly and to keep working rather than stopping and adjusting 
the VTF using the counterweight at the rear of the arm. Once the best tracking force is 
determined, the washers are counted and removed, and the appropriate adjustment is 
made to the VTF counterweight. The washers are not used to actually apply the extra 
force if it appears they might resonate or rattle during the transfer; 
guiding the head shell with a hand or fingers may help to keep the stylus in the 
 
grooves;
using a horsehair brush (a soft two-inch paint brush) to apply gentle pressure to the 
 
headshell. Sometimes the tonearm can be better controlled by applying pressure to 
the rear of the tonearm (at the counterweight) rather than at the headshell. Frequently, 
this method is the only way to get through a heavily damaged disc;
employing a viscous damping trough (if the tonearm has this option). The trough can 
 
limit dynamics subtly on the one hand, but can also make some transfers of damaged 
discs more consistent and easier.
The microscope allows us to see problems on the disc close-up and, with experience, make 
an educated guess as to what technique(s) is likely to work best.
2.2.3.3 Playback Problems
The only difficult, persistent preservation problem encountered so far at Indiana in the playback 
of open reel tapes is severe squealing on Scotch 175-brand tapes. Degradation of magnetic 
tape is complex and not yet well understood, sometimes requiring multiple procedures to 
30
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
render a tape playable. This squealing was not accompanied by significant shedding and 
did not appear to be classic Sticky Shed Syndrome for which there is a temporary remedy—
baking—available. For many years, preservation engineers believed that squealing without 
shedding was basically caused by a loss of lubricant from the tape. However, recent work by 
Richard Hess in consultation with a group of scientists, audio engineers, and tape specialists, 
has demonstrated that what has been termed loss of lubricant in open reel tapes is likely 
caused by a number of factors not yet completely understood. His work also suggests that the 
mechanism by which baking (also called incubation) renders a Sticky Shed Syndrome tape 
playable has also been misunderstood. Hess has proposed a new category using the term 
Soft Binder Syndrome (SBS) for all polyester-backed tapes that exhibit sticking, squealing, 
and abnormal shedding.
50
Hess further theorizes that the degradation process results in the 
lowering of the tape’s glass transition temperature to below room temperature, and that 
playback in cold conditions (below this reduced temperature) might stop squealing. We 
tested Hess’ theory by acclimating one Scotch 175 tape from the Henry Glassie collection 
along with a playback machine to the 50° F, 30% RH climate at the IU Auxiliary Library 
Facility (ALF). First attempts to transfer this tape failed. We then used a freezer at ALF, and 
acclimated the tape to 38° F, 24% RH. This was ultimately successful, but only after one 
failed attempt and an additional 24 hours of storage in these cold conditions.
Indiana has encountered a number of cassettes that would not play and, in all but two cases, 
re-housing the tape into a new outer shell solved the problem. One tape for which re-housing 
did not work was twisted and reversed in a number of places so that the back of the tape 
mistakenly made contact with the playback head. In addition, the tape pack had loosened so 
much that it could no longer wind to the end because it would not fit. We were able to work 
through this tape slowly, opening the shell and straightening it out as necessary, transferring 
all but the last five minutes of the second side, which were unplayable. This process took a 
full day. Fortunately, the last five minutes were available on a backup open reel tape copy 
that was recorded before the cassette original had deteriorated to this extent. The second 
cassette, from the same collection, was suffering from a similar problem although somewhat 
worse. We could have invested an estimated two days in capturing as much content from 
it as possible. Instead, the ATM Director and Archivist, after examining the nature of the 
content on the tape, recommended that we transfer the backup open reel in its place. 
At Harvard, we encountered many playback problems during the process of digitizing a 
collection of R-DAT field recordings dating from 1992 to 2004. The most challenging problem 
was misalignment of the field recorder. To remedy this we selected the worst examples of 
mis-tracking tapes, and sent the field recorder with them to be “de-aligned” to match those 
tapes in hopes of a successful transfer. This resulted in a slight increase of successful transfers. 
However, some tracking errors could not be eliminated. In addition, we discovered mis-
tracking due to speed changes during start and stop of the field recorder at the time of 
recording. We were unable to compensate for these tracking errors. Further tracking errors 
occurred during playback due to poor head-to-tape contact—perhaps from curling, damage 
or poor storage. We found that acclimating the tape in the R-DAT player for at least twenty 
to thirty minutes, increased our success rate. This led us to believe that R-DAT head-to-tape 
contact is improved by the higher temperatures of the interior of the playback machine. Other 
errors encountered were due to tape damage and loss of oxide. We found no correlation 
between tape errors and age or brand of tape.
50 Richard L. Hess, “Tape Degradation Factors and Predicting Tape Life” (paper presented at the 121st AES 
Convention, San Francisco, Calif., October 5-8, 2006).  
31
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
2.2.4 Conversion
2.2.4.1 Best Practices 
Because analog-to-digital conversion is covered in the works cited above, this topic is 
another in which we agreed to report on our choices and practices, rather than research best 
practices. For specific recommendations, see IASA-TC 04 and the article by Ken Pohlmann, 
published by CLIR.
2.2.4.2  Analog-to-Digital  and  Digital-to-Analog  Conversion  at  Harvard  and 
Indiana
At Harvard, the choice of a Prism AD-2 analog-to-digital converter and a DA-2 digital-to-
analog converter was based upon the accuracy of the conversion and the usefulness of 
the feature set. The converter pair’s apparent accuracy when comparing the pre-conversion 
and post-conversion signal was a significant factor in our decision, but chief among useful 
features that influenced the purchase were the multiple digital inputs and outputs and, in 
the case of the AD-2, the ability to adjust input sensitivity from -28 dBFS to 0 dBFS. Multiple 
digital outputs provide a simultaneous source for recording and real time signal analysis. 
An adjustable input sensitivity can compensate for low-level recordings without adding 
undue amounts of noise that might occur if a previous gain stage were pushed significantly 
past its optimal range. Additionally, the AD-2’s input balance can be adjusted in steps of 
one one-hundredth dB. The DA-2 is switchable among its multiple digital inputs and allows 
monitoring of multiple signals without the engineer having to change connections. The Prism 
AD-2 and DA-2 reduce setup time and make our workflow more efficient than would a more 
limited design converter pair.
Indiana currently uses two-channel Benchmark ADC1 and DAC1 converters for preservation 
transfer work and is very satisfied with their functionality and performance. We began the 
project with converters from another company that did not consistently function properly as 
described in the section on quality control in Chapter 7, but switched to the Benchmarks. 
The ADC1 features two stages of gain, the first stage with three selectable levels that are 
optimized for signal to noise performance, and the second stage that uses either a 41-detent 
potentiometer or a continuously variable, 10-turn gain range calibration trimmer for finer 
input gain adjustments. It also features multiple digital outputs and, although we don’t 
currently use it, the ability to simultaneously output multiple sample rates and bit depths.
Engineers at both institutions have found that our converters typically do not seem to perform 
best near 0 dBFS but have a sweet spot that is significantly lower where they simply sound 
better. With 24 bit recording there is plenty of dynamic range available so that levels can be 
set lower without penalty and there is no need to drive the converter at high levels. Therefore 
we do not try to set levels so that peaks are just below 0dBFS.
Sample rate and word length is another area in which the Sound Directions project did not 
propose to recommend best practices but to report on our choices. Both the ATM and HCL-
APS now digitize analog sources as PCM audio at 96 kHz sample frequency and 24 bit word 
length. This seems the best compromise among coding format, file size and audio fidelity. 
We say compromise because we realize that choosing a coding, a sample frequency and a 
word length is a limiting choice in an ever-changing landscape of audio formats and tools. 
At this time, the wide support for PCM audio at this resolution should ensure that our digital 
objects have a fairly long life before migration to the next form becomes necessary. 
32
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
For digital-to-digital transfer and digital file conversion, Harvard neither re-samples nor up-
samples tape-based and file-based digital audio objects to a higher resolution for preservation. 
We retain the original audio object’s resolution. We transfer tape-based digital audio objects 
such as DAT, by routing the DAT’s AES/EBU digital audio signal through our Prism AD-2 in 
Digital-to-Digital mode using the incoming digital audio as the synchronization master for 
the AD-2, and then to our Pyramix DAW that gets its synchronization from the incoming 
signal. The Pyramix project’s sample rate and word depth match those of the incoming audio. 
During the transfer we watch for error indications on the AD-2 as well as monitoring the 
SpectraFoo analysis. We import file-based digital audio objects directly into Pyramix in their 
original form if possible. If the original file is not supported in Pyramix, we convert the file 
to Broadcast Wave at the original sample rate and word length, and import that BWF into 
Pyramix.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested