upload pdf file in asp.net c# : Paste jpg into pdf preview software SDK dll winforms windows .net web forms sd_bp_075-part978

43
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
<bext> chunk fields
Field
Use
Example Data
Description
owner supplied 
name
(filename from 
originating unit)
AWM_RL_0001_AM_01_01
Originator
originating DAW
PyramixOne
OriginatorReference
USID
CHMTIPYRAMIX16934153213745780579
OriginationDate
file creation date
(yyyy-mm-dd)
2007-01-10
(Although OriginationDate and 
OriginationTime are stored separately 
in the <bext> chunk, our tools display 
date & time as one field labeled 
OriginationDateTime.)
OriginationTime
file creation time
(hh-mm-ss)
15-32-13
(Although OriginationDate and 
OriginationTime are stored separately 
in the <bext> chunk, our tools display 
date & time as one field labeled 
OriginationDateTime.)
TimeReference
1st sample count 
since midnight
2374
Version
version of BWF
Our DAW produces version 0
Our tools produce version 1 (current 
version)
The version difference is in the SMPTE 
UMID that we do not use, and for which 
we write all zeros
UMID
Unique Material 
Identifier
Supported by our tools but not currently 
used
CodingHistory
ASCII strings 
describing coding 
process applied to 
the audio data
Supported by our tools but not currently 
used
Table 5: Harvard <bext> chunk fields
Paste jpg into pdf preview - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy an image from a pdf in preview; how to copy an image from a pdf in
Paste jpg into pdf preview - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
pdf cut and paste image; how to copy image from pdf to word document
44
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
3.2.1.6 Institutional Comparison of <bext> Chunk Field Use
contrasting uses of <bext> chunk fields
Field
HCL-APS Use
IU ATM Use
Description
owner supplied name
Collection ID, Source Object ID, File 
Use, IUCAT Title Control Number, 
Original Filename
Originator
originating DAW
originating institution
OriginatorReference
USID
not used
OriginationDate
file creation date
(Although 
OriginationDate and 
OriginationTime are 
stored separately in the 
<bext> chunk, our tools 
display date & time 
as one field labeled 
OriginationDateTime.)
file creation date
OriginationTime
file creation time
(Although 
OriginationDate and 
OriginationTime are 
stored separately in the 
<bext> chunk, our tools 
display date & time 
as one field labeled 
OriginationDateTime.)
Not used
TimeReference
1st sample count since 
midnight
1st sample count since midnight
Version
version of BWF
version of BWF
UMID
supported in tools but not 
currently used
not used
CodingHistory
supported in tools but not 
currently used
used to describe the digitization of 
analog recordings
Table 6: Harvard and Indiana <bext> chunk fields
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview
how to copy pdf image to word document; how to cut a picture out of a pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif Ability to put image into specified PDF page position and component supports inserting image to PDF in preview
paste image into pdf in preview; how to paste a picture into pdf
45
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
3.2.2 Digital File Types and Uses for Preservation
3.2.2.1 Best Practices
Best Practice 10: Clearly define the purpose(s) of every digital file surrogate created for 
preservation or access. This metadata must be preserved so that files are managed in a way 
that is appropriate to their defined role and value in the archive.
Best Practice 11: Develop specific, written guidelines on the characteristics of primary 
preservation surrogates, and the procedures used to produce them, within the context of the 
institution’s workflow.
Best Practice 12: Develop written guidelines on handling both technical and content edits.
3.2.2.2 Rationale
Preservation (or Archival) Master Files contain the most authentic and highest-quality 
representation of the original or source recording to be carried into the future. For this reason, 
their production and use must be specifically defined and tightly controlled. Likewise, the 
creation of other types of preservation or access files must be defined and controlled to 
assure that the target content is accurately presented to end users. 
3.2.2.3 File Types and Uses at Indiana
3.2.2.3.1 Background
Our aim in this area was to add specificity and detail to the international standards discussed 
in the preservation overview above by defining such notions as “unmodified,” “without 
subjective alteration,” and “historical accuracy” within the context of daily preservation 
transfer work, and all of the anomalies and problems that it presents. Towards this goal, 
Indiana University developed the definition of Preservation Master Files presented below.
3.2.2.3.2 Preservation Master Files
The ATM calls its first, and primary, digital file produced from the transfer process a Preservation 
Master File. We define this file type as containing complete, unaltered data from the source 
audio object exactly as reproduced by the playback machine. It functions as a carrier of the 
raw material from the transfer. This file (or its ADL) establishes the reference timeline if there 
is no Preservation Master–Intermediate file (see below). A Preservation Master File is always 
produced during preservation transfer projects. 
A Preservation Master File
contains a complete, unaltered stream from the playback machine. This stream begins 
 
when the field recording machine is placed in record and ends when it is taken out of 
record;
is produced without data reduction (either lossless or lossy compression); 
 
is produced without any equalization other than that inherent in the playback 
 
machine (NAB or IEC1 equalization on an open reel tape machine, for example. Disc 
equalization is a special case considered below);
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support various formats image deletion, such as Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other bitmap images. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file.
copy picture from pdf reader; copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET in Visual Studio, such as Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif
copy a picture from pdf; how to copy and paste an image from a pdf
46
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
is not signal processed, contains no gain or level changes (including normalizing) or 
 
dithering in the digital domain;
contains no added spoken announcements or slates. This type of information is handled 
 
by metadata in the BWF <bext> chunk and in our metadata system;
is recorded at a high resolution and high sampling rate—24 bit/96 kHz;  
 
is a Broadcast Wave file with metadata contained in the BWF <bext> chunk; 
 
is created by an audio preservation engineer in a studio designed for preservation 
 
transfer work.
Here is how we handle some specific issues and problems that emerge during transfer:
If there is unrecorded silence in the middle of the source recording, with content 
 
beginning again afterwards, this is retained in the Preservation Master File to accurately 
represent the source recording
Unrecorded tape after the end of content, when the field recording machine has clearly 
 
been taken out of record, is not retained. Unrecorded tape at the beginning of content, 
before the field recording machine was placed in record, is not retained
Signal level from the playback machine and into the computer is never adjusted 
 
during 
the transfer in order to preserve the source recording’s dynamic range in the digital 
file. The exception is when discrete, unrelated performances are recorded onto the 
source, separated by the turning on and then off of the recording machine. In this case, 
recording levels may be adjusted to maximize the signal to noise ratio of each discrete 
performance
Discs requiring a playback equalization curve are transferred both with and without the 
 
curve at the same time in one pass, and both files are preserved to maintain maximum 
flexibility into the future. The file produced from the unequalized transfer becomes the 
Preservation Master, while the equalized version is defined as a Preservation Master–
Intermediate (see below)
The Preservation Master File is defined as the primary object produced by the preservation 
transfer project. 
3.2.2.3.3 Preservation Master–Intermediate Files
The ATM at IU defines a Preservation Master –Intermediate File as a faithful representation 
of the source object, optimized with a type of post-processing that does not lead to the 
substantive loss of any content. Although it is not the raw material from the transfer, it is a 
valid stand-in for the Preservation Master. It represents some stringently-defined decisions 
and provides a file type that may be used in ways that the Preservation Master cannot because 
of the strict way in which it is defined. This file type is created only when necessary and 
represents one important step towards a more user-friendly presentation of the content.
A Preservation Master–Intermediate File
may carry “technical” edits that solve technical problems from the transfer. For example, 
 
skips and other tracking problems on a disc may be edited out only if it does not lead 
to loss of content or loss of ability to interpret content;
does not contain any edits other than technical edits described above;
 
may include the application of a disc playback equalization curve;
 
is never signal processed (denoised, for example) other than the disc eq curve;
 
contains the content from one Preservation Master File, that is, a Preservation Master–
 
Intermediate is created for each individual Preservation Master File; 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif doc = PDFDocument.Create(2); // Save the new created PDF document into file doc
copy image from pdf reader; copy and paste image into pdf
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
how to copy pdf image; how to copy and paste a pdf image
47
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
is the same bit depth and sample rate as the Preservation Master File;
 
always establishes the reference timeline to which further derivatives, including 
 
Production Masters, are created. This file type is often used in situations where the 
timeline from the Preservation Master cannot easily be carried forward as described 
below; 
is a Broadcast Wave Format file with metadata contained in the <bext> chunk.
 
For example, a Preservation Master–Intermediate File is created when a disc has a locked 
groove in the middle that prevents the stylus from moving forward. The listener hears the same 
word(s) repeated any number of times until the transfer engineer is able to move the stylus 
forward by hand. Similarly, a number of stylus drops may be necessary at the beginning of a 
disc to get it started. These technical problems are addressed by editing in the Preservation 
Master–Intermediate File. This alters the timeline from the Preservation Master; therefore, the 
reference timeline is established by the Intermediate. Similarly, re-pitching part of a file to 
make content understandable will result in an altered timeline and is accomplished using a 
Preservation Master–Intermediate File.
Edits are not made if content will be lost, or if the edit changes the aural context in such a 
way as to make the content unclear. Sometimes a skip alerts the listener to a problem on the 
disc and makes it clear that the loss of a word was due to disc problems, not engineer error. 
For example, a skip forward resulting in a loss of content may be impossible to fix due to 
groove problems. Removing such a skip results in a jarring jump from one part of the content 
to another with nothing to indicate why it happened. In cases like this, the skip is not edited 
out.
Bands on the disc or the entire disc side may be topped and tailed as necessary to edit out 
repeated needle drops at the start of the disc or repeated content at the end due to a locked 
groove. Some disc noise is left in the file during the topping and tailing process for use by 
signal processing algorithms. This noise is left at the tail as a first choice, if possible, but may 
also be left at the head. 
Authenticity of the final product depends somewhat on the skill and judgment of the audio 
engineer, although the “raw” Preservation Master File is always kept in addition to the 
Preservation Master–Intermediate.
Preservation Master–Intermediate Files are also created when a disc requires a playback 
equalization curve. In this case, a single transfer produces both an unequalized Preservation 
Master and an equalized Preservation Master–Intermediate.
3.2.2.3.3.1 Rationale for the Preservation Master–Intermediate File Type
The word intermediate can be defined as situated between two points, stages, or things. In 
our case, the Preservation Master–Intermediate is a proxy for the Preservation Master File, 
representing a step towards the creation of a Production Master File (described below) that is 
then used to produce all further derivatives, especially deliverables.
We have chosen not to perform these technical edits in either Preservation Master or 
Production Master Files for a number of reasons:
Preservation Masters are strictly defined as the unaltered material from the transfer 
 
and we do not wish to loosen or expand this definition 
Production Masters may be signal processed to provide a further optimized version 
 
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
paste picture to pdf; how to copy text from pdf image to word
C# Word - Insert Image to Word Page in C#.NET
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET the reference RasterEdge.XImage.Raster. dll into your project. image = new REImage(@"C:\logo2.jpg"); page.AddImage
how to copy images from pdf to word; how to copy pictures from pdf to word
48
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
for end users. Signal processing tools grow in their capabilities each year, and we fully 
expect to re-create some Production Masters for this and other reasons over time. If 
these types of technical edits were made in Production Masters they would be lost 
and need to be re-done 
It is also possible to carry technical edits in an ADL so that the Preservation Master 
 
is left intact, but this requires software that can efficiently separate the file around 
each edit point, and then render in place multiple files while adjusting the time 
stamp. WaveLab does not do this easily or efficiently. Additional software with this 
capability is expensive; hence our use of an alternative that affords some flexibility 
in this area.
69
Note that in response to this problem, Harvard developed a tool called 
“adlconsolidate” that will be available as part of the Sound Directions Toolkit.  
A workflow using a Preservation Master–Intermediate File type still adheres to the key 
principle of providing a common reference (or destination) timeline for all manifestations of 
the recorded work. Timelines are discussed in Chapter 4, section 4.2.3.4.1.2. The Preservation 
Master–Intermediate is a valid stand-in for the Preservation Master, and the reference timeline 
extends from it forward through all downstream derivatives. We do not anticipate reasons 
to return to the Preservation Master itself except in the rarest of cases, but it is retained as 
verification of an accurate preservation transfer process.
3.2.2.3.4 Production Master Files
Production Master is a term historically used in the audio, video, and film industries to refer 
to an object that provides a source for the production of further copies. At Indiana University, 
a Production Master File is used to generate all further derivatives, particularly deliverables 
that will be used by researchers. A Production Master is a representation of the source audio 
object that is optimized as determined by the ATM Archivist and the ATM Associate Director 
for Recording Services. This optimization may include (rarely) editing of the content and/or 
signal processing. When an optimized representation is not necessary—when the Preservation 
Master Files are considered sufficient for the creation of deliverables—a Production Master 
that is a clone of the Preservation Master is produced. 
A Production Master File
contains the content of one “Face” (for example, one side of a disc or one track on a 
 
tape) of a source recording. If multiple Preservation Master Files were created during 
transfer of one Face of an analog recording, these files will be edited together into one 
Production Master;
may have either the same or different bit depth, sample rate, and number of channels
 
70
as the Preservation Master File depending on end use and production workflow;
may be edited as directed by the ATM Archivist and/or ATM Director; 
 
may be signal processed using procedures established by the Associate Director for 
 
Recording Services;
is a BWF file with metadata in the <bext> chunk;
 
may exist in different versions. For example, a 24/96 and a 16/44.1 Production Master 
 
may be produced at different times to satisfy production and/or workflow demands.
If transfer of a source audio object results in multiple Preservation Master Files for one 
Face, the Production Master File will carry the complete, combined content of this Face for 
69 Steinberg’s Nuendo will do all of this more efficiently. As of this writing, the price to academic institutions is 
$1,000.
70 Mono field discs, for example, are often transferred stereo for technical reasons but presented to end users in 
mono.
C# Excel - Convert Excel to JPEG in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
copy picture from pdf to word; how to copy pdf image into word
49
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
seamless presentation to the end user. The edits necessary to combine the files are carried by 
an AES31-3 ADL, allowing the Preservation Master Files to remain intact.
Edits in a Production Master File are based on content issues with decisions made at the 
curatorial level. Content deemed unquestionably irrelevant for research use or designated as 
restricted by the collector are examples of what may be removed from a Production Master. 
Underlying Preservation Master Files that contain complete, unaltered content are always 
retained.
71
Production Masters may be signal processed for increased clarity and understandability, or 
for easier listening, following guidelines that outline a signal processing aesthetic for research 
use. Underlying Preservation Master Files that contain unaltered sound are always retained.
The ATM generates Production Masters for all preserved content for the following reasons:
1. To limit handling of the Preservation Master Files to rare cases where a new Production 
Master must be created. At Indiana University, deliverables are produced by the Digital 
Library Program, not the ATM. This means that someone outside of the content-generating 
unit works with the files. While we fully trust the DLP it makes sense structurally, over time, 
to have this safeguard in place for both ATM and DLP staff 
2. So that no analysis is needed when accessing files to produce deliverables—the procedure 
is simply to find the Production Master. If we chose to create this file type for only some 
purposes—to retain the work of signal processing, for example—it would be necessary to 
first search for this file then, if not found, look for a Preservation Master-Intermediate. If 
this file was not found then the search would continue for a Preservation Master for use in 
producing deliverables
3. To provide flexibility in accessing content. Production Masters can be stored somewhere 
other than deep preservation storage in a location that provides quicker and easier access. 
This is important to the ATM, which receives a steady stream of orders that are currently filled 
by burning CDs.
All Production Master Files are currently created at high resolutions and sample rates—
24/96—to facilitate delivery of high resolution files to end users, which we think is likely in 
the future.
The main disadvantage of generating Production Masters for all content is an automatic 
doubling of storage space. This is not an issue at Indiana University, at least at this time. With 
71 Note that content editing may be handled successfully in several ways and at several levels. One strategy is to 
keep restricted content in a Production Master and let a downstream access system exclude the material using 
metadata. For example, a SMIL file could be used with the Production Master (or a deliverable file) to point to 
only the content that may be played. With this approach, restricted content does not need to be edited out of 
a source file since SMIL will simply not point to the restricted areas. Another approach is to replace restricted 
material in a Production Master with silence. This has the advantage of physically removing the material while 
also signaling its removal, all the while maintaining the reference timeline so that the Production Master is still in-
sync with the Preservation Master. The need for editing based on content restrictions was not encountered at IU 
during the project, although we are sure that it will be necessary at some point given the nature of our collections. 
Therefore, we have not actually researched either of these procedures. We do have a number of issues in this area 
that we will consider, including: the general principle that restricted content should stay as close to ATM control 
as possible, the possibility that someone could hack the SMIL format and gain access to restricted material, the 
feasibility of supporting the SMIL format at IU into the future, and the possibility that access for certain content 
may be possible only for the community that created it. This is a decision that will ultimately be made by ATM and 
DLP staff together, and it is possible that we will implement multiple procedures.  
50
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
storage costs steadily decreasing, and audio files relatively small compared to other audio-
visual formats such as video or data from scientific experiments, we don’t think that this will 
be an issue for many institutions in the foreseeable future.
3.2.2.3.5 Deliverables
Online access to ATM content will be provided by the IU Digital Library Program through 
an access system developed or modified to handle field collections. This system does not 
yet exist, although preliminary work to define its functionality is underway as part of an 
internally-funded grant project. In addition, the focus of Phase 1 of Sound Directions at Indiana 
University is preservation. For these reasons we are not currently generating derivatives for 
use in either a campus- or web-based access system. We anticipate, however, the automated 
production of deliverables from Production Masters at the appropriate time. 
3.2.2.4 File Types and Uses at Harvard
When we speak of file types, we are referring to the audio file in either BWF or RealAudio, 
keeping in mind that these files are merely the raw audio assets (source files) for their respective 
interpreting documents such as an AES31-3 ADL in the case of BWF or a SMIL file in the case 
of a RealAudio asset. We use five preservation file types at the Archive of World Music: pre-
archival, Archival Master, pre-production, Production Master, and Delivery Master.
3.2.2.4.1 pre-archival
The pre-archival file is the result of AES31-3 export from the DAW digitization project of the 
original audio object, in which the files from the digitization are created and their time stamp 
is adjusted in the appropriate relation to midnight,
72
or the zero point or zero hour, in the 
project timeline, by editing and rendering in place. The pre-archival file naming convention 
is identical to that of the Archival Master File—as the pre-archival is a temporary file used 
for preparing the Archival Master so that no further operations on the Archival are necessary 
once it is created. The pre-archival is not deposited in the Digital Repository.
3.2.2.4.2 Archival Master
The Archival Master is the BWF file or set of files that, together with the AES31-3 ADL, 
comprise the unadulterated digital surrogate of the source audio object for preservation. 
The Archival Master is the source-file part of the result of our software script “makearchival” 
operation on the pre-archival AES31 export. Once created, the Archival Master is untouched 
by manual operations. We use the abbreviation “AM” for Archival Master. For example: 
AWM_RL_0001_AM_01_01
3.2.2.4.3 pre-production
The pre-production is the first intermediary file in the creation of deliverables. It is the file 
whose purpose is de-noising and file consolidation prior to making the Production Master. 
The pre-production naming convention remains the same as the Archival Master again 
because it is temporary and not deposited.
72 The term “midnight” refers to the fact that many nonlinear editing systems have an unlimited timeline that could 
span more than one day including negative time before the zero point, or normal project start point—midnight 
being the zero point where positive time begins.
51
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
3.2.2.4.4 Production Master
The Production Master is the second and potentially permanent intermediary file for the 
purpose of creating a deliverable. In most cases the Production Master is deposited and 
kept indefinitely, although as a Production Master it can be remade to suit different delivery 
purposes. Since in our current workflow we need only make a single delivery file per Face, 
and that delivery file can be repurposed by creating additional SMIL navigation documents, 
the Production Master can remain in the repository until such time that it becomes obsolete. 
The Production Master is the stage at which sample rate conversion happens. It is the result 
of our software script “makeproduction” operation on the pre-production project. Again, this 
file is not altered by any manual operations once created. We use the abbreviation “PM” for 
Production Master. For example: AWM_RL_0001_PM_01_01
3.2.2.4.5 Delivery Master
The Delivery Master is the source file we use for patron access to the audio content. It is 
the result of encoding the sample rate converted Production Master into RealAudio through 
the action of the “makedeliverable” script. Its interpreting and navigational document is 
the SMIL file accessed via an assigned URN in the online catalog. We use the abbreviation 
“DM” for Delivery Master. For example: AWM_RL_0001_DM_01_01
52
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
3.2.3 Local Filenames
3.2.3.1 Best Practices
These best practices refer to locally-generated filenames that are human-readable and carry 
meaning:
Best Practice 13: Use ASCII letters (a-z), ASCII digits (0-9), underscores and hyphens, and be 
aware of the implications of using any other characters in filenames.
Best Practice 14: Do not use diacritic marks or any non-printing characters.
Best Practice 15:  Reserve the period (full stop) for the file extension at the end of the 
filename.
Best Practice 16: Do not use values in file elements that might change over time.
Best Practice 17: The first element should identify the unit that created the file.
Best Practice 18: Make filename elements more detailed and/or specific as they are read 
from left to right.
Best Practice 19: Identifiers used in the filename should correspond to those used with 
physical objects and in existing catalogs.
Best Practice 20: Include a sequence indicator in the filename.
Best Practice 21: For derivative files, use the same name as the master file with the addition 
of an element that indicates the derivative’s type.
3.2.3.2 Rationale
The details of local filenames are necessarily institution-specific, and while we believe 
that the models presented below may be helpful to many organizations, they will not 
be applicable to everyone. For this reason we have issued a list of general practices that 
are recommended for maximum interoperability and ease of use for filenames that carry 
meaning. This list incorporates both best practices reported by other organizations and those 
from our own experience. Both Sound Directions institutions use file-naming conventions 
that clearly identify preservation files, their relation to the catalog, and their respective roles 
in the workflow, but we differ in the extent of detail that we include in filenames. These 
conventions are offered in this document only as examples of what we have found useful in 
our workflows, and not as prescriptions for successful preservation. Note that both institutions 
have external metadata systems that store content information included in filenames.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested