upload pdf file in asp.net c# : How to cut a picture from a pdf document Library control API .net azure windows sharepoint sd_bp_076-part979

53
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
3.2.3.3 Filenames at the IU Archives of Traditional Music
3.2.3.3.1 Background
The Archives of Traditional Music generates filenames that carry content and are human-
readable. While metadata is available for all files, we find that the convenience of meaningful 
filenames makes it simpler and quicker to manage folders and directories of files as the 
content and use of any given file can be determined at a glance. This is especially true when 
filling orders for ATM collections when only particular types of files—signal processed, for 
example—are needed. Indiana University does not yet have a fully functioning preservation 
repository and we do not know how ingestion into our future repository will affect our use 
of filenames.
The ATM worked with the IU Digital Library Program to update and refine its naming scheme 
while the DLP was also creating preservation repository requirements for filenames. This 
process yielded a number of recommendations.
73
Here are basic guidelines that we used 
that encourage maximum interoperability and efficient use over time and that appear to have 
general agreement in the field:
74
Keep filenames as short as possible
 
Include only alphanumeric characters plus the special characters underscore, hyphen, 
 
and period (before the file extension only)
Use lowercase letters
 
Do not use spaces
 
Do not use any values that might change over time
 
Do  not duplicate other names used in the same organization
 
If carrying meaning in names, and if there is an existing catalog, use numbers/letters 
 
that match what is already cataloged
We also made use of these more specific recommendations:
The first character of the filename should be an ASCII letter as many programming 
 
and metadata languages place this restriction on their identifiers. Filenames should be 
usable as identifiers in these languages (e.g., section ID’s in a METS document)
The use of camelCase (first word starts with lower case, second word begins with 
 
upper case) for adjacent words to increase readability is acceptable, if necessary
While periods are permissible in filenames, it is 
 
highly recommended that they be 
avoided in the base of the name. A period is used to separate the base name from the 
extension that specifies the type of file. Some programs assume that there is only a 
single period in a filename, and will behave strangely if multiple periods are present 
Filename elements should indicate more specific detail as they are read from left to 
 
right as alphabetical listings of files in a directory or folder are more easily understood 
with this organization
Elements of the filename should be separated by either hyphens or underscores for 
 
73 See Indiana University, Digital Library Program, “Filename Requirements for Digital Objects, Indiana 
University Digital Library Program,” Indiana University (2 November 2006),  
http://wiki.dlib.indiana.edu/confluence/display/INF/Filename+Requirements+for+Digital+Objects for many of 
these.
74 See, for example: Online Computer Library Center, Research Libraries Group, “Recommendations for 
Digitizing for RLG Cultural Materials” (2006), http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=220; UCSD Libraries, 
Digital Library Program, “A Naming Protocol for Digital Content Files” (10 February 2006),  
http://tpot.ucsd.edu/Cataloging/MASU/naming%20protocol.pdf; and Indiana University, DLP, “Filename 
Requirements.” 
How to cut a picture from a pdf document - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to cut a picture from a pdf document; copy images from pdf file
How to cut a picture from a pdf document - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
pasting image into pdf; how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint
54
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
readability and automated processing. It may be easier for later parsing to avoid mixing 
the two 
The first element in the filename should identify the unit that produced the file to easily 
 
identify it in a digital library setting that includes files from many organizations
When possible, the digital object’s “primary” identifier (the identifier appearing in the 
 
filenames) should correspond to an identifier in use for the original (physical) object. 
This makes it easy to match files with physical objects without the need to refer to 
metadata
If the transfer of a physical object resulted in multiple files, the filename must include 
 
a sequence number
Dates used in filenames should follow the ISO 8601 standard (yyyy-mm-dd). Among 
 
other benefits, this allows file directory listings to be sorted into correct chronological 
order 
A derivative file must have the same name as the master file, except the “base” filename 
 
should have an indication of the derivative’s type appended. This will make it easy to 
identify master-derivative relationships. Derivative files may or may not be a different 
file type, with a different extension, than the master file
3.2.3.3.2 General ATM Filename Form
The general form for Indiana University ATM filenames is:
unit_collectionID_sourceObjectID_physicalSequenceIndicator_fileUse_
signalProcessingFlag_date.fileExtension
Where:
unit 
 
= atm
collectionID
 
= shortened ATM accession number
sourceObjectID 
 
= ATM shelf number
physicalSequenceIndicator
 
= identification of what part of the source recording is 
represented by the file
fileUse
 
= the role that the file plays within the unit. 
signalProcessingFlag
 
= identification that the file was signal processed
date 
 
= year, month, day using the ISO 8601 standard 
fileExtension
 
= extension that identifies the type of file, automatically placed at the end 
by software
3.2.3.3.3 ATM Filename Elements
Unit: atm_
All Archives of Traditional Music filenames begin with “atm” followed by an underscore. 
This identifies the derivation of the file within a larger digital library setting and increases the 
chances of a globally unique name.
collectionID: atm_86507_
Collections are identified at the ATM through accession numbers that serve as their primary 
identifier. Filenames contain a shortened version of the accession number, dropping the 
hyphens and last letter. For example, accession number 86-507-F (the 507
th
collection 
accessioned in 1986—the “F” designates a field collection) becomes 86507 in a filename.
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; library SDK allows developers to cut out certain com is professional provider of document, content and
how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word; how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
NET image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF document file page
how to copy images from pdf file; cut and paste pdf image
55
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
sourceObjectID: atm_86507_ot4214_
Each physical recording receives a unique identifier called a shelf number by which it is 
stored on a shelf in the ATM vault. Filenames contain a version of the shelf number with a 
lower case prefix and no spaces. Some of our shelf numbers contain the symbol for inches 
(“) which is replaced with a lowercase letter n in the filename.
physicalSequenceIndicator: atm_86507_ot4214_020101_
The  digitization  of  one  analog  recording  often results  in  multiple  digital  files. The 
physicalSequenceIndicator documents the relationship of the digital file to the analog source 
recording, notating what portion of the source recording is included in the digital file. This 
enables multiple files for one source to be sequenced, based on their relationships to the 
physical, analog recording. 
For  Preservation  Master  and  Preservation  Master–Intermediate  files,  the  physical-
SequenceIndicator always consists of a series of three, two-digit numbers with a leading 
zero (if necessary). The first number indicates which Face of the source analog recording is 
represented in the file. A Face is a group of one or more streams (audio channels or tracks) 
that are meant to be played synchronously, such as one direction of a tape or one side of a 
disc. 
The second number in the physicalSequenceIndicator documents which Region of the source 
analog recording is represented in the file. Faces may be divided into Regions if necessary, 
each characterized by a change in a basic characteristic of the format within the Face. If 
a tape is recorded at 15 ips but switches to 7.5 ips for its remainder, then the Face would 
contain two Regions, one for each tape speed. A Face must have at least one Region, by 
definition. 
Faces may also be divided into Parts, if necessary, and the third number indicates which 
Part of the Face or Region is represented in the file. A Part is created when a transfer must 
be stopped for reasons other than a change in format, resuming in a second digital file that 
is labeled Part 2. For example, a physical problem with a tape may necessitate stopping the 
transfer to fix the problem, resuming again in a second digital file. 
Note that Regions are created (conceptually) on analog sources while Parts refer to digital 
files. Parts may be created at either the Face or Region level as needed.
The physicalSequenceIndicator always consists of just one number for Production Master Files, 
which contain the content from one complete Face, by definition. Therefore, designations for 
Region and Part are omitted from these filenames. 
Examples:
010101
 
= contains content from Face 1, Region 1, Part 1 of the source recording. There 
may or may not be a Face 2, Region 2, or Part 2
020101 
 
= Face 2, Region 1, Part 1. There must also be a file containing Face 1
010201
 
= Face 1, Region 2, Part 1. There must also be a file containing Face 1, Region 
1
 02  = Face 2. By definition, this means that all of the content from Face 2 is included, 
regardless of the number of Regions and Parts
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
VB.NET image cropping application to cut out an VB.NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to paste a picture into a pdf document; how to copy pictures from a pdf to word
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo to remove a specific image from PDF document page. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF
paste image into pdf acrobat; copy image from pdf acrobat
56
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
fileUse: atm_86507_ot4214_020101_pres_
This element identifies the assigned use or role of the file within the ATM.
Examples:
pres
 
: This string is used for a Preservation Master File 
presInt
 
: This string is used for a Preservation Master –Intermediate File
prod
 
: This string is used for a Production Master File. A Production Master File always 
includes two numbers within this element that indicate bit depth and sample rate. For 
example, prod2496 = a 24 bit, 96K Production Master 
signalProcessingFlag:  atm_86507_ot4214_02_prod2496_sproc
Although our metadata system will supply this information, it is very useful to see at a glance 
which files have been signal processed as we often choose these to fill orders. The word sproc 
is added between the fileUse and date elements if a file is signal processed (in a Production 
Master), however, this element is absent if the file is flat or unaltered.
75
date: atm_86507_ot4214_020101_pres_20070925
The date that the file was created is included in the date element using the ISO 8601 standard 
without hyphens to avoid mixing hyphens with underscores in our filenames. 
fileExtension: atm_86507_ot4214_020101_pres_20070925.wav
The file extension is the (usually) three letter code automatically placed at the end of a filename by 
software. This extension is NOT added into the filename by ATM workers. All of our preservation 
files are currently in the Broadcast Wave Format, which uses the .wav extension. 
3.2.3.3.4 ATM Filename Examples
Preservation Master Files
Audio file: atm_67934_ot290_010101_pres_20060915.wav
This is a Preservation Master File of source OT 290 from collection 67-934-F. This file 
contains the content from Face 1 (direction or track 1 of the tape), Region 1, Part 1. The file 
was created Sept 15, 2006.
Related ADL file: atm_67934_ot290_010101_pres_20060915.adl
Preservation Master–Intermediate Files
atm_54323_10n348_020101_presInt_20061121.wav
This is a Preservation Master–Intermediate File for 10” disc number 348 from collection 54-
323-F. This file contains the content from Face 2 (side B of the disc), Region 1, Part 1. The file 
75 Note that we do not consider dithering as signal processing within this context as it is a basic engineering 
practice—always done when appropriate—and does not need to be indicated in a filename. Note also that a 
playback equalization curve applied to a file is also not considered signal processing in this sense. Both of these 
examples, which technically qualify as signal processing, are tracked through metadata.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
how to copy and paste image from pdf to word; copy paste picture pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo or all image objects from PDF document in .NET
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; how to cut image from pdf file
57
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
was created November 21, 2006.
Production Master Files
atm_85553_cass458_02_prod2496_20060423.wav
This is a 24 bit, 96 kHz Production Master File from cassette 458 from collection 85-553-F, 
containing all of the content for Face 2 (side B of cassette). The file was created April 23, 
2006.
Signal processed files
atm_54673_10n3467_02_prod2496_sproc_20070224.wav
3.2.3.4 Filenames at Harvard
We view filenames as temporary conveniences that should be used for their benefit as 
human readable, curatorially-derived identifiers. It is helpful, and we feel it is essential in the 
workflow, to have a standard naming convention, and to stick to that convention in order to 
avoid confusion. 
Our naming convention for preservation objects is derived from the catalog or shelf number 
and denotes the following:
creating unit name abbreviation such as AWM for Archive of World Music
 
original object type such as RL for reel
 
shelf number such as 0001
 
volume number such as V
 
n when the shelf number pertains to more than one item, 
where V=volume, and n=the item number
additional specifier such as S
 
n when the volume contains more than one item, where 
S=the media type such as T for Tape or D for Disc, etc., and n=the item number
preservation file type or role such as   AM for Archival Master,
 
PM for Production Master,
DM for Delivery Master
incrementing Face number such as 01 for side 1
 
incrementing file number such as 01 for the first file in the timeline
 
In addition, the local filename may include a pseudo-random unique identifier created by 
the originating DAW.
Example: AWM_DAT_139_AM_01_01_{BB4BB2F2-A64C-4AAA-8B2C-D34506FDF7E7}
Note: The above example is from a single item R-DAT, and so has neither volume nor 
additional specifier in its filename.
As an example of the fleeting nature of preservation filenames, the above-mentioned file’s 
assigned Object ID in the Digital Repository Service (DRS) is 6459098, and if one were to 
download the file from the repository, it would be labeled 6459098.wav. Since we store the 
original name in the <bext> chunk description field, examination of that field would reveal 
the name as AWM_DAT_139_AM_01_01_{BB4BB2F2-A64C-4AAA-8B2C-D34506FDF7E7}. 
In addition, examination of the metadata for the file in the DRS would reveal the same 
filename (called “owner supplied name” by the DRS). The original filename and file path are 
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
After getting an image / picture / photo with image capturing device, in RasterEdge.com is professional provider of document, content and imaging solutions
copy pdf picture to word; how to copy picture from pdf file
58
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
stored as separate metadata in both the DRS and the METS Archival Information Package. We 
could have chosen any name for the file. The preservation of that file does not depend upon 
the form of the filename. Only the uniqueness of the object ID is significant where there are 
robust external systems for handling metadata.
3.2.4 File Data Integrity
3.2.4.1 Best Practices
Best Practice 22: Generate a checksum for every file that has enduring value. This includes 
both audio and non-audio files created during the preservation process. 
Best Practice 23: Generate a checksum as soon as possible after a file is created—usually 
after basic work with the file is completed.
Best Practice 24: Consider the checksum value critical technical metadata. Store the value in 
the system used for other technical metadata, with backup copies kept in multiple physical 
locations.
Best Practice 25: Verify the checksum before trusting any file that has been moved, copied, 
or had its header edited.
3.2.4.2 Rationale
As discussed in the overview, the integrity of every file created for preservation must be 
verified over time. Generating the checksum soon after a file is created provides a baseline in 
case there are problems during the preservation workflow, or during storage or transmission. 
In order to ensure that checksum values remain available in the face of system failures or 
other disasters, we should avoid susceptibility to a single point of failure. For example, the 
repository might be structured to store checksums within the deposit package as well as on 
a separate file system for metadata storage, with backup copies kept in multiple physical 
locations. The integrity of files in long-term preservation storage must be verified regularly. 
3.2.4.3 Background   
Both Sound Directions institutions experienced problems related to  either checksum 
generation or verification that proved instructive.
The ATM experienced one case of failed checksum verification in an audio file that we 
believe was caused by correcting BWF metadata and forgetting to generate a new checksum. 
To confirm that the audio was not compromised we compared the file with a version on 
another hard drive using the audio file compare process in WaveLab. We also reversed 
the phase in one file and compared it to the other to check for differences. The process of 
verifying this audio data would have been far simpler had a chunk-specific checksum (as 
produced by a Harvard tool described below) been available for the audio data only.
In the initial implementation of Harvard’s SAN at the Archive of World Music, the SAN 
software used a file system translation utility to allow Windows and Macintosh to read 
from and write to a single file system. During the production of RealAudio deliverables, 
the translation utility caused file corruption to the SAN volumes that manifested as spurious 
59
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
audio appearing in the deliverable files when tested. This discovery was made before a 
checksum had been generated for the files. Had we not tested the files, and then generated 
a checksum, the resulting corrupted files would have been validated—even though they 
were corrupt. It is important to generate a checksum as soon as possible after the basic work 
is completed. However, it is also important to verify the quality of the file that you wish to 
validate before you run a checksum. This experience confirmed our belief in the importance 
of quality control, and led us to adopt a split file system on our SAN—thereby eliminating 
the translation utility at the cost of the increased labor of a split file system.
3.2.4.4 Redundancy Checks at Harvard and Indiana 
Both IU and Harvard use the MD5 hash algorithm (a type of “checksum”) for verifying data 
integrity of every file. This algorithm was chosen because it is widely used in the digital 
library community and there are many tools available that support it. Although we have 
some concern about malicious behavior, we do not feel that a completely secure encryption 
algorithm is as necessary in our environments as it might be in other fields. We also reason 
that malicious action would likely render the content of the files themselves unusable since 
they would be the primary target.
The technical metadata collection software used at each institution generates an MD5 digest 
that is stored with other technical metadata, which is placed in preservation packages and 
stored in our preservation repositories.
In general practice an MD5 is calculated for a file using the entire contents of the file. In the 
case of the Broadcast Wave Format, metadata in the <bext> chunk of the file may be edited 
later either by hand or using a script as a normal part of the preservation workflow. When 
this happens, the originally generated MD5 no longer matches the edited file—even if the 
audio data portion of the BWF file remains perfectly intact—and there is no way to verify 
that the audio data is unchanged. Therefore, using a simple MD5 as a means of verifying data 
integrity throughout a production process such as this is impossible. An alternative approach 
developed at Harvard is to generate an MD5 on only the sound data portion of the BWF, and 
use that message digest as a means to verify that the audio payload of the file is unchanged 
even after the metadata in the header has been edited. Our “bwavinfo” software tool’s “-md5” 
function will validate only the audio payload portion of BWF files whose metadata has been 
purposely edited during the preservation workflow. Using an audio chunk-specific checksum 
may also aid the verification of data integrity into the future, revealing problems created 
through programming mistakes or as files are handled within a preservation repository.
Indiana uses a Windows software program called FastSum to verify its MD5 values.
76
Our 
technical metadata collector will generate, but not yet verify, these values. FastSum is available 
as both shareware and freeware and supports several different user interfaces. 
76 FastSum. http://www.fastsum.com/.
60
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
4.1 Preservation Overview 
M
etadata provides the framework for digital audio preservation and thus forms an 
essential component of the virtual object. More specifically, various kinds of metadata 
document the identity of a recording such as its title and call number, the performer’s name 
or the occasion of the performance, the format of the original recording and how the original 
was played back. Other forms of metadata document the kinds of digital copies produced [i.e. 
Archival Master, de-noised Production Master, streaming Delivery Master], where the digital 
files are stored, the relationships between the object’s virtual and original manifestations and, 
importantly, how the digital files were made. All of this information is critical to our ability 
to find what we have in the first place, and in the long run to automatically migrate it to the 
digital file formats of the future. The significant amount of time spent collecting accurate 
metadata is never wasted. Effectively, there is no preservation without metadata. Fortunately, 
some of the software developed by Sound Directions automates the collection of this data, 
thus saving time and limiting the opportunity for human error.
The categories of metadata discussed below include descriptive, structural and administrative— 
with administrative further divided into its subcategories: technical, rights management, and 
digital provenance. There are other names that are used in place of or in addition to these. 
For example, the term “preservation metadata” is used, notably by the PREMIS project, to 
refer to any metadata that “a repository uses to support the digital preservation process.”  
PREMIS’ preservation metadata may include data elements from each of the categories listed 
above.
77
Curators will perhaps be most familiar with descriptive metadata which is, in effect, cataloging 
information: the content of the object, the names of performers and producers, the subjects of 
the recording, and the recording’s key component parts. Access and property rights metadata 
enable us to govern who may listen to a file. For instance, may the general public listen, only 
those with a particular password, or only the staff of the institution? This is where the specifics 
of rights information for use of the recording may be spelled out. Technical metadata records 
characteristics of the original formats of the recordings such as playback speed, track format, 
or playback equalization. Structural metadata can define relationships among a group of 
digital audio files. If, for instance, a single performance occupies four reels of tape and both 
Archival Masters and deliverable audio files have been made of the entire performance, the 
structural metadata will link the files to each other and to descriptions of the physical items 
so that it is clear at a glance what one has and what belongs with what.
Digital provenance metadata, often called process history or abbreviated as digiprov, describes 
in detail the entire preservation process from the analog or digital transfer and conversion, 
to the digital repository deposit. This information is essential if we are to manage files and 
migrate them automatically in years to come. Message digest information, sometimes referred 
to as a checksum, is also vital, and is used by programs to check for file errors that would 
indicate that refreshing or reversion is needed. Potentially, metadata can be used to identify 
and group like digital objects for the purpose of uniformly treating them in a future mass data 
77 Preservation Metadata: Implementation Strategies (PREMIS), Data Dictionary for Preservation Metadata: Final 
Report of the PREMIS Working Group (Dublin, OH: OCLC and RLG, 2005), ix. Also available online: 
http://www.oclc.org/research/projects/pmwg/premis-final.pdf
4 Metadata
61
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
migration. In order to capitalize on labor-saving processes of the future, information about 
what we have done to create these files should be recorded now.
A metadata creation workflow in an audio archive must match appropriately trained 
individuals with the task at hand. Curators and content specialists play critical roles in 
the construction of metadata. It is generally they who provide cataloging or descriptive 
metadata, of course, but they may also provide valuable information in determining where 
the performance boundaries reside within a recording. Similarly, it is the engineers and 
technologists who have the knowledge necessary to document the technical characteristics 
of the original recording, the resulting digital files, and the processes used to transform one to 
the other. Subject-matter experts and technologists must collaborate to ensure that structural 
metadata faithfully represents the original object. Essentially, the archival tasks of sorting and 
ordering physical objects move into a virtual arena and object-based workflows must be 
adjusted to accommodate the new considerations.
Further, the rubrics (titles, call numbers, filenames and so forth) used by engineers and 
technologists ideally should correspond to those that appear in print catalog records or 
finding aids. In a perfect world, automated software tools would harvest descriptive metadata 
from online cataloging or finding aids to insure that all information about a single recording 
“matches.”  This work will always require close communication between curators and 
technologists to establish clear understandings of preservation values and expectations.
4.2 Recommended Technical Practices
4.2.1 Best Practices
Best Practice 26: Validate all generated metadata against the schema of a published standard, 
or against a copy of a locally agreed upon schema.
Best Practice 27: Generate valid audio object (technical) metadata for all physical and digital 
audio objects in the preservation workflow.
Best Practice 28: Generate valid digital provenance (process history) metadata that describes 
each process event in the preservation workflow.
Best Practice 29: If a transfer must be stopped and restarted, resume in a new digital file that 
contains overlaps in content. Use an AES31-3 ADL to document the edits needed to present 
seamless audio as originally recorded on the source audio object.
Best Practice 30: Maintain a common timeline that references the Preservation (Archival) 
Master and all further file manifestations of the content.
4.2.2 Rationale
Without metadata, digital audio preservation is not possible. We might have a collection 
of digital audio files as a result of an archival transfer, but unless those files possess just 
one of the metadata fields of a Broadcast Wave file, the time stamp, there is no way to 
accurately determine the files’ relationships in time. Without the structural metadata of an 
Audio Decision List (ADL), we cannot be certain of the transitions between the files. Without 
62
Sound Directions    
Best Practices For Audio Preservation
technical metadata about the files we cannot easily migrate them. Without information about 
how they were created and by whom, there is no way to judge what we have. We can make 
the highest quality transfers, with the finest equipment available, but unless we record and 
maintain the requisite metadata, essentially all we have is a bunch of files with an uncertain 
past and an even less certain future.
4.2.3 Background
The table below shows the different categories of metadata, and gives examples of each. For 
the purposes of this document we will refer to each individual subcategory of administrative 
metadata separately—keeping in mind their greater role.
Descriptive Metadata
Cataloging data encoded in MARC or MODS
Administrative - Rights Management 
Metadata
Rights management metadata governs access to files. (The 
Sound Directions project did not address this topic.)
Administrative - Technical Metadata
Tape  Speed,  Oxide  Coating,  Groove Width, Sample 
Rate, Word Length, Coding, Noise Reduction, Condition 
Comments
Administrative - Digital Provenance 
Metadata
Process History (digiprov) for: archival transfer, sample 
rate conversion, de-noising or any DSP event, deliverable 
creation
Structural Metadata
AES31-3 Archival ADL, Audio Object Face, Region & 
Stream, BWF Time Stamp, PQ Marks, SMIL document, 
METS document (in its role documenting relationships 
using its <structMap>)
Table 7: Categories of metadata
4.2.3.1 Descriptive Metadata
Descriptive metadata is dedicated to curatorial information, rather than technical. This data 
identifies the object and its performances in a collections and patron research-centered 
manner. While it is clear that descriptive metadata plays an important role in the preservation 
process, the development of best practices for descriptive metadata was considered outside 
the scope of this phase of the Sound Directions project. Both IU and Harvard have existing 
descriptive metadata creation workflows for field audio. The best practices developed during 
this project phase therefore focus on technical, structural, and digital provenance metadata.
4.2.3.2 Technical Metadata  
Technical metadata describes the immediate technical attributes of a physical or file-based 
audio object including specifications that enable access to the content. Both Harvard and 
Indiana implemented the technical metadata standard emerging from the Audio Engineering 
Society’s AES SC-03-06 Working Group, labeled AES-X098-B in its draft form. This as-yet-
unreleased standard provides the vocabulary for describing analog audio formats, physical 
digital audio formats and file-based digital audio formats. This vocabulary takes the form of 
an XML schema. It also provides for the collection of a specific type of structural metadata as 
described below along with minimal descriptive metadata. This schema provides for the collection 
of technical metadata in a number of broad categories, including, but not limited to 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested