upload pdf file in asp.net c# : How to copy text from pdf image Library software class asp.net winforms html ajax sec131-part987

denaturant is from PSA/PSM, Table 1, data for renewable
fuels and oxygenate plant net production of conventional
motor gasoline and motor gasoline blending components,
multiplied by -1.    
Fuel  Ethanol  Feedstock.    EIA  used  corn  input  to  the
production  of  undenatured  ethanol  (million  Btu  corn  per
barrel  undenatured  ethanol)  as  the  annual  factor  to
estimate total biomass inputs to the production of undena-
tured ethanol.   EIA used the following  observed ethanol
yields (in gallons undenatured ethanol per bushel of corn)
from U.S. Department of Agriculture:  2.5 in 1980, 2.666
in 1998, 2.68 in 2002; and from University of Illinois at
Chicago,  Energy  Resources  Center,  “2012  Corn
Ethanol:    Emerging  Plant  Energy  and  Environmental
Technologies”:    2.78  in  2008,  and  2.82  in  2012.  EIA
estimated  the  ethanol  yields  in  other  years.    EIA  also
assumed  that  corn  has  a  gross  heat  content  of  0.392
million Btu per bushel.
Approximate  Heat  Content  of  Natural
Gas
Natural  Gas  Consumption,  Electric  Power  Sector.
Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat content of
natural gas  consumed by the  electric power sector  by the
quantity  consumed.      Data  are    from  Form  EIA-923,
“Power Plant Operations Report,” and predecessor forms.
Natural Gas Consumption, End-Use Sectors. Calculated
annually by EIA by dividing the heat content of natural gas
consumed by the end-use sectors (residential, commercial,
industrial,  and  transportation)  by  the  quantity  consumed.
Data  are from Form EIA-176, “Annual Report of Natural
and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition.”
Natural  Gas  Consumption,  Total.    •  1949–1962:    EIA
adopted  the  thermal  conversion  factor  of  1,035  Btu  per
cubic foot as estimated  by  the Bureau  of Mines and first
published in the Petroleum Statement, Annual, 1956.
•  1963–1979:  EIA  adopted the thermal  conversion  factor
calculated annually by the American Gas Association (AGA)
and published in Gas Facts, an AGA annual publication.
• 1980 forward: Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the
total  heat  content  of  natural  gas  consumed  by  the  total
quantity consumed.
Natural Gas Exports.  • 1949–1972:  Assumed by EIA to
be equal to the thermal conversion factor for dry natural gas
consumed (see Natural Gas Consumption, Total).  • 1973
forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat
content  of  natural  gas exported  by  the  quantity  exported.
For  1973–1995,  data  are  from  Form  FPC-14,  “Annual
Report for Importers and Exporters of Natural Gas.” Begin-
ning  in  1996,  data  are  from  U.S.  Department  of  Energy,
Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports.
Natural Gas Imports.  • 1949–1972:  Assumed by EIA to
be equal to the thermal conversion factor for dry natural
gas consumed (see Natural Gas Consumption, Total).
• 1973 forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing
the  heat  content  of  natural  gas  imported  by  the  quantity
imported.  For  1973–1995,  data  are  from  Form  FPC-14,
“Annual  Report  for  Importers  and  Exporters  of  Natural
Gas.” Beginning in 1996, data are from U.S. Department of
Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and
Exports.
Natural  Gas  Production,  Dry.  Assumed  by  EIA  to  be
equal  to the thermal  conversion  factor for dry natural gas
consumed. See Natural Gas Consumption, Total.
Natural Gas Production, Marketed. Calculated annually
by  EIA  by  dividing  the  heat  content  of  dry  natural  gas
produced (see Natural Gas Production, Dry) and natural
gas  plant  liquids  produced  (see  Natural  Gas  Plant
Liquids  Production)  by  the  total  quantity  of  marketed
natural gas produced.
Approximate Heat Content of Coal and
Coal Coke
Coal Coke Imports and Exports. EIA adopted the Bureau
of Mines estimate of 24.800 million Btu per short ton.
Coal  Consumption,  Electric  Power  Sector.  Calculated
annually  by  EIA  by  dividing  the  heat  content  of  coal
consumed  by  the  electric  power  sector  by  the  quantity
consumed.  Data  are  from Form EIA-923, “Power Plant
Operations Report,” and predecessor forms.
Coal Consumption, Industrial Sector, Coke Plants. 
•  1949–2011:    Calculated  annually by  EIA  based on  the
reported volatility (low, medium, or high) of coal received
by coke plants. (For 2011, EIA used the following volatility
factors, in million Btu per short ton:  low volatile—26.680;
medium  volatile—27.506;  and  high  volatile—25.652.)
Data are from Form EIA-5, “Quarterly Coal Consumption
and Quality Report—Coke Plants,” and predecessor forms.
• 2012 forward:   Calculated annually by EIA by dividing
the  heat  content  of  coal  received  by  coke  plants  by  the
quantity received.  Data are from Form EIA-5, “Quarterly
Coal Consumption and Quality Report—Coke Plants.”
Coal Consumption, Industrial Sector, Other.  
• 1949–2007:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the
heat content of coal received by manufacturing plants by
the  quantity  received.  Data  are  from  Form  EIA-3,
“Quarterly  Coal  Consumption  and  Quality  Report—
Manufacturing  Plants,”  and  predecessor  forms.    •  2008
forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat
content of coal received by manufacturing, gasification, and
liquefaction plants by the quantity received.  Data are from
Form  EIA-3,  “Quarterly  Coal  Consumption  and  Quality
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
197
How to copy text from pdf image - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy picture from pdf; copy images from pdf to powerpoint
How to copy text from pdf image - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste image into pdf; how to copy and paste image from pdf to word
Report—Manufacturing  and  Transformation/Processing
Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Users.”
Coal  Consumption,  Residential  and  Commercial
Sectors.  •  1949–1999:    Calculated  annually  by  EIA  by
dividing the heat content of coal received by the residential
and commercial sectors by the quantity received.  Data are
from Form EIA-6, “Coal  Distribution Report,” and prede-
cessor forms.   • 2000–2007:   Calculated annually by EIA
by dividing the heat content of coal consumed by commer-
cial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants by the quantity
consumed.    Data  are  from  Form  EIA-923,  “Power  Plant
Operations  Report,”  and  predecessor  forms.    •  2008
forward: Calculated  annually by EIA by dividing the heat
content  of  coal  received  by  commercial  and  institutional
users by the quantity received.  Data are from Form EIA-3,
“Quarterly 
Coal 
Consumption 
and 
Quality
Report—Manufacturing  and  Transformation/Processing
Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Users.”
Coal Consumption, Total. Calculated annually by EIA by
dividing  the  total  heat  content  of  coal  consumed  by  all
sectors by the total quantity consumed.
Coal Exports. • 1949–2011: Calculated annually by EIA
by dividing the heat content of steam coal and metallurgi-
cal coal exported by the quantity exported. Data are from
U.S.  Department  of  Commerce,  U.S.  Census  Bureau,
“Monthly Report EM 545,” and predecessor forms.  • 2012
forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat
content of steam coal and metallurgical coal exported by the
quantity exported.  The average heat content of steam coal
is derived from receipts data from Form EIA-3, “Quarterly
Coal Consumption and Quality Report—Manufacturing and
Transformation/Processing  Coal  Plants  and  Commercial
and Institutional Users,” and Form EIA-923, “Power Plant
Operations Report.”  The average heat content of metallur-
gical coal is derived from receipts data from Form EIA-5,
“Quarterly  Coal  Consumption  and  Quality  Report—Coke
Plants.”  Data for export quantities are from U.S. Department
of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau,  “Monthly Report EM
545.” 
Coal Imports.  • 1949–1963:  Calculated annually by EIA
by  dividing  the  heat  content  of  coal  imported  by  the
quantity  imported.    Data  are  from  U.S.  Department  of
Commerce,  U.S.  Census  Bureau,  “Monthly  Report  IM
145,” and predecessor forms.  • 1964–2011:  Assumed by
EIA to be 25.000 million Btu per short ton.  • 2012 forward:
Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat content of
coal  imported  (received)  by  the  quantity  imported
(received).    Data  are  from  Form  EIA-3,  “Quarterly  Coal
Consumption  and  Quality  Report—Manufacturing  and
Transformation/Processing Coal Plants and Commercial and
Institutional  Users”;  Form  EIA-5,  “Quarterly  Coal
Consumption and Quality Report—Coke Plants”; and Form
EIA-923, “Power Plant Operations Report.” 
Coal Production.  •  1949–2011:   Calculated annually  by
EIA  by  dividing  the  heat  content  of  domestic  coal
(excluding  waste coal)  received  by the  quantity received.
Data are from Form  EIA-3, “Quarterly Coal Consumption
and  Quality  Report—Manufacturing  and  Transformation/
Processing  Coal  Plants  and  Commercial  and  Institutional
Users”;  Form  EIA-5,  “Quarterly  Coal  Consumption  and
Quality Report—Coke Plants”; Form EIA-923, “Power Plant
Operations  Report”;  and  predecessor  forms.      •  2012
forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by dividing the heat
content  of  domestic  coal  (excluding  waste  coal)  received
and exported by the quantity received and exported.  Data
are  from  Form  EIA-3,  “Quarterly  Coal  Consumption  and
Quality 
Report—Manufacturing 
and
Transformation/Processing  Coal  Plants  and  Commercial
and  Institutional  Users”;  Form  EIA-5,  “Quarterly  Coal
Consumption  and  Quality  Report—Coke  Plants”;  Form
EIA-923, “Power Plant Operations Report”; U.S. Department
of  Commerce,  U.S.  Census  Bureau,  “Monthly  Report  EM
545”; and predecessor forms.
Waste Coal Supplied.  • 1989–2000:  Calculated annually
by EIA by dividing the heat content of waste coal consumed
by the quantity consumed.  Data are from Form EIA-860B,
“Annual Electric Generator Report—Nonutility,” and prede-
cessor form.  • 2001 forward:  Calculated by EIA by dividing
the heat content of waste coal received (or consumed) by the
quantity  received  (or  consumed).    Receipts  data  are  from
Form  EIA-3,  “Quarterly  Coal  Consumption  and  Quality
Report—Manufacturing and Transformation/Processing Coal
Plants and Commercial and Institutional Users,” and prede-
cessor  form.    Consumption  data  are  from  Form  EIA-923,
“Power Plant Operations Report,” and predecessor forms.  
Approximate Heat Rates for Electricity
Electricity Net Generation, Coal.  • 2001 forward:  Calcu-
lated annually by EIA  by using  fuel consumption and  net
generation  data  reported on Form  EIA-923,  “Power  Plant
Operations Report,” and predecessor forms.  The computa-
tion  includes  data  for  all  electric  utilities  and  electricity-
only independent power producers using anthracite, bitumi-
nous  coal,  subbituminous  coal,  lignite,  and  beginning  in
2002, waste coal and coal synfuel.
Electricity  Net  Generation,  Natural  Gas.    •  2001
forward:    Calculated  annually  by  EIA  by  using  fuel
consumption  and  net  generation  data  reported  on  Form
EIA-923, “Power Plant Operations Report,” and predeces-
sor  forms.   The  computation  includes  data  for  all  electric
utilities  and  electricity-only  independent  power  producers
using natural gas and supplemental gaseous fuels.
Electricity Net Generation, Noncombustible Renewable
Energy.    There  is  no  generally  accepted  practice  for
measuring  the  thermal  conversion  rates  for  power  plants
that  generate  electricity  from  hydro,  geothermal,  solar
thermal, photovoltaic, and wind energy sources.  Therefore,
EIA  calculates  a  rate  factor  that  is  equal  to  the  annual
average heat rate factor for fossil-fueled power plants in the
198
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
paste image in pdf preview; copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
how to cut image from pdf file; copy image from pdf preview
United States (see “Electricity Net Generation, Total Fossil
Fuels”).  By using that factor it is possible to evaluate fossil
fuel  requirements  for  replacing  those  sources  during
periods of interruption, such as droughts.
Electricity  Net  Generation,  Nuclear.    •  1957–1984:
Calculated  annually  by  dividing  the  total  heat  content
consumed  in  nuclear  generating  units  by  the  total  (net)
electricity  generated  by  nuclear  generating  units.  The  heat
content  and  electricity  generation  were  reported  on  Form
FERC-1, “Annual Report of Major Electric Utilities, Licen-
sees, and Others”; Form EIA-412, “Annual Report of Public
Electric  Utilities”;  and  predecessor  forms.  For  1982,  the
factors  were  published  in  EIA,  Historical  Plant  Cost  and
Annual  Production  Expenses  for  Selected  Electric  Plants
1982,  page  215.    For  1983  and  1984,  the  factors  were
published in EIA, Electric Plant Cost and Power Production
Expenses  1991,  Table  13.    •  1985  forward:
Calculated
annually  by  EIA  by using  the  heat  rate  data  reported  on
Form  EIA-860,  “Annual  Electric  Generator  Report,”  and
predecessor forms.
Electricity Net Generation, Petroleum.  • 2001 forward:  
Calculated annually by EIA by using fuel consumption and
net  generation  data  reported  on  Form  EIA-923,  “Power
Plant  Operations  Report,”  and  predecessor  forms.    The
computation  includes  data  for  all  electric  utilities  and
electricity-only  independent  power  producers  using  distillate
fuel oil, residual fuel oil,  jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke,
and waste oil.
Electricity Net Generation, Total Fossil Fuels.
• 1949–1955:  The weighted annual average heat rate for 
fossil-fueled  steam-electric  power  plants  in  the  United
States,  as  published  by  EIA  in  Thermal-Electric  Plant
Construction Cost and Annual Production Expenses—1981
and  Steam-Electric  Plant  Construction  Cost  and  Annual
Production Expenses—1978.  •
1956–1988:  The weighted
annual  average  heat  rate  for  fossil-fueled  steam-electric
power  plants
in  the  United  States,  as  published  in  EIA,
Electric Plant Cost and Power Production Expenses 1991,
Table  9.   
1989–2000:    Calculated  annually  by  EIA  by
using  heat  rate  data  reported  on  Form  EIA-860,  “Annual
Electric Generator Report,” and predecessor forms; and net
generation  data  reported  on  Form  EIA-759,  “Monthly
Power Plant Report.”  The computation includes data for all
electric utility steam-electric plants using fossil fuels.
• 2001 forward:  Calculated annually by EIA by using fuel
consumption  and  net  generation  data  reported  on  Form
EIA-923, “Power Plant Operations Report,” and predecessor
forms. The computation includes data for all electric utilities
and  electricity-only  independent  power  producers  using
coal, petroleum, natural gas, and other gases (blast furnace
gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases
derived from fossil fuels).
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
199
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. The
how to copy text from pdf image to word; how to copy an image from a pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
paste jpeg into pdf; cut and paste pdf images
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to copy images from pdf file; copying images from pdf files
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
Although it is feasible for users to extract text content from source PDF document file with a copy-and-paste method, it is time-consuming and
copy pictures from pdf to word; paste picture into pdf
Data presented in the Monthly Energy Review and in other
U.S.  Energy  Information  Administration  publications  are
expressed predominately in units that historically have been used
in the United States, such as British thermal units, barrels, cubic
feet, and short tons.  The metric conversion factors presented in
Table B1 can be used to calculate the metric-unit equivalents of
values expressed in  U.S. Customary  units.  For example, 500
short tons are the equivalent of 453.6 metric tons (500 short tons
x 0.9071847 metric tons/short ton = 453.6 metric tons).
In  the metric system of weights and measures, the names
of multiples and subdivisions of any unit may be derived
by combining the name of the unit with prefixes, such as
deka,  hecto,  and  kilo,  meaning,  respectively,  10,  100,
1,000,  and  deci,  centi,  and  milli,  meaning,  respectively,
one-tenth,  one-hundredth,  and  one-thousandth.    Common
metric prefixes can be found in Table B2.
The conversion factors presented in Table B3 can be used to
calculate  equivalents  in  various  physical  units  commonly
used  in  energy  analyses.    For  example,  10  barrels  are  the
equivalent  of  420  U.S.  gallons  (10  barrels  x  42
gallons/barrel = 420 gallons).
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
201
Appendix B
Metric Conversion Factors, Metric Prefixes, and Other Physical
Conversion Factors
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET can also help with this.
how to copy pictures from a pdf file; how to cut image from pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
how to copy images from pdf; pasting image into pdf
202
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
a
Exact conversion.
b
Calculated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.
c
The Btu used in this table is the International Table Btu adopted by the Fifth International Conference on Properties of Steam, London, 1956.
d
To convert degrees Fahrenheit (ºF) to degrees Celsius (ºC) exactly, subtract 32, then multiply by 5/9.
Notes:    Spaces have been inserted after every third digit to the right of the decimal for ease of reading.   •   Most metric units belong to the 
International System of Units (SI), and the liter, hectare, and metric ton are accepted for use with the SI units.  For more information about the SI
units, see http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/index.html.
Web Page:  http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices.
Sources:     General Services Administration, Federal Standard 376B, Preferred Metric Units for General Use by the Federal Government
(Washington, DC, January 1993), pp. 9-11, 13, and 16.   •   U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology,
Special Publications 330, 811, and 814.  •  American National Standards Institute/Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, ANSI/IEEE Std
268-1992, pp. 28 and 29. 
degrees Celsius (ºC)
100
a       
=
212 degrees Fahrenheit (ºF)     
degrees Celsius (ºC)
0
a       
=
32 degrees Fahrenheit (ºF)
Temperature
d
megajoules (MJ)
3.6
a
=
1 kilowatthour (kWh)
joules (J)
4.186 8
a
=
1 calorie (cal)
joules (J)
1,055.055 852 62
a
=
1 British thermal unit (Btu)
c
Energy
square centimeters (cm
2
)
6.451 6
a
=
1 square inch (in
2
)
square meters (m
2
)
0.092 903 04
a
=
1 square foot (ft
2
)
square meters (m
2
)
0.836 127 4
=
1 square yard (yd
2
)
square kilometers (km
2
)
2.589 988
=
1 square mile (mi
2
)
hectares (ha)
0.404 69
=
1 acre
Area
centimeters (cm)
2.54
a
=
1 inch (in)
meters (m)
0.304 8
a
=
1 foot (ft)
meters (m)
0.914 4
a
=
1 yard (yd)
kilometers (km)
1.609 344
a
=
1 mile (mi)
Length
milliliters (mL)
16.387 06
=
1 cubic inch (in
3
)
milliliters (mL)
29.573 53
=
1 ounce, fluid (fl oz)
liters (L)
3.785 412
=
1 U.S. gallon (gal)
cubic meters (m
3
)
0.028 316 85
=
1 cubic foot (ft
3
)
cubic meters (m
3
)
0.764 555
=
1 cubic yard (yd
3
)
cubic meters (m
3
)
0.158 987 3
=
1 barrel of oil (bbl)
Volume
grams (g)
28.349 52
=
1 ounce, avoirdupois (avdp oz)
kilograms uranium (kgU) 
0.384 647
b
=
1 pound uranium oxide (lb U
3
O
8
)
kilograms (kg)
0.453 592 37
a
=
1 pound (lb)
metric tons (t) 
1.016 047
=
1 long ton
metric tons (t)
0.907 184 7
=
1 short ton (2,000 lb)
Mass
Metric Units
Equivalent in 
U.S. Unit
Type of Unit
Table B1.  Metric Conversion Factors
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
203
a
Exact conversion.
b
Calculated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.
Web Page:  http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices.
Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Specifications, Tolerances, and Other Techni-
cal Requirements for Weighing and Measuring Devices, NIST Handbook 44, 1994 Edition (Washington, DC, October 1993), pp. B-10,
C-17,
and C-21.
cubic feet (ft
3
)
128
a
  
1 cord (cd)
shorts tons
1.25
b
  
1 cord (cd)
Wood
kilograms (kg)
1,000
a
  
1 metric ton (t)
pounds (lb)
2,240
a
  
1 long ton
pounds (lb)
2,000
a
  
1 short ton
Coal
U.S. gallons (gal)
42
a
  
1 barrel (bbl)
Petroleum
alent in Final Units                              
Equiv
Original Unit
Energy Source
Table B3. Other Physical Conversion Factors
Web Page: http ://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices.
Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, The International System of Units (SI), NIST
Special Publication 330, 1991 Edition (Washington, DC, August 1991), p.10.
y
yocto
10
-24
Y
yotta
10
24
z
zepto
10
-21
Z
zetta
10
21
a
atto
10
-18
E
exa
10
18
f
femto
10
-15
P
peta
10
15
p
pico
10
-12
T
tera
10
12
n
nano
10
-9
G
giga
10
9

micro
10
-6
M
mega
10
6
m
milli
10
-3
k
kilo
10
3
c
centi
10
-2
h
hecto
10
2
d
deci
10
-1
da
deka
10
1
Symbol
Prefix
Unit Subdivision
Symbol
Prefix
Unit Multiple
Table B2.  Metric Prefixes
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review April 2016
205
Appendix C
Table C1.  Population, U.S. Gross Domestic Product, and U.S. Gross Output
t
Population
U.S. Gross Domestic Product
U.S. Gross Outputa
United Statesb
World
United States
as Share of World
Billion
Nominal
Dollarsd
Billion
Chained (2009)
Dollarse
Implicit Price
Deflatorc
(2009 = 1.00000)
Billion
Nominal
Dollarsd
Million People
Percent
1950..............
.
152.3
2,557.6
6.0
300.2
2,184.0
0.13745
NA
1955..............
.
165.9
2,782.1
6.0
426.2
2,739.0
.15559
NA
1960..............
.
180.7
3,043.0
5.9
543.3
3,108.7
.17476
NA
1965..............
.
194.3
3,350.4
5.8
743.7
3,976.7
.18702
NA
1970..............
.
205.1
3,712.7
5.5
1,075.9
4,722.0
.22784
NA
1975..............
.
216.0
4,089.1
5.3
1,688.9
5,385.4
.31361
NA
1980..............
.
227.2
4,451.4
5.1
2,862.5
6,450.4
.44377
NA
1981..............
.
229.5
4,534.4
5.1
3,211.0
6,617.7
.48520
NA
1982..............
.
231.7
4,614.6
5.0
3,345.0
6,491.3
.51530
NA
1983..............
.
233.8
4,695.7
5.0
3,638.1
6,792.0
.53565
NA
1984..............
.
235.8
4,774.6
4.9
4,040.7
7,285.0
.55466
NA
1985..............
.
237.9
4,856.5
4.9
4,346.7
7,593.8
.57240
NA
1986..............
.
240.1
4,940.6
4.9
4,590.2
7,860.5
.58395
NA
1987..............
.
242.3
5,027.2
4.8
4,870.2
8,132.6
.59885
8,639.9
1988..............
.
244.5
5,114.6
4.8
5,252.6
8,474.5
.61982
9,359.5
1989..............
.
246.8
5,201.4
4.7
5,657.7
8,786.4
.64392
9,969.6
1990..............
.
249.6
5,289.0
4.7
5,979.6
8,955.0
.66773
10,511.1
1991..............
.
253.0
5,371.6
4.7
6,174.0
8,948.4
.68996
10,676.5
1992..............
.
256.5
5,456.1
4.7
6,539.3
9,266.6
.70569
11,242.4
1993..............
.
259.9
5,538.3
4.7
6,878.7
9,521.0
.72248
11,857.6
1994..............
.
263.1
5,618.7
4.7
7,308.8
9,905.4
.73785
12,647.2
1995..............
.
266.3
5,699.2
4.7
7,664.1
10,174.8
.75324
13,451.6
1996..............
.
269.4
5,779.4
4.7
8,100.2
10,561.0
.76699
14,259.9
1997..............
.
272.6
5,858.0
4.7
8,608.5
11,034.9
.78012
15,355.4
1998..............
.
275.9
5,935.2
4.6
9,089.2
11,525.9
.78859
16,171.3
1999..............
.
279.0
6,012.1
4.6
9,660.6
12,065.9
.80065
17,244.8
2000..............
.
282.2
6,088.6
4.6
10,284.8
12,559.7
.81887
18,564.6
2001..............
.
285.0
6,165.2
4.6
10,621.8
12,682.2
.83754
18,863.1
2002..............
.
287.6
6,242.0
4.6
10,977.5
12,908.8
.85039
19,175.0
2003..............
.
290.1
6,318.6
4.6
11,510.7
13,271.1
.86735
20,135.1
2004..............
.
292.8
6,395.7
4.6
12,274.9
13,773.5
.89120
21,697.3
2005..............
.
295.5
6,473.0
4.6
13,093.7
14,234.2
.91988
23,514.9
2006..............
.
298.4
6,551.3
4.6
13,855.9
14,613.8
.94814
24,888.0
2007..............
.
301.2
6,629.9
4.5
14,477.6
14,873.7
.97337
26,151.3
2008..............
.
304.1
6,709.0
4.5
14,718.6
14,830.4
.99246
26,825.7
2009..............
.
306.8
6,788.2
4.5
14,418.7
14,418.7
1.00000
24,657.2
2010..............
.
309.3
6,866.3
4.5
14,964.4
14,783.8
1.01221
26,093.5
2011..............
.
311.7
6,944.1
4.5
15,517.9
15,020.6
1.03311
27,536.0
2012..............
.
314.1
7,022.3
4.5
16,155.3
15,354.6
1.05214
28,703.8
2013..............
.
316.4
7,101.0
4.5
16,663.2
15,583.3
1.06929
29,721.3
2014..............
.
318.9
7,178.7
4.4
17,348.1
15,961.7
1.08686
31,001.4
Gross output is the value of gross domestic product (GDP) plus the value of
intermediate inputs used to produce GDP.
.
Resident population of the 50 states and the District of Columbia estimated for
July 1 of each year.
.
The gross domestic product implicit price deflator is used to convert nominal
dollars to chained (2009) dollars.
.
See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary.
See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary.
NA=Not available.  
Notes:  
Data are estimates.  
U.S. geographic coverage is the 50 states and
the District of Columbia.
.
Web  Page:        See  http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#appendices
(Excel and CSV files) for all available annual data beginning in 1949.
.
Sources:   
 United  States  Population:    1949–1989—U.S. Department of
Commerce (DOC), U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports Series P-25
(June 2000).  1990–1999— DOC, U.S. Census Bureau, "Time Series of Intercensal
State Population Estimates" (April 2002).  2000–2009— DOC, U.S. Census Bureau,
"Intercensal Estimates of the Resident Population for the United States, Regions,
States, and Puerto Rico" (September 2011).  2010 forward— DOC, U.S. Census
Bureau,  "Annual  Estimates  of  the  Resident  Population  for  the  United  States,
Regions, States, and Puerto Rico" (December 2014).  
World Population:  1950
forward—DOC, U.S. Census Bureau, International Database (July 2015).
United States as Share of World Population:  Calculated as U.S. population
divided  by  world  population.   
 U.S.  Gross  Domestic  Product:    1949
forward—DOC, Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), National Income and Product
Accounts (September 2015), Tables 1.1.5, 1.1.6, and 1.1.9.  
U.S. Gross Output:
1987 forward—DOC, BEA, GDP by Industry data (July 2015).
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested