SPM
Summary for Policymakers
20
vector-borne diseases (medium confidence). Positive effects are expected to include modest reductions in cold-related mortality and morbidity
in some areas due to fewer cold extremes (low confidence), geographical shifts in food production (medium confidence), and reduced capacity
of vectors to transmit some diseases. But globally over the 21st century, the magnitude and severity of negative impacts are projected to
increasingly outweigh positive impacts (high confidence). The most effective vulnerability reduction measures for health in the near term are
programs that implement and improve basic public health measures such as provision of clean water and sanitation, secure essential health
care including vaccination and child health services, increase capacity for disaster preparedness and response, and alleviate poverty (very high
confidence). By 2100 for the high-emission scenario RCP8.5, the combination of high temperature and humidity in some areas for parts of the
year is projected to compromise normal human activities, including growing food or working outdoors (high confidence).
62
Human security
Climate change over the 21st century is projected to increase displacement of people (medium evidence, high agreement).
Displacement risk increases when populations that lack the resources for planned migration experience higher exposure to extreme weather
events, in both rural and urban areas, particularly in developing countries with low income. Expanding opportunities for mobility can reduce
vulnerability for such populations. Changes in migration patterns can be responses to both extreme weather events and longer-term climate
variability and change, and migration can also be an effective adaptation strategy. There is low confidence in quantitative projections of
changes in mobility, due to its complex, multi-causal nature.
63
Climate change can indirectly increase risks of violent conflicts in the form of civil war and inter-group violence by amplifying
well-documented drivers of these conflicts such as poverty and economic shocks (medium confidence). Multiple lines of evidence
relate climate variability to these forms of conflict.
64
The impacts of climate change on the critical infrastructure and territorial integrity of many states are expected to influence
national security policies (medium evidence, medium agreement). For example, land inundation due to sea level rise poses risks to the
territorial integrity of small island states and states with extensive coastlines. Some transboundary impacts of climate change, such as changes
in sea ice, shared water resources, and pelagic fish stocks, have the potential to increase rivalry among states, but robust national and
intergovernmental institutions can enhance cooperation and manage many of these rivalries.
65
Livelihoods and poverty
Throughout the 21st century, climate-change impacts are projected to slow down economic growth, make poverty reduction
more difficult, further erode food security, and prolong existing and create new poverty traps, the latter particularly in urban
areas and emerging hotspots of hunger (medium confidence). Climate-change impacts are expected to exacerbate poverty in most
developing countries and create new poverty pockets in countries with increasing inequality, in both developed and developing countries. In
urban and rural areas, wage-labor-dependent poor households that are net buyers of food are expected to be particularly affected due to food
price increases, including in regions with high food insecurity and high inequality (particularly in Africa), although the agricultural self-
employed could benefit. Insurance programs, social protection measures, and disaster risk management may enhance long-term livelihood
resilience among poor and marginalized people, if policies address poverty and multidimensional inequalities.
66
B-3. Regional Key Risks and Potential for Adaptation
Risks will vary through time across regions and populations, dependent on myriad factors including the extent of adaptation and mitigation. A
selection of key regional risks identified with medium to high confidence is presented in Assessment Box SPM.2. For extended summary of
regional risks and potential benefits, see Technical Summary Section B-3 and WGII AR5 Part B: Regional Aspects.
Pdf hyperlinks - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink pdf; adding a link to a pdf in preview
Pdf hyperlinks - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add link to pdf file; chrome pdf from link
SPM
21
Key risk
Adaptation issues & prospects
Climatic
drivers
Risk & potential for 
adaptation
Timeframe
Africa
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Carbon dioxide 
fertilization
C
O
O
Damaging 
cyclone
Ocean 
acidification
Precipitation
C
O
O
Climate-related drivers of impacts
Warming 
trend
Extreme 
precipitation
Extreme 
temperature
Sea 
level
Level of risk & potential for adaptation
Potential for additional adaptation 
to reduce risk
Risk level with 
current adaptation
Risk level with 
high adaptation
Drying 
trend
Snow 
cover
Compounded stress on water resources facing 
significant strain from overexploitation and 
degradation at present and increased demand in the 
future, with drought stress exacerbated in 
drought-prone regions of Africa (high confidence) 
[22.3-4]
• Reducing non-climate stressors on water resources
• Strengthening institutional capacities for demand management, 
groundwater assessment, integrated water-wastewater planning, 
and integrated land and water governance
• Sustainable urban development
Reduced crop productivity associated with heat and 
drought stress, with strong adverse effects on 
regional, national, and household livelihood and food 
security, also given increased pest and disease 
damage and flood impacts on food system 
infrastructure (high confidence)
[22.3-4]
• Technological adaptation responses (e.g., stress-tolerant crop 
varieties, irrigation, enhanced observation systems)
• Enhancing smallholder access to credit and other critical production 
resources; Diversifying livelihoods
• Strengthening institutions at local, national, and regional levels to 
support agriculture (including early warning systems) and 
gender-oriented policy
• Agronomic adaptation responses (e.g., agroforestry, conservation 
agriculture)
Changes in the incidence and geographic range of 
vector- and water-borne diseases due to changes in 
the mean and variability of temperature and 
precipitation, particularly along the edges of their 
distribution (medium confidence)
[22.3]
• Achieving development goals, particularly improved access to safe 
water and improved sanitation, and enhancement of public health 
functions such as surveillance
• Vulnerability mapping and early warning systems
• Coordination across sectors
• Sustainable urban development
Continued next page
Assessment Box SPM.2 Table 1 | Key regional risks from climate change and the potential for reducing risks through adaptation and mitigation. Each key risk is characterized as 
very low to very high for three timeframes: the present, near term (here, assessed over 2030–2040), and longer term (here, assessed over 2080–2100). In the near term, 
projected levels of global mean temperature increase do not diverge substantially for different emission scenarios. For the longer term, risk levels are presented for two scenarios 
of global mean temperature increase (2°C and 4°C above preindustrial levels). These scenarios illustrate the potential for mitigation and adaptation to reduce the risks related to 
climate change. Climate-related drivers of impacts are indicated by icons.
Summary for Policymakers
62
8.2, 11.3-8, 19.3, 22.3, 25.8, 26.6, Figure 25-5, Box CC-HS
63 9.3, 12.4, 19.4, 22.3, 25.9
64
12.5, 13.2, 19.4
65
12.5-6, 23.9, 25.9
66 8.1, 8.3-4, 9.3, 10.9, 13.2-4, 22.3, 26.8
Assessment Box SPM.2 | Regional Key Risks
The accompanying Assessment Box SPM.2 Table 1 highlights several representative key risks for each region. Key risks have been
identified based on assessment of the relevant scientific, technical, and socioeconomic literature detailed in supporting chapter sections.
Identification of key risks was based on expert judgment using the following specific criteria: large magnitude, high probability, or
irreversibility of impacts; timing of impacts; persistent vulnerability or exposure contributing to risks; or limited potential to reduce risks
through adaptation or mitigation.
For each key risk, risk levels were assessed for three timeframes. For the present, risk levels were estimated for current adaptation and
a hypothetical highly adapted state, identifying where current adaptation deficits exist. For two future timeframes, risk levels were
estimated for a continuation of current adaptation and for a highly adapted state, representing the potential for and limits to adaptation.
The risk levels integrate probability and consequence over the widest possible range of potential outcomes, based on available literature.
These potential outcomes result from the interaction of climate-related hazards, vulnerability, and exposure. Each risk level reflects total
risk from climatic and non-climatic factors. Key risks and risk levels vary across regions and over time, given differing socioeconomic
development pathways, vulnerability and exposure to hazards, adaptive capacity, and risk perceptions. Risk levels are not necessarily
comparable, especially across regions, because the assessment considers potential impacts and adaptation in different physical,
biological, and human systems across diverse contexts. This assessment of risks acknowledges the importance of differences in values
and objectives in interpretation of the assessed risk levels.
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Embed zoom setting (fit page, fit width). Turn PDF form data to HTML form. Export PDF images to HTML images. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links.
adding links to pdf; convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Available zoom setting (fit page, fit width).
c# read pdf from url; add url pdf
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
22
Continued next page
Key risk
Adaptation issues & prospects
Climatic
drivers
Risk & potential for 
adaptation
Timeframe
Europe
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Increased economic losses and people affected by 
flooding in river basins and coasts, driven by 
increasing urbanization,  increasing sea levels, 
coastal erosion, and peak river discharges 
(high confidence)
[23.2-3, 23.7]
Adaptation can prevent most of the projected damages (high 
confidence). 
• Significant experience in hard flood-protection technologies and 
increasing experience with restoring wetlands
• High costs for increasing flood protection 
• Potential barriers to implementation: demand for land in Europe 
and environmental and landscape concerns
Increased water restrictions. Significant reduction in 
water availability from river abstraction and from 
groundwater resources, combined with increased 
water demand (e.g., for irrigation, energy and industry, 
domestic use) and with reduced water drainage and 
runoff as a result of increased evaporative demand, 
particularly in southern Europe (high confidence)
[23.4, 23.7]
• Proven adaptation potential from adoption of more water-efficient 
technologies and of water-saving strategies (e.g., for irrigation, crop 
species, land cover, industries, domestic use)
• Implementation of best practices and governance instruments in 
river basin management plans and integrated water management
Increased economic losses and people affected by 
extreme heat events: impacts on health and 
well-being, labor productivity, crop production, air 
quality, and increasing risk of wildfires in southern 
Europe and in Russian boreal region 
(medium confidence)
[23.3-7, Table 23-1]
• Implementation of warning systems
• Adaptation of dwellings and workplaces and of transport and 
energy infrastructure
• Reductions in emissions to improve air quality
• Improved wildfire management
• Development of insurance products against weather-related yield 
variations
Key risk
Adaptation issues & prospects
Climatic
drivers
Risk & potential for 
adaptation
Timeframe
Asia
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Increased riverine, coastal, and urban 
flooding leading to widespread damage 
to infrastructure, livelihoods, and 
settlements in Asia (medium confidence)
[24.4]
• Exposure reduction via structural and non-structural measures, effective 
land-use planning, and selective relocation
• Reduction in the vulnerability of lifeline infrastructure and services (e.g., water, 
energy, waste management, food, biomass, mobility, local ecosystems, 
telecommunications)
• Construction of monitoring and early warning systems; Measures to identify 
exposed areas, assist vulnerable areas and households, and diversify livelihoods
• Economic diversification
Increased risk of heat-related mortality 
(high confidence)
[24.4]
• Heat health warning systems
• Urban planning to reduce heat islands; Improvement of the built environment; 
Development of sustainable cities
• New work practices to avoid heat stress among outdoor workers
Increased risk of drought-related water 
and food shortage causing malnutrition 
(high confidence)
[24.4]
• Disaster preparedness including early-warning systems and local coping 
strategies
• Adaptive/integrated water resource management
• Water infrastructure and reservoir development
• Diversification of water sources including water re-use
• More efficient use of water (e.g., improved agricultural practices, irrigation 
management, and resilient agriculture)
Assessment Box SPM.2 Table 1 (continued)
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Able to replace all PDF page contents in VB.NET, including text, image, hyperlinks, etc. Professional VB.NET
adding links to pdf document; pdf email link
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
of text, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata; Advanced document cleanup and image processing options provided; Annotate and redact in PDF documents; Fully support
change link in pdf file; add links to pdf online
SPM
23
Continued next page
C
O
O
Key risk
Adaptation issues & prospects
Climatic
drivers
Risk & potential for 
adaptation
Timeframe
Australasia
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Significant change in community 
composition and structure of coral reef 
systems in Australia (high confidence)
[25.6, 30.5, Boxes CC-CR and CC-OA]
• Ability of corals to adapt naturally appears limited and insufficient to offset the 
detrimental effects of rising temperatures and acidification.
• Other options are mostly limited to reducing other stresses (water quality, 
tourism, fishing) and early warning systems; direct interventions such as assisted 
colonization and shading have been proposed but remain untested at scale.
Increased frequency and intensity of flood 
damage to infrastructure and settlements 
in Australia and New Zealand 
(high confidence)
[Table 25-1, Boxes 25-8 and 25-9]
• Significant adaptation deficit in some regions to current flood risk.
• Effective adaptation includes land-use controls and relocation as well as 
protection and accommodation of increased risk to ensure flexibility.
Increasing risks to coastal infrastructure 
and low-lying ecosystems in Australia and 
New Zealand, with widespread damage 
towards the upper end of projected 
sea-level-rise ranges (high confidence)
[25.6, 25.10, Box 25-1]
• Adaptation deficit in some locations to current coastal erosion and flood risk. 
Successive building and protection cycles constrain flexible responses.
• Effective adaptation includes land-use controls and ultimately relocation as well 
as protection and accommodation.
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Heat-related human mortality 
(high confidence)
[26.6, 26.8]
• Residential air conditioning (A/C) can effectively reduce risk. However, 
availability and usage of A/C is highly variable and is subject to complete loss 
during power failures. Vulnerable populations include athletes and outdoor 
workers for whom A/C is not available. 
• Community- and household-scale adaptations have the potential to reduce 
exposure to heat extremes via family support, early heat warning systems, 
cooling centers, greening, and high-albedo surfaces.
Urban floods in riverine and coastal areas, 
inducing property and infrastructure 
damage; supply chain, ecosystem, and 
social system disruption; public health 
impacts; and water quality impairment, due 
to sea level rise, extreme precipitation, and 
cyclones (high confidence)
[26.2-4, 26.8]
• Implementing management of urban drainage is expensive and disruptive to 
urban areas. 
• Low-regret strategies with co-benefits include less impervious surfaces leading 
to more groundwater recharge, green infrastructure, and rooftop gardens. 
• Sea level rise increases water elevations in coastal outfalls, which impedes 
drainage. In many cases, older rainfall design standards are being used that need 
to be updated to reflect current climate conditions.
• Conservation of wetlands, including mangroves, and land-use planning 
strategies can reduce the intensity of flood events.
Key risk
Adaptation issues & prospects
Climatic
drivers
Risk & potential for 
adaptation
Timeframe
North America
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Wildfire-induced loss of ecosystem 
integrity, property loss, human morbidity, 
and mortality as a result of increased 
drying trend and temperature trend 
(high confidence)
[26.4, 26.8, Box 26-2]
• Some ecosystems are more fire-adapted than others. Forest managers and 
municipal planners are increasingly incorporating fire protection measures (e.g., 
prescribed burning, introduction of resilient vegetation). Institutional capacity to 
support ecosystem adaptation is limited. 
• Adaptation of human settlements is constrained by rapid private property 
development in high-risk areas and by limited household-level adaptive capacity.
• Agroforestry can be an effective strategy for reduction of slash and burn 
practices in Mexico.
Assessment Box SPM.2 Table 1 (continued)
Summary for Policymakers
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
application. Generating thumbnail for PDF document is an easy work and gives quick access to PDF page and file, or even hyperlinks. This
accessible links in pdf; add hyperlink to pdf
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and metadata as well as updating, splitting and merging pages from existing PDF documents
clickable pdf links; add link to pdf
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
24
Continued next page
not available
not available
Key risk
Adaptation issues & prospects
Climatic
drivers
Risk & potential for 
adaptation
Timeframe
Central and South America
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
C
O
O
Water availability in semi-arid and 
glacier-melt-dependent regions and Central 
America; flooding and landslides in urban 
and rural areas due to extreme precipitation 
(high confidence)
[27.3]
• Integrated water resource management
• Urban and rural flood management (including infrastructure), early warning 
systems, better weather and runoff forecasts, and infectious disease control
Decreased food production and food quality 
(medium confidence)
[27.3]
• Development of new crop varieties more adapted to climate change  
(temperature and drought)
• Offsetting of human and animal health impacts of reduced food quality
• Offsetting of economic impacts of land-use change
• Strengthening traditional indigenous knowledge systems and practices
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Spread of vector-borne diseases in altitude 
and latitude (high confidence)
[27.3]
• Development of early warning systems for disease control and mitigation 
based on climatic and other relevant inputs. Many factors augment 
vulnerability. 
• Establishing programs to extend basic public health services
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Key risk
Adaptation issues & prospects
Climatic
drivers
Risk & potential for 
adaptation
Timeframe
Small Islands
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Key risk
Adaptation issues & prospects
Climatic
drivers
Risk & potential for 
adaptation
Timeframe
Polar Regions
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
C
O
O
C
O
O
Loss of livelihoods, coastal settlements, 
infrastructure, ecosystem services, and 
economic stability (high confidence)
[29.6, 29.8, Figure 29-4]
• Significant potential exists for adaptation in islands, but additional external 
resources and technologies will enhance response.
• Maintenance and enhancement of ecosystem functions and services and of 
water and food security
• Efficacy of traditional community coping strategies is expected to be 
substantially reduced in the future.
The interaction of rising global mean sea level 
in the 21st century with high-water-level 
events will threaten low-lying coastal areas 
(high confidence)
[29.4, Table 29-1; WGI AR5 13.5, Table 13.5]
• High ratio of coastal area to land mass will make adaptation a significant 
financial and resource challenge for islands. 
• Adaptation options include maintenance and restoration of coastal landforms 
and ecosystems, improved management of soils and freshwater resources, and 
appropriate building codes and settlement patterns.
Risks for freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems 
(high confidence) and marine ecosystems 
(medium confidence), due to changes in ice, 
snow cover, permafrost, and freshwater/ocean 
conditions, affecting species´ habitat quality, 
ranges, phenology, and productivity, as well as 
dependent economies
[28.2-4]
• Improved understanding through scientific and indigenous knowledge, 
producing more effective solutions and/or technological innovations
• Enhanced monitoring, regulation, and warning systems that achieve safe and 
sustainable use of ecosystem resources
• Hunting or fishing for different species, if possible, and diversifying income 
sources
Risks for the health and well-being of Arctic 
residents, resulting from injuries and illness 
from the changing physical environment, 
food insecurity, lack of reliable and safe 
drinking water, and damage to 
infrastructure, including infrastructure in 
permafrost regions (high confidence)
[28.2-4]
• Co-production of more robust solutions that combine science and technology 
with indigenous knowledge                                                                                                                                                          
• Enhanced observation, monitoring, and warning systems
• Improved communications, education, and training                                                                                  
• Shifting resource bases, land use, and/or settlement areas                                                                      
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Unprecedented challenges for northern 
communities due to complex inter-linkages 
between climate-related hazards and societal 
factors, particularly if rate of change is faster 
than social systems can adapt 
(high confidence)
[28.2-4]
• Co-production of more robust solutions that combine science and 
technology with indigenous knowledge                                                                                                                                                        
• Enhanced observation, monitoring, and warning systems 
• Improved communications, education, and training
• Adaptive co-management responses developed through the settlement of 
land claims 
Assessment Box SPM.2 Table 1 (continued)
SPM
25
Key risk
Adaptation issues & prospects
Climatic
drivers
Risk & potential for 
adaptation
Timeframe
The Ocean
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
Near term 
(2030–2040)
Present
Long term
(2080–2100)
2°C
4°C
Very
low 
Very 
high 
Medium 
C
O
O
C
O
O
Distributional shift in fish and invertebrate 
species, and decrease in fisheries catch 
potential at low latitudes, e.g., in equatorial 
upwelling and coastal boundary systems and 
sub-tropical gyres (high confidence)
[6.3, 30.5-6, Tables 6-6 and 30-3, Box 
CC-MB]
• Evolutionary adaptation potential of fish and invertebrate species to warming 
is limited as indicated by their changes in distribution to maintain temperatures. 
• Human adaptation options: Large-scale translocation of industrial fishing 
activities following the regional decreases (low latitude) vs. possibly transient 
increases (high latitude) in catch potential; Flexible management that can react 
to variability and change; Improvement of fish resilience to thermal stress by 
reducing other stressors such as pollution and eutrophication; Expansion of 
sustainable aquaculture and the development of alternative livelihoods in some 
regions.
Reduced biodiversity, fisheries abundance, 
and coastal protection by coral reefs due to 
heat-induced mass coral bleaching and 
mortality increases, exacerbated by ocean 
acidification, e.g., in coastal boundary systems 
and sub-tropical gyres (high confidence)
[5.4, 6.4, 30.3, 30.5-6, Tables 6-6 and 30-3, 
Box CC-CR]
• Evidence of rapid evolution by corals is very limited. Some corals may migrate 
to higher latitudes, but entire reef systems are not expected to be able to track 
the high rates of temperature shifts. 
• Human adaptation options are limited to reducing other stresses, mainly by 
enhancing water quality, and limiting pressures from tourism and fishing. These 
options will delay human impacts of climate change by a few decades, but their 
efficacy will be severely reduced as thermal stress increases.
Coastal inundation and habitat loss due to 
sea level rise, extreme events, changes in 
precipitation, and reduced ecological 
resilience, e.g., in coastal boundary systems 
and sub-tropical gyres 
(medium to high confidence)
[5.5, 30.5-6, Tables 6-6 and 30-3, Box 
CC-CR]
• Human adaptation options are limited to reducing other stresses, mainly by 
reducing pollution and limiting pressures from tourism, fishing, physical 
destruction, and unsustainable aquaculture. 
• Reducing deforestation and increasing reforestation of river catchments and 
coastal areas to retain sediments and nutrients
• Increased mangrove, coral reef, and seagrass protection, and restoration to 
protect numerous ecosystem goods and services such as coastal protection, 
tourist value, and fish habitat
Assessment Box SPM.2 Table 1 (continued)
C: MANAGING FUTURE RISKS AND BUILDING RESILIENCE
Managing the risks of climate change involves adaptation and mitigation decisions with implications for future generations, economies, and
environments. This section evaluates adaptation as a means to build resilience and to adjust to climate-change impacts. It also considers limits
to adaptation, climate-resilient pathways, and the role of transformation. See Figure SPM.8 for an overview of responses for addressing risk
related to climate change.
C-1. Principles for Effective Adaptation 
Adaptation is place- and context-specific, with no single approach for reducing risks appropriate across all settings (high
confidence). Effective risk reduction and adaptation strategies consider the dynamics of vulnerability and exposure and their linkages with
socioeconomic processes, sustainable development, and climate change. Specific examples of responses to climate change are presented in
Table SPM.1.
67
Adaptation planning and implementation can be enhanced through complementary actions across levels, from individuals to
governments (high confidence). National governments can coordinate adaptation efforts of local and subnational governments, for example
by protecting vulnerable groups, by supporting economic diversification, and by providing information, policy and legal frameworks, and
financial support (robust evidence, high agreement). Local government and the private sector are increasingly recognized as critical to progress
in adaptation, given their roles in scaling up adaptation of communities, households, and civil society and in managing risk information and
financing (medium evidence, high agreement).
68
A first step towards adaptation to future climate change is reducing vulnerability and exposure to present climate variability
(high confidence). Strategies include actions with co-benefits for other objectives. Available strategies and actions can increase
resilience across a range of possible future climates while helping to improve human health, livelihoods, social and economic well-being, and
Summary for Policymakers
67
2.1, 8.3-4, 13.1, 13.3-4, 15.2-3, 15.5, 16.2-3, 16.5, 17.2, 17.4, 19.6, 21.3, 22.4, 26.8-9, 29.6, 29.8
68
2.1-4, 3.6, 5.5, 8.3-4, 9.3-4, 14.2, 15.2-3, 15.5, 16.2-5, 17.2-3, 22.4, 24.4, 25.4, 26.8-9, 30.7, Tables 21-1, 21-5, & 21-6, Box 16-2
environmental quality. See Table SPM.1. Integration of adaptation into planning and decision making can promote synergies with development
and disaster risk reduction.
69
Adaptation planning and implementation at all levels of governance are contingent on societal values, objectives, and risk
perceptions (high confidence). Recognition of diverse interests, circumstances, social-cultural contexts, and expectations can
benefit decision-making processes. Indigenous, local, and traditional knowledge systems and practices, including indigenous peoples’
holistic view of community and environment, are a major resource for adapting to climate change, but these have not been used consistently in
existing adaptation efforts. Integrating such forms of knowledge with existing practices increases the effectiveness of adaptation.
70
Decision support is most effective when it is sensitive to context and the diversity of decision types, decision processes, and
constituencies (robust evidence, high agreement). Organizations bridging science and decision making, including climate services, play
an important role in the communication, transfer, and development of climate-related knowledge, including translation, engagement, and
knowledge exchange (medium evidence, high agreement).
71
Existing and emerging economic instruments can foster adaptation by providing incentives for anticipating and reducing impacts
(medium confidence). Instruments include public-private finance partnerships, loans, payments for environmental services, improved resource
pricing, charges and subsidies, norms and regulations, and risk sharing and transfer mechanisms. Risk financing mechanisms in the public and
private sector, such as insurance and risk pools, can contribute to increasing resilience, but without attention to major design challenges, they
can also provide disincentives, cause market failure, and decrease equity. Governments often play key roles as regulators, providers, or insurers
of last resort.
72
Constraints can interact to impede adaptation planning and implementation (high confidence). Common constraints on
implementation arise from the following: limited financial and human resources; limited integration or coordination of governance; uncertainties
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
26
EMISSIONS
and Land-use Change
Hazards
Anthropogenic 
Climate Change
Socioeconomic 
Pathways
Adaptation and 
Mitigation 
Actions
Governance
IMPACTS
Natural 
Variability
SOCIOECONOMIC
PROCESSES
CLIMATE
Socioeconomic Pathways
Adaptation & Interactions 
with Mitigation
Governance
Diverse values & objectives 
[A-3]
Climate-resilient pathways 
[C-2]
Transformation 
[C-2]
Decision making under 
uncertainty 
[A-3]
Learning, monitoring, & flexibility 
[A-2, A-3, C-1]
• 
Coordination across scales 
[A-2, C-1]
Incremental & transformational 
adaptation 
[A-2, A-3, C-2]
Co-benefits, synergies, & 
tradeoffs 
[A-2, C-1, C-2]
Context-specific adaptation 
[C-1]
Complementary actions 
[C-1]
Limits to adaptation 
[C-2]
Exposure
Vulnerability
RISK
Vulnerability & Exposure
Risk
•   Vulnerability & exposure  
reduction 
[C-1]
•   Low-regrets strategies &
actions 
[C-1]
•   Addressing multidimensional 
inequalities 
[A-1, C-1]
•   Risk assessment 
[B]
•   Iterative risk management
[A-3]
•   Risk perception 
[A-3, C-1]
Anthropogenic 
Climate Change
•   Mitigation [WGIII AR5]
Figure SPM.8 | The solution space. Core concepts of the WGII AR5, illustrating overlapping entry points and approaches, as well as key considerations, in managing risks related 
to climate change, as assessed in this report and presented throughout this SPM. Bracketed references indicate sections of this summary with corresponding assessment findings.
69 3.6, 8.3, 9.4, 14.3, 15.2-3, 17.2, 20.4, 20.6, 22.4, 24.4-5, 25.4, 25.10, 27.3-5, 29.6, Boxes 25-2 and 25-6
70
2.2-4, 9.4, 12.3, 13.2, 15.2, 16.2-4, 16.7, 17.2-3, 21.3, 22.4, 24.4, 24.6, 25.4, 25.8, 26.9, 28.2, 28.4, Table 15-1, Box 25-7
71
2.1-4, 8.4, 14.4, 16.2-3, 16.5, 21.2-3, 21.5, 22.4, Box 9-4
72 10.7, 10.9, 13.3, 17.4-5, Box 25-7
SPM
27
Overlapping 
Approaches
Category
Examples
Chapter Reference(s)
Human 
development
Improved access to education, nutrition, health facilities, energy, safe housing & settlement structures, 
& social support structures; Reduced gender inequality & marginalization in other forms.
8.3, 9.3, 13.1-3, 14.2-3, 22.4
Poverty alleviation
Improved access to & control of local resources; Land tenure; Disaster risk reduction; Social safety nets 
& social protection; Insurance schemes.
8.3-4, 9.3, 13.1-3
Livelihood security
Income, asset, & livelihood diversifi cation; Improved infrastructure; Access to technology & decision-
making fora; Increased decision-making power; Changed cropping, livestock, & aquaculture practices; 
Reliance on social networks.
7.5, 9.4, 13.1-3, 22.3-4, 23.4, 26.5, 
27.3, 29.6, Table SM24-7
Disaster risk 
management
Early warning systems; Hazard & vulnerability mapping; Diversifying water resources; Improved 
drainage; Flood & cyclone shelters; Building codes & practices; Storm & wastewater management; 
Transport & road infrastructure improvements.
8.2-4, 11.7, 14.3, 15.4, 22.4, 24.4, 
26.6, 28.4, Box 25-1, Table 3-3
Ecosystem 
management
Maintaining wetlands & urban green spaces; Coastal afforestation; Watershed & reservoir 
management; Reduction of other stressors on ecosystems & of habitat fragmentation; Maintenance 
of genetic diversity; Manipulation of disturbance regimes; Community-based natural resource 
management.
4.3-4, 8.3, 22.4, Table 3-3, Boxes 4-3, 
8-2, 15-1, 25-8, 25-9, & CC-EA
Spatial or land-use 
planning
Provisioning of adequate housing, infrastructure, & services; Managing development in fl ood prone & 
other high risk areas; Urban planning & upgrading programs; Land zoning laws; Easements; Protected 
areas.
4.4, 8.1-4, 22.4, 23.7-8, 27.3, Box 25-8
Structural/physical
Engineered & built-environment options: Sea walls & coastal protection structures; Flood levees;  
Water storage; Improved drainage; Flood & cyclone shelters; Building codes & practices; Storm & 
wastewater management; Transport & road infrastructure improvements; Floating houses; Power plant 
& electricity grid adjustments.
3.5-6, 5.5, 8.2-3, 10.2, 11.7, 23.3, 
24.4, 25.7, 26.3, 26.8, Boxes 15-1, 
25-1, 25-2, & 25-8
Technological options: New crop & animal varieties; Indigenous, traditional, & local knowledge, 
technologies, & methods; Effi cient irrigation; Water-saving technologies; Desalinization; Conservation 
agriculture; Food storage & preservation facilities; Hazard & vulnerability mapping & monitoring; Early 
warning systems; Building insulation; Mechanical & passive cooling; Technology development, transfer, 
& diffusion.
7.5, 8.3, 9.4, 10.3, 15.4, 22.4, 24.4, 
26.3, 26.5, 27.3, 28.2, 28.4, 29.6-7, 
Boxes 20-5 & 25-2, Tables 3-3 & 15-1
Ecosystem-based options: Ecological restoration; Soil conservation; Afforestation & reforestation; 
Mangrove conservation & replanting; Green infrastructure (e.g., shade trees, green roofs); 
Controlling overfi shing; Fisheries co-management; Assisted species migration & dispersal; Ecological 
corridors; Seed banks, gene banks, & other ex situ conservation; Community-based natural resource 
management.
4.4, 5.5, 6.4, 8.3, 9.4, 11.7, 15.4, 22.4, 
23.6-7, 24.4, 25.6, 27.3, 28.2, 29.7, 
30.6, Boxes 15-1, 22-2, 25-9, 26-2, 
& CC-EA
Services: Social safety nets & social protection; Food banks & distribution of food surplus; Municipal 
services including water & sanitation; Vaccination programs; Essential public health services; Enhanced 
emergency medical services.
3.5-6, 8.3, 9.3, 11.7, 11.9, 22.4, 29.6, 
Box 13-2
Institutional
Economic options: Financial incentives; Insurance; Catastrophe bonds; Payments for ecosystem 
services; Pricing water to encourage universal provision and careful use; Microfi nance; Disaster 
contingency funds; Cash transfers; Public-private partnerships.
8.3-4, 9.4, 10.7, 11.7, 13.3, 15.4, 17.5, 
22.4, 26.7, 27.6, 29.6, Box 25-7
Laws & regulations: Land zoning laws; Building standards & practices; Easements; Water regulations 
& agreements; Laws to support disaster risk reduction; Laws to encourage insurance purchasing; 
Defi ned property rights & land tenure security; Protected areas; Fishing quotas; Patent pools & 
technology transfer.
4.4, 8.3, 9.3, 10.5, 10.7, 15.2, 15.4, 
17.5, 22.4, 23.4, 23.7, 24.4, 25.4, 26.3, 
27.3, 30.6, Table 25-2, Box CC-CR
National & government policies & programs: National & regional adaptation plans including 
mainstreaming; Sub-national & local adaptation plans; Economic diversifi cation; Urban upgrading 
programs; Municipal water management programs; Disaster planning & preparedness; Integrated 
water resource management; Integrated coastal zone management; Ecosystem-based management; 
Community-based adaptation.
2.4, 3.6, 4.4, 5.5, 6.4, 7.5, 8.3, 11.7, 
15.2-5, 22.4, 23.7, 25.4, 25.8, 26.8-9, 
27.3-4, 29.6, Boxes 25-1, 25-2, & 25-9, 
Tables 9-2 & 17-1
Social
Educational options: Awareness raising & integrating into education; Gender equity in education; 
Extension services; Sharing indigenous, traditional, & local knowledge; Participatory action research & 
social learning; Knowledge-sharing & learning platforms.
8.3-4, 9.4, 11.7, 12.3, 15.2-4, 22.4, 
25.4, 28.4, 29.6, Tables 15-1 & 25-2
Informational options: Hazard & vulnerability mapping; Early warning & response systems; 
Systematic monitoring & remote sensing; Climate services; Use of indigenous climate observations; 
Participatory scenario development; Integrated assessments.
2.4, 5.5, 8.3-4, 9.4, 11.7, 15.2-4, 22.4, 
23.5, 24.4, 25.8, 26.6, 26.8, 27.3, 28.2, 
28.5, 30.6, Table 25-2, Box 26-3
Behavioral options: Household preparation & evacuation planning; Migration; Soil & water 
conservation; Storm drain clearance; Livelihood diversifi cation; Changed cropping, livestock, & 
aquaculture practices; Reliance on social networks.
5.5, 7.5, 9.4, 12.4, 22.3-4, 23.4, 23.7, 
25.7, 26.5, 27.3, 29.6, Table SM24-7, 
Box 25-5
Spheres of change
Practical: Social & technical innovations, behavioral shifts, or institutional & managerial changes that 
produce substantial shifts in outcomes.
8.3, 17.3, 20.5, Box 25-5
Political: Political, social, cultural, & ecological decisions & actions consistent with reducing 
vulnerability & risk & supporting adaptation, mitigation, & sustainable development.
14.2-3, 20.5, 25.4, 30.7, Table 14-1
Personal: Individual & collective assumptions, beliefs, values, & worldviews infl uencing climate-change 
responses.
14.2-3, 20.5, 25.4, Table 14-1
Vulnerability & Exposure Reduction
 through development, planning, & practices including many low-regrets measures
Adaptation
 including incremental & transformational adjustments
Transformation
Table SPM.1 | Approaches for managing the risks of climate change. These approaches should be considered overlapping rather than discrete, and they are often pursued 
simultaneously. Mitigation is considered essential for managing the risks of climate change. It is not addressed in this table as mitigation is the focus of WGIII AR5. Examples are 
presented in no specifi c order and can be relevant to more than one category. [14.2-3, Table 14-1]
Summary for Policymakers
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
28
about projected impacts; different perceptions of risks; competing values; absence of key adaptation leaders and advocates; and limited tools
to monitor adaptation effectiveness. Another constraint includes insufficient research, monitoring, and observation and the finance to maintain
them. Underestimating the complexity of adaptation as a social process can create unrealistic expectations about achieving intended adaptation
outcomes.
73
Poor planning, overemphasizing short-term outcomes, or failing to sufficiently anticipate consequences can result in maladaptation
(medium evidence, high agreement). Maladaptation can increase the vulnerability or exposure of the target group in the future, or the
vulnerability of other people, places, or sectors. Some near-term responses to increasing risks related to climate change may also limit future
choices. For example, enhanced protection of exposed assets can lock in dependence on further protection measures.
74
Limited evidence indicates a gap between global adaptation needs and the funds available for adaptation (medium confidence).
There is a need for a better assessment of global adaptation costs, funding, and investment. Studies estimating the global cost of adaptation
are characterized by shortcomings in data, methods, and coverage (high confidence).
75
Significant co-benefits, synergies, and trade-offs exist between mitigation and adaptation and among different adaptation
responses; interactions occur both within and across regions (very high confidence). Increasing efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate
change imply an increasing complexity of interactions, particularly at the intersections among water, energy, land use, and biodiversity, but
tools to understand and manage these interactions remain limited. Examples of actions with co-benefits include (i) improved energy efficiency
and cleaner energy sources, leading to reduced emissions of health-damaging climate-altering air pollutants; (ii) reduced energy and water
consumption in urban areas through greening cities and recycling water; (iii) sustainable agriculture and forestry; and (iv) protection of
ecosystems for carbon storage and other ecosystem services.
76
C-2. Climate-resilient Pathways and Transformation
Climate-resilient pathways are sustainable-development trajectories that combine adaptation and mitigation to reduce climate change and its
impacts. They include iterative processes to ensure that effective risk management can be implemented and sustained. See Figure SPM.9.
77
Prospects for climate-resilient pathways for sustainable development are related fundamentally to what the world accomplishes
with climate-change mitigation (high confidence). Since mitigation reduces the rate as well as the magnitude of warming, it also
increases the time available for adaptation to a particular level of climate change, potentially by several decades. Delaying mitigation actions
may reduce options for climate-resilient pathways in the future.
78
Greater rates and magnitude of climate change increase the likelihood of exceeding adaptation limits (high confidence). Limits to
adaptation occur when adaptive actions to avoid intolerable risks for an actor’s objectives or for the needs of a system are not possible or are
not currently available. Value-based judgments of what constitutes an intolerable risk may differ. Limits to adaptation emerge from the
interaction among climate change and biophysical and/or socioeconomic constraints. Opportunities to take advantage of positive synergies
between adaptation and mitigation may decrease with time, particularly if limits to adaptation are exceeded. In some parts of the world,
insufficient responses to emerging impacts are already eroding the basis for sustainable development.
79
73
3.6, 4.4, 5.5, 8.4, 9.4, 13.2-3, 14.2, 14.5, 15.2-3, 15.5, 16.2-3, 16.5, 17.2-3, 22.4, 23.7, 24.5, 25.4, 25.10, 26.8-9, 30.6, Table 16-3, Boxes 16-1 and 16-3
74
5.5, 8.4, 14.6, 15.5, 16.3, 17.2-3, 20.2, 22.4, 24.4, 25.10, 26.8, Table 14-4, Box 25-1
75
14.2, 17.4, Tables 17-2 and 17-3
76
2.4-5, 3.7, 4.2, 4.4, 5.4-5, 8.4, 9.3, 11.9, 13.3, 17.2, 19.3-4, 20.2-5, 21.4, 22.6, 23.8, 24.6, 25.6-7, 25.9, 26.8-9, 27.3, 29.6-8, Boxes 25-2, 25-9, 25-10, 30.6-7, CC-WE,
and CC-RF
77
2.5, 20.3-4
78
1.1, 19.7, 20.2-3, 20.6, Figure 1-5
79
1.1, 11.8, 13.4, 16.2-7, 17.2, 20.2-3, 20.5-6, 25.10, 26.5, Boxes 16-1, 16-3, and 16-4
SPM
29
Transformations in economic, social, technological, and political decisions and actions can enable climate-resilient pathways (high
confidence).Specific examples are presented in Table SPM.1. Strategies and actions can be pursued now that will move towards climate-
resilient pathways for sustainable development, while at the same time helping to improve livelihoods, social and economic well-being, and
responsible environmental management. At the national level, transformation is considered most effective when it reflects a country’s own
visions and approaches to achieving sustainable development in accordance with its national circumstances and priorities. Transformations to
sustainability are considered to benefit from iterative learning, deliberative processes, and innovation.
80
Low risk 
High resilience
(D) Decision points
(E) Climate-resilient pathways
Low resilience
High risk
(B) Opportunity space
(F) Pathways that lower resilience
(C) Possible futures
Resilience space
Multiple stressors
including 
climate change
(A) Our world
Social stressors 
Biophysical stressors 
Figure SPM.9 | Opportunity space and climate-resilient pathways. (A) Our world [Sections A-1 and B-1] is threatened by multiple stressors that impinge on resilience from many directions, 
represented here simply as biophysical and social stressors. Stressors include climate change, climate variability, land-use change, degradation of ecosystems, poverty and inequality, and 
cultural factors. (B) Opportunity space [Sections A-2, A-3, B-2, C-1, and C-2] refers to decision points and pathways that lead to a range of (C) possible futures [Sections C and B-3] with 
differing levels of resilience and risk. (D) Decision points result in actions or failures-to-act throughout the opportunity space, and together they constitute the process of managing or failing 
to manage risks related to climate change. (E) Climate-resilient pathways (in green) within the opportunity space lead to a more resilient world through adaptive learning, increasing scientific 
knowledge, effective adaptation and mitigation measures, and other choices that reduce risks. (F) Pathways that lower resilience (in red) can involve insufficient mitigation, maladaptation, 
failure to learn and use knowledge, and other actions that lower resilience; and they can be irreversible in terms of possible futures.
Summary for Policymakers
80
1.1, 2.1, 2.5, 8.4, 14.1, 14.3, 16.2-7, 20.5, 22.4, 25.4, 25.10, Figure 1-5, Boxes 16-1, 16-4, and TS.8
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested