view pdf in asp net mvc : Check links in pdf software application dll winforms windows azure web forms WGIAR5_SPM_brochure_en1-part1030

Summary for Policymakers
5
Phenomenon and 
direction of trend
Assessment that changes occurred (typically 
since 1950 unless otherwise indicated)
Assessment of a human 
contribution to observed changes
Early 21st century
Late 21st century
Warmer and/or fewer 
cold days and nights 
over most land areas
Very likely 
{2.6}
Very likely
Very likely 
Very likely 
{10.6}
Likely
Likely  
Likely 
{11.3}
Virtually certain 
{12.4}
Virtually certain
Virtually certain
Warmer and/or more 
frequent hot days and 
nights over most land areas
Very likely 
{2.6}
Very likely
Very likely
Very likely 
{10.6}
Likely
Likely (nights only)
Likely 
{11.3}
Virtually certain 
{12.4}
Virtually certain
Virtually certain
Warm spells/heat waves. 
Frequency and/or duration 
increases over most 
land areas
Medium confidence on a global scale 
Likely in large parts of Europe, Asia and Australia 
{2.6}
Medium confidence in many (but not all) regions
Likely
aLikely
{10.6}
Not formally assessed
More likely than not
bNot formally assessed
{11.3}
Very likely 
{12.4}
Very likely
Very likely
Heavy precipitation events.
Increase in the frequency, 
intensity, and/or amount 
of heavy precipitation
cLikely more land areas with increases than decreases 
{2.6}
Likely more land areas with increases than decreases
Likely over most land areas
Medium confidence 
{7.6, 10.6}
Medium confidence
More likely than not
Likely over many land areas 
{11.3}
Very likely over most of the mid-latitude land 
masses and over wet tropical regions  
{12.4}
Likely over many areas
Very likely over most land areas
Increases in intensity 
and/or duration of drought
Low confidence on a global scale 
Likely changes in some regionsd 
{2.6}
Medium confidence in some regions
eLikely in many regions, since 1970  
Low confidence 
{10.6}
fMedium confidence
More likely than not
gLow confidence 
{11.3}
Likely (medium confidence) on a regional to 
global scaleh  
{12.4}
Medium confidence in some regions
eLikely
Increases in intense 
tropical cyclone activity
Low confidence in long term (centennial) changes 
Virtually certain in North Atlantic since 1970 
{2.6}
Low confidence
Likely in some regions, since 1970 
Low confidencei 
{10.6}
Low confidence
More likely than not
Low confidence 
{11.3}
More likely than not in the Western North Pacific 
jand North Atlantic 
{14.6}
More likely than not in some basins
Likely
Increased incidence and/or 
magnitude of extreme 
high sea level 
Likely (since 1970) 
{3.7}
Likely (late 20th century)
Likely 
kLikely 
{3.7}
kLikely
kMore likely than not
lLikely 
{13.7}
lVery likely 
{13.7}
mVery likely
Likely
Likelihood of further changes
Table SPM.1 |  Extreme weather and climate events: Global-scale assessment of recent observed changes, human contribution to the changes, and projected further changes for the early (2016–2035) and late (2081–2100) 21st century. 
Bold indicates where the AR5 (black) provides a revised* global-scale assessment from the SREX (blue) or AR4 (red). Projections for early 21st century were not provided in previous assessment reports. Projections in the AR5 are relative to 
the reference period of 1986–2005, and use the new Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (see Box SPM.1) unless otherwise specified. See the Glossary for definitions of extreme weather and climate events.
* The direct comparison of assessment findings between reports is difficult. For some climate variables, different aspects have been assessed, and the revised guidance note on uncertainties has been used for the SREX and AR5. The availability of new information, improved scientific understanding, continued 
analyses of data and models, and specific differences in methodologies applied in the assessed studies, all contribute to revised assessment findings.
Notes:
a Attribution is based on available case studies. It is likely that human influence has more than doubled the probability of occurrence of some observed heat waves in some locations.
b Models project near-term increases in the duration, intensity and spatial extent of heat waves and warm spells.
c In most continents, confidence in trends is not higher than medium except in North America and Europe where there have been likely increases in either the frequency or intensity of heavy precipitation with some seasonal and/or regional variation. It is very likely that there have been increases in central 
North America.
d The frequency and intensity of drought has likely increased in the Mediterranean and West Africa, and likely decreased in central North America and north-west Australia.
e AR4 assessed the area affected by drought. 
f SREX assessed medium confidence that anthropogenic influence had contributed to some changes in the drought patterns observed in the second half of the 20th century, based on its attributed impact on precipitation and temperature changes. SREX assessed low confidence in the attribution of changes 
in droughts at the level of single regions.
g There is low confidence in projected changes in soil moisture.
h Regional to global-scale projected decreases in soil moisture and increased agricultural drought are likely (medium confidence) in presently dry regions by the end of this century under the RCP8.5 scenario. Soil moisture drying in the Mediterranean, Southwest US and southern African regions is consistent 
with projected changes in Hadley circulation and increased surface temperatures, so there is high confidence in likely surface drying in these regions by the end of this century under the RCP8.5 scenario.
i There is medium confidence that a reduction in aerosol forcing over the North Atlantic has contributed at least in part to the observed increase in tropical cyclone activity since the 1970s in this region.
j Based on expert judgment and assessment of projections which use an SRES A1B (or similar) scenario.
k Attribution is based on the close relationship between observed changes in extreme and mean sea level.
l There is high confidence that this increase in extreme high sea level will primarily be the result of an increase in mean sea level. There is low confidence in region-specific projections of storminess and associated storm surges.
m SREX assessed it to be very likely that mean sea level rise will contribute to future upward trends in extreme coastal high water levels.
SPM
Check links in pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlinks to pdf; add url link to pdf
Check links in pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlink pdf document; change link in pdf
Summary for Policymakers
6
B.2  Ocean
Ocean warming dominates the increase in energy stored in the climate system, accounting 
for more than 90% of the energy accumulated between 1971 and 2010 (high confidence). 
It is virtually certain that the upper ocean (0−700 m) warmed from 1971 to 2010 (see Figure 
SPM.3), and it likely warmed between the 1870s and 1971. 
{3.2, Box 3.1}
•  On a global scale, the ocean warming is largest near the surface, and the upper 75 m warmed by 0.11 [0.09 to 0.13] °C 
per decade over the period 1971 to 2010. Since AR4, instrumental biases in upper-ocean temperature records have been 
identified and reduced, enhancing  confidence in the assessment of change. {3.2}
•  It is likely that the ocean warmed between 700 and 2000 m from 1957 to 2009. Sufficient observations are available for 
the period 1992 to 2005 for a global assessment of temperature change below 2000 m. There were likely no significant 
observed temperature trends between 2000 and 3000 m for this period. It is likely that the ocean warmedfrom 3000 m 
to the bottom for this period, with the largest warming observed in the Southern Ocean. {3.2}
•  More than 60% of the net energy increase in the climate system is stored in the upper ocean (0–700 m) during the 
relatively well-sampled 40-year period from 1971 to 2010, and about 30% is stored in the ocean below 700 m. The 
increase in upper ocean heat content during this time period estimated from a linear trend is likely 17 [15 to 19] × 
10
22
7
(see Figure SPM.3). {3.2, Box 3.1} 
•  It is about as likely as not that ocean heat content from 0–700 m increased more slowly during 2003 to 2010 than during 
1993 to 2002 (see Figure SPM.3). Ocean heat uptake from 700–2000 m, where interannual variability is smaller, likely 
continued unabated from 1993 to 2009. {3.2, Box 9.2}
•  It is very likely that regions of high salinity where evaporation dominates have become more saline, while regions of 
low salinity where precipitation dominates have become fresher since the 1950s. These regional trends in ocean salinity 
provide indirect evidence that evaporation and precipitation over the oceans have changed (medium confidence). {2.5, 
3.3, 3.5}
•  There is no observational evidence of a trend in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), based on the 
decade-long record of the complete AMOC and longer records of individual AMOC components. {3.6} 
Figure SPM.2 |  Maps of observed precipitation change from 1901 to 2010 and from 1951 to 2010 (trends in annual accumulation calculated using the 
same criteria as in Figure SPM.1) from one data set. For further technical details see the Technical Summary Supplementary Material. {TS TFE.1, Figure 2; 
Figure 2.29} 
−100
−50
−25
−10
−5
−2.5
0
2.5
5
10
25
50
100
(mm yr
-1
per decade)
1901– 2010
1951– 2010
Observed change in annual precipitation over land
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; program with an incorrect format", please check your configure
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Online Demo See the PDF SDK for .NET in action and check how much they can do for you. See Pricing
pdf links; adding hyperlinks to a pdf
B.3  Cryosphere
Over the last two decades, the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have been losing mass, 
glaciers  have  continued  to  shrink  almost  worldwide,  and  Arctic  sea  ice  and  Northern 
Hemisphere spring snow cover have continued to decrease in extent (high confidence) (see 
Figure SPM.3). 
{4.2–4.7}
•  The average rate of ice loss
8
from glaciers around the world, excluding glaciers on the periphery of the ice sheets
9
, was 
very likely 226 [91 to 361] Gt yr
−1
over the period 1971 to 2009, and very likely 275 [140 to 410] Gt yr
−1
over the period 
1993 to 2009
10
. {4.3}
•  The average rate of ice loss from the Greenland ice sheet has very likely substantially increased from 34 [–6 to 74] Gt yr
–1
over the period 1992 to 2001 to 215 [157 to 274] Gt yr
–1
over the period 2002 to 2011. {4.4}
•  The average rate of ice loss from the Antarctic ice sheet has likely increased from 30 [–37 to 97] Gt yr
–1
over the period 
1992–2001 to 147 [72 to 221] Gt yr
–1
over the period 2002 to 2011. There is very high confidence that these losses are 
mainly from the northern Antarctic Peninsula and the Amundsen Sea sector of West Antarctica. {4.4}
•  The annual mean Arctic sea ice extent decreased over the period 1979 to 2012 with a rate that was very likely in the 
range 3.5 to 4.1% per decade (range of 0.45 to 0.51 million km
2
per decade), and very likely in the range 9.4 to 13.6% 
per decade (range of 0.73 to 1.07 million km
2
per decade) for the summer sea ice minimum (perennial sea ice). The 
average decrease in decadal mean extent of Arctic sea ice has been most rapid in summer (high confidence); the spatial 
extent has decreased in every season, and in every  successive decade since 1979 (high confidence) (see Figure SPM.3). 
There is medium confidence from reconstructions that over the past three decades, Arctic summer sea ice retreat was 
unprecedented and sea surface temperatures were anomalously high in at least the last 1,450 years. {4.2, 5.5}
•  It is very likely that the annual mean Antarctic sea ice extent increased at a rate in the range of 1.2 to 1.8% per decade 
(range of 0.13 to 0.20 million km
2
per decade) between 1979 and 2012. There is high confidence that there are strong 
regional differences in this annual rate, with extent increasing in some regions and decreasing in others. {4.2}
•  There is very high confidence that the extent of Northern Hemisphere snow cover has decreased since the mid-20th 
century (see Figure SPM.3). Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent decreased 1.6 [0.8 to 2.4] % per decade for March 
and April, and 11.7 [8.8 to 14.6] % per decade for June, over the 1967 to 2012 period. During this period, snow cover 
extent in the Northern Hemisphere did not show a statistically significant increase in any month. {4.5}
•  There is high confidence that permafrost temperatures have increased in most regions since the early 1980s. Observed 
warming was up to 3°C in parts of Northern Alaska (early 1980s to mid-2000s) and up to 2°C in parts of the Russian 
European North (1971 to 2010). In the latter region, a considerable reduction in permafrost thickness and areal extent 
has been observed over the period 1975 to 2005 (medium confidence). {4.7}
•  Multiple lines of evidence support very substantial Arctic warming since the mid-20th century. {Box 5.1, 10.3}
8
All references to ‘ice loss’ or ‘mass loss’ refer to net ice loss, i.e., accumulation minus melt and iceberg calving. 
9
For methodological reasons, this assessment of ice loss from the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets includes change in the glaciers on the periphery. These peripheral glaciers 
are thus excluded from the values given for glaciers.
10
100 Gt yr
−1
of ice loss is equivalent to about 0.28 mm yr
−1
of global mean sea level rise.
SPM
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; a program with an incorrect format", please check your configure
add links to pdf in acrobat; add page number to pdf hyperlink
C# PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
text, images, interactive elements, such as links and bookmarks using RasterEdge. XDoc.PDF; load a program with an incorrect format", please check your configure
add url link to pdf; add link to pdf file
Summary for Policymakers
8
1900
1920
1940
1960
1980
2000
−20
−10
0
10
20
Year
2 (10J)
Change in global average upper ocean heat content
(c)
Global average sea level change
1900
1920
1940
1960
1980
2000
−50
0
50
100
150
200
Year
(mm)
(d)
Arctic summer sea ice extent
1900
1920
1940
1960
1980
2000
4
6
8
10
12
14
Year
2(million km)
(b)
Northern Hemisphere spring snow cover
1900
1920
1940
1960
1980
2000
30
35
40
45
Year
2(million km)
(a)
Figure SPM.3 |  Multiple observed indicators of a changing global climate: (a) Extent of Northern Hemisphere March-April (spring) average snow cover; (b) 
extent of Arctic July-August-September (summer) average sea ice; (c) change in global mean upper ocean (0–700 m) heat content aligned to 2006−2010, 
and relative to the mean of all datasets for 1970; (d) global mean sea level relative to the 1900–1905 mean of the longest running dataset, and with all 
datasets aligned to have the same value in 1993, the first year of satellite altimetry data. All time-series (coloured lines indicating different data sets) show 
annual values, and where assessed, uncertainties are indicated by coloured shading. See Technical Summary Supplementary Material for a listing of the 
datasets. {Figures 3.2, 3.13, 4.19, and 4.3; FAQ 2.1, Figure 2; Figure TS.1}
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
9
B.4  Sea Level
The  atmospheric  concentrations  of  carbon  dioxide,  methane,  and  nitrous  oxide  have 
increased  to  levels  unprecedented  in  at  least  the  last  800,000  years.  Carbon  dioxide 
concentrations have increased by 40% since pre-industrial times, primarily from fossil fuel 
emissions and secondarily from net land use change emissions. The ocean has absorbed 
about 30% of the emitted anthropogenic carbon dioxide, causing ocean acidification (see 
Figure SPM.4). 
{2.2, 3.8, 5.2, 6.2, 6.3}
11
ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion, 1 billion = 1,000 million) is the ratio of the number of gas molecules to the total number of molecules of dry air. For example, 
300 ppm means 300 molecules of a gas per million molecules of dry air.
The rate of sea level rise since the mid-19th century has been larger than the mean rate 
during the previous two millennia (high confidence). Over the period 1901 to 2010, global 
mean sea level rose by 0.19 [0.17 to 0.21] m (see Figure SPM.3). 
{3.7, 5.6, 13.2}
•  Proxy and instrumental sea level data indicate a transition in the late 19th to the early 20th century from relatively low 
mean rates of rise over the previous two millennia to higher rates of rise (high confidence). It is likely that the rate of 
global mean sea level rise has continued to increase since the early 20th century. {3.7, 5.6, 13.2}
•  It is very likely that the mean rate of global averaged sea level rise was 1.7 [1.5 to 1.9] mm yr
–1
between 1901 and 2010, 
2.0 [1.7 to 2.3] mm yr
–1
between 1971 and 2010, and 3.2 [2.8 to 3.6] mm yr
–1
between 1993 and 2010. Tide-gauge and 
satellite altimeter data are consistent regarding the higher rate of the latter period. It is likely that similarly high rates 
occurred between 1920 and 1950. {3.7}
•  Since the early 1970s, glacier mass loss and ocean thermal expansion from warming together explain about 75% of the 
observed global mean sea level rise (high confidence). Over the period 1993 to 2010, global mean sea level rise is, with 
high confidence, consistent with the sum of the observed contributions from ocean thermal expansion due to warming 
(1.1 [0.8 to 1.4] mm yr
–1
), from changes in glaciers (0.76 [0.39 to 1.13] mm yr
–1
), Greenland ice sheet (0.33 [0.25 to 0.41] 
mm yr
–1
), Antarctic ice sheet (0.27 [0.16 to 0.38] mm yr
–1
), and land water storage (0.38 [0.26 to 0.49] mm yr
–1
). The sum 
of these contributions is 2.8 [2.3 to 3.4] mm yr
–1
. {13.3}
•  There is very high confidence that maximum global mean sea level during the last interglacial period (129,000 to 116,000 
years ago) was, for several thousand years, at least 5 m higher than present, and high confidence that it did not exceed 
10 m above present. During the last interglacial period, the Greenland ice sheet very likely contributed between 1.4 and 
4.3 m to the higher global mean sea level, implying with medium confidence an additional contribution from the Antarctic 
ice sheet. This change in sea level occurred in the context of different orbital forcing and with high-latitude surface 
temperature, averaged over several thousand years, at least 2°C warmer than present (high confidence). {5.3, 5.6}
B.5  Carbon and Other Biogeochemical Cycles
•  The atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO
2
), methane (CH
4
), and nitrous oxide (N
2
O) 
have all increased since 1750 due to human activity. In 2011 the concentrations of these greenhouse gases were 391 
ppm
11
, 1803 ppb, and 324 ppb, and exceeded the pre-industrial levels by about 40%, 150%, and 20%, respectively. {2.2, 
5.2, 6.1, 6.2}
•  Concentrations of CO
2
, CH
4
, and N
2
O now substantially exceed the highest concentrations recorded in ice cores during 
the past 800,000 years. The mean rates of increase in atmospheric concentrations over the past century are, with very 
high confidence, unprecedented in the last 22,000 years. {5.2, 6.1, 6.2}
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
10
•  Annual CO
2
emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement  production were 8.3 [7.6 to 9.0] GtC
12
yr
–1
averaged over 
2002–2011 (high confidence) and were 9.5 [8.7 to 10.3] GtC yr
–1
in 2011, 54% above the 1990 level. Annual net CO
2
emissions from  anthropogenic land use change were 0.9 [0.1 to 1.7] GtC yr
–1
on average during 2002 to 2011 (medium 
confidence). {6.3}
•  From 1750 to 2011, CO
2
emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production have released 375 [345 to 405] 
GtC to the atmosphere, while deforestation and other land use change are estimated to have released 180 [100 to 260] 
GtC. This results in cumulative anthropogenic emissions of 555 [470 to 640] GtC. {6.3}
•  Of these cumulative anthropogenic CO
2
emissions, 240 [230 to 250] GtC have accumulated in the atmosphere, 155 [125 
to 185] GtC have been taken up by the ocean and 160 [70 to 250] GtC have accumulated in natural terrestrial ecosystems 
(i.e., the cumulative residual land sink). {Figure TS.4, 3.8, 6.3}
•  Ocean acidification is quantified by decreases in pH
13
. The pH of ocean surface water has decreased by 0.1 since the 
beginning of the industrial era (high confidence), corresponding to a 26% increase in hydrogen ion concentration (see 
Figure SPM.4). {3.8, Box 3.2}
Figure SPM.4 |  Multiple observed indicators of a changing global carbon cycle: (a) atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO
2
) from Mauna Loa 
(19°32’N, 155°34’W – red) and South Pole (89°59’S, 24°48’W – black) since 1958; (b) partial pressure of dissolved CO
2
at the ocean surface (blue curves) 
and in situ pH (green curves), a measure of the acidity of ocean water. Measurements are from three stations from the Atlantic (29°10’N, 15°30’W – dark 
blue/dark green; 31°40’N, 64°10’W – blue/green) and the Pacific Oceans (22°45’N, 158°00’W − light blue/light green). Full details of the datasets shown 
here are provided in the underlying report and the Technical Summary Supplementary Material. {Figures 2.1 and 3.18; Figure TS.5}
(a)
(b)
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2010
300
320
340
360
380
400
Year
CO2 (ppm)
1950
1960
1970
1980
1990
2000
2010
320
340
360
380
400
Year
pCO2 (μatm)
8.06
8.09
8.12
in situ pH unit
Surface ocean CO
2
and pH 
Atmospheric CO
2
12
1 Gigatonne of carbon = 1 GtC = 10
15
grams of carbon. This corresponds to 3.667 GtCO
2
.
13
pH is a measure of acidity using a logarithmic scale: a pH decrease of 1 unit corresponds to a 10-fold increase in hydrogen ion concentration, or acidity. 
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
11
14
The strength of drivers is quantified as Radiative Forcing (RF) in units watts per square metre (W m
–2
) as in previous IPCC assessments. RF is the change in energy flux 
caused by a driver, and is calculated at the tropopause or at the top of the atmosphere. In the traditional RF concept employed in previous IPCC reports all surface and 
tropospheric conditions are kept fixed. In calculations of RF for well-mixed greenhouse gases and aerosols in this report, physical variables, except for the ocean and sea 
ice, are allowed to respond to perturbations with rapid adjustments. The resulting forcing is called Effective Radiative Forcing (ERF) in the underlying report. This change 
reflects the scientific progress from previous assessments and results in a better indication of the eventual temperature response for these drivers. For all drivers other than 
well-mixed greenhouse gases and aerosols, rapid adjustments are less well characterized and assumed to be small, and thus the traditional RF is used. {8.1}
15
This approach was used to report RF in the AR4 Summary for Policymakers.
Total radiative forcing is positive, and has led to an uptake of energy by the climate system. 
The largest contribution to total radiative forcing is caused by the increase in the atmospheric 
concentration of CO
2
since 1750 (see Figure SPM.5). 
{3.2, Box 3.1, 8.3, 8.5}
C.  Drivers of Climate Change
Natural and anthropogenic substances and processes that alter the Earth’s energy budget are drivers of climate change. 
Radiative forcing
14
(RF) quantifies the change in energy fluxes caused by changes in these drivers for 2011 relative to 1750, 
unless otherwise indicated. Positive RF leads to surface warming, negative RF leads to surface cooling. RF is estimated based 
on in-situ and remote observations, properties of greenhouse gases and aerosols, and calculations using numerical models 
representing observed processes. Some emitted compounds affect the atmospheric concentration of other substances. The RF 
can be reported based on the concentration changes of each substance
15
. Alternatively, the emission-based RF of a compound 
can be reported, which provides a more direct link to human activities. It includes contributions from all substances affected 
by that emission. The total anthropogenic RF of the two approaches are identical when considering all drivers. Though both 
approaches are used in this Summary for Policymakers, emission-based RFs are emphasized.
•  The total anthropogenic RF for 2011 relative to 1750 is 2.29 [1.13 to 3.33] W m
−2
(see Figure SPM.5), and it has increased 
more rapidly since 1970 than during prior decades. The total anthropogenic RF best estimate for 2011 is 43% higher than 
that reported in AR4 for the year 2005. This is caused by a combination of continued growth in most greenhouse gas 
concentrations and improved estimates of RF by aerosols indicating a weaker net cooling effect (negative RF). {8.5}
•  The RF from emissions of well-mixed greenhouse gases (CO
2
, CH
4
, N
2
O, and Halocarbons) for 2011 relative to 1750 is 
3.00 [2.22 to 3.78] W m
–2
(see Figure SPM.5). The RF from changes in concentrations in these gases is 2.83 [2.26 to 3.40] 
W m
–2
. {8.5}
•  Emissions of CO
2
alone have caused an RF of 1.68 [1.33 to 2.03] W m
–2
(see Figure SPM.5). Including emissions of other 
carbon-containing gases, which also contributed to the increase in CO
2
concentrations, the RF of CO
2
is 1.82 [1.46 to 
2.18] W m
–2
. {8.3, 8.5}
•  Emissions of CH
4
alone have caused an RF of 0.97 [0.74 to 1.20] W  m
−2
(see Figure SPM.5). This is much larger than the 
concentration-based estimate of 0.48 [0.38 to 0.58] W m
−2
(unchanged from AR4). This difference in estimates is caused 
by concentration changes in ozone and stratospheric water vapour due to CH
4
emissions and other emissions indirectly 
affecting CH
4
. {8.3, 8.5}
•  Emissions of stratospheric ozone-depleting halocarbons have caused a net positive RF of 0.18 [0.01 to 0.35] W m
−2
(see 
Figure SPM.5). Their own positive RF has outweighed the negative RF from the ozone depletion that they have induced. 
The positive RF from all halocarbons is similar to the value in AR4, with a reduced RF from CFCs but increases from many 
of their substitutes. {8.3, 8.5}
•  Emissions of short-lived gases contribute to the total anthropogenic RF. Emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) are virtually 
certain to have induced a positive RF, while emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO
x
) are likely to have induced a net negative 
RF (see Figure SPM.5). {8.3, 8.5}
•  The RF of the total aerosol effect in the atmosphere, which includes cloud adjustments due to aerosols, is –0.9 [–1.9 to 
−0.1] W m
−2
(medium confidence), and results from a negative forcing from most aerosols and a positive contribution 
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
12
from black carbon absorption of solar radiation. There is high confidence that  aerosols and their interactions with clouds 
have offset a substantial portion of global mean forcing from well-mixed greenhouse gases. They continue to contribute 
the largest uncertainty to the total RF estimate. {7.5, 8.3, 8.5}
•  The forcing from stratospheric volcanic aerosols can have a large impact on the climate for some years after volcanic 
eruptions. Several small eruptions have caused an RF of –0.11 [–0.15 to –0.08] W m
–2
for the years 2008 to 2011, which 
is approximately twice as strong as during the years 1999 to 2002. {8.4}
•  The RF due to changes in solar irradiance is estimated as 0.05 [0.00 to 0.10] W m
−2
(see Figure SPM.5). Satellite obser-
vations of total solar irradiance changes from 1978 to 2011 indicate that the last solar minimum was lower than the 
previous two. This results in an RF of –0.04 [–0.08 to 0.00] W m
–2
between the most recent minimum in 2008 and the 
1986 minimum. {8.4}
•  The total natural RF from solar irradiance changes and stratospheric volcanic aerosols made only a small contribution to 
the net radiative forcing throughout the last century, except for brief periods after large volcanic eruptions. {8.5}
Figure SPM.5 |  Radiative forcing estimates in 2011 relative to 1750 and aggregated uncertainties for the main drivers of climate change. Values are 
global average radiative forcing (RF
14
), partitioned according to the emitted compounds or processes that result in a combination of drivers. The best esti-
mates of the net radiative forcing are shown as black diamonds with corresponding uncertainty intervals; the numerical values are provided on the right 
of the figure, together with the confidence level in the net forcing (VH – very high, H – high, M – medium, L – low, VL – very low). Albedo forcing due to 
black carbon on snow and ice is included in the black carbon aerosol bar. Small forcings due to contrails (0.05 W m
–2
, including contrail induced cirrus), 
and HFCs, PFCs and SF
6
(total 0.03 W m–2) are not shown. Concentration-based RFs for gases can be obtained by summing the like-coloured bars. Volcanic 
forcing is not included as its episodic nature makes is difficult to compare to other forcing mechanisms. Total anthropogenic radiative forcing is provided 
for three different years relative to 1750. For further technical details, including uncertainty ranges associated with individual components and processes, 
see the Technical Summary Supplementary Material. {8.5; Figures 8.14–8.18; Figures TS.6 and TS.7}
Anthropogenic
Natural
−1
0
1
2
3
Radiative forcing relative to 1750 (W m
−2
)
Level of
confidence
Radiative forcing by emissions and drivers
1.68 [1.33 to 2.03] 
0.97 [0.74 to 1.20]
0.18 [0.01 to 0.35]
0.17 [0.13 to 0.21]
0.23 [0.16 to 0.30]
0.10 [0.05 to 0.15]
-0.15 [-0.34 to 0.03]
-0.27 [-0.77 to 0.23]
-0.55 [-1.33 to -0.06]
-0.15 [-0.25 to -0.05]
0.05 [0.00 to 0.10]
2.29 [1.13 to 3.33]
1.25 [0.64 to 1.86]
0.57 [0.29 to 0.85]
VH
H
H
VH
M
M
M
H
L
M
M
H
H
M
CO
2
CH
4
Halo-
carbons
N
2
O
CO
NMVOC
NO
x
Emitted
compound
Aerosols and
precursors
(Mineral dust
SO
2
NH
3
,
Organic carbon
and Black carbon)
Well-mixed greenhouse gases
Short lived gases and aerosols
Resulting atmospheric
drivers
CO
2
CO
2
H
2
O
str
O
3
CH
4
O
3
CFCs HCFCs
CO
2
CH
4
O
3
N
2
O
CO
2
CH
4
O
3
Nitrate CH
4
O
3
Black carbon
Mineral dust
Organic carbon
Nitrate
Sulphate
Cloud adjustments
due to aerosols
Albedo change
due to land use
Changes in
solar irradiance
Total anthropogenic
RF relative to 1750
1950
1980
2011
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
13
D.  Understanding the Climate System and its Recent Changes
Understanding recent changes in the climate system results from combining observations, studies of feedback processes, and 
model simulations. Evaluation of the ability of climate models to simulate recent changes requires consideration of the state 
of all modelled climate system components at the start of the simulation and the natural and anthropogenic forcing used to 
drive the models. Compared to AR4, more detailed and longer observations and improved climate models now enable the 
attribution of a human contribution to detected changes in more climate system components. 
Human influence on the climate system is clear. This is evident from the increasing greenhouse 
gas concentrations in the atmosphere, positive radiative forcing, observed warming, and 
understanding of the climate system. 
{2–14}
Climate models have improved since  the AR4. Models  reproduce observed continental-
scale surface temperature patterns and trends over many decades, including the more rapid 
warming since the mid-20th century and the cooling immediately following large volcanic 
eruptions (very high confidence). 
{9.4, 9.6, 9.8}
D.1  Evaluation of Climate Models
•  The long-term climate model simulations show a trend in global-mean surface temperature from 1951 to 2012 that 
agrees with the observed trend (very high confidence). There are, however, differences between simulated and observed 
trends over periods as short as 10 to 15 years (e.g., 1998 to 2012). {9.4, Box 9.2}
•  The observed reduction in surface warming trend over the period 1998 to 2012 as compared to the period 1951 to 2012, 
is due in roughly equal measure to a reduced trend in radiative forcing and a cooling contribution from natural internal 
variability, which includes a possible redistribution of heat within the ocean (medium confidence). The reduced trend 
in radiative forcing is primarily due to volcanic eruptions and the timing of the downward phase of the 11-year solar 
cycle. However, there is low confidence in quantifying the role of changes in radiative forcing in causing the reduced 
warming trend. There is medium confidence that natural internal decadal variability causes to a substantial degree the 
difference between observations and the simulations; the latter are not expected to reproduce the timing of natural 
internal variability. There may also be a contribution from forcing inadequacies and, in some models, an overestimate of 
the response to increasing greenhouse gas and other anthropogenic forcing (dominated by the effects of aerosols). {9.4, 
Box 9.2, 10.3, Box 10.2, 11.3}
•  On regional scales, the confidence in model capability to simulate surface temperature is less than for the larger scales. 
However, there is high confidence that regional-scale surface temperature is better simulated than at the time of the AR4. 
{9.4, 9.6}
•  There has been substantial progress in the assessment of extreme weather and climate events since AR4. Simulated 
global-mean trends in the frequency of extreme warm and cold days and nights over the second half of the 20th century 
are generally consistent with observations. {9.5}
•  There has been some improvement in the simulation of continental- scale patterns of precipitation since the AR4. At 
regional scales, precipitation is not simulated as well, and the assessment is hampered by observational uncertainties. 
{9.4, 9.6}
•  Some important climate phenomena are now better reproduced by models. There is high confidence that the statistics of 
monsoon and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) based on multi-model simulations have improved since AR4. {9.5}
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
14
•  Climate models now include more cloud and aerosol processes, and their interactions, than at the time of the AR4, but 
there remains low confidence in the representation and quantification of these processes in models. {7.3, 7.6, 9.4, 9.7}
•  There is robust evidence that the downward trend in Arctic summer sea ice extent since 1979 is now reproduced by more 
models than at the time of the AR4, with about one-quarter of the models showing a trend as large as, or larger than, 
the trend in the observations. Most models simulate a small downward trend in Antarctic sea ice extent, albeit with large 
inter-model spread, in contrast to the small upward trend in observations. {9.4}
•  Many models reproduce  the observed changes in upper-ocean heat  content (0–700 m) from 1961  to  2005 (high 
confidence), with the multi-model mean time series falling within the range of the available observational estimates for 
most of the period. {9.4}
•  Climate models that include the carbon cycle (Earth System Models) simulate the global pattern of ocean-atmosphere 
CO
fluxes, with outgassing in the tropics and uptake in the mid and high latitudes. In the majority of these models the 
sizes of the simulated global land and ocean carbon sinks over the latter part of the 20th century are within the range of 
observational estimates. {9.4}
D.2  Quantification of Climate System Responses
16 
No best estimate for equilibrium climate sensitivity can now be given because of a lack of agreement on values across assessed lines of evidence and studies.
Observational and model studies of temperature change, climate feedbacks and changes in 
the Earth’s energy budget together provide confidence in the magnitude of global warming 
in response to past and future forcing. 
{Box 12.2, Box 13.1}
•  The net feedback from the combined effect of changes in water vapour, and differences between atmospheric and 
surface warming is extremely likely positive and therefore amplifies changes in climate. The net radiative feedback due to 
all cloud types combined is likely positive. Uncertainty in the sign and magnitude of the cloud feedback is due primarily 
to continuing uncertainty in the impact of warming on low clouds. {7.2}
•  The equilibrium climate sensitivity quantifies the response of the climate system to constant radiative forcing on multi-
century time scales. It is defined as the change in global mean surface temperature at equilibrium that is caused by a 
doubling of the atmospheric CO
2
concentration. Equilibrium climate sensitivity is likely in the range 1.5°C to 4.5°C (high 
confidence), extremely unlikely less than 1°C (high confidence), and very unlikely greater than 6°C (medium confidence)
16
The lower temperature limit of the assessed likely range is thus less than the 2°C in the AR4, but the upper limit is the 
same. This assessment reflects improved understanding, the extended temperature record in the atmosphere and ocean, 
and new estimates of radiative forcing. {TS TFE.6, Figure 1; Box 12.2}
•  The rate and magnitude of global climate change is determined by radiative forcing, climate feedbacks and the storage 
of energy by the climate system. Estimates of these quantities for recent decades are consistent with the assessed 
likely range of the equilibrium climate sensitivity to within assessed uncertainties, providing strong evidence for our 
understanding of anthropogenic climate change. {Box 12.2, Box 13.1}
•  The transient climate response quantifies the response of the climate system to an increasing radiative forcing on a decadal 
to century timescale. It is defined as the change in global mean surface temperature at the time when the atmospheric CO
2
concentration has doubled in a scenario of concentration increasing at 1% per year. The transient climate response is likely 
in the range of 1.0°C to 2.5°C (high confidence) and extremely unlikely greater than 3°C. {Box 12.2}
•  A related quantity is the transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions (TCRE). It quantifies the transient 
response of the climate system to cumulative carbon emissions (see  Section E.8). TCRE is defined as the global mean 
SPM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested