view pdf in asp net mvc : Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks control Library utility azure .net web page visual studio WGIAR5_SPM_brochure_en2-part1031

Summary for Policymakers
15
surface temperature change per 1000 GtC emitted to the atmosphere. TCRE is likely in the range of 0.8°C to 2.5°C per 
1000 GtC and applies for cumulative emissions up to about 2000 GtC until the time temperatures peak (see Figure 
SPM.10). {12.5, Box 12.2}
•  Various metrics can be used to compare the contributions to climate change of emissions of different substances. The 
most appropriate metric and time horizon will depend on which aspects of climate change are considered most important 
to a particular application. No single metric can accurately compare all consequences of different emissions, and all have 
limitations and uncertainties. The Global Warming Potential is based on the cumulative radiative forcing over a particular 
time horizon, and the Global Temperature Change Potential is based on the change in global mean surface temperature 
at a chosen point in time. Updated values are provided in the underlying Report. {8.7} 
D.3  Detection and Attribution of Climate Change
Human influence has been detected in warming of the atmosphere and the ocean, in changes 
in the global water cycle, in reductions in snow and ice, in global mean sea level rise, and 
in changes in some climate extremes (see Figure SPM.6 and Table SPM.1). This evidence for 
human influence has grown since AR4. It is extremely likely that human influence has been 
the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century. 
{10.3–10.6, 10.9}
•  It is extremely likely that more than half of the observed increase in global average surface temperature from 1951 to 
2010 was caused by the anthropogenic increase in greenhouse gas concentrations and other anthropogenic forcings 
together. The best estimate of the human-induced contribution to warming is similar to the observed warming over this 
period. {10.3}
•  Greenhouse gases contributed a global mean surface warming likely to be in the range of 0.5°C to 1.3°C over the period 
1951 to 2010, with the contributions from other anthropogenic forcings, including the cooling effect of aerosols, likely to 
be in the range of −0.6°C to 0.1°C. The contribution from natural forcings is likely to be in the range of −0.1°C to 0.1°C, 
and from natural internal variability is likely to be in the range of −0.1°C to 0.1°C. Together these assessed contributions 
are consistent with the observed warming of approximately 0.6°C to 0.7°C over this period. {10.3}
•  Over every continental region except Antarctica, anthropogenic forcings have likely made a substantial contribution to 
surface temperature increases since the mid-20th century (see Figure SPM.6). For Antarctica, large observational uncer-
tainties result in low confidence that anthropogenic forcings have contributed to the observed warming averaged over 
available stations. It is likely that there has been an anthropogenic contribution to the very substantial Arctic warming 
since the mid-20th century. {2.4, 10.3}
•  It is very likely that anthropogenic influence, particularly greenhouse gases and stratospheric ozone depletion, has led 
to a detectable observed pattern of tropospheric warming and a corresponding cooling in the lower stratosphere since 
1961. {2.4, 9.4, 10.3}
•  It is very likely that anthropogenic forcings have made a substantial contribution to increases in global upper ocean heat 
content (0–700 m) observed since the 1970s (see Figure SPM.6). There is evidence for human influence in some individual 
ocean basins. {3.2, 10.4}
•  It is likely that anthropogenic influences have affected the global water cycle since 1960. Anthropogenic influences have 
contributed to observed increases in atmospheric moisture content in the atmosphere (medium confidence), to global-
scale changes in precipitation patterns over land (medium confidence), to intensification of heavy precipitation over land 
regions where data are sufficient (medium confidence), and to changes in surface and sub-surface ocean salinity (very 
likely). {2.5, 2.6, 3.3, 7.6, 10.3, 10.4}
SPM
Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
clickable links in pdf from word; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
Convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf hyperlinks; add link to pdf
Summary for Policymakers
16
Figure SPM.6 |  Comparison of observed and simulated climate change based on three large-scale indicators in the atmosphere, the cryosphere and 
the ocean: change in continental land surface air temperatures (yellow panels), Arctic and Antarctic September sea ice extent (white panels), and upper 
ocean heat content in the major ocean basins (blue panels). Global average changes are also given. Anomalies are given relative to 1880–1919 for surface 
temperatures, 1960–1980 for ocean heat content and 1979–1999 for sea ice. All time-series are decadal averages, plotted at the centre of the decade. 
For temperature panels, observations are dashed lines if the spatial coverage of areas being examined is below 50%. For ocean heat content and sea ice 
panels the solid line is where the coverage of data is good and higher in quality, and the dashed line is where the data coverage is only adequate, and 
thus, uncertainty is larger. Model results shown are Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) multi-model ensemble ranges, with shaded 
bands indicating the 5 to 95% confidence intervals. For further technical details, including region definitions see the Technical Summary Supplementary 
Material. {Figure 10.21; Figure TS.12}
Observations
Models using only natural forcings
Models using both natural and anthropogenic forcings
Land surface
Global averages
Ocean heat content
Land and ocean surface
SPM
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage using VB.NET programming code?
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; adding links to pdf in preview
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
Our PDF to HTML converter library control is a 100% clean .NET document image solution, which is designed to help .NET developers convert PDF to HTML
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; active links in pdf
Summary for Policymakers
17
•  There has been further strengthening of the evidence for human influence on temperature extremes since the SREX. It 
is now very likely that human influence has contributed to observed global scale changes in the frequency and intensity 
of daily temperature extremes since the mid-20th century, and likely that human influence has more than doubled the 
probability of occurrence of heat waves in some locations (see Table SPM.1). {10.6}
•  Anthropogenic influences have very likely contributed to Arctic sea ice loss since 1979. There is low confidence in the 
scientific understanding of the small observed increase in Antarctic sea ice extent due to the incomplete and competing 
scientific explanations for the causes of change and low confidence in estimates of natural internal variability in that 
region (see Figure SPM.6). {10.5}
•  Anthropogenic influences likely contributed to the retreat of glaciers since the 1960s and to the increased surface mass 
loss of the Greenland ice sheet since 1993. Due to a low level of scientific understanding there is low confidence in 
attributing the causes of the observed loss of mass from the Antarctic ice sheet over the past two decades. {4.3, 10.5}
•  It is likely that there has been an anthropogenic contribution to observed reductions in Northern Hemisphere spring snow 
cover since 1970. {10.5}
•  It is very likely that there is a substantial anthropogenic contribution to the global mean sea level rise since the 1970s. 
This is based on the high confidence in an anthropogenic influence on the two largest contributions to sea level rise, that 
is thermal expansion and glacier mass loss. {10.4, 10.5, 13.3}
•  There is high confidence that changes in total solar irradiance have not contributed to the increase in global mean 
surface temperature over the period 1986 to 2008, based on direct satellite measurements of total solar irradiance. There 
is medium confidence that the 11-year cycle of solar variability influences decadal climate fluctuations in some regions. 
No robust association between changes in cosmic rays and cloudiness has been identified. {7.4, 10.3, Box 10.2}
E.  Future Global and Regional Climate Change
Projections of changes in the climate system are made using a hierarchy of climate models ranging from simple climate 
models, to models of intermediate complexity, to comprehensive climate models, and Earth System Models. These models 
simulate changes based on  a set  of  scenarios  of anthropogenic forcings. A  new  set of scenarios,  the  Representative 
Concentration Pathways (RCPs), was used for the new climate model simulations carried out under the framework of the 
Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) of the World Climate Research Programme. In all RCPs, atmospheric 
CO
2
concentrations are higher in 2100 relative to present day as a result of a further increase of cumulative emissions of 
CO
2
to the atmosphere during the 21st century (see Box SPM.1). Projections in this Summary for Policymakers are for the 
end of the 21st century (2081–2100) given relative to 1986–2005, unless otherwise stated. To place such projections in 
historical context, it is necessary to consider observed changes between different periods. Based on the longest global 
surface temperature dataset available, the observed change between the average of the period 1850–1900 and of the AR5 
reference period is 0.61 [0.55 to 0.67] °C. However, warming has occurred beyond the average of the AR5 reference period. 
Hence this is not an estimate of historical warming to present (see Chapter 2) .
Continued emissions of greenhouse gases will cause further warming and changes in all 
components of the climate system. Limiting climate change will require substantial and 
sustained reductions of greenhouse gas emissions. 
{6, 11–14}
•  Projections for the next few decades show spatial patterns of climate change similar to those projected for the later 
21st century but with smaller magnitude. Natural internal variability will continue to be a major influence on climate, 
particularly in the near-term and at the regional scale. By the mid-21st century the magnitudes of the projected changes 
are substantially affected by the choice of emissions scenario (Box SPM.1). {11.3, Box 11.1, Annex I}
SPM
VB.NET PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images DNN, C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET
add a link to a pdf file; pdf links
VB.NET PDF Thumbnail Create SDK: Draw thumbnail images for PDF in
C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Generating thumbnail for PDF document is an easy work and gives
accessible links in pdf; adding links to pdf document
Summary for Policymakers
18
•  Projected climate change based on RCPs is similar to AR4 in both patterns and magnitude, after accounting for scenario 
differences. The overall spread of projections for the high RCPs is narrower than for comparable scenarios used in AR4 
because in contrast to the SRES emission scenarios used in AR4, the RCPs used in AR5 are defined as concentration 
pathways and thus carbon cycle  uncertainties affecting atmospheric CO
2
concentrations are not  considered in  the 
concentration-driven CMIP5 simulations. Projections of sea level rise are larger than in the AR4, primarily because of 
improved modelling of land-ice contributions.{11.3, 12.3, 12.4, 13.4, 13.5}
E.1  Atmosphere:  Temperature
Global surface temperature change for the end  of the 21st century is likely to exceed 
1.5°C relative to 1850 to 1900 for all RCP scenarios except RCP2.6. It is likely to exceed 2°C 
for RCP6.0 and RCP8.5, and more likely than not to exceed 2°C for RCP4.5. Warming will 
continue beyond 2100 under all RCP scenarios except RCP2.6. Warming will continue to 
exhibit interannual-to-decadal variability and will not be regionally uniform (see Figures 
SPM.7 and SPM.8). 
{11.3, 12.3, 12.4, 14.8}
•  The global mean surface temperature change for the period 2016–2035 relative to 1986–2005 will likely be in the range 
of 0.3°C to 0.7°C (medium confidence). This assessment is based on multiple lines of evidence and assumes there will be 
no major volcanic eruptions or secular changes in total solar irradiance.  Relative to natural internal variability, near-term 
increases in seasonal mean and annual mean temperatures are expected to be larger in the tropics and subtropics than 
in mid-latitudes (high confidence). {11.3}
•  Increase of global mean surface temperatures for 2081–2100 relative to 1986–2005 is projected to likely be in the 
ranges derived from the concentration-driven CMIP5 model simulations, that is, 0.3°C to 1.7°C (RCP2.6), 1.1°C to 2.6°C 
(RCP4.5), 1.4°C to 3.1°C (RCP6.0), 2.6°C to 4.8°C (RCP8.5). The Arctic region will warm more rapidly than the global 
mean, and mean warming over land will be larger than over the ocean (very high confidence) (see Figures SPM.7 and 
SPM.8, and Table SPM.2). {12.4, 14.8}
•  Relative to the average from year 1850 to 1900, global surface temperature change by the end of the 21st century is 
projected to likely exceed 1.5°C for RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5 (high confidence). Warming is likely to exceed 2°C for 
RCP6.0 and RCP8.5 (high confidence), more likely than not to exceed 2°C for RCP4.5 (high confidence), but unlikely to 
exceed 2°C for RCP2.6 (medium confidence). Warming is unlikely to exceed 4°C for RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP6.0 (high 
confidence) and is about as likely as not to exceed 4°C for RCP8.5 (medium confidence). {12.4}
•  It is virtually certain that there will be more frequent hot and fewer cold temperature extremes over most land areas on 
daily and seasonal timescales as global mean temperatures increase. It is very likely that heat waves will occur with a 
higher frequency and duration. Occasional cold winter extremes will continue to occur (see Table SPM.1). {12.4}
E.2  Atmosphere:  Water Cycle
Changes in the global water cycle in response to the warming over the 21st century will not 
be uniform. The contrast in precipitation between wet and dry regions and between wet 
and dry seasons will increase, although there may be regional exceptions (see Figure SPM.8). 
{12.4, 14.3}
•  Projected changes in the water cycle over the next few decades show similar large-scale patterns to those towards the 
end of the century, but with smaller magnitude. Changes in the near-term, and at the regional scale will be strongly 
influenced by natural internal variability and may be affected by anthropogenic aerosol emissions. {11.3}
SPM
.NET PDF SDK | Read & Processing PDF files
Able to convert PDF documents into other formats (multipage TIFF bookmarks and metadata; Advanced document cleanup and Annotate and redact in PDF documents; Fully
clickable links in pdf; add url to pdf
PDF Image Viewer| What is PDF
advanced capabilities, such as text extraction, hyperlinks, bookmarks and write, view, render, report and convert word document without need for PDF.
add hyperlink to pdf online; convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks
Summary for Policymakers
19
Figure SPM.7 | 
CMIP5 multi-model simulated time series from 1950 to 2100 for (a) change in global annual mean surface temperature relative to 
1986–2005, (b) Northern Hemisphere September sea ice extent (5-year running mean), and (c) global mean ocean surface pH. Time series of projections 
and a measure of uncertainty (shading) are shown for scenarios RCP2.6 (blue) and RCP8.5 (red). Black (grey shading) is the modelled historical evolution 
using historical reconstructed forcings. The mean and associated uncertainties averaged over 2081−2100 are given for all RCP scenarios as colored verti-
cal bars. The numbers of CMIP5 models used to calculate the multi-model mean is indicated. For sea ice extent (b), the projected mean and uncertainty 
(minimum-maximum range) of the subset of models that most closely reproduce the climatological mean state and 1979 to 2012 trend of the Arctic sea 
ice is given (number of models given in brackets). For completeness, the CMIP5 multi-model mean is also indicated with dotted lines. The dashed line 
represents nearly ice-free conditions (i.e., when sea ice extent is less than 106 km2 for at least five consecutive years). For further technical details see the 
Technical Summary Supplementary Material {Figures 6.28, 12.5, and 12.28–12.31; Figures TS.15, TS.17, and TS.20}
6.0
4.0
2.0
−2.0
0.0
o(C)
42
32
39
historical
RCP2.6
RCP8.5
Global average surface temperature change
(a)
RCP2.6 
RCP4.5 
RCP6.0 
RCP8.5 
Mean over
2081–2100
1950
2000
2050
2100
Northern Hemisphere September sea ice extent
(b)
RCP2.6 
RCP4.5 
RCP6.0 
RCP8.5 
1950
2000
2050
2100
10.0
8.0
6.0
4.0
2.0
0.0
6(10 km)
29 (3)
37 (5)
39 (5)
1950
2000
2050
2100
8.2
8.0
7.8
7.6
(pH unit)
12
9
10
Global ocean surface pH
(c)
RCP2.6 
RCP4.5 
RCP6.0 
RCP8.5 
Year
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
20
Figure SPM.8 | Maps of CMIP5 multi-model mean results for the scenarios RCP2.6 and RCP8.5 in 2081–2100 of (a) annual mean surface temperature 
change, (b) average percent change in annual mean precipitation, (c) Northern Hemisphere September sea ice extent, and (d) change in ocean surface pH. 
Changes in panels (a), (b) and (d) are shown relative to 1986–2005. The number of CMIP5 models used to calculate the multi-model mean is indicated in 
the upper right corner of each panel. For panels (a) and (b), hatching indicates regions where the multi-model mean is small compared to natural internal 
variability (i.e., less than one standard deviation of natural internal variability in 20-year means). Stippling indicates regions where the multi-model mean is 
large compared to natural internal variability (i.e., greater than two standard deviations of natural internal variability in 20-year means) and where at least 
90% of models agree on the sign of change (see Box 12.1). In panel (c), the lines are the modelled means for 1986−2005; the filled areas are for the end 
of the century. The CMIP5 multi-model mean is given in white colour, the projected mean sea ice extent of a subset of models (number of models given in 
brackets) that most closely reproduce the climatological mean state and 1979 to 2012 trend of the Arctic sea ice extent is given in light blue colour. For 
further technical details see the Technical Summary Supplementary Material. {Figures 6.28, 12.11, 12.22, and 12.29; Figures TS.15, TS.16, TS.17, and TS.20}
0.55 −0.5
0.6
0.4 −0.35
0.45
0.25 −0.2
0.3
0.1 −0.05
0.15
(pH unit)
10
9
−20
−10
−30
−50
−40
0
10
20
30
40
50
(b)
(c)
RCP 2.6
RCP 8.5
Change in average precipitation (1986−2005 to 2081−2100)
Northern Hemisphere September sea ice extent (average 2081−2100)
29 (3)
37 (5)
39
32
(d)
Change in ocean surface pH (1986−2005 to 2081−2100)
(%)
(a)
Change in average surface temperature (1986−2005 to 2081−2100)
39
32
(°C)
−0.5
−1
−2 −1.5
0
1
1.5
2
3
4
5
7
9
11
0.5
CMIP5 multi-model 
average 2081−2100
CMIP5 multi-model
average 1986−2005
CMIP5 subset 
average 2081−2100
CMIP5 subset
average 1986−2005
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
21
•  The high latitudes and the equatorial Pacific Ocean are likely to experience an increase in annual mean precipitation by 
the end of this century under the RCP8.5 scenario. In many mid-latitude and subtropical dry regions, mean precipitation 
will likely decrease, while in many mid-latitude wet regions, mean precipitation will likely increase by the end of this 
century under the RCP8.5 scenario (see Figure SPM.8). {7.6, 12.4, 14.3}
•  Extreme precipitation events over most of the mid-latitude land masses and over wet tropical regions will very likely 
become more intense and more frequent by the end of this century, as global mean surface temperature increases (see 
Table SPM.1). {7.6, 12.4}
•  Globally, it is likely that the area encompassed by monsoon systems will increase over the 21st century. While monsoon 
winds are likely to weaken, monsoon precipitation is likely to intensify due to the increase in atmospheric moisture. 
Monsoon onset dates are likely to become earlier or not to change much. Monsoon retreat dates will likely be delayed, 
resulting in lengthening of the monsoon season in many regions. {14.2}
•  There is high confidence that the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) will remain the dominant mode of interannual 
variability in the tropical Pacific, with global effects in the 21st century. Due to the increase in moisture availability, ENSO-
related precipitation variability on regional scales will likely intensify. Natural variations of the amplitude and spatial 
pattern of ENSO are large and thus confidence in any specific projected change in ENSO and related regional phenomena 
for the 21st century remains low. {5.4, 14.4}
Table SPM.2 |  Projected change in global mean surface air temperature and global mean sea level rise for the mid- and late 21st century relative to the 
reference period of 1986–2005. {12.4; Table 12.2, Table 13.5}
2046–2065
2081–2100
Scenario
Mean
Likely rangec
Mean
Likely rangec
Global Mean Surface 
Temperature Change (°C)
a
RCP2.6
1.0
0.4 to 1.6
1.0
0.3 to 1.7
RCP4.5
1.4
0.9 to 2.0
1.8
1.1 to 2.6
RCP6.0
1.3
0.8 to 1.8
2.2
1.4 to 3.1
RCP8.5
2.0
1.4 to 2.6
3.7
2.6 to 4.8
Scenario
Mean
Likely ranged
Mean
Likely ranged
Global Mean Sea Level 
Rise (m)
b
RCP2.6
0.24
0.17 to 0.32
0.40
0.26 to 0.55
RCP4.5
0.26
0.19 to 0.33
0.47
0.32 to 0.63
RCP6.0
0.25
0.18 to 0.32
0.48
0.33 to 0.63
RCP8.5
0.30
0.22 to 0.38
0.63
0.45 to 0.82
Notes:
a
Based on the CMIP5 ensemble; anomalies calculated with respect to 1986–2005. Using HadCRUT4 and its uncertainty estimate (5−95% confidence interval), the 
observed warming to the reference period 1986−2005 is 0.61 [0.55 to 0.67] °C from 1850−1900, and 0.11 [0.09 to 0.13] °C from 1980−1999, the reference period 
for projections used in AR4. Likely ranges have not been assessed here with respect to earlier reference periods because methods are not generally available in the 
literature for combining the uncertainties in models and observations. Adding projected and observed changes does not account for potential effects of model biases 
compared to observations, and for natural internal variability during the observational reference period {2.4; 11.2; Tables 12.2 and 12.3}
b Based on 21 CMIP5 models; anomalies calculated with respect to 1986–2005. Where CMIP5 results were not available for a particular AOGCM and scenario, they 
were estimated as explained in Chapter 13, Table 13.5. The contributions from ice sheet rapid dynamical change and anthropogenic land water storage are treated as 
having uniform probability distributions, and as largely independent of scenario. This treatment does not imply that the contributions concerned will not depend on the 
scenario followed, only that the current state of knowledge does not permit a quantitative assessment of the dependence. Based on current understanding, only the 
collapse of marine-based sectors of the Antarctic ice sheet, if initiated, could cause global mean sea level to rise substantially above the likely range during the 21st 
century. There is medium confidence that this additional contribution would not exceed several tenths of a meter of sea level rise during the 21st century.
c Calculated from projections as 5−95% model ranges. These ranges are then assessed to be likely ranges after accounting for additional uncertainties or different levels 
of confidence in models. For projections of global mean surface temperature change in 2046−2065 confidence is medium, because the relative importance of natural 
internal variability, and uncertainty in non-greenhouse gas forcing and response, are larger than for 2081−2100. The likely ranges for 2046−2065 do not take into 
account the possible influence of factors that lead to the assessed range for near-term (2016−2035) global mean surface temperature change that is lower than the 
5−95% model range, because the influence of these factors on longer term projections has not been quantified due to insufficient scientific understanding. {11.3}
d Calculated from projections as 5−95% model ranges. These ranges are then assessed to be likely ranges after accounting for additional uncertainties or different levels 
of confidence in models. For projections of global mean sea level rise confidence is medium for both time horizons.
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
22
E.3  Atmosphere:  Air Quality
•  The range in projections of air quality (ozone and PM2.5
17
in near-surface air) is driven primarily by emissions (including 
CH
4
), rather than by physical climate change (medium confidence).  There is high confidence that globally, warming 
decreases background surface ozone. High CH
4
levels (as in RCP8.5) can offset this decrease, raising background surface 
ozone by year 2100 on average by about 8 ppb (25% of current levels) relative to scenarios with small CH
changes (as 
in RCP4.5 and RCP6.0) (high confidence). {11.3}
•  Observational and modelling evidence indicates that, all else being equal, locally higher surface temperatures in polluted 
regions will trigger regional feedbacks in chemistry and local emissions that will increase peak levels of ozone and PM2.5 
(medium confidence). For PM2.5, climate change may alter natural aerosol sources as well as removal by precipitation, 
but no confidence level is attached to the overall impact of climate change on PM2.5 distributions. {11.3}
E.4  Ocean
The global ocean will continue to warm during the 21st century. Heat will penetrate from 
the surface to the deep ocean and affect ocean circulation. 
{11.3, 12.4}
It is very likely that the Arctic sea ice cover will continue to shrink and thin and that Northern 
Hemisphere spring snow cover will decrease during the 21st century as global mean surface 
temperature rises. Global glacier volume will further decrease.
{12.4, 13.4}
•  The strongest ocean warming is projected for the surface in tropical and Northern Hemisphere subtropical regions. At 
greater depth the warming will be most pronounced in the Southern Ocean (high confidence). Best estimates of ocean 
warming in the top one hundred meters are about 0.6°C (RCP2.6) to 2.0°C (RCP8.5), and about 0.3°C (RCP2.6) to 0.6°C 
(RCP8.5) at a depth of about 1000 m by the end of the 21st century. {12.4, 14.3}
•  It is very likely that the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) will weaken over the 21st century. Best 
estimates and ranges
18
for the reduction are 11% (1 to 24%) in RCP2.6 and 34% (12 to 54%) in RCP8.5. It is likely that 
there will be some decline in the AMOC by about 2050, but there may be some decades when the AMOC increases due 
to large natural internal variability. {11.3, 12.4}
•  It is very unlikely that the AMOC will undergo an abrupt transition or collapse in the 21st century for the scenarios 
considered. There is low confidence in assessing the evolution of the AMOC beyond the 21st century because of the 
limited number of analyses and equivocal results. However, a collapse beyond the 21st century for large sustained 
warming cannot be excluded. {12.5}
E.5  Cryosphere
17 
PM2.5 refers to particulate matter with a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometres, a measure of atmospheric aerosol concentration.
18 
The ranges in this paragraph indicate a CMIP5 model spread. 
•  Year-round reductions in Arctic sea ice extent are projected by the end of the 21st century from multi-model averages. 
These reductions range from 43% for RCP2.6 to 94% for RCP8.5 in September and from 8% for RCP2.6 to 34% for 
RCP8.5 in February (medium confidence) (see Figures SPM.7 and SPM.8). {12.4}
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
23
•  Based on an assessment of the subset of models that most closely reproduce the climatological mean state and 1979 
to 2012 trend of the Arctic sea ice extent, a nearly ice-free Arctic Ocean
19
in September before mid-century is likely for 
RCP8.5 (medium confidence) (see Figures SPM.7 and SPM.8). A projection of when the Arctic might become nearly ice-
free in September in the 21st century cannot be made with confidence for the other scenarios. {11.3, 12.4, 12.5}
•  In the Antarctic, a decrease in sea ice extent and volume is projected with low confidence for the end of the 21st century 
as global mean surface temperature rises. {12.4}
•  By the end of the 21st century, the global glacier volume, excluding glaciers on the periphery of Antarctica, is projected 
to decrease by 15 to 55% for RCP2.6, and by 35 to 85% for RCP8.5 (medium confidence). {13.4, 13.5}
•  The area of Northern Hemisphere spring snow cover is projected to decrease by 7% for RCP2.6 and by 25% in RCP8.5 by 
the end of the 21st century for the model average (medium confidence). {12.4}
•  It is virtually certain that near-surface permafrost extent at high northern latitudes will be reduced as global mean 
surface temperature increases. By the end of the 21st century, the area of permafrost near the surface (upper 3.5 m) is 
projected to decrease by between 37% (RCP2.6) to 81% (RCP8.5) for the model average (medium confidence). {12.4}
E.6  Sea Level
Global mean sea level will continue to rise during the 21st century (see Figure SPM.9). Under 
all RCP scenarios, the rate of sea level rise will very likely exceed that observed during 1971 
to 2010 due to increased ocean warming and increased loss of mass from glaciers and ice 
sheets. 
{13.3–13.5}
19 
Conditions in the Arctic Ocean are referred to as nearly ice-free when the sea ice extent is less than 106 km2 for at least five consecutive years.
•  Confidence in projections of global mean sea level rise has increased since the AR4 because of the improved physical 
understanding of the components of sea level, the improved agreement of process-based models with observations, and 
the inclusion of ice-sheet dynamical changes. {13.3–13.5}
•  Global mean sea level rise for 2081–2100 relative to 1986–2005 will likely be in the ranges of 0.26 to 0.55 m for RCP2.6, 
0.32 to 0.63 m for RCP4.5, 0.33 to 0.63 m for RCP6.0, and 0.45 to 0.82 m for RCP8.5 (medium confidence). For RCP8.5, 
the rise by the year 2100 is 0.52 to 0.98 m, with a rate during 2081 to 2100 of 8 to 16 mm yr
–1
(medium confidence). 
These ranges are derived from CMIP5 climate projections in combination with process-based models and literature 
assessment of glacier and ice sheet contributions (see Figure SPM.9, Table SPM.2). {13.5}
•  In the RCP projections, thermal expansion accounts for 30 to 55% of 21st century global mean sea level rise, and glaciers 
for 15 to 35%. The increase in surface melting of the Greenland ice sheet will exceed the increase in snowfall, leading to 
a positive contribution from changes in surface mass balance to future sea level (high confidence). While surface melt-
ing will remain small, an increase in snowfall on the Antarctic ice sheet is expected (medium confidence), resulting in a 
negative contribution to future sea level from changes in surface mass balance. Changes in outflow from both ice sheets 
combined will likely make a contribution in the range of 0.03 to 0.20 m by 2081−2100 (medium confidence). {13.3−13.5}
•  Based on current understanding, only the collapse of marine-based sectors of the Antarctic ice sheet, if initiated, could 
cause global mean sea level to rise substantially above the likely range during the 21st century. However, there is 
medium confidence that this additional contribution would not exceed several tenths of a meter of sea level rise during 
the 21st century. {13.4, 13.5}
SPM
Summary for Policymakers
24
•  The basis for higher projections of global mean sea level rise in the 21st century has been considered and it has been 
concluded that there is currently insufficient evidence to evaluate the probability of specific levels above the assessed 
likely range. Many semi-empirical model projections of global mean sea level rise are higher than process-based model 
projections (up to about twice as large), but there is no consensus in the scientific community about their reliability and 
there is thus low confidence in their projections. {13.5}
•  Sea level rise will not be uniform. By the end of the 21st century, it is very likely that sea level will rise in more than about 
95% of the ocean area.  About 70% of the coastlines worldwide are projected to experience sea level change within 20% 
of the global mean sea level change. {13.1, 13.6}
E.7  Carbon and Other Biogeochemical Cycles
Climate change will affect carbon cycle processes in a way that will exacerbate the increase 
of CO
2
in the atmosphere (high confidence). Further uptake of carbon by the ocean will 
increase ocean acidification.
{6.4}
•  Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO
2
will continue under all four RCPs through to 2100, with higher uptake for higher 
concentration pathways (very high confidence). The future evolution of the land carbon uptake is less certain. A majority 
of models projects a continued land carbon uptake under all RCPs, but some models simulate a land carbon loss due to 
the combined effect of climate change and land use change. {6.4}
•  Based on Earth System Models, there is high confidence that the feedback between climate and the carbon cycle is 
positive in the 21st century; that is, climate change will partially offset increases in land and ocean carbon sinks caused 
by rising atmospheric CO
2
. As a result more of the emitted anthropogenic CO
2
will remain in the atmosphere. A positive 
feedback between climate and the carbon cycle on century to millennial time scales is supported by paleoclimate 
observations and modelling. {6.2, 6.4}
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
(m)
2000
2020
2040
2060
2080
2100
Year
RCP2.6 
RCP4.5 
RCP6.0 
RCP8.5 
Mean over
2081–2100
Global mean sea level rise
Figure SPM.9 | Projections of global mean sea level rise over the 21st century relative to 1986–2005 from the combination of the CMIP5 ensemble 
with process-based models, for RCP2.6 and RCP8.5. The assessed likely range is shown as a shaded band. The assessed likely ranges for the mean 
over the period 2081–2100 for all RCP scenarios are given as coloured vertical bars, with the corresponding median value given as a horizontal 
line. For further technical details see the Technical Summary Supplementary Material {Table 13.5, Figures 13.10 and 13.11; Figures TS.21 and TS.22}
SPM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested