view pdf in asp net mvc : Add links to pdf online application software cloud windows html wpf class william-s-burroughs-word-virus-the-william-s-burroughs-reader-110-part1051

democracy of the equally suffering) offered
an attractive alternative to what Burroughs
saw as the enforced, institutionalized hypo-
crisy of middle-class America—as exempli-
fied by his uncle, Ivy Lee, whom he visited in
New York, with his parents, at Christmas
1925.
Mote and Laura took the family on a vaca-
tion cruise to France in 1929—the first of
many extracontinental journeys in Bur-
roughs’ life. Young Billy had persistent sinus
troubles, so in 1930 his parents sent him to
the Los Alamos Ranch School for boys in
northern New Mexico. The school was foun-
ded and run by A. J. Connell, a sort of Lord
Baden-Powell for the American Southwest:
he stressed an idealized Boy Scout-like exist-
ence, emphasizing physical hardening and
manly bonding, for both of which Burroughs
was rather ill-suited. The roster of fellow
L.A.R.S. alumni included many future Amer-
ican industrialists, as well as the author Gore
101/1780
Add links to pdf online - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add links to pdf in preview; add hyperlinks to pdf
Add links to pdf online - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf link open in new window; pdf email link
Vidal—who, late in Burroughs’ life, remin-
isced with him about the sexual importunit-
ies of Connell. Later, during WWII, the
Ranch School was commandeered as the ul-
trasecret home for the Manhattan Project.
Burroughs always hated Robert Oppen-
heimer and the other scientists who de-
veloped the atomic bomb, and the president
from Missouri who ordered its use on Japan.
Among L.A.R.S. alumni, however, this was
probably a minority view.
The New Mexico experience was trying for
Burroughs, in several ways; for one thing, it
was a separation from his mother that
proved unexpectedly stressful for him. He
was soon in trouble for going down to Santa
Fe with a classmate and passing out on
chloral hydrate, or “knockout drops”—no
doubt inspired by reading tales in boys’-ad-
venture magazines about shanghaied sailors.
Also at Los Alamos, he was first indulging his
dream of being a writer, and he kept a torrid
102/1780
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to Add necessary references
adding hyperlinks to pdf documents; add links to pdf in acrobat
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links. Form Process. Fill in form data programmatically.
convert excel to pdf with hyperlinks; add a link to a pdf
diary of his romantic feelings toward one of
the other boys. As Burroughs later wrote,
when he finally retrieved this diary—among
his possessions shipped home after the epis-
ode with the “Mickey”—he quickly destroyed
the dangerous pages.
Burroughs finished his high school credits
at the Taylor School in St. Louis after his ig-
nominious retreat from the Ranch School,
and in 1932, at eighteen, he left home for
Harvard University in Cambridge, Mas-
sachusetts. One of his friends there, Richard
Stern, was from a wealthy Kansas City fam-
ily, and he was instrumental in exposing
Burroughs to the gay subculture of New York
City in the early 1930s. They would drive
down to Harlem and Greenwich Village,
where they found lesbian dives, piano bars,
and a homosexual underground—exposing
Burroughs to some social stereotypes that he
found repulsive, but also giving him his first
inkling of a way of life that was an alternative
103/1780
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Turn PDF images to HTML images in VB.NET. Embed PDF hyperlinks to HTML links in VB.NET. Convert PDF to HTML in VB.NET Demo Code. Add necessary references:
add link to pdf file; pdf hyperlink
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness). C#.NET DLLs and Demo Code: Convert PDF to Word Document in C# Add necessary references
add links pdf document; accessible links in pdf
to the straight world. Burroughs went home
to St. Louis in the summer of 1935, and by
one account he lost his heterosexual virginity
at age twenty-one with an African-American
prostitute in an East St. Louis brothel, which
he then frequented for a time.
As Burroughs’ older brother grew up, Mort
proved to be a sensible, stoic member of his
family and of society—in marked contrast to
his brother William. He studied architecture
at Princeton and Harvard, then spent the
rest of his life in St. Louis. During WWII,
Mort had steady employment as a draftsman
for the Emerson Electric engineering com-
pany, where he worked until retirement. He
married a St. Louis woman and raised twin
daughters there, and attended to his parents
for as long as they lived, even after they re-
tired to Palm Beach, Florida, in 1952.
Throughout his life, William Burroughs
owed much of his freedom to his brother’s
dutiful help to the family—which began in
104/1780
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add links in pdf; add hyperlink pdf file
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
more detailed C# tutorials on each part by following the links respectively are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; pdf link to attached file
earnest just as the younger Burroughs was
moving as far away from all of them as
possible.
Burroughs had already embraced, at least
in his mind, a wide social underground of the
imagination; since boyhood, he was fascin-
ated with gangsters and hoboes, an under-
world with roots in nineteenth-century
America. He affected various eccentricities,
such as keeping a pet ferret in his rooms in
Adams House at Harvard, in emulation of
Saki’s “Sredni Vashtar” character. And he
kept pistols, with one of which he almost
killed Stern one day, firing it at him without
realizing the gun was loaded—an ominous
foreshadowing. Burroughs’ love of guns
began in the 1920s, when the pacification of
the Western frontier was still a living
memory in eastern Missouri; but he had a
special fascination for all weapons and tech-
niques of self-defense and mastery over oth-
ers, even as a young boy.
105/1780
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB.NET program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add links to pdf; add link to pdf
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# program. to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick
add a link to a pdf file; clickable pdf links
Burroughs completed his baccalaureate in
American Literature at Harvard in 1936,
and—after a “grand tour” through Eastern
Europe, which brought him fact-to-face with
the open homosexuality of the Weimar era in
Hungary and Austria—he stayed on in Vi-
enna, took classes in medicine there, and
briefly attended a school for fledgling diplo-
mats. He followed the rise of the Nazis in
Germany, and the impending Anschluss of
Austria; he picked up boys in Vienna’s an-
cient steam baths, the Romanische Baden,
and moved in a rarefied world of exiles, run-
aways, queers, and spies. In 1937, he agreed
to marry a woman he knew from his trips to
Dubrovnik: Ilse Herzfeld Klapper, a thirty-
seven-year-old German Jew, the doyenne of
a circle of gay intellectuals Burroughs had
met there. The marriage was Ilse’s idea, to
escape the Nazi invasion. Burroughs did not
share the anti-Semitism prevalent in the so-
ciety from which he sprang; he did not seek
106/1780
his parents’ permission, nor would they have
given it. He married Use in Athens, and gave
her the status she needed to flee to New
York. Burroughs met up with her there, and
although they remained friendly for years,
they separated at once, and he formally di-
vorced her nine years later.
Burroughs took psychology courses at
Columbia University in New York City, but
returned to Cambridge in the summer of
1938 to study anthropology. He was twenty-
four years old, and his roommates were Alan
Calvert and his best friend from St. Louis,
Kells Elvins. Kells was an intelligent, hand-
some man who was irresistible to women; he
married three of them in his short life.
Undoubtedly, Burroughs’ attraction to Elvins
was partly sexual, but there is no evidence
the relationship was ever physically consum-
mated. Elvins was studying criminal psycho-
logy, and Burroughs also wanted to under-
stand the criminal mind. During their time
107/1780
as graduate students, they wrote the farcical
vignette “Twilight’s Last Gleamings,” drunk-
enly acting out the scenes on a screened
porch, with lightning in the night sky.
Kells Elvins is an important figure in Bur-
roughs’ life; his innate mordant humor
helped to shape Burroughs’ writing. With the
savage, take-no-prisoners satire of college
men, informed by a shared appreciation of
the psychopathic mind, they tapped a vein of
cruel funniness that goes back through
Nashe, Sterne, Swift, Voltaire, and Petronius
to Aristophanes. The figure of “pure glitter-
ing shamelessness,” exemplified by the boat
captain’s rushing into the first lifeboat in wo-
men’s clothing, would be a touchstone of all
Burroughs’ work. This volume also includes
an essay from a mid-1970s Crawdaddy
column, in which Burroughs offers a more
explicit
retrospective
introduction
to
“Twilight’s Last Gleamings”—it is invaluable
for understanding the autobiographical
108/1780
Burroughs Ur-hero, “Audrey”/“Kim.” This
character also represents a visceral rejec-
tion—on grounds of hypocrisy, if not melo-
drama—of the “hero principle” as it was in-
culcated in young men of his social class.
Burroughs gained mastery over the Wasp
hero he was expected to be, and could never
become, by seizing upon and elaborating a
post-Nietzschean “antihero” concept.
The manuscript used for this version of
“Twilight’s Last Gleamings” was evidently
typed on a Spanish typewriter, and therefore
was typed—either from memory or (less
likely)
a
copy
of
the
original
manuscript—after Burroughs moved to Mex-
ico in 1949. But as the 1938 pages are lost,
this is the fullest extant version of this sem-
inal work, whose characters, ideas, and
scenes would recur throughout all of Bur-
roughs’ writing, sometimes verbatim. (The
reader will also find at least two further
echoes of this story, in Nova Express and
109/1780
The Wild Boys.) It marks the birth of “Doctor
Benway,” one of Burroughs’ archetypes—two
years after his medical-school experiences in
Vienna. In the heyday of Burroughs’ later
performing career, 1974–87, “Twilight’s Last
Gleamings” was a staple of his public read-
ings, never failing to get a rise from the
audience.
Kells Elvins went to Huntsville, Texas, to
work as a psychologist at the state prison,
and in late 1938 Burroughs visited him for a
few weeks, then returned to New York City
for the winter. Except for his friendship with
Ilse Klapper, who had worked as secretary
for a fellow émigré, the Broadway playwright
Ernst Toller, Burroughs’ activities during
1938–39 remain unclear. After Toller’s sui-
cide in May 1937, Klapper worked for the
actor Kurt Kasznar and the writer John
Latouche, and Burroughs may have unknow-
ingly met Brion Gysin, who worked on the
110/1780
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested