view pdf in asp net mvc : Active links in pdf control software platform web page winforms wpf web browser william-s-burroughs-word-virus-the-william-s-burroughs-reader-113-part1084

from the adding
machine
THE NAME IS BURROUGHS
The name is Bill Burroughs. I am a writer.
Let me tell you a few things about my job,
what an assignment is like.
You
hit Interzone
with
that grey
anonymously ill-intentioned look all writers
have.
“You crazy or something walk around
alone? Me good guide. What you want
Meester?”
Active links in pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding hyperlinks to pdf files; add links to pdf in acrobat
Active links in pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add link to pdf; pdf link open in new window
“Well uh,I wouldlike to writeabestseller
thatwouldbeagoodbook,abookaboutreal
people and places . . .”
The Guide stopped me. “That’s enough
Mister. I don’t want to read your stinking
book.That’sajobfortheWhiteReader.”The
guide’s face was a grey screen, hustler faces
moved across it. “Your case is difficult
frankly. If we put it through channels they
will want abigpiece inadvance.Now Ihap-
pen to know the best continuity man in the
industry, only handles boys he likes. He’ll
want a piece of you too but he’s willing to
take it on spec.”
People ask what would lead me to write a
book like Naked Lunch. One is slowly led
along to write a book and this looked good,
notrouble withthecastat all and that’s half
thebattlewhenyoucanfindyourcharacters.
The more far-out sex pieces I was just writ-
ing for my own amusement. I would put
them away in an old attic trunk and leave
132/1780
them for adistant boy to find . . . “Why Ma
this stuff is terrific—and I thought he was
just an old book-of-the-month-club corn
ball.”
Yes I was writing my bestseller . . . I fin-
ished it with a flourish, fadingstreets a dis-
tant sky, handed it to the publisher and
stood there expectantly.
He averted his face . . . “I’ll let you know
later,comearound,infact.Alwaysliketosee
a writer’s digs.” He coughed, as if he found
my presence suffocating.
Afewnightslaterhevisitedmeinmy attic
room, leaded glass windows under the slate
roof. He did not remove his long black coat
or his bowler hat. He dropped my
manuscript on a table.
“What are you,awise guy? We don’t have
a license on this. The license alone costs
more than we could clear.” His eyes darted
around the room. “What’s that over there?”
he demanded, pointing to a sea chest.
133/1780
“It’s a sea chest.”
“I can see that. What’s in it?”
“Oh, nothingmuch,justsome oldthings I
wrote,nottoshow anybody,quite badreally.
. .”
“Let’s see some of it.”
Now,tosay thatI never intendedpublica-
tion of these pieces would not be altogether
honest. They were there, just in case my
bestseller fell on the average reader like a
bag of sour dough—I’ve seen it happen, we
all have: a book’s got everything, topical my
God,thesceneispresent-day Vietnam(Falk-
landIslands!)seen through a rich variety of
characters .. . How canit miss? But it does.
People just don’t buy it. Some say you can
put acurse ona book so the reader hates to
touch it, or your book simply vanishes in a
little swirl of disinterest. So I had to cover
myself in case somebody had the curse in;
after all, I am a professional. I like cool re-
moteSundaygardenssetagainstaslate-blue
134/1780
mist, and for that set you need the Yankee
dollar.
As a youngchild Iwantedto be awriter be-
cause writers were rich and famous. They
lounged around Singapore and Rangoon
smoking opium in ayellow pongee silk suit.
They sniffed cocaine in Mayfair and they
penetratedforbidden swamps withafaithful
native boy andlived in the native quarter of
Tangier smoking hashish and languidly
caressing a pet gazelle.
I can divide my literary production into
sets: where, when and under what circum-
stances produced. The first set is a street of
redbrickthree-storyhouses withslateroofs,
lawns in front and large back yards. In our
back yard my father and the gardener, Otto
Belue, tended a garden with roses, peonies,
irisandafishpond.Theaddressis4664Per-
shing Avenue and the house is still there.
My first literary endeavor was called “The
Autobiography of a Wolf,” written after
135/1780
reading The Biography of a Grizzly. In the
end this poor old bear, his health failing,
deserted by his mate, goes to a valley he
knows is full of poison gas. I can see a pic-
turefromthe bookquite clearly,a sepiaval-
ley,animal skeletons, theoldbear slouching
in,all the old brokenvoices fromthe family
album find that valley where they come at
lasttodie.“They calledme the GreyGhost..
. . Spent most of my time shaking off the
ranchers.” The Grey Ghost met death at the
hands of agrizzly bear after seven pages, no
doubt in revenge for plagiarism.
There was something called Carl Cran-
buryinEgyptthatnevergotofftheground..
..CarlCranbury frozenbackthereon yellow
lined paper, his hand an inch from his blue
steelautomatic.Inthis setIalsowrote west-
erns,gangsterstories,andhauntedhouses.I
was quite sure that I wanted to be a writer.
WhenIwastwelvewemovedtoafive-acre
place onPriceRoadandIattendedtheJohn
136/1780
Burroughs School which is just down the
road. This period was mostly crime and
gangster stories. I was fascinated by gang-
sters and like most boys at that time I
wanted to be one because I would feel so
muchsafer withmy loyalguns aroundme.I
neverquitefoundthesensitive oldlady Eng-
lishteacher who moldedmy future career.I
wrote at that time Edgar Allan Poe things,
likeoldmeninforgottenplaces,veryflowery
and sentimental too, that flavor of high
school prose. I can taste it still, like chicken
croquettes and canned peas in the school
dining room. I wrote bloody westerns too,
and would leave enigmatic skeletons lying
around in barns for me to muse over . . .
“Tom was quick but Joe was quicker. He
turned the gun on his unfaithful wife and
then upon himself, fell dead in a pool of
blood and lay there drawing flies. The vul-
tures came later. ..especially the eyes were
alike, adeadblue opaqueness.” Iwrote alot
137/1780
of hangings: “Hardened old sinner that he
was, he still experienced a shudder as he
looked back at the three bodies twisting on
ropes, etched against the beautiful red sun-
set.”Thesestories werereadaloudinclass.I
remember one story written by another boy
who later lost his mind, dementia praecox
they calledit:“The captain triedtoswimbut
the water was too deep and he went down
screaming, ‘Help, help, I am drowning.’”
And one story, oh very mysterious . . . an
old man in his curtained nine-teen-twenties
Spanish library chances on a forgotten
volume and there written in letters of gold
the single word “ATHENA.” . .. “That ques-
tion will haunt him until the house shall
crumbletoruinsandhisbooksshallmoulder
away.”
At the age of fourteen I read a book called
you Can’t Win, being the life story of a
second-story man. And I met the Johnson
Family. A world of hobo jungles, usually by
138/1780
the river, where the bums and hobos and
rod-ridingpete men gatheredto cookmeals,
drink canned heat, and shoot the snow . . .
blacksmoke onthehipbehindaChinklaun-
dry in Montana. The Sanctimonious Kid:
“Thisisacrookedgame,kid,butyouhave to
think straight. Be as positive yourself as you
like, but no positive clothes. You dress like
every JohnCitizenorwepartcompany,kid.”
HewashangedinAustraliaforthemurderof
a constable.
And Salt Chunk Mary: “Mary had all the
no’s and none of them ever meant yes. She
received and did business in the kitchen.
Mary kept an iron pot of salt chunk and a
bluecoffeepotalwaysonthewoodstove.You
eat first and then you talk business, your
gear slopped out on the kitchen table, her
eyes old, unbluffed, unreadable. She named
a price, heavy and cold as a cop’s blackjack
on a winter night. She didn’t name another.
She kept her money in a sugar bowl but
139/1780
nobody thought about that. Her cold grey
eyeswouldhaveseenthethoughtandmaybe
something goes wrong on the next day,
Johnny Law just happens by or Johnny Cit-
izen comes up with a load of double-ought
buckshot into your soft and tenders. It
wouldn’tpaytogetgay withMary.Shewas a
sainttotheJohnsonFamily,alwaysgoodfor
aplate ofsaltchunk.Onetime Gimpy Gates,
anoldrod-ridingpeteman,killedabumina
jungle forcallingSalt ChunkMaryan oldfat
cow. The old yegg looked at him across the
fire,hiseyescoldasgunmetal...‘Youwerea
goodbum,butyou’redogmeatnow.’Hefired
threetimes.The bumfellforward,his hands
clutching coals, and his hair catching fire.
Well, the bulls pick up Gates and show him
the body: ‘There’s the poor devil you killed,
and you’ll swing for it.’ The old yegg looked
atthemcoldly.Heheldouthishand,gnarled
from years of safe-cracking, two fingers
blown off by the ‘soup’. ‘If I killed him,
140/1780
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested