view pdf in asp net mvc : Active links in pdf software control project winforms web page .net UWP william-s-burroughs-word-virus-the-william-s-burroughs-reader-132-part1153

citizens of the Federal District. One cop says,
‘Ah, Gonzalez, you should see what I got
today. Oh la la, such a bite!’
“‘Aah, you shook down a puto queer for
two pesetas in a bus station crapper. We
know you, Hernandez, and your cheap tricks.
You’re the cheapest cop inna Federal
District.’”
Lee waved to the waiter. “Hey, Jack. Dos
martinis, much dry. Seco. And dos plates
Sheeshka Babe. Sabe?”
The waiter nodded. “That’s two dry mar-
tinis and two orders of shish kebab. Right,
gentlemen?”
“Solid, Pops. . . . So how was your evening
with Dumé?”
“We went to several bars full of queers.
One place a character asked me to dance and
propositioned me.”
“Take him up?”
“No.”
“Dumé is a nice fellow.”
321/1780
Active links in pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add a link to a pdf; chrome pdf from link
Active links in pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add links to pdf; add url to pdf
Allerton smiled. “Yes, but he is not a per-
son I would confide too much in. That is,
anything I wanted to keep private.”
“You refer to a specific indiscretion?”
“Frankly, yes.”
“I see.” Lee thought, Dumé never misses.
The waiter put two martinis on the table.
Lee held his martini up to the candle, looking
at it with distaste. “The inevitable watery
martini with a decomposing olive,” he said.
Lee bought a lottery ticket from a boy of
ten or so, who had rushed in when the waiter
went to the kitchen. The boy was working the
last-ticket routine. Lee paid him expansively,
like a drunk American. “Go buy yourself
some marijuana, son,” he said. The boy
smiled and turned to leave. “Come back in
five years and make an easy ten pesos,” Lee
called after him.
Allerton smiled. Thank god, Lee thought. I
won’t have to contend with middle-class
morality.
322/1780
“Here you are, sir,” said the waiter, placing
the shish kebab on the table.
Lee ordered two glasses of red wine. “So
Dumé told you about my, uh, proclivities?”
he said abruptly.
“Yes,” said Allerton, his mouth full.
“A curse. Been in our family for genera-
tions. The Lees have always been perverts. I
shall never forget the unspeakable horror
that froze the lymph in my glands—the
lymph glands that is, of course—when the
baneful word seared my reeling brain: I was
a homosexual. I thought of the painted,
simpering female impersonators I had seen
in a Baltimore night club. Could it be pos-
sible that I was one of those subhuman be-
ings? I walked the streets in a daze, like a
man with a slight concussion—just a minute,
Doctor Kildare, this isn’t your script. I might
well have destroyed myself, ending an exist-
ence which seemed to offer nothing but grot-
esque misery and humiliation. Nobler, I
323/1780
thought, to die a man than live on, a sex
monster. It was a wise old queen—Bobo, we
called her—who taught me that I had a duty
to live and to bear my burden proudly for all
to see, to conquer prejudice and ignorance
and hate with knowledge and sincerity and
love. Whenever you are threatened by a hos-
tile presence, you emit a thick cloud of love
like an octopus squirts out ink . . .
“Poor Bobo came to a sticky end. He was
riding in the Duc de Ventre’s Hispano-Suiza
when his falling piles blew out of the car and
wrapped around the rear wheel. He was
completely gutted, leaving an empty shell sit-
ting there on the giraffe-skin upholstery.
Even the eyes and the brain went, with a hor-
rible shlupping sound. The Duc says he will
carry that ghastly shlup with him to his
mausoleum . . .
“Then I knew the meaning of loneliness.
But Bobo’s words came back to me from the
tomb, the sibilants cracking gently. ‘No one
324/1780
is ever really alone. You are part of
everything alive.’ The difficulty is to convince
someone else he is really part of you, so what
the hell? Us parts ought to work together.
Reet?”
Lee paused, looking at Allerton speculat-
ively. Just where do I stand with the kid? he
wondered. He had listened politely, smiling
at intervals. “What I mean is, Allerton, we
are all parts of a tremendous whole. No use
fighting it.” Lee was getting tired of the
routine. He looked around restlessly for
some place to put it down. “Don’t these gay
bars depress you? Of course, the queer bars
here aren’t to compare with Stateside queer
joints.”
“I wouldn’t know,” said Allerton. “I’ve nev-
er been in any queer joints except those
Dumé took me to. I guess there’s kicks and
kicks.”
“You haven’t, really?”
“No, never.”
325/1780
Lee paid the bill and they walked out into
the cool night. A crescent moon was clear
and green in the sky. They walked aimlessly.
“Shall we go to my place for a drink? I
have some Napoleon brandy.”
“All right,” said Allerton.
“This is a completely unpretentious little
brandy, you understand, none of this tourist
treacle with obvious effects of flavoring, ap-
pealing to the mass tongue. My brandy has
no need of shoddy devices to shock and co-
erce the palate. Come along.” Lee hailed a
cab.
“Three pesos to Insurgentes and Monter-
rey,” Lee said to the driver in his atrocious
Spanish. The driver said four. Lee waved him
on. The driver muttered something, and
opened the door.
Inside, Lee turned to Allerton. “The man
plainly harbors subversive thoughts. You
know, when I was at Princeton, Communism
was the thing. To come out flat for private
326/1780
property and a class society, you marked
yourself a stupid lout or suspect to be a High
Episcopalian pederast. But I held out against
the infection—of Communism I mean, of
course.”
“Aquí.” Lee handed three pesos to the
driver, who muttered some more and started
the car with a vicious clash of gears.
“Sometimes I think they don’t like us,”
said Allerton.
“I don’t mind people disliking me,” Lee
said. “The question is, what are they in a pos-
ition to do about it? Apparently nothing, at
present. They don’t have the green light. This
driver, for example, hates gringos. But if he
kills someone—and very possibly he will—it
will not be an American. It will be another
Mexican. Maybe his good friend. Friends are
less frightening than strangers.”
Lee opened the door of his apartment and
turned on the light. The apartment was per-
vaded by seemingly hopeless disorder. Here
327/1780
and there, ineffectual attempts had been
made to arrange things in piles. There were
no lived-in touches. No pictures, no decora-
tions. Clearly, none of the furniture was his.
But Lee’s presence permeated the apart-
ment. A coat over the back of a chair and a
hat on the table were immediately recogniz-
able as belonging to Lee.
“I’ll fix you a drink.” Lee got two water
glasses from the kitchen and poured two
inches of Mexican brandy in each glass.
Allerton tasted the brandy. “Good Lord,”
he said. “Napoleon must have pissed in this
one.”
“I was afraid of that. An untutored palate.
Your generation has never learned the pleas-
ures that a trained palate confers on the dis-
ciplined few.”
Lee took a long drink of the brandy. He at-
tempted an ecstatic “aah,” inhaled some of
the brandy, and began to cough. “It is god-
awful,” he said when he could talk. “Still,
328/1780
better than California brandy. It has a sug-
gestion of cognac taste.”
There was a long silence. Allerton was sit-
ting with his head leaning back against the
couch. His eyes were half closed.
“Can I show you over the house?” said Lee,
standing up. “In here we have the bedroom.”
Allerton got to his feet slowly. They went
into the bedroom, and Allerton lay down on
the bed and lit a cigarette. Lee sat in the only
chair.
“More brandy?” Lee asked. Allerton nod-
ded. Lee sat down on the edge of the bed,
and filled his glass and handed it to him. Lee
touched his sweater. “Sweet stuff, dearie,” he
said. “That wasn’t made in Mexico.”
“I bought it in Scotland,” he said. He
began to hiccough violently, and got up and
rushed for the bathroom.
Lee stood in the doorway. “Too bad,” he
said. “What could be the matter? You didn’t
drink much.” He filled a glass with water and
329/1780
handed it to Allerton. “You all right now?” he
asked.
“Yes, I think so.” Allerton lay down on the
bed again.
Lee reached out a hand and touched Aller-
ton’s ear, and caressed the side of his face.
Allerton reached up and covered one of Lee’s
hands and squeezed it.
“Let’s get this sweater off.”
“O.K.,” said Allerton. He took off the
sweater and then lay down again. Lee took
off his own shoes and shirt. He opened Aller-
ton’s shirt and ran his hand down Allerton’s
ribs and stomach, which contracted beneath
his fingers. “God, you’re skinny,” he said.
“I’m pretty small.”
Lee took off Allerton’s shoes and socks. He
loosened Allerton’s belt and unbuttoned his
trousers. Allerton arched his body, and Lee
pulled the trousers and drawers off. He
dropped his own trousers and shorts and lay
down beside him. Allerton responded
330/1780
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested