Natives . . . flat two-dimension faces of scav-
enger fish. . . .
“Throw the gasoline on them and light it. .
. .”
QUICK . . .
white flash . . . mangled insect
screams . . .
Iwoke up with the taste of metal in my
mouth back from the dead
trailing the colorless death smell
afterbirth of a withered grey monkey
phantom twinges of amputation . . .
“Taxi boys waiting for a pickup,” Eduardo
said and died of an overdose in Madrid. . . .
Powder trains burn back through pink
convolutions of tumescent flesh . . . set off
flash bulbs of orgasm . . . pin-point photos of
arrested motion . . . smooth brown side twis-
ted to light a cigarette. . . .
641/1780
Pdf hyperlink - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add hyperlink pdf; add link to pdf file
Pdf hyperlink - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding links to pdf in preview; change link in pdf file
He stood there in a 1920 straw hat some-
body gave him . . . soft mendicant words fall-
ing like dead birds in the dark street. . . .
“No . . . No more . . . No más. . .”
Aheaving sea of air hammers in the purple
brown dusk tainted with rotten metal smell
of sewer gas . . . young worker faces vibrating
out of focus in yellow halos of carbide lan-
terns . . . broken pipes exposed. . . .
“They are rebuilding the City.”
Lee nodded absently. . . . “Yes . . . Always .
. .”
Either way is a bad move to The East
Wing. . . .
If I knew I’d be glad to tell you. . . .
“No good . . . no bueno . . . husding myself.
. . .”
“No glot. . . C’lom Fliday”
Tangier, 1959
642/1780
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add a link to a pdf; accessible links in pdf
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add a link to a pdf file; add url to pdf
THE CUT-UPS
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Ability to get word count of PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
change link in pdf; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Merge all Excel sheets to one PDF file in VB.NET. Change Excel hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border.
add links to pdf document; add hyperlink to pdf
the cut-ups
by james grauerholz
Living alone at the Empress Hotel in Lon-
don, visiting Ian Sommerville (who was back
in school at Cambridge), and renewing his
literary work, William Burroughs began in
1960 to create his “cut-up trilogy”: The Soft
Machine, The Ticket That Exploded, and
Nova Express. He was mixing new pages
with older writing, cutting up everything
from his past to write an as-yet-unimagined
future. His publishers waged legal and liter-
ary battles on his behalf, even as they began
to recognize that this new work Burroughs
was turning in was hardly as accessible to his
growing public as Naked Lunch had
been—that novel did, after all, contain plenty
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Please click to see details. PDF Hyperlink Edit. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document
add hyperlinks pdf file; pdf link open in new window
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Please click to see details. C#.NET: Edit PDF Hyperlink. RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document
clickable pdf links; pdf email link
of satirical humor and titillating sexual and
drug-related material.
Now that Burroughs had achieved a meas-
ure of fame, he began to attract young ad-
mirers; Michael Portman, aged seventeen,
was the first of these, stalking Burroughs in
the fall of 1960 and making himself irresist-
ible. But “Mikey” was a trouble-child from
the English upper classes, and he tried to
outdo Burroughs in narcotics and alcohol
consumption. This pattern
continued,
worsening throughout his short life. Portman
was around Burroughs and Gysin, in London
and Tangier, for only about three years; he
died in his late thirties, from what Brion Gys-
in termed “wretched excess.”
Arelationship that, in contrast, would last
all Burroughs’ life, but that—like so many of
his important friendships—started off on the
wrong foot, began in early 1961 when Bur-
roughs received a letter from Timothy Leary,
Ph.D., Harvard. Leary was a psychological
645/1780
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Able to get word count in PDF pages. Change Word hyperlink to PDF hyperlink and bookmark. Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
add url link to pdf; add links in pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Add signature image to PDF file. PDF Hyperlink Edit. Support adding outline; More about PDF Hyperlink Edit ▶. PDF Metadata Edit. Support
adding an email link to a pdf; add hyperlink pdf file
researcher, but soon would leave that far be-
hind. His specialty was the relatively new
field of hallucinogenic drugs, which he
termed “psychedelic”—mind-expanding. The
history of these substances encompasses
some
interesting
anthropology
and
pharmaco-botany—as well as a political in-
tersection with the “Control machine,” in the
person of the CIA, whose secret experiments
with LSD in the fifties and sixties were later
revealed to have been widespread. Of course,
Burroughs’ early interest in yagé, had put
him in contact with these discoveries, and
Leary recognized this. He sent some psilo-
cybin mushrooms to Burroughs in London in
early 1961, at a time when Burroughs was
planning to spend the summer in Tangier
with Ian Sommerville.
Allen Ginsberg and Gregory Corso arrived
in Tangier in June 1961, just as The Olympia
Press published The Soft Machine in Paris.
Alan Ansen was not far behind, and everyone
646/1780
was now taking a potpourri of psychedelic
drugs in the name of spiritual discovery.
Leary arrived in Tangier at the climax of the
summer, and persuaded Burroughs to join
him in Newton, Massachusetts, for a month.
As Corso, Ansen, and Ginsberg all departed
Tangier in September, Burroughs flew to Bo-
ston to participate in Leary’s experiments.
But Leary was entering a messianic phase,
and after a few weeks he and Burroughs did
not see eye to eye.
Barney Rosset offered Burroughs a base-
ment apartment in Brooklyn, where he
worked on Nova Express. In New York at
this time, Le Roi Jones and Diane Di Prima
published their ninth issue of Floating Bear,
which included the suppressed “Roosevelt
After Inauguration” routine—for which they
were arrested. Burroughs spent only two
months in Brooklyn, returning to London for
his forty-eighth birthday in February 1962.
He came home to the sad news that Kells
647/1780
Elvins, passing through New York just after
Burroughs’ departure, had died of a heart at-
tack. Back at the Empress Hotel, living with
Sommerville (and Portman), Burroughs re-
turned to work on The Ticket That Exploded,
finishing the manuscript at this time—just as
Naked Lunch was finally published in the
U.S. by Grove Press in March.
With his publishers in France, England,
and the U.S. fighting various court battles for
the right to print his books (and the works of
Henry Miller, James Joyce, Frank Harris,
Vladimir Nabokov, and J. P. Donleavy), Bur-
roughs seized the opportunity to rewrite
some of his books between editions. After
The Soft Machine was published in Paris in
1961, Burroughs significantly expanded the
text for its 1966 publication by Grove in New
York, and again for John Calder’s 1968 Lon-
don edition, giving rise to three separate
states of the novel. The Ticket That Exploded
appeared in Paris in 1962; for Grove’s 1967
648/1780
edition, Burroughs expanded the text, but he
left it alone for Calder’s 1968 edition, so
there are just two states of Ticket. Grove was
the first publisher of Nova Express, in 1964,
and the (unchanged) U.K. edition, two years
later, was given to Jonathan Cape Ltd., due
to the reluctance of Burroughs’ U.K. agent to
grant Calder a monopoly.
As Barry Miles pointed out in his 1993 bio-
graphy of Burroughs, the new material in the
second and third states of Soft Machine, and
in the second state of Ticket, contain pas-
sages that provide a bridge to Burroughs’
next phase of writing: a polemical period
that parallels his erotic revival in his early
fifties. For this collection, however, the
American editions have been used.
The Edinburgh Conference was an annual
literary event in Scotland, and by the early
1960s it was exerting a notable attraction for
American and European literary figures.
John Calder arranged for Burroughs to be
649/1780
invited to Edinburgh, Calder’s hometown, in
August 1962. Attended by such luminaries as
Norman Mailer, Mary McCarthy, and Henry
Miller, the conference became focused on
Naked Lunch, pro and con. McCarthy’s con-
troversial appreciation of the novel—a defec-
tion from her social class—gave new mo-
mentum to Burroughs’ career. His remarks
at the conference were entitled “The Future
of the Novel,” and he ended with this state-
ment: “I am primarily concerned with the
question of survival—with Nova conspir-
acies, Nova criminals, and Nova police—A
new mythology is possible in the Space Age,
where we will again have heroes and villains
with respect to intentions towards this plan-
et—the future of the novel is not in Time, but
in Space.”
Around Christmas 1962, The Ticket that
Exploded was published in Paris, and there
was bad news from Palm Beach: Burroughs’
fifteen-year-old son had accidentally shot a
650/1780
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested