view pdf in windows form c# : Adding hyperlinks to a pdf software application project winforms windows asp.net UWP william-s-burroughs-word-virus-the-william-s-burroughs-reader-191-part1218

flapping down the lost streets a child sad as
stagnant flowers.
“Remember I was abandoned long ago
empty waiting on 1920 world in his eyes.”
Silence by 1920 ponds in vacant lots. Last
awning flaps on the pier last man here now.
February 22,1965
New York
ST. LOUIS RETURN
(ticket to St. Louis and return in a first class
room for two people who is the third that
walks beside you?) After a parenthesis of
more than forty years I met my old neighbor,
Rives Skinker Mathews, in Tangier. I was
born 4664 Berlin Avenue changed it to Per-
shing during the war. The Mathews family
lived next door at 4660—red brick three-
story houses separated by a gangway large
back yard where I could generally see a rat
911/1780
Adding hyperlinks to a pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add link to pdf; pdf link
Adding hyperlinks to a pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf email link; add hyperlinks to pdf online
one time or another from my bedroom win-
dow on the top floor. Well we get to talking
St. Louis and “what happened to so and so”
sets in and Rives Mathews really knows what
happened to any so and so in St. Louis. His
mother had been to dancing school with
“Tommy Eliot”—(His socks wouldn’t stay up.
His hands were clammy. I will show you fear
in dancing school)—Allow me to open a par-
enthesis you see Rives Mathews had kept a
scrapbook of St. Louis years and his mother
left a collection of visiting cards from the
capitals of Europe. I was on my way back to
St. Louis as I looked through Rives’s scrap-
book dim flickering pieces of T. S. Eliot
rising from the pages—(But what have I my
friend to give you put aside on another tray?
Those cards were burned in my winter house
fire, October 27,1961—Comte Wladmir Sollo-
hub Rashis Ali Khan Bremond d’ars Marquis
de Migre St. John’s College 21 Quai
Malaquais Principe de la Tour—Gentilhomo
912/1780
di Palazzo—you’re a long way from St. Louis
and vice versa.)
“I want to reserve a drawing-room for St.
Louis.”
“A drawing-room? Where have you been?”
“I have been abroad.”
“I can give you a bedroom or a roomette as
in smaller.”
“I will take the bedroom.”
6:40
P.M.
Loyal Socks Rapids out of New
York for St. Louis—Settled in my bedroom
surrounded by the luggage of ten years
abroad I wondered how small a roomette
could be. A space capsule is where you find
it. December 23, 1964, enlisting the aid of
my porter, a discreet Oriental personage and
a far cry indeed from old “Yassah Boss Ge-
orge” of my day, a table was installed in this
bedroom where I could set up my Facit port-
able and type as I looked out the train win-
dow. Snapping an occasional picture with my
Zeiss Ikon, I could not but lament the old
913/1780
brass spittoons, the smell of worn leather,
stale cigar smoke, steam iron and soot. Look-
ing out the train window—click click
clack—back back back—Pennsylvania Rail-
road en route four people in a drawing
room::::One leafs through an old joke
magazine called LIFE:—(“What we want to
know is who put the sand in the spin-
ach?”)—A thin boy in prep school clothes
thinks this is funny. Ash gathers on his fath-
er’s Havana held in a delicate grey cone the
way it holds on a really expensive cigar.
Father is reading The Wall Street Journal.
Mother is putting on the old pancake, The
Green Hat folded on her knee. Broth-
er—“Bu” they call him—is looking out the
train window. The time is 3
P.M.
The train is
one hour out of St. Louis, Missouri. Sad toy
train it’s a long way to go see on back each
time place what I mean dim jerky far away.
/Take/hook out the window of the train.
Look. Postulate an observer Mr. B. from
914/1780
Pitman’s Common Sense Arithmetic at Point
Xone light hour away from the train. Postu-
late further that Mr. B. is able to observe and
photograph the family with a telescopic cam-
era. Since the family image moving at the
speed of light will take an hour to reach Mr.
B., when he takes the 3
P.M.
set the train is
pulling into St. Louis Union Station at 4
P.M.
St. Louis time George the porter there wait-
ing for his tip. (Are you a member of the
Union? Film Union 4
P.M.?)
The family will be
met at the station by plain Mr. Jones or Mr.
J. if you prefer. (It was called Lost Flight.
Newspapers from vacant lots in a back alley
print shop lifted bodily out of a movie set the
Editor Rives Mathews. Mr. and Mrs. Mor-
timer Burroughs and their two sons Mor-
timer Jr. and William Seward Burroughs of
4664 Berlin Avenue changed it to Pershing
during the war. I digress I digress.)
Postulate another observer Mr. B-l at
Point X-l two light hours away. The train in
915/1780
his picture is now two light hours out of St.
Louis at 2
P.M.
still in the diner. The train is
stopped by a vacant lot distant 1920 wind
and dust /Take/ remote foreign sub-
urbs—end of a subdivision street—What a
spot to land with a crippled ship—sad train
whistles cross a distant sky. See on back
what I mean each time place dim jerky far
away not present except in you watching a
1920 movie out the train window? Returning
to 1964 or what’s left of it—December 23,
1964, if my memory serves I was thinking
about a friend in New York name of Mack
Sheldon Thomas not a finer man in In-
terzone than old S.T. has this loft apartment
and every time he leaves the bathroom door
open there is a rat gets in the house so look-
ing out the train window I see a sign: Able
Pest Control /Take/
“I tell you boss when you think something
you see it—all Mayan according to the Hindu
philosophizers,” observed
B. J. who
916/1780
fortunately does not take up any space in the
bedroom.
“B. J. there is no call to theorize from a
single brass spittoon or even a multiple smell
of worn leather. You know I dislike theories.”
“George! the nudes!”—(He knew of course
that the nudes would be waiting for me in
front of the Union Station.)
Look out the train window/Take/’. acres of
rusting car bodies—streams crusted with
yesterday’s sewage—American flag over an
empty field—Wilson Stomps Cars—City of
Xenia Disposal—South Hill a vast rubbish
heap—Where are the people? What in the
name of Christ goes on here? Church of
Christ / Take/ crooked crosses in winter
stubble—The porter knocks discreetly.
“Half an hour out of St. Louis, sir.”
Yes the nudes are still there across from
the station recollect once returning after a
festive evening in East St. Louis hit a parked
car 60 MPH thrown out of the car rolled
917/1780
across the pavement and stood up feeling for
broken bones right under those monumental
bronze nudes by Carl Milles Swedish
sculptor depict the meeting of the Missouri
and Mississippi river waters. It was a long
time ago and my companion of that remote
evening is I believe dead. (I digress I
digress.)
But what has happened to Market Street
the skid row of my adolescent years? Where
are the tattoo parlors, novelty stores, hock
shops—brass knucks in a dusty window—the
seedy pitch men—(“This museum shows all
kinds social disease and self abuse. Young
boys need it special”—Two boys standing
there can’t make up their mind whether to go
in or not—One said later “I wonder what was
in that lousy museum?”)—Where are the old
junkies hawking and spitting on street
corners under the gas lights?—distant 1920
wind and dust—box apartments each with its
own
918/1780
balcony—Amsterdam—Copenhagen—Frank-
furt—London—anyplace.
Arriving at the Chase Plaza Hotel I was
shown to a large double room a first class
room in fact for two people. Like a good
European I spent some time bouncing on the
beds, testing the hot water taps, gawking at
the towels the soap the free stationery the
television set—(And they call us hicks).
“This place is a paradise,” I told B. J.
And went down to the lobby for the local
papers which I check through carefully for
items or pictures that intersect amplify or il-
lustrate any of my writings past present or
future. Relevant material I cut out and paste
in a scrapbook—(some creaking hints—por
eso I have survived) Relevant material I cut
out and paste in a scrapbook—(Hurry up
please it’s time)—For example, last winter I
assembled a page entitled Afternoon Ticker
Tape which appeared in My Magazine pub-
lished by Jeff Nuttall of London. This page,
919/1780
an experiment in newspaper format, was
largely a rearrangement of phrases from the
front page of The New York Times, Septem-
ber 17, 1899, cast in the form of code mes-
sages. Since some readers objected that the
meaning was obscure to them I was particu-
larly concerned to find points of intersection,
adecoding operation you might say relating
the text to external coordinates: (From
Afternoon Tieker Tape: “Most fruitful
achievement of the Amsterdam Conference a
drunk policeman”). And just here in the St.
Louis Globe Demoerat for December 23, I
read that a policeman has been suspended
for drinking on duty slobbed out drunk in his
prowl car with an empty brandy bottle—(few
more brandies neat)—(From A. T. T.: “Have
fun in Omaha”)—And this item from Vermil-
lion, S.D.: “Omaha Kid sends jail annual note
and $10”—Please use for nuts food or
smokes for any prisoners stuck with Christ-
mas in your lousy jail” signed “The Omaha
920/1780
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested