194' 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Ilxi
a  box.  But  if  it  meant  this  I  ought  to  know  it.  I  ought  to  be
able to refer to the experience directly, and not only indirectly.  (As
I can speak of red without calling it the colour of blood.)
I shall call  the following figure, derived from Jastrow
1
, the duck-
rabbit.  It can be seen as a rabbit's head or as a duck's.
And I must distinguish between the 'continuous seeing' of an aspect
and the 'dawning' of an aspect.
The  picture  might  have  been  shewn  me,  and I  never  have  seen
anything but a rabbit in it.
Here  it  is  useful  to  introduce  the  idea  of a  picture-object.  For
instance
would be a 'picture-face'.
In some respects I stand towards it as I do towards a human face.
I can study its expression, can react to it as to the expression of the
human face.  A child can talk to picture-men or picture-animals, can
treat them as it treats dolls.
I may, then, have seen the duck-rabbit simply as a picture-rabbit
from the  first.  That is to  say, if asked "What's that?"  or "What do
you  see  here?"  I should  have  replied:  "A  picture-rabbit".  If I  had
further been asked what that was, I should have explained by pointing
to all sorts of pictures of rabbits, should perhaps have pointed to real
rabbits, talked about their habits, or given an imitation of them.
1 should not have answered the question "What do you see here?"
by saying:  "Now I am seeing it as a picture-rabbit".  I should simply
1
Fact and Fabli in Psyebologj.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Ilxi 
195*
have described my perception:  just as if I had said "I see a red circle
over  there."—
Nevertheless someone else could have said of me: "He is seeing the
figure as a picture-rabbit."
It would have made as little sense for me to say "Now I am seeing
it as  ..." as to say at the sight of a knife and fork "Now I am seeing
this as a knife and fork".  This expression would not be understood.—
Any more than: "Now it's a fork" or "It can be a fork too".
One  doesn't 'take'  what  one  knows  as  the  cutlery  at  a  meal for
cutlery;  any more  than  one  ordinarily  tries  to  move one's  mouth as
one eats, or aims at moving it.
If you say "Now it's a face for me", we can ask:  "What change are
you alluding to?"
I see  two  pictures,  with the duck-rabbit surrounded by rabbits in
one,  by ducks in  the other.  I  do not notice that they  are  the same.
Does it follow  from this that I see  something different in the two cases?—
It gives us a reason for using this expression here.
"I  saw  it  quite  differently,  I  should  never  have  recognized  it!"
Now, that is an exclamation.  And there is also a justification for it.
I  should  never have  thought  of superimposing  the  heads  like that,
of making this comparison between them.  For they suggest a different
mode  of comparison.
Nor has  the head  seen like this the  slightest similarity to  the head
seen like this—— although they are congruent.
I am shewn a picture-rabbit and asked what it is; I say "It's a rabbit".
Not "Now it's a rabbit".  I am reporting my perception.—I am shewn
the  duck-rabbit  and asked  what it  is;  I may say "It's a duck-rabbit".
But  I  may also  react  to  the  question  quite  differently.—The answer
that it is  a duck-rabbit is again the report of a perception; the answer
"Now it's a rabbit" is not.  Had I replied "It's a rabbit", the ambiguity
would  have  escaped me,  and I  should have been  reporting  my per-
ception.
The change of aspect.  "But surely you would say that the picture
is  altogether different now!"
But what is different: my impression?  my point of view?—Can I
say?  I describe the alteration like a perception; quite as if the object
had altered before my eyes.
Pdf reader link - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add link to pdf file; add a link to a pdf in preview
Pdf reader link - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf link to attached file; add links to pdf acrobat
196°
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS Ilxi
"Now I am seeing this", I might say (pointing to another picture, for
example).  This has the form of a report of a new perception.
The  expression  of  a  change  of  aspect  is  the  expression  of  a new
perception and at the same time of the perception's being unchanged.
I suddenly see the solution of a puzzle-picture.  Before, there were
branches there;  now there is  a human  shape.  My visual impression
has changed and now I recognize that it has not only shape and colour
but also a quite particular 'organization'.—My visual  impression has
changed;—what  was  it  like  before  and  what  is  it  like  now?—If I
represent it by means of an exact copy—and isn't that a good repre-
sentation of it?—no change is shewn.
And above all do not say "After all my visual impression isn't the
drawing; it is this——which I can't shew to anyone."—Of course it is
not  the  drawing,  but  neither  is  it  anything  of  the  same  category,
which I carry within myself.
The  concept  of the  'inner  picture'  is  misleading,  for  this  concept
uses the 'outer picture' as a model; and yet the uses of the words for
these concepts are no more like one another than the uses of 'numeral'
and 'number'.  (And if one chose to call numbers 'ideal numerals', one
might produce a similar confusion.)
If you put the 'organization' of a visual impression on a level with
colours  and  shapes,  you  are  proceeding  from the  idea  of the  visual
impression as an inner object.  Of course this makes this object into a
chimera; a queerly shifting construction.  For the similarity to a picture
is now impaired.
If I know that the schematic cube has various aspects and I want to
find out what someone else sees, I can get him to make  a  model of
what he sees, in addition to a copy, or to point to such a model; even
though he has no idea of my purpose in demanding two accounts.
But when we have a changing aspect the case is altered.  Now the
only  possible  expression  of  our  experience  is  what  before  perhaps
seemed, or even was, a useless specification when once we had  the
copy.
And  this  by  itself  wrecks  the  comparison  of  'organization'  with
colour and shape in visual impressions.
If I saw the duck-rabbit as  a rabbit, then I  saw:  these  shapes and
colours (I give them in detail)—and I saw besides something like this:
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS Ilxi 
197*
and here  I  point  to a number  of different  pictures  of rabbits.—This
shews the difference between the concepts.
'Seeing as . . . .' is not part of perception.  And for that reason it is
like seeing and again not like.
I  look at an animal and  am asked:  "What do you  see?"  I  answer:
"A rabbit".—I see a landscape; suddenly a rabbit runs past.  I exclaim
"A rabbit!"
Both things, both the report and the exclamation, are expressions of
perception  and of visual experience.  But  the exclamation is  so in  a
different sense from the repoit: it is forced from us.—It is related to the
experience as a cry is to pain.
But since it is the description of a perception, it can also be called the
expression of thought.——If you are looking at the object, you need
not think of it; but if you are having the visual experience expressed by
the exclamation, you are also thinking  of what you see.
Hence the flashing of an aspect on us seems half visual experience,
half  thought.
Someone suddenly sees an appearance which he does not recognize
(it may be a familiar object, but in an unusual position or lighting); the
lack of recognition perhaps lasts only a few seconds.  Is it correct to say
he  has  a  different  visual  experience  from  someone  who  knew  the
object at once?
For  might  not  someone  be  able  to  describe  an  unfamiliar  shape
that appeared before him just as accurately as I, to whom it is familiar?
And  isn't  that  the  answer?—Of course  it will  not  generally  be  so.
And his  description  will run  quite  differently.  (I  say, for example,
"The animal had long ears"—he:  "There were two long appendages",
and then he draws them.)
I meet someone whom I have not seen for years; I see him clearly,
but fail to know him.  Suddenly I  know him,  I  see the old face in the
altered one.  I believe that I should do a different portrait of him now
if I could paint.
Now,  when  I  know  my  acquaintance  in  a  crow
r
d,  perhaps  after
looking  in  his  direction for quite a while,—is  this  a  special sort  of
seeing?  Is it a case of both seeing and thinking? or an amalgam of the
two, as I should almost like to say?
The question is: why  does one want to say this?
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Adobe PDF. XDoc.PDF. Scanning. XImage.OCR. Microsoft Office. XDoc.Word. XDoc.Excel. XDoc.PowerPoint. Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator.
add hyperlinks pdf file; add page number to pdf hyperlink
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
pdf reader link; pdf link to email
i
9
8« 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Ilxi
The very expression which is also a report of what is seen, is here
a cry of recognition.
What  is  the  criterion  of  the  visual  experience?—The  criterion?
What do you suppose?
The representation of 'what is seen'.
The concept of a representation of what is seen, like that of a copy,
is very elastic, and so together with it is the concept of what is seen.
The two are intimately connected.  (Which is not to say that they are
alike.)
How does  one  tell that human  beings see   three-dimensionally?—
I ask someone about the lie of the land (over there) of which he has a
view.  "Is it like A&/J?" (I shew him with my hand)—"Yes."—"How
do you know?"—"It's not misty, I see it quite clear."—He does not
give reasons  for the  surmise.  The  only thing  that  is  natural  to  us
is to represent what we see three-dimensionally; special practice and
training  are  needed  for  two-dimensional  representation  whether  in
drawing or in words.  (The queerness of children's drawings.)
If someone sees a smile and does not know it for a smile, does not
understand it as such, does he see it differently from someone who
understands it?—He mimics it differently, for instance.
Hold  the  drawing  of a  face  upside  down  and  you  can't  recognize
the expression of the face.  Perhaps you can see that it is smiling, but
not exactly what kind  of smile it is.  You cannot imitate the smile or
describe it more exactly.
And yet the picture which you have turned round may be a most
exact representation of a person's face.
The figure  (a)
As  (c)
is  the  reverse  of the  figure  (b)
is  the  reverse  of  (d)
But — I should like to say — there is a different difference between my
impressions  of (c)  and  (d)  and  between  those  of  (a)  and  (b).  (d),
for  example,  looks  neater  than  (c).  (Compare  a  remark  of Lewis
Carroirs.)  (d) is easy, (c) hard to copy.
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS Ilxi
I
99
e
Imagine the duck-rabbit hidden in a tangle of lines.  Now I suddenly
notice it in the  picture, and notice it simply as the head of a rabbit.
At  some  later  time  I look at the  same picture  and  notice  the same
figure, but see it as the duck, without necessarily realizing that it was
the same figure both times.—If I later see the aspect change—can I say
that the duck and rabbit aspects are now seen quite differently from
when I recognized them separately in the tangle of lines?  No.
But  the  change  produces  a  surprise  not  produced  by  the  recog-
nition.
If you search in a figure (i) for another figure (2), and then find it,
you see (i) in a new way.  Not only can you give a new kind of descrip-
tion of it, but noticing the second figure was a new visual experience.
But you would not necessarily want to say "Figure (i) looks quite
different now; it isn't even in the least like  the figure I saw before,
though  they are  congruent!"
There are here hugely  many interrelated phenomena  and possible
concepts.
Then is the copy of the figure an incomplete  description of my visual
experience?  No.—But the circumstances decide whether, and what,
more detailed specifications are necessary.—It may be an incomplete
description; if there is still something to ask.
Of course we can  say:  There  are certain things which fall equally
under  the  concept  'picture-rabbit'  and  under  the  concept  'picture-
duck'.  And a picture, a drawing, is such a thing.—But the impression
is not simultaneously of a picture-duck and a picture-rabbit.
"What I  really see  must surely be what is produced in me by the
influence  of the object"—Then  what  is  produced in  me is  a sort  of
copy,  something  that  in  its  turn  can  be  looked  at,  can  be  before
one; almost something like a materialisation.
And this materialization is something spatial and it must be possible
to  describe  it  in  purely  spatial terms.  For instance  (if it  is  a face)
it can smile; the concept of friendliness, however, has no place in an
account of it,  but is foreign  to such an account  (even though it may
subserve it).
If you ask me what I saw, perhaps I shall be able to make a sketch
which shews you; but I shall mostly have no recollection of the way
my glance shifted in looking at it.
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows C# developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add hyperlinks to pdf online; pdf link open in new window
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
XDoc.PDF for .NET allows VB.NET developers to edit hyperlink of PDF document, including editing PDF url links and quick navigation link in bookmark/outline.
add hyperlink pdf file; pdf hyperlink
2OO*
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Hxi
The  concept  of  'seeing'  makes  a  tangled  impression.  Well,  it  is
tangled.—I  look  at  the  landscape,  my  gaze  ranges  over  it,  I  see
all  sorts  of  distinct  and  indistinct  movement; this  impresses  itself
sharply on  me, that is  quite hazy.  After all,  how completely ragged
what we see can appear 1  And now look at all that can be meant by
"description of what is seen".—But this just is what is called descrip-
tion  of what  is  seen.  There  is  not one genuine  proper  case  of  such
description—the  rest  being  just  vague,  something  which  awaits
clarification, or which must just be swept aside as rubbish.
Here we are in enormous danger of wanting to make fine distinc-
tions.—It is the same when one tries to define the concept of a material
object in terms of 'what is really seen'.—What we have rather to do is
to accept  the  everyday  language-game,  and  to  note false  accounts  of
the matter as false.  The primitive language-game which children are
taught  needs  no  justification;  attempts  at  justification  need  to  be
rejected.
Take as an example the aspects of a triangle.  This triangle
can be seen as a triangular hole, as a solid, as a geometrical drawing;
as  standing  on  its  base,  as  hanging  from  its  apex;  as  a  mountain,
as a wedge, as an arrow or pointer, as an overturned object which is
meant to stand on the shorter side of the right angle, as a half parallel-
ogram, and as various other things.
"You can think now of this now of this as you look at it, can regard
it now as this now as this, and then you will see it now this way, now
/j-." — What way? There is no further qualification.
But how is it possible to see an object according to an interpretation? —
The question represents it as a queer fact; as if something were being
forced into a form it did not really  fit. But no squeezing, no forcing
took place here.
When it looks as if there were no room for such a form between
other ones you have to look for it in another dimension.  If there is
no room here, there is room in another dimension.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Hxi 
201*
(It is in this sense too that there is no room for imaginary numbers
in the continuum of real numbers.  But what this means is: the applica-
tion  of the  concept  of imaginary  numbers  is  less  like  that  of  real
numbers than appears from the look of the calculations.  It is necessary
to get down to the application, and then the concept finds a different
place, one which, so to speak, one never dreamed of.)
How  would  the following  account do:  "What I  can  see  something
as
y
is what it can be a picture of"?
What this  means  is:  the  aspects  in  a  change  of aspects are those
ones which the figure might sometimes have permanently in a picture.
A triangle can really be standing up  in one picture, be hanging in
another, and can in a third be something that has fallen over.—That is,
I  who  am looking at it say, not  "It may also be  something that  has
fallen  over",  but  "That  glass  has  fallen  over  and  is  lying  there  in
fragments".  This is how we react to the picture.
Could  I  say  what  a  picture  must  be  like  to  produce  this  effect?
No.  There are,  for example,  styles  of painting which do not  convey
anything  to  me  in  this  immediate  way,  but  do  to  other  people.  I
think custom and upbringing have a hand in this.
What does it mean to say that I 'see the sphere floating in the air' in a
picture?
Is it enough that this description is the first to hand, is the matter-
of-course one?  No, for it might be so for various reasons.  This might,
for instance, simply be the conventional description.
What is the expression of my not merely understanding the picture in
this way, for instance,  (knowing what it is supposed to  be),  but seeing
it in this way?—It is expressed by: "The sphere seems to float", "You
see it  floating", or again, in a special tone of voice, "It floats!"
This,  then,  is  the  expression  of taking  something  for  something.
But not being used as  such.
Here  we  are  not  asking  ourselves  what  are  the  causes  and  what
produces this impression in a particular case.
And is  it  a  special  impression?—"Surely  I  see  something different
when I see the sphere floating from when I merely see it lying there."—
This really means: This expression is justified!—(For taken  literally
it is no more than a repetition.)
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
create PDF document viewer & reader in ASP.NET web application using C# code. Related C# PDF Imaging Project Tutorials! Please click the following link to see
pdf link to specific page; clickable links in pdf files
C# Raster - Raster Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
add hyperlink pdf; clickable links in pdf
202*
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Ilxi
(And yet my impression is not that of a real floating sphere either.
There  are  various  forms  of  'three-dimensional  seeing'.  The  three-
dimensional  character  of  a  photograph  and  the  three-dimensional
character of what we see through a stereoscope.)
"And is  it really a different  impression?"—In order to  answer this
I should like to ask myself whether there is really something different
there in me.  But how can I find out?——I describe  what I am seeing
differently.
Certain  drawings  are always  seen  as flat figures, and  others some-
times, or always, three-dimensionally.
Here one would now like to say:  the visual impression of what  is
seen three-dimensionally is three-dimensional; with the schematic cube,
for  instance,  it  is  a cube.  (For the  description  of the  impression  is
the description of a cube.)
And then it seems  queer that  with some drawings  our impression
should be a flat thing, and with some a three-dimensional thing.  One
asks oneself "Where is this going to end?"
When I see the picture of a galloping horse—do I merely know  that
this is the kind of movement meant?  Is it superstition to think I see
the horse galloping in the picture?——And does my visual impression
gallop too?
What  does  anyone  tell  me  by  saying  "Now  I  see  it  as .... ."?
What consequences has this information?  What can I do with it?
People  often  associate  colours  with  vowels.  Someone  might find
that a vowel changed its  colour when it was repeated over  and  over
again.  He finds a  'now blue—now red', for instance.
The expression  "Now I am seeing it as . . ."  might have no more
significance for us than:  "Now I find a  red".
(Linked  with  physiological  observations,  even  this  change  might
acquire importance for us.)
Here it occurs  to  me that in  conversation on aesthetic matters  we
use the words:  "You have to see it like this, this is how it is meant";
"When you see it like this, you see where it goes wrong";  "You have
to hear this bar as  an introduction";  "You must hear it in this  key";
"You must phrase it like this"  (which can refer to hearing as well as to
playing).
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS  Ilxi
This 
figure 
a
203*
is  supposed  to represent  a  convex step and to be used in some kind
of topological demonstration.  For this purpose we draw the straight
line a   through the  geometric centres  of the  two surfaces.—Now  if
anyone's three-dimensional impression of the figure were never more
than momentary, and even  so  were now  concave, now  convex,  that
might  make it  difficult  for him  to  follow  our demonstration.  And
if he finds that the flat aspect alternates with a three-dimensional one,
that is just as  if I were to shew him completely different objects in
the course of the demonstration.
What  does  it  mean  for  me  to  look  at  a  drawing  in  descriptive
geometry and  say:  "I  know  that this  line appears  again here,  but  I
can't see it like that"?  Does it simply  mean a lack of familiarity in
operating with  the  drawing;  that I  don't  'know  my  way  about'  too
well?—This  familiarity  is  certainly  one  of our  criteria.  What  tells
us that someone is seeing the drawing three-dimensionally is a certain
kind  of 'knowing  one's  way about'.  Certain  gestures,  for  instance,
which indicate the three-dimensional relations: fine shades of behaviour.
I see that an animal in a picture is transfixed by an arrow.  It has
struck it in the throat and sticks out at the back of the neck.  Let the
picture be a silhouette.—Do you see the arrow—or do you merely know
that these two bits are supposed to represent part of an arrow?
(Compare Kohler's figure of the interpenetrating hexagons.)
"But this isn't seeing]"—— "But this is seeing I"—It must be possible
to give both remarks a conceptual justification.
But this is seeing! In what sense is it seeing?
"The phenomenon is at first surprising, but a physiological explana-
tion of it will certainly be found."—
Our problem is not a causal but a conceptual one.
If  the  picture  of  the  transfixed  beast  or  of  the  interpenetrating
hexagons were  shewn to me  just  for  a  moment and  then  I  had  to
describe it, that would be my description; if I had to draw it I  should
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
reading PDF document in ASP.NET web, .NET Windows Forms and mobile developing applications respectively. For more information on them, just click the link and
add email link to pdf; adding links to pdf in preview
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
Besides, here is the quick link for how to process Word document within We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add hyperlink to pdf in preview; add a link to a pdf in acrobat
204
e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Ilxi
certainly produce a very faulty copy, but it would shew some sort of
animal transfixed by an arrow, or two hexagons interpenetrating.  That
is to say: there are certain mistakes that I should not make.
The first thing to  jump to my  eye  in this  picture is:  there  are two
hexagons.
Now I  look at them and ask  myself: "Do I really see them as hexa-
gons?"—and for the whole time they are before my eyes?  (Assuming
that they have not changed their aspect in that time.)—And I  should
like to reply: "I am not thinking of them as hexagons the whole time."
Someone tells  me:  "I  saw it  at once  as two  hexagons.  And  that's
the whole  of what I saw."  But how do I understand this?  I think he
would have  given  this  description at once in answer to the  question
"What are you  seeing?",  nor would he  have treated it as  one  among
several possibilities.  In this his description is like the answer "A face"
on being shewn the figure
The best description I can give of what was shewn me for a moment
is this:  .....
"The  impression  was  that  of  a  rearing  animal."  So  a  perfectly
definite description came out.—Was it seeing, or was it a thought?
Do not try to analyse your own inner experience.
Of  course  I  might  also  have  seen  the  picture  first  as  something
different,  and  then  have  said  to  myself  "Oh,  it's  two  hexagons!"
So the aspect would have altered.  And does this prove that I in fact
saw it as something definite?
"Is it a genuine visual experience?"  The question is:  in what sense
is it one?
Here it is difficult to see that what is at issue is the fixing of concepts.
A concept forces itself on one.  (This is what you must not forget.)
For when  should I  call  it  a  mere  case  of knowing,  not  seeing?—
Perhaps  when  someone  treats  the  picture  as  a  working  drawing,
reads it like a blueprint. (Fine shades of behaviour.—Why are they
important* They have important consequences.)
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS   Ilxi
205*
"To me it is an animal pierced by an arrow."  That is what I  treat
it as; this is my attitude to the  figure.  This is one meaning in calling it
a case of 'seeing'.
But can I say in the same sense: "To me these are two hexagons"?
Not in the  same sense, but in a similar one.
You need to think of the role which pictures  such as paintings (as
opposed to working drawings) have in our lives.  This role is by no
means a uniform one.
A  comparison:  texts  are  sometimes  hung  on  the  wall.  But  not
theorems of mechanics.  (Our relation to these two things.)
If you see the drawing  as such-and-such an animal, what I expect
from you will be pretty different from what I expect when you merely
know what it is meant to be.
Perhaps  the  following  expression  would  have  been  better:  we
regard the photograph, the picture on our wall, as the object itself
(the man, landscape, and so on) depicted there.
This need not have been so.  We could easily imagine people who
did not have this relation to such pictures.  Who, for example, would
be repelled by photographs, because a face without colour and even
perhaps a face reduced in scale struck them as inhuman.
I say: "We regard a portrait as a human being,"—but when do we do
so, and for how long? Always, if we see it at all (and do not, say, see it
as something else)?
I might say  yes to this,  and  that would determine the concept of
regarding-as.—The question  is whether yet another concept, related
to this  one, is also of importance to us:  that, namely, of a seeing-as
which only takes place while I am actually concerning myself with the
picture as the object depicted.
I might say: a picture does not always live for me while I am seeing it.
"Her picture smiles down on me from the wall."  It need not always
do so, whenever my glance lights on it.
The  duck-rabbit.  One  asks  oneself:  how  can  the  eye—this dot
be looking in a direction?—"See, if is looking^  (And one 'looks' one-
self as one says this.)  But one does not say and do this the whole time
one is looking at the picture.  And now, what is this "See, it's looking!"
—does it express a sensation?
2o6<= 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Ilxi
(In  giving  all  these  examples  I  am  not  aiming  at  some  kind  of
completeness, some classification of psychological concepts.  They are
only meant to enable the reader to shift for himself when he encounters
conceptual difficulties.)
"Now I see it as a ... ." goes with "I am trying to see it as a ... ."
or "I can't see it as a .... yet".  But I cannot try to see a conventional
picture of a lion as a lion, any more than  an F as that letter.  (Though
I may well try to see it as a gallows, for example.)
Do not ask yourself "How does it work with met"— Ask "What do I
know about someone else?"
How does one play the game: "It could be this too"?  (What a figure
could also be—which is what it can be seen as—is not simply another
figure.  If  someone  said  "I  see
he might  still be  meaning very different things.)
Here is a game played by children: they say that a chest, for example,
is  a house;  and thereupon it is interpreted  as  a house in every detail.
A piece of fancy is worked into it.
And does the child now see the chest as a house?
"He quite forgets that it  is a chest; for him it actually is  a house."
(There  are  definite  tokens  of  this.)  Then  would  it  not  also  be
correct to say he sees it as a house?
And  if you  knew  how  to  play  this  game,  and,  given  a  particular
situation, you exclaimed with special expression "Now it's a house!"—
you would be giving expression to the dawning of an aspect.
If I heard someone talking about the duck-rabbit, and now  he spoke
in  a  certain  way  about  the  special  expression  of the  rabbit's  face  I
should say, now he's seeing the picture as a rabbit.
But the expression in one's voice and gestures is the same as if the
object had altered and had ended by becoming  this or that.
I have a theme played to me several times and each time in a slower
tempo.  In the end I say "Now  it's right", or "Now  at last it's a march",
"Now at last it's a dance".—The same tone of voice expresses the
dawning of an aspect.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Hxi 
207*
Tine  shades  of behaviour.'—When  my understanding of a theme is
expressed  by  my whistling  it with  the  correct  expression, this is  an
example of such fine shades.
The aspects of the triangle: it  is  as if an image  came into contact,
and for a time remained in contact, with the visual impression.
In this, however, these aspects differ from the concave and convex
aspects  of the step  (for  example).  And  also from the aspects  of the
figure
(which  I  shall  call  a  "double  cross")  as  a  white cross on a black
ground and as a black cross on  a white ground.
You must  remember that the descriptions of the alternating aspects
are of a different kind in each case.
(The temptation to say "I see it like fbis", pointing to the same thing
for "it" and "this".)  Always  get rid  of the idea  of the  private  object
in this  way: assume that  it constantly  changes,  but  that  you  do  not
notice the change because your memory constantly deceives you.
Those two aspects of the double cross (I shall call them the aspects
A)  might  be  reported  simply  by  pointing  alternately to  an  isolated
white and an isolated black cross.
One could quite well imagine this as a primitive reaction in a child
even  before  it  could talk.
(Thus  in  reporting  the  aspects A we  point to  a part  of the  double
cross.—The  duck  and  rabbit  aspects  could  not  be  described  in  an
analogous  way.)
You only 'see the duck and rabbit aspects' if you are already conver-
sant with the shapes of those two animals.  There is no analogous con-
dition for seeing the aspects A.
It  is  possible  to  take  the duck-rabbit  simply  for  the  picture  of a
rabbit, the double cross simply for the picture of a black cross, but not
to take the bare triangular figure for the picture of an object that has
fallen over.  To see this aspect of the triangle demands imagination.
,208
e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Ilxi
The  aspects A are  not  essentially three-dimensional;  a black  cross
on a white ground is not essentially a cross with a white surface in the
background.  You could teach someone the idea of the black cross on
a ground of different colour without shewing him anything but crosses
painted  on  sheets  of  paper.  Here  the  'background'  is  simply  the
surrounding of the cross.
The  aspects  A  are  not  connected  with  the  possibility  of  illusion
in the same way as are the three-dimensional aspects of the drawing of
a cube or step.
I can see the schematic cube as a box;—but can I also see it now as a
paper, now as a tin, box?—What ought I to say, if someone assured me
he could?—I can set a limit to the concept here.
Yet think  of the  expression "felt"  in  connexion with  looking  at  a
picture.  ("One feels the softness of that material") (Knowing  in dreams.
"And I knew  that  . .  .  was in the room.")
How  does  one  teach  a  child  (say  in  arithmetic)  "Now  take these
things  together!"  or  "Now these  go  together"?  Clearly  "taking
together"  and  "going  together"  must  originally  have  had  another
meaning for him than that of seeing  in this way or that.—And this is a
remark about concepts, not about teaching methods.
One kind  of aspect  might be called  'aspects of organization'.  When
the  aspect changes parts  of the  picture go  together which before did
not.
In the triangle I can see now this as apex, that as base—now this as
apex, that as base.—Clearly the words "Now I  am seeing this as the
apex"  cannot  so  far  mean  anything  to  a  learner  who  has  only  just
met the concepts  of apex, base,  and  so  on.—But I do not mean this
as an empirical proposition.
"Now he's seeing it like this", "now like that" would only be said of
someone capable   of making  certain  applications  of the  figure  quite
freely.
The substratum of this experience is the mastery of a technique.
But  how  queer  for  this  to  be  the  logical  condition  of someone's
having such-and-such an experience^.  After  all, you don't say that  one
only  'has toothache' if one is capable of doing such-and-such.—From
this  it  follows  that we  cannot  be  dealing  with  the  same  concept  of
experience here.  It is a different though related concept.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Ilxi
2096
It is only if someone can do, has learnt, is master of, such-and-such,
that it makes sense to say he has had this experience.
And if this sounds crazy, you need to reflect that the concept of seeing
is  modified here.  (A  similar  consideration  is  often  necessary  to  get
rid of a feeling of dizziness in mathematics.)
We talk, we utter words, and only later get a picture of their life.
For  how  could  I  see  that  this  posture was  hesitant before  I  knew
that it was a posture and not the anatomy of the animal?
But surely that only means that I cannot use this concept to describe
the object of sight, just because it has more than purely visual reference?—
Might  I  not  for  all  that  have  a  purely  visual  concept  of a  hesitant
posture, or of a timid face?
Such a concept would be comparable with 'major' and 'minor' which
certainly have emotional value, but can also be used purely to describe
 perceived  structure.
The  epithet  "sad",  as  applied  for  example  to  the  outline  face,
characterizes  the  grouping  of lines  in  a  circle.  Applied  to  a  human
being it has a different (though related)  meaning.  (But this does not
mean that a sad expression is like the feeling of sadness!)
Think  of  this  too:  I  can  only  see,  not  hear,  red  and  green,—but
sadness I can hear as much as I can see it.
Think of the expression "I heard a plaintive melody".  And now the
question is:  "Does he hear the plaint?"
And if I reply: "No, he doesn't hear it, he merely has a sense of it"—
where  does  that  get  us?  One  cannot  mention  a  sense-organ  for this
'sense'.
Some  would  like  to  reply  here:  "Of  course  I  hear  it!"—Others:
"I don't really bear it."
We can, however, establish differences  of concept here.
We react to the visual impression differently from someone who does
not recognize it as timid (in the full sense of the word).—But I do not
want to say here that we feel this reaction in our muscles and joints
and  that  this  is  the 'sensing'.—No, what we  have here is  a modified
concept of sensation.
2I0
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  Ilxi
One might say of someone that he was blind to the expression  of a
face.  Would his eyesight on that account be defective?
This is, of course, not simply a question for physiology.  Here the
physiological is a symbol of the logical.
If you  feel the  seriousness of a  tune,  what  are  you perceiving?—
Nothing that could be conveyed by reproducing what you heard.
 can  imagine  some arbitrary  cipher—this,  for instance:
to be a  strictly correct letter of some foreign alphabet.  Or again, to
be a faultily written one, and faulty in this way or that: for example,
it  might  be  slap-dash,  or  typical  childish  awkwardness,  or  like  the
flourishes in  a  legal  document.  It  could  deviate,  from  the  correctly
written  letter  in  a  variety  of  ways.—And  I  can  see  it  in  various
aspects according to the fiction I surround it with.  And here there is a
close kinship with 'experiencing the meaning of a word'.
I should like to say that what dawns here lasts only as long as I am
occupied with the object in a particular way.  ("See, it's looking 1")——
'I  should  like  to  say'—and is it  so?——Ask  yourself "For how long
am I struck by a thing?"—For how long do I find it new?
The  aspect  presents  a  physiognomy  which  then  passes  away.  It
is almost as if there were a face there which at first I imitate, and then
accept without imitating it.—And isn't this really explanation enough?
—But isn't it too much?
"I  observed  the  likeness  between  him  and  his  father  for  a  few
minutes,  and  then  no  longer."—One  might  say this  if his  face  were
changing and only looked like his father's for a short time.  But it can
also  mean  that  after  a  few  minutes  I  stopped  being  struck  by  the
likeness.
"After the likeness had struck you, how long were you aware of it?"
What  kind  of  answer  might  one  give  to  this  question?—"I  soon
stopped thinking about it",  or "It struck me again from time to time",
or  "I  several times  had the  thought, how  like they arel",  or  "I  mar-
velled at the likeness for at least a minute"—That is the sort of answer
you would get.
I should like to put the question "Am I aware  of the spatial character,
the depth of an object  (of this  cupboard  for instance), the whole  time
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS  Ilxi
I am seeing it?"  Do I, so to speak,/*??/ it the whole time?—But put the
question in the third person.—When would you say of someone that he
was  aware of it the whole  time, and when the  opposite?—Of course,
one  could  ask  him,—but  how  did  he  learn  how  to  answer  such  a
question?—He  knows  what  it  means  "to  feel  pain  continuously".
But that will only confuse him here (as it confuses me).
If he now says he is continuously aware of the depth—do I believe
him?  And if he says he is aware of it only occasionally (when talking
about it, perhaps)—do I believe that?   These answers will strike me as
resting on a false foundation.—It will be different if he says that the
object sometimes strikes him as flat, sometimes as three-dimensional.
Someone  tells  me:  "I  looked  at  the  flower,  but  was  thinking  of
something else and was not conscious of its colour."  Do I understand
this?—I  can imagine  a significant  context, say his going on:  "Then I
suddenly saw  it, and realized it was the one which . . . . . . " .
Or again:  "If I  had  turned  away then, I  could  not  have  said what
colour  it  was."
"He  looked  at  it  without  seeing  it."—There  is  such  a  thing.  But
what is the criterion for it?—Well, there is a variety of cases here.
"Just now I looked at the shape rather than at the colour."  Do not
let  such  phrases  confuse  you.  Above  all,  don't  wonder  "What  can
be going on in the eyes or brain?"
The likeness makes a striking impression on me; then the impression
fades.
It only struck me for a few minutes, and then no longer did.
What happened here?—What can I recall?  My own facial expression
comes  to mind; I could  reproduce it.  If someone who knew  me had
seen my face he would have said "Something about his face struck you
just now".—There further occurs  to me what I say on  such an occa-
sion, out loud or to myself.  And that is all.—And is this what being
struck is?  No.  These are the phenomena of being struck; but they are
'what happens'.
Is  being  struck looking plus  thinking?  No.  Many of our  concepts
cross here.
('Thinking'  and  'inward  speech'—I  do  not  say 'to   oneself*—are
different  concepts.)
I2
e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS Ilxi
The colour of the  visual  impression  corresponds  to  the colour of
:he  object  (this  blotting  paper  looks  pink  to  me,  and  is  pink)—the
shape of the visual impression to the shape  of the object  (it looks rect-
mgular to me, and is rectangular)—but what I perceive in the dawning
of an  aspect  is  not  a property of the  object,  but  an  internal relation
between it and other objects.
It is  almost as  if 'seeing the sign in this context' were an echo of a
thought.
"The echo of a thought in sight"—one  would like to say.
Imagine  a  physiological  explanation  of the  experience.  Let  it  be
this: When we look at the figure, our eyes  scan it repeatedly, always
following  a  particular  path.  The  path  corresponds  to  a  particular
pattern of oscillation of the eyeballs in the act of looking.  It is possible
to jump from one such pattern to another and for the two to alternate.
(Aspects  A.)  Certain  patterns  of  movement  are  physiologically im-
possible; hence, for example, I cannot see the  schematic cube as two
interpenetrating  prisms.  And so  on.  Let this  be  the explanation.—
"Yes, that shews it is  a kind of seeing"— You have now introduced a
new, a physiological, criterion for seeing.  And this can screen the old
problem from view,  but not solve it.—The purpose of this paragraph
however, was to bring before our view what happens when a physio-
logical explanation is offered.  The psychological concept hangs out of
reach of this explanation.  And this makes  the nature of the problem
clearer.
Do I really see something different each time, or do I only interpret
what I see in a different way?  I am inclined to say the former.  But
why?—To interpret is to think, to do something; seeing is a state.
Now it is easy to recognize cases in which we are interpreting.  When
we  interpret  we  form  hypotheses,  which  may  prove  false.—"I  am
seeing this figure as a . . . .. " can be verified as little as (or in the same
sense as) "I am seeing bright red".  So there is a similarity in the use
of  "seeing"  in  the  two  contexts.  Only  do  not  think  you  knew  in
advance what the "state  of seeing" means here!  Let the use teach  you
the  meaning.
We  find  certain  things  about  seeing  puzzling,  because  we  do  not
find the whole business of seeing puzzling enough.
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS Ilxi
2130
If you look at a photograph of people, houses and trees, you do not
feel the lack of the third dimension in it.  We should not find it easy
to  describe  a  photograph  as  a  collection  of  colour-patches  on  a  flat
surface; but what we see in a stereoscope looks three-dimensional in
a different way again.
(It is  anything but a matter of course that we see 'three-dimension-
ally'  with  two  eyes.  If the  two  visual  images  are amalgamated,  we
might expect a blurred one as a result.)
The  concept  of an  aspect  is  akin  to  the  concept  of an  image.  In
other words: the concept 'I air  now seeing it as . . . .' is akin to  'I am
now having this  image'.
Doesn't  it  take  imagination  to  hear  something  as a variation on  a
particular theme?  And yet one is perceiving something in so hearing it.
"Imagine  this  changed  like  this,  and  you  have  this  other  thing."
One can use imagining in the course of proving something.
Seeing  an  aspect  and  imagining  are  subject to  the  will.  There  is
such an order as "Imagine this", and also:  "Now see the figure like
this"; but not: "Now see this leaf green".
The question  now arises:  Could there be human beings lacking in
the capacity to see something as something— and what would that be
like?  What sort of consequences would it have?—Would this defect
be comparable to colour-blindness or to not having absolute pitch?—
We will call it  "aspect-blindness"—and will next consider what might
be meant by this.  (A conceptual investigation.)  The aspect-blind man
is supposed not to see the aspects A change.  But is he also supposed
not  to  recognize  that  the  double  cross  contains  both  a  black and  a
white  cross?  So  if told  "Shew  me  figures  containing  a  black  cross
among these examples" will he be unable to manage it?  No, he should
be able to  do  that;  but he will not be  supposed  to  say:  "Now it's  a
black  cross  on  a  white  ground!"
Is  he supposed to be blind to  the  similarity between two faces?—
And so also to their identity or approximate identity?  I do not want
to settle this.  (He ought to be able to  execute such orders as "Bring
me something that looks like this")
Ought he  to  be  unable  to see  the  schematic  cube  as  a  cube?—It
would not follow from that that he could not recognize it as a repre-
sentation  (a working drawing  for instance) of a cube.  But for him it
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested