view pdf in windows form c# : Clickable links in pdf SDK software API .net winforms html sharepoint WittgensteinInvestigations2-part1302

34
e
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
71.  One might say that the concept 'game' is a concept with blurred
edges.—"But is a blurred concept a concept at all?"—Is an indistinct
photograph a picture of a person at all?  Is it even always an advantage
to replace an indistinct picture by a sharp one?  Isn't the indistinct one
often exactly what we need?
Frege  compares  a  concept  to  an  area  and  says  that an  area  with
vague  boundaries  cannot  be  called  an  area  at  all.  This  presumably
means that we cannot do anything with it.—But is it senseless to say:
"Stand  roughly there"?  Suppose that  I  were standing with someone
in a city square and said that.  As I say it I do not draw any kind of
boundary, but perhaps point with my hand—as if I were indicating a
particular spot.  And this  is  just how  one  might explain  to  someone
what a  game is.  One  gives  examples  and  intends  them to  be  taken
in  a  particular  way.—I  do  not,  however,  mean  by  this  that  he  is
supposed  to  see  in  those  examples  that  common thing  which I—for
some  reason—was  unable  to  express;  but  that he is  now  to employ
those examples in a particular way.  Here giving examples is not an
indirect means of explaining—in default of a better. For any general
definition can be misunderstood too.  The point is that this is how we
play the game.  (I mean the language-game with the word "game".)
72. Seeing what is com?non.  Suppose I shew someone various multi-
coloured pictures, and  say:  "The  colour you see in all these is  called
'yellow ochre' ".—This is a definition, and the other will get to under-
stand  it  by  looking  for  and  seeing  what  is  common  to  the pictures.
Then he can look at., can point to, the common thing.
Compare with this a case in which I shew him figures of different
shapes  all  painted  the  same  colour,  and  say:  "What  these  have  in
common is  called  'yellow  ochre' ".
And compare this  case:  I shew him samples of different shades of
blue and say:  "The  colour that is  common  to all these is  what I call
'blue' ".
73.  When someone defines the names of colours for me by point-
ing  to  samples  and  saying  "This  colour  is  called  'blue',  this
'green' . . . . . "  this case can be compared in many respects to putting
a table in my hands, with the words written under the colour-samples.—
Though  this  comparison  may  mislead  in  many  ways.—One  is  now
inclined  to extend  the  comparison:  to  have  understood  the  definition
means to have in one's mind an idea of the thing defined, and that is a
sample or picture.  So if I am shewn various different leaves and told
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
3J
e
"This is  called a  'leaf ", I get an idea of the shape of a leaf, a picture
of it  in  my  mind.—But  what  does  the  picture  of  a  leaf  look  like
when it does not shew us any particular shape, but 'what is  common
to all shapes of leaf?  Which shade is the 'sample in my mind'  of the
colour green—the sample of what is common to all shades of green?
"But  might  there not  be  such 'general'  samples?  Say  a  schematic
leaf,  or  a  sample  of pure   green?"—Certainly  there  might.  But  for
such a schema to be understood as a schema, and not as the shape of a
particular  leaf,  and  for  a  slip  of pure  green  to  be  understood  as  a
sample of all that is greenish and not as a sample of pure green—this
in turn resides in the way the samples are used.
Ask yourself: what shape must the sample of the  colour green  be?
Should it be rectangular?  Or would it then be the sample of a green
rectangle?—So  should  it  be  'irregular'  in  shape?  And  what  is  to
prevent us  then from regarding  it—that is, from using it—only as a
sample of irregularity of shape?
74.  Here also belongs the idea that if you see this leaf as a sample
of 'leaf shape in  general'  you see   it  differently  from  someone  who
regards it as, say, a sample of this particular shape.  Now this might
well be so—though it is not so—for it would only be to say that, as a
matter of experience, if you see the leaf in a particular way, you use it
in such-and-such a way or according to such-and-such rules.  Of course,
there is  such a thing as  seeing in this way or that; and there are also
cases where whoever sees  a sample like this will in general use it in
this way, and whoever sees it otherwise in another way. For example,
if you see the schematic drawing of a cube as a plane figure consisting
of a  square  and two  rhombi you will,  perhaps,  carry  out  the  order
"Bring  me  something  like  this"  differently  from  someone  who  sees
the  picture  three-dimensionally.
75.  What does  it  mean  to  know what a game is?  What does  it
mean, to know it and not be able to say it?  Is this  knowledge some-
how  equivalent  to  an  unformulated  definition?  So  that  if it  were
formulated I  should  be able  to recognize  it as  the  expression  of my
knowledge?  Isn't my knowledge,  my concept of a game,  completely
expressed in the explanations that I could give?  That is, in my describ-
ing examples of various kinds of game; shewing how all sorts of other
games can be constructed on the analogy of these; saying that I should
scarcely include this or this among games; and so on.
Clickable links in pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
add email link to pdf; add page number to pdf hyperlink
Clickable links in pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
pdf reader link; add links to pdf in preview
36*
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
76.  If someone were to draw a sharp boundary I could not acknow-
ledge it as the one that I too always wanted to draw, or had drawn in
my mind.  For I did not want to draw one at all.  His concept can then
be  said  to  be  not  the  same  as  mine,  but  akin to  it.  The  kinship  is
that  of two  pictures,  one  of which  consists  of colour  patches  with
vague  contours,  and  the  other  of patches  similarly  shaped  and  dis-
tributed, but with clear contours.  The kinship is just as undeniable as
the  difference.
77.  And if we carry this comparison still further it is clear that the
degree to which the sharp picture can  resemble the blurred one depends
on the latter's  degree  of vagueness.  For imagine having to  sketch a
sharply defined picture 'corresponding' to a blurred one.  In the latter
there is a blurred red rectangle: for it you put down a sharply defined
one.  Of course—several such sharply defined rectangles can be drawn
to correspond to the indefinite one.—But if the colours in the original
merge without a hint of any outline won't it become  a  hopeless  task
to  draw  a  sharp  picture  corresponding  to  the blurred  one?  Won't
you then have to say: "Here I might just as well draw a circle or heart
as a rectangle, for all the colours merge.  Anything—and nothing—is
right."——And this is the position you are in if you look for definitions
corresponding to our concepts in aesthetics or ethics.
In such a difficulty always ask yourself: How did we learn the mean-
ing of tliis word ("good" for instance)?  From what sort of examples?
in what language-games?  Then it will be easier for you to see that the
word must have a family of meanings.
78.  Compare knowing and saying*.
how many feet high Mont Blanc is—
how the word "game" is used—
how a clarinet sounds.
If you  are  surprised  that  one  can  know  something  and  not be able
to say it, you are perhaps thinking of a case like the first. Certainly not
of one  like the third.
79.  Consider  this  example.  If one  says  "Moses  did  not  exist",
this  may  mean various  things.  It  may mean:  the  Israelites  did  not
have  a single  leader  when  they  withdrew  from  Egypt——or:  their
leader was  not called Moses——-or
s
there cannot  have been anyone
who accomplished all that the Bible relates of Moses——or: etc. etc.—
We may say, following Russell: the name "Moses" can be defined by
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
37
e
means of various descriptions.  For example, as "the man who led the
Israelites  through  the  wilderness",  "the  man  who  lived  at  that  time
and place and was then called 'Moses' ", "the man who as a child was
taken out of the Nile by Pharaoh's daughter" and so on.  And accord-
ing  as  we  assume  one  definition  or  another the proposition "Moses
did  not  exist"  acquires  a  different  sense,  and  so  does  every  other
proposition about Moses.—And if we are told "N did not exist", we do
ask: "What do you mean? Do you want to say . . . . . . or . . . . . . etc.?"
But when I make a  statement about Moses,—am I always ready to
substitute some one of these descriptions for "Moses"?  I shall perhaps
say: By "Moses" I understand the man who did what the Bible relates
of Moses,  or at any rate a good deal of it.  But how much?  Have I
decided how much must be proved false for me to give up my proposi-
tion  as false?  Has the name "Moses" got a fixed and unequivocal use
for me in all possible cases?—Is it not the case that I have, so to speak,
a whole series of props in readiness, and am ready to lean on one if
another should be taken from under me and vice versa?——Consider
another case.  When I say "N is dead", then something like the follow-
ing may hold for the meaning of the name "N": I believe that a human
being has lived, whom I  (i) have seen in such-and-such places, who
(2) looked like this (pictures), (3) has done such-and-such things, and
(4)  bore  the  name  "N"  in  social  life.—Asked  what I understand by
"N", I should enumerate all or some of these points, and different ones
on  different  occasions.  So  my  definition  of  "N"  would  perhaps  be
"the  man  of whom all  this  is  true".—But if  some point now proves
false?—Shall  I  be  prepared  to  declare  the  proposition  "N  is  dead"
false—even  if  it  is  only  something  which  strikes  me  as  incidental
that has turned out false?  But where are the bounds of the incidental?—
If I had given a definition of the name in such a case, I should now be
ready to alter it.
And this can be expressed like this: I use the name "N" without a
fixed meaning. (But that detracts as little from its usefulness, as it
detracts from that of a table that it stands on four legs instead of three
and so sometimes wobbles.)
Should it be  said that I  am using  a word whose meaning I  don't
know, and so am talking nonsense?—Say what you choose,  so long
as it does not prevent you from seeing the facts.  (And when you see
them there is a good deal that you will not say.)
(The  fluctuation  of scientific definitions:  what  to-day  counts  as  an
C# TIFF: How to Convert TIFF File to PDF Document in C# Project
Standardization (ISO). Clickable links and buttons, form fields and video can be inserted into a PDF file without quality loss. Documents, forms
adding hyperlinks to a pdf; add hyperlink pdf file
38« 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
observed  concomitant  of  a  phenomenon  will  to-morrow  be  used  to
define  it.)
80.  I say "There is a  chair".  What if I go up to it, meaning to
fetch it, and it suddenly disappears from sight?——"So it wasn't a chair,
but some kind of illusion".——But in a few  moments we see it again
and are able to touch it and so on.——"So the chair was there after all
and its  disappearance was some kind of illusion".——But suppose that
after a time it disappears again—or seems to disappear.  What are wei
to  say  now?  Have  you  rules  ready  for  such  cases—rules  saying
whether one may use the  word "chair" to include  this  kind  of thing?
But do we miss them when we  use the  word  "chair";  and are we to
say that we do not really attach any meaning to this word, because we
are  not  equipped  with  rules  for  every  possible  application  of it?
81.  F.  P.  Ramsey  once emphasized  in  conversation  with  me  that
logic was  a  'normative science'.  I do  not  know exactly what he had
in mind, but it was doubtless closely related to what only dawned on
me later: namely, that in philosophy we often compare the use of words
with  games  and  calculi  which  have  fixed  rules,  but  cannot  say
that someone who is using language must be playing such a game.——
But if you  say  that  our  languages  only approximate   to  such  calculi
you are  standing  on  the very brink  of a misunderstanding.  For then
it may look as if what we were talking about were an ideal language.
As if our logic were, so to speak, a logic for a vacuum.—Whereas logic
does  not treat  of language—or  of thought—in  the sense  in  which a
natural science treats of a natural phenomenon, and the most that can
be said  is that we construct ideal languages.  But here the word "ideal"
is liable to mislead, for it sounds as if these languages were better, more
perfect,  than  our  everyday  language;  and  as  if it  took  the  logician
to shew people at last what a proper sentence looked like.
All this, however, can only appear in the right light when one has
attained greater clarity about the concepts of understanding, meaning,
and thinking.  For it will then also become clear what can lead us (and
did lead me) to  think  that  if anyone utters  a  sentence and means or
understands it he is operating a calculus according to definite rules.
82.  What do I call 'the rule by which he proceeds'?—The hypothesis
that  satisfactorily  describes  his  use of words, which  we  observe;  or
the rule which he looks up when  he uses  signs;  or the  one which he
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
39
e
gives us in reply if we ask him what his rule is?—But what if observa-
tion does not enable us to see any clear rule, and the question brings
none to light?—For he did indeed give me a definition when I asked
him what he understood by "N", but he was prepared to withdraw and
alter it.—So how am I to determine the rule according to which he is
playing?  He does not know it himself.—Or, to ask a better question:
What  meaning  is  the  expression  "the  rule  by  which  he  proceeds"
supposed to have left to it here?
83.  Doesn't the analogy between language and games throw  light
here?  We can easily imagine people amusing themselves in a field by
playing with a ball so as to start various existing games, but playing
many without finishing them and in  between throwing the ball aim-
lessly into the air, chasing one another with the ball and bombarding
one another for a joke and so on.  And now someone says: The whole
time they are playing a ball-game and following definite rules at every
throw.
And is there not also the case where we play and—make up the rules
as we go along?  And there is even one where we alter them—as we go
along.
84.  I said that the application of a word is not everywhere bounded
by rules.  But what does a game look like that is everywhere bounded
by  rules?  whose  rules  never  let  a  doubt  creep  in,  but  stop  up  all
the cracks where it might?—Can't we imagine a rule determining the
application of a rule, and a doubt which // removes—and so on?
But that is not to say that we are in doubt because it is possible for
us to imagine  a doubt.  I can easily imagine someone always doubting
before he opened his front door whether an abyss did not yawn behind
it,  and  making  sure  about it  before  he went  through the  door  (and
he  might  on  some  occasion  prove  to  be  right)—but  that  does  not
make me doubt in the same case.
85.  A rule stands there like a sign-post.—Does the sign-post leave
no  doubt  open  about  the  way  I  have  to  go?  Does  it  shew  which
direction I am to take when I have passed it; whether along the road
or the footpath or  cross-country?  But  where is  it said which way I
am to follow it;  whether in the direction  of its  ringer  or (e.g.) in the
opposite  one?—And if there were,  not a  single sign-post,  but  a chain
of adjacent ones or of chalk marks on the  ground—is there  only one
way of interpreting  them?—So  I  can say,  the sign-post does  after all
40
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
leave no  room for  doubt.  Or  rather:  it  sometimes  leaves  room  for
doubt and sometimes not.  And now this is no longer a philosophical
proposition, but an empirical one.
86.  Imagine  a  language-game like  (2)  played  with  the  help of a
table.  The  signs  given  to  B  by  A  are now  written  ones.  B  has  a
table; in the first column are the signs used in the game, in the second
pictures of building stones.  A shews B such a written sign; B looks it
up in the table, looks at the picture opposite, and so on.  So the table is a
rule  which  he  follows  in  executing  orders.—One  learns  to  look the
picture up in the table by receiving a training, and part of this training
consists  perhaps  in the pupil's learning  to  pass  with  his  finger  hori-
zontally  from  left  to  right;  and  so,  as  it  were,  to  draw  a  series  of
horizontal lines on the table.
Suppose  different  ways  of reading  a  table  were  now  introduced;
one time, as above, according to the schema:
another time like this:
or in some  other way.—Such a schema is  supplied with  the table as
the rule for its use.
Can we not now imagine further rules to explain this one?  And, on
the other hand, was  that first table incomplete without the schema of
arrows?  And are other tables incomplete without their schemata?
87.  Suppose I give this  explanation:  "I take 'Moses'  to mean the
man, if there  was  such  a  man,  who  led the  Israelites  out  of Egypt,
whatever he was called then and whatever he  may  or may  not have
done  besides."—But  similar  doubts  to  those  about  "Moses"  are
possible  about the  words  of this  explanation  (what  are  you  calling
"Egypt",  whom  the  "Israelites"  etc.?).  Nor  would  these  questions
come  to  an  end  when  we  got  down  to  words  like  "red",  "dark",
"sweet".—"But  then  how  does  an  explanation  help  me  to  under-
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
4
stand, if after all it is not the final one?  In that case the explanation is
never completed; so I still don't understand what he means, and never
shall!"—As though an explanation as it were hung in the air unless
supported  by another  one.  Whereas  an  explanation  may  indeed  rest
on  another one that has been  given, but none stands in need of an-
other—unless we  require it to prevent a misunderstanding.  One might
say:  an  explanation  serves  to  remove  or  to  avert  a  misunder-
standing——one,  that  is,  that  would  occur  but  for  the  explanation;
not every one that I can imagine.
It may easily look as if every doubt merely revealed  an existing gap
in the foundations; so that secure understanding is only possible if we
first doubt everything that can  be doubted, and then remove all these
doubts.
The sign-post is in order—if, under normal circumstances, it fulfils
its  purpose.
88.  If I tell someone "Stand roughly here"—may not this explana-
tion work perfectly?  And cannot every other one fail too?
But isn't it an inexact explanation?—Yes; why  shouldn't  we call it
"inexact"?  Only let us understand what "inexact" means.  For it does
not mean "unusable".  And let us  consider  what  we  call  an  "exact"
explanation in contrast with this one.  Perhaps something like drawing
a chalk line round an area?  Here it strikes us at once that the line has
breadth.  So a colour-edge would be more exact.  But has this exactness
still got a function here: isn't the engine idling?  And remember too that
we have not yet defined what is to count as overstepping this exact
boundary;  how,  with what instruments, it is to be established.  And
so on.
We understand what it means to set a pocket watch to the exact time
or to regulate it to be exact.  But what if it were asked: is this exactness
ideal exactness, or how nearly does it approach the ideal?—Of course,
we can speak of measurements of time in which there is a different,
and as we should say a greater, exactness than in the measurement of
time by a pocket-watch; in which the words  "to set the clock to the
exact time" have a different, though related  meaning, and 'to tell the
time' is a different process and so on.—Now, if I tell someone: "You
should  come to  dinner more  punctually;  you know it begins  at  one
o'clock exactly"—is there really no question of exactness here? because
it  is  possible  to  say:  "Think  of  the  determination  of  time  in  the
laboratory or the observatory; there  you see what 'exactness'  means"?
42
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
"Inexact" is really a reproach, and "exact" is praise.  And that is to
say that what is inexact attains its goal less perfectly than what is more
exact.  Thus  the  point here  is what we  call  "the  goal".  Am I inexact
when I do not give our distance from the  sun to the nearest foot, or
tell a joiner the width of a table to the nearest thousandth of an inch?
No single ideal  of exactness has  been  laid down;  we do  not know
what we should be supposed to imagine under this head—unless you
yourself lay down what is to be so called.  But you will find it difficult
to hit upon such a convention; at least any that satisfies you.
89.  These considerations bring us up to the problem: In what sense
is logic something sublime?
For  there  seemed to  pertain to  logic  a  peculiar  depth—a  universal
significance.  Logic lay, it seemed, at the bottom of all the sciences.—
For logical investigation  explores  the  nature  of all  things.  It seeks to
see to the bottom of things  and is not meant to concern itself whether
what  actually  happens is  this  or  that.——It  takes  its  rise,  not  from
an  interest  in  the  facts  of nature,  nor  from  a  need  to  grasp  causal
connexions:  but from an urge  to understand the basis,  or essence,, of
everything empirical.  Not, however, as if to this end we had to hunt out
new facts; it is, rather, of the essence of our investigation that we do
not seek to learn anything new  by it.  We want to understand  something
that is already in plain view.  For this is what we seem in some sense
not  to  understand.
Augustine  says  in the Confessions "quid  est  ergo tempus?  si  nemo
ex me quaerat scio;  si quaerenti explicare velim,  nescio".—This  could
not be  said  about  a question  of natural  science  ("What is the specific
gravity  of hydrogen?"  for  instance).  Something  that we know when
no one asks us, but no longer know when we are supposed to give an
account of it, is something that we need to remind  ourselves of.  (And
it is  obviously  something  of which for  some  reason  it is difficult  to
remind  oneself.)
90.  We feel as if we had to penetrate phenomena: our investigation,
however,  is directed not towards  phenomena, but,  as one might  say,
towards  the 'possibilities'  of phenomena.  We remind  ourselves,  that
is  to  say,  of the kind of statement  that  we  make  about  phenomena.
Thus Augustine recalls to mind the different statements that are made
about the duration, past present or future,  of events.  (These  are,  of
course,  not philosophical statements  about  time, the  past, the present
and the future.)
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS  I
43
e
Our investigation is therefore a grammatical one.  Such an investiga-
tion sheds light on our problem by clearing misunderstandings away.
Misunderstandings concerning the use of words, caused, among other
things, by certain analogies between the forms of expression in different
regions of language.—Some of them  can be removed by substituting
one form of expression for another; this may be called an  "analysis"
of our forms of expression, for the process is sometimes like one of
taking a thing apart.
91.  But now it may come to look as if there were something like a
final analysis  of  our  forms  of  language,  and  so  a single  completely
resolved form  of every expression.  That  is, as  if our usual forms of
expression were, essentially, unanalysed; as  if there were something
hidden in them that had to be brought to light.  When this is  done
the expression is completely clarified and our problem solved.
It  can  also  be  put  like  this:  we  eliminate  misunderstandings  by
making our expressions more exact; but now it may look as if we were
moving towards a particular state, a state of complete exactness; and
as if this were the real goal of our investigation.
92..  This finds expression in questions as to the essence  of language,
of propositions, of thought.—For if we too in these investigations are
trying to understand the essence of language—its function, its struc-
ture,—yet this  is  not what those  questions  have in view.  For  they
see in the essence, not something that already lies open to view and that
becomes  surveyable  by  a  rearrangement,  but  something  that  lies
beneath the surface. Something that lies within, which we see when we
look into  the thing, and which an analysis digs out.
'The  essence  is  hidden from  us*: this is the form our problem now
assumes.  We  ask: "What is  language?", "What is  a  proposition?"
And  the answer to these  questions  is  to  be  given once  for  all;  and
independently of any future experience.
93.  One  person  might  say  "A  proposition  is  the  most  ordinary
tiling in  the  world"  and  another:  "A  proposition—that's  something
very queer 1"——And the latter is unable simply to look and see how
propositions really work.  The forms that we use in expressing  our-
selves about propositions and thought stand in his way.
Why do we say a proposition is something  remarkable?  On the
one hand, because of the enormous importance attaching to it.  (And
that  is  correct).  On  the  other  hand  this,  together  with  a  misunder-
44
e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
standing of the logic of language, seduces us into thinking that some-
thing extraordinary, something unique, must be achieved by proposi-
tions.—A misunderstanding  makes it look to us as if a proposition did
something queer.
94.  'A proposition is a queer thing!'  Here we have  in  germ  the
subliming  of our whole account of logic.  The tendency to assume a
pure intermediary between the propositional signs and the facts.  Or
even to try to purify, to sublime, the signs themselves.—For our forms
of expression prevent us in all sorts of ways from seeing that nothing
out of the ordinary is involved, by sending us in pursuit of chimeras.
95.  "Thought  must  be  something  unique".  When  we  say,  and
mean, that such-and-such is the case, we—and our meaning—do not
stop anywhere short of the fact; but we mean: this—isso.  But  this
paradox (which has the form of a truism) can also be expressed in this
way: Thought can be of what is not the case.
96.  Other illusions come from various quarters to attach themselves
to the special one spoken of here.  Thought, language, now appear to
us  as  the  unique  correlate,  picture,  of the  world.  These  concepts:
proposition,  language,  thought,  world,  stand  in  line  one  behind  the
other, each equivalent to each.  (But what are these words to be used
for  now?  The  language-game  in  which  they  are  to  be  applied  is
missing.)
97.  Thought is surrounded by a halo.—Its essence, logic, presents
an order, in fact the a priori order of the world: that is, the  order  of
possibilities, which must be common to both world and thought.
But  this  order,  it  seems,  must  be utterly simple.  It  is prior  to  all
experience, must run through all experience;  no  empirical  cloudiness
or uncertainty can be allowed to affect it——It must rather be of the
purest  crystal.  But  this  crystal  does  not  appear  as  an  abstraction;
but as something concrete, indeed, as the most concrete, as it were the
hardest thing there is  (Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus No. 5.5563).
We are under the illusion that what is peculiar, profound, essential,
in  our  investigation,  resides  in  its  trying  to  grasp  the  incomparable
essence of language.  That is, the order existing between the concepts
of proposition, word, proof, truth, experience, and so on.  This order
is a super-order between—so to speak—super-concepts.  Whereas, of
course, if the words "language", "experience", "world", have a use, it
must be as humble a one as that of the words "table", "lamp", "door".
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
45«
98.  On the one hand it is clear that every sentence in our language
'is in order as it is'.  That is to say, we are not striving after an ideal,
as if our ordinary vague sentences had not yet got a quite unexception-
able sense, and a perfect language awaited construction by us.—On the
other hand it seems clear that where there is sense there must be perfect
order.——So there must be perfect order even in the vaguest sentence.
99.  The  sense  of  a  sentence—one  would  like  to  say—may,  of
course,  leave  this  or  that  open,  but  the  sentence  must  nevertheless
have a  definite sense.  An indefinite sense—that would really not be a
sense at all.— This  is  like:  An  indefinite  boundary  is  not  really  a
boundary at all.  Here one thinks perhaps:  if I say "I have locked the
man up fast in the  room—there is  only one  door left open"—then I
simply  haven't  locked  him in  at  all;  his  being  locked in is  a  sham.
One would be inclined to say here: "You haven't done anything at all".
An enclosure with a hole in it is as good as none.— But is that true?
100.  "But still, it  isn't  a game,  if there is  some vagueness in the
rules".—But does this prevent its being a game?—"Perhaps you'll call
it a game, but at any rate it certainly isn't a perfect game."  This means:
it  has  impurities,  and what I am interested in  at present is  the pure
article.—But  I  want  to  say:  we  misunderstand  the  role  of the  ideal
in our language.  That is to say: we too should call it a game, only we
are dazzled by the ideal and therefore fail to see the actual use of the
word  "game"  clearly.
101.  We  want  to  say  that  there  can't  be  any  vagueness in  logic.
The idea now absorbs us, that the ideal 'must' be found in reality.  Mean-
while we do not as yet see how  it occurs there, nor do we understand
the nature of this "must".  We think it must be in reality; for we think
we already see it there.
102.  The strict and clear rules  of the  logical structure of proposi-
tions  appear  to  us  as  something  in  the  background—hidden  in  the
medium  of  the  understanding.  I  already  see  them  (even  though
through a medium):  for I  understand the propositional sign,  I  use it
to say something.
103.  The ideal, as we think of it, is unshakable.  You can never get
outside it; you  must always  turn back.  There is no  outside; outside
you cannot breathe.—Where does this idea come from?  It is like a pair
of glasses on our nose through which we see whatever we look at.  It
never occurs to us to take them off.
4
f,c 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS
104.  We  predicate  of the  thing  what  lies  in  the  method  of repre-
senting  it.  Impressed  by  the  possibility  of a  comparison,  we  think
we are perceiving a state of affairs of the highest generality.
105.  When we believe that we must find that order, must find the
ideal,  in  our  actual  language, we  become  dissatisfied with what are
ordinarily  called  "propositions",  "words",  "signs".
The  proposition  and  the  word  that  logic  deals  with  are  supposed
to be something pure and clear-cut.  And we rack our brains  over the
nature of the real sign.—It is perhaps the idea  of the sign? or the idea at
the  present  moment?
106.  Here it is difficult as it  were to  keep  our heads up,—to see
that we must stick to the subjects of our every-day thinking, and not
go  astray  and  imagine  that  we  have  to  describe  extreme  subtleties,
which  in  turn  we  are  after  all  quite  unable  to  describe  with  the
means at  our disposal.  We feel as if we  had to repair a torn  spider's
web with our fingers.
107.  The more narrowly we examine actual language, the sharper
becomes the conflict between it and our requirement.  (For the crystal-
line purity of logic was, of course, not a result of investigation: it was a
requirement.)  The  conflict  becomes  intolerable;  the  requirement  is
now  in  danger  of becoming  empty.—We  have  got on  to  slippery ice
where there is no friction and so in a certain sense the conditions are
ideal, but also, just because of that, we are unable to walk.  We want to
walk:  so we need friction.  Back to the rough ground!
108.  We  see  that  what  we  call  "sentence"  and  "language"  has
not the formal unity that I  imagined, but is  the family of structures
more  or less  related  to  one  another.——But  what  becomes  of logic
now?  Its rigour seems to be giving way here.—But in that case doesn't
logic altogether disappear?—For how can it lose its rigour?  Of course
not by  our  bargaining any of its  rigour  out of it.—The preconceived idea
of  crystalline  purity  can  only  be  removed  by  turning  our  whole
examination  round.  (One  might  say:  the  axis  of  reference  of  our
examination must be rotated, but about the fixed point ofour real need.)
The philosophy of logic speaks of sentences and words in exactly the
sense  in which  we speak  of them  in  ordinary  life  when  we  say  e.g.
Faraday in The Chemical History of a Candle: "Water is one individual
thing—it never changes."
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
47
e
"Here is a Chinese sentence", or "No, that only  looks like writing; it  is
actually just an ornament" and so on.
We  are  talking  about  the  spatial  and  temporal  phenomenon  of
language, not about some non-spatial, non-temporal phantasm.  [Note
in margin:  Only it is possible to be interested in a phenomenon in a
variety  of ways].  But  we talk  about  it  as we do about the  pieces in
chess when we are stating the rules of the game, not describing their
physical properties.
The question "What is a word  really?"  is  analogous to  "What is  a
piece in chess?"
109.  It was true to say that our considerations could not be scientific
ones.  It was not of any possible interest to us to find out empirically
'that, contrary to our preconceived ideas, it is possible to think such-
and-such'—whatever that may mean.  (The conception of thought as a
gaseous medium.)  And we may not advance any kind of theory.  There
must not be anything hypothetical in our considerations.  We must do
away with  all explanation, and description alone must take its place.
And  this  description  gets  its  light,  that  is to  say  its  purpose,  from
the  philosophical  problems.  These  are,  of  course,  not  empirical
problems; they are solved, rather, by looking into the workings of our
language, and that in such a way as to make us recognize those work-
ings: in despite of an  urge to  misunderstand them.  The problems are
solved,  not  by  giving  new  information,  but  by  arranging  what  we
have always known.  Philosophy is a battle against the bewitchment
of our intelligence by means of language.
no.
"Language (or thought) is something unique"—this proves to
be a superstition (not a mistake!), itself produced by grammatical illusions.
And  now  the  impressiveness  retreats  to  these  illusions,  to  the
problems.
in.  The problems arising through a misinterpretation of our forms
of language have the character of depth.  They are deep disquietudes;
their roots are as  deep in us as  the forms of our language and their
significance is as great as the importance of our language.——Let us
ask ourselves: why do we feel a grammatical joke to be deep*   (And that
is  what  the depth  of philosophy  is.)
112.  A  simile  that  has  been  absorbed  into  the  forms  of  our
language produces a false appearance, and this disquiets us.  "But this
isn't how it isl"—we say.  "Yet this is how it has to be I"
4
8e 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
113.  "But this is how it is————" I  say  to  myself over and  over
again.  I feel as though, if only I could fix my gaze absolutely sharply
on  this  fact,  get  it  in  focus,  I  must grasp the essence of the matter.
114. (Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus,  4.5):  "The  general  form  of
propositions is: This is how things are."——That is the kind of propo-
sition that one repeats to oneself countless times.  One thinks that one is
tracing the outline of the thing's nature over and over again, and one is
merely tracing round the frame through which we look at it.
115. A. picture held us captive.  And we could not get outside it, for
it lay in our language and language seemed to repeat it to us inexorably.
116.  When  philosophers  use  a  word—"knowledge",  "being",
"object",  "I",  "proposition",  "name"—and  try  to  grasp  the essence
of the thing,  one must always ask oneself:  is the word ever actually
used in this way in the language-game which is its  original home?—
What we do is to bring words back from their metaphysical to their
everyday use.
117.  You  say  to  me:  "You  understand  this  expression,  don't
you?  Well then—I am using it in the sense you are familiar with."—
As if the sense were an atmosphere accompanying the word, which it
carried with it into every kind of application.
If,  for  example,  someone  says  that  the  sentence  "This  is  here"
(saying which he points to an object in front of him) makes sense to
him,  then  he  should  ask  himself in  what  special  circumstances  this
sentence is actually used.  There it does make sense.
118.  Where does our investigation get its importance from, since
it seems only to destroy everything interesting, that is, all that is great
and important?  (As it were all the buildings, leaving behind only bits
of stone and rubble.)  What we are destroying is nothing but houses of
cards and  we are clearing up  the  ground of language on which they
stand.
119.  The  results  of  philosophy  are  the  uncovering  of  one  or
another piece  of plain nonsense and of bumps that the understanding
has got by  running its head up against the limits of language.  These
bumps make us see the value of the discovery.
120.  When I  talk about  language  (words,  sentences,  etc.)  I  must
speak the language of every day.  Is this language somehow too coarse
and material for what we want to say? Then how is another one to be
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
49
e
constructed?—And how strange that we should be able to do anything
at all with the one we have!
In  giving  explanations  I  already  have  to  use  language  full-blown
(not  some  sort  of preparatory,  provisional  one);  this  by  itself shews
that I can adduce only exterior facts about language.
Yes,  but  then  how  can  these  explanations  satisfy  us?—Well,  your
very questions were framed in this language;  they had to be expressed
in this language, if there was anything to ask!
And  your scruples  are  misunderstandings.
Your questions  refer to words;  so I have to talk about words.
You say: the point isn't the word, but its meaning, and you think of
the  meaning  as  a  thing  of the  same  kind  as  the  word,  though  also
different  from  the  word.  Here  the  word,  there  the  meaning.  The
money,  and the cow that you can buy with it.  (But contrast: money,
and  its use.)
121.  One might think: if philosophy speaks of the use of the word
"philosophy"  there  must be a  second-order philosophy.  But it is  not
so: it is, rather, like the case of orthography, which deals with the word
"orthography"  among  others  without  then  being  second-order.
122.  A main source of our failure to understand is that we do not
command a clear view of the use of our words.—Our grammar is lacking in
this  sort  of perspicuity.  A  perspicuous  representation  produces  just
that understanding which  consists  in  'seeing  connexions'.  Hence  the
importance of finding and inventing intermediate cases.
The  concept  of  a  perspicuous  representation  is  of  fundamental
significance  for  us.  It  earmarks  the  form  of account  we  give,  the
way we look at things.  (Is this a 'Weltanschauung'?)
123.  A  philosophical  problem  has  the  form:  "I  don't  know  my
way about".
124.  Philosophy may  in  no  way interfere  with the  actual use  of
language; it can in the end only describe it.
For  it cannot give it any foundation either.
It leaves everything as it is.
It  also  leaves  mathematics  as  it is,  and  no mathematical discovery
can advance it.  A "leading problem of mathematical logic" is for us
a problem of mathematics  like  any  other.
5
oe 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
125.  It is the business of philosophy, not to resolve a contradiction
by  means  of  a  mathematical  or  logico-mathematical  discovery,  but
to make it possible for us to get a clear view of the state of mathematics
that  troubles us:  the state  of affairs before the contradiction is resolved.
(And this does not mean that one is sidestepping a difficulty.)
The  fundamental fact here is that we  lay  down rules, a technique,
for a game,  and  that then  when  we  follow  the  rules,  things  do  not
turn out as we had assumed.  That we are therefore as it were entangled
in our own  rules.
This entanglement in our rules is what we want to understand (i.e.
get a clear view of).
It throws light on our concept of meaning  something.  For in those
cases things turn out otherwise than we had meant, foreseen.  That is
just what we say when, for example, a contradiction appears: "I didn't
mean it like  that."
The civil status of a contradiction, or its status in civil life: there is
the  philosophical  problem.
126.  Philosophy  simply  puts  everything  before  us,  and  neither
explains  nor  deduces  anything.—Since  everything  lies  open  to  view
there is nothing to explain.  For what is hidden, for example, is of no
interest to us.
One  might  also  give  the  name  "philosophy"  to  what  is  possible
before all new discoveries and inventions.
127.  The work of the philosopher consists in assembling reminders
for a particular purpose.
128.  If one tried  to advance theses in  philosophy, it would never
be possible to debate them, because everyone would agree to them.
129.  The  aspects  of  things  that  are  most  important  for  us  are
hidden because  of their  simplicity  and familiarity.  (One  is  unable  to
notice  something—because  it  is  always  before  one's eyes.)  The  real
foundations of his enquiry do not strike a man at all.  Unless that fact
has at some  time struck him.—And this  means:  we fail to be struck
by what, once seen, is most striking and most powerful.
130.  Our clear and simple language-games are not preparatory studies
for a future regularization of language—as it were first approximations,
ignoring friction and air-resistance.  The language-games are rather set
up as objects of comparison which are meant to throw light on the facts of
our language by way not only of similarities, but also of dissimilarities.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I 
jie
131.  For  we  can  avoid ineptness  or  emptiness  in  our  assertions
only by presenting the  model as what it is, as an object of compari-
son—as, so to speak,  a measuring-rod; not as a preconceived idea to
which reality must correspond.  (The dogmatism into which we fall so
easily in  doing  philosophy.)
132.  We want  to establish an order in our knowledge  of the  use
of language:  an order with a particular end in view; one out of many
possible  orders;  not the  order.  To  this  end  we  shall  constantly  be
giving  prominence  to  distinctions  which  our  ordinary  forms  of
language  easily  make  us  overlook.  This  may make  it look  as if we
saw it as our task to reform language.
Such a reform for particular practical purposes, an improvement in
our terminology  designed  to  prevent  misunderstandings  in  practice,
is perfectly possible.  But these are not the cases we have to do with.
The confusions which occupy us arise when language is like an engine
idling, not when it is doing work.
133.  It is not our aim to refine or complete the system of rules for
the use of our words in unheard-of ways.
For the clarity that we are aiming at is indeed complete clarity.  But
this simply means that the philosophical problems  should completely
disappear.
The real  discovery is  the  one  that  makes  me  capable  of stopping
doing philosophy when  I  want  to.—The  one  that  gives  philosophy
peace, so that it is no longer tormented by questions which bring itself
in question.—Instead, we now demonstrate a  method,  by examples;
and the series of examples can  be broken off.—Problems are solved
(difficulties  eliminated),  not  a single  problem.
There  is  not a   philosophical  method,  though  there  are  indeed
methods, like different therapies.
134.  Let us examine the proposition:  "This is how  things  are."—
How  can  I  say that  this  is  the  general  form  of propositions?—It  is
first and  foremost itself a proposition, an English sentence, for it has
a subject and a predicate.  But how is this sentence applied—that is,
in our everyday language?  For I got it from  there  and nowhere else.
We may say, e.g.:  "He  explained his  position to  me,  said that  this
was  how  things  were,  and  that  therefore  he  needed  an  advance".
So far, then, one can say that that sentence stands for any statement
It is employed  as  a  prepositional schema,  but only  because it  has  the
J2
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
construction of an English sentence.  It would be possible to say instead
"such and such is the case", "this is the situation", and so on.  It would
also be possible here simply to use a letter, a variable, as in symbolic
logic.  But no  one is going  to  call the  letter "p"  the  general form  of
propositions.  To  repeat:  "This  is  how  things  are"  had  that  position
only because it is itself what one calls an English sentence.  But though
it  is  a proposition, still  it gets  employed as  a propositional  variable.
To  say  that  this  proposition  agrees  (or  does  not  agree)  with  reality
would be obvious nonsense.  Thus it illustrates the fact that one feature
of our concept of a proposition is, sounding like a proposition.
135.  But haven't we got a concept of what a proposition is, of what
we take "proposition" to mean?—Yes; just as we also have a concept
of what we mean by  "game".  Asked what a  proposition is—whether
it  is  another  person  or  ourselves  that we  have  to  answer—we  shall
give examples  and  these will include  what  one  may  call  inductively
defined  series  of propositions. This is the kind of way  in which we
have  such  a  concept  as  'proposition'.  (Compare  the  concept  of  a
proposition with the concept of number.)
136.  At bottom,  giving  "This  is  how  things  axe"  as  the  general
form of propositions is the same as giving the definition: a proposition
is whatever can be true  or false.  For instead  of "This is  how  things
are"  I  could  have  said  "This  is  true".  (Or  again  "This  is  false".)
But we have
'p' is true — p
'p' is false  = not-p.
And  to  say  that  a  proposition  is  whatever  can  be  true  or  false
amounts  to  saying:  we  call  something  a  proposition  when in our
language we apply the calculus of truth functions to it.
Now it looks as if the definition—a proposition is whatever can be
true or false—determined what a proposition was, by saying: what fits
the  concept  'true',  or  what  the  concept  'true'  fits,  is  a  proposition.
So it is as if we had a concept of true and false, which we could use
to determine what is and what is not a proposition.  What engages with
the concept of truth (as with a cogwheel), is a proposition.
But this is a bad  picture.  It is as if one were to say  "The king in
chess is the piece that one can check."  But this can mean no more than
that in our game of chess we only check the king.  Just as the proposi-
tion that only  a proposition  can be true or false can say no more than
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
53
e
that  we  only  predicate  "true"  and  "false"  of what  we  call  a proposi-
tion.  And  what  a  proposition  is  is  in  one  sense  determined  by  the
rules  of sentence formation  (in  English  for example),  and  in another
sense by the use of the sign in the language-game.  And the use of the
words  "true"  and  "false" may be  among  the  constituent parts  of this
game;  and if so  it belongs  to our concept  'proposition'  but does  not
'fit* it. As we might also say, check  belongs to our concept of the king
in chess (as so to speak a constituent part of it).  To say that check did
not fit our concept of the  pawns, would  mean that  a  game  in  which
pawns were checked, in which, say, the players who lost their pawns
lost, would  be uninteresting or stupid  or too complicated or something
of the  kind.
137.  What about learning to determine the subject of a sentence by
means  of the question  "Who or what . . . .?"—Here,  surely, there is
such a thing as the subject's 'fitting' this question; for otherwise how
should we find  out what the  subject was by means of the question?
We find it out much as we find out which letter of the alphabet comes
after 'K' by saying the alphabet up to 'K' to ourselves.  Now in what
sense does 'L' fit on to this series of letters?—In that sense "true" and
"false" could be said to fit propositions;  and a child  might  be  taught
to distinguish between propositions and  other expressions  by  being
told "Ask yourself if you can say 'is true' after it.  If these words fit,
it's a proposition."  (And in the same way one might have said: Ask
yourself if you can put the words
<l
This is how things are:" in front
of it.)
138.  But can't the  meaning  of  a  word  that  I  understand  fit the
sense  of a sentence that I understand?  Or the meaning of one word
fit the meaning of another?——Of course, if the meaning is the use  we
make  of the word,  it makes no sense to speak of such 'fitting.'  But
we understand  the meaning of a word when we hear or say it; we grasp
it in a flash, and what we grasp in this way is surely something different
from the 'use' which is extended in time!
Must I know  whether I understand a word?  Don't I also sometimes
imagine myself to understand a word  (as I may imagine I understand
a kind of calculation) and then realize that I did not understand it?
("I thought  I  knew what  'relative'  and  'absolute'  motion  meant,  but
I see that  I don't know.")
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested