view pdf in windows form c# : Add links to pdf in preview software SDK project winforms wpf .net UWP WittgensteinInvestigations3-part1303

54
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
139.  When  someone  says  the word  "cube" to me,  for example,
I know what it means.  But can the whole use of the word come before
my mind, when I understand  it in this way?
Well,  but  on  the  other  hand  isn't  the  meaning  of  the  word  also
determined  by  this  use ?  And can  these ways  of determining meaning
conflict?  Can what we grasp in a flash  accord with a use, fit or fail to
fit it?  And how can what is  present  to us in an instant, what comes
before our mind in an instant, fit a use"?
What really comes before our mind when we understand  a word?—
Isn't it something like a picture?  Can't it be a picture?
Well, suppose that a picture does come before your mind when you
hear the word  "cube",  say the drawing of a  cube.  In what  sense  can
this  picture  fit or  fail  to fit a use  of the  word  "cube"?—Perhaps  you
say:  "It's  quite  simple;—if that  picture  occurs  to  me  and  I  point  to
a triangular prism for instance, and say it is a cube, then this use of the
word  doesn't  fit  the  picture."—But  doesn't  it  fit?  I  have  purposely
so  chosen  the  example  that  it  is  quite  easy  to  imagine  a method of
projection according to which the picture does fit after all.
The  picture  of  the  cube  did indeed suggest a certain use to us, but
it was  possible for me  to use it differently.
(a) "I believe the right word in this case is ... .". Doesn't this
shew that the meaning of a word is a something that comes before our
mind, and which is, as it were, the exact picture we want to use here?
Suppose I  were  choosing between the words  "imposing",  "dignified",
"proud",  "venerable";  isn't  it  as  though  I  were  choosing  between
drawings in a portfolio?—No: the fact that one speaks of the appropriate
word does not  shew the existence of a something that etc.. One is
inclined,  rather,  to  speak  of this  picture-like  something  just  because
one can find a word  appropriate;  because one  often chooses  between
words as  between similar but not identical pictures; because pictures
are often used instead of words, or to illustrate words;  and so on.
(&)  I  see  a  picture;  it  represents  an  old  man  walking  up  a  steep
path leaning on a stick.—How?  Might it not have looked just the same
if he had been sliding downhill  in  that  position?  Perhaps  a  Martian
would describe the picture so.  I do not need to explain why we do not
describe it so.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
55
e
140.  Then what sort of mistake did I make; was it what we should
like to express by saying: I should have thought the picture forced  a
particular use on me?  How could I think that?  What did  I think?  Is
there such a thing as a picture, or something like a picture, that forces
a particular application on us; so that my mistake lay in confusing one
picture  with  another?—For  we  might  also  be  inclined  to  express
ourselves like this: we are at most under a psychological, not a logical,
compulsion.  And now it looks quite as  if we  knew of two  kinds  of
case.
What  was  the  effect  of  my  argument?  It  called  our  attention  to
(reminded us of) the fact that there are other processes, besides the one
we originally thought of, which we should sometimes be prepared to
call  "applying  the picture  of a cube".  So our 'belief that  the picture
forced a particular application upon us' consisted in the fact that only
the one case and no other occurred  to us.  "There is another solution
as well" means: there is something else that I am also prepared to call
a "solution"; to which I am prepared to apply such-and-such a picture,
such-and-such an analogy, and so on.
What is essential is to see that the same thing can come before our
minds when we hear the word and  the application still be different.
Has it the same meaning both times?  I think we shall say not.
141.  Suppose,  however,  that  not  merely the  picture  of the cube,
but also the method of projection  comes before  our  mind?——How
am I to imagine this?—Perhaps I see before me a schema shewing the
method  of projection:  say a picture of two cubes connected by lines
of projection.—But does this really get me any further?  Can't I now
imagine different applications of this schema too?——Well, yes, but
then can't  an application come before my mind~?— It  can:  only  we  need  to
get clearer about our application of this expression.  Suppose I explain
various  methods of projection  to someone  so  that he  may go  on to
apply them; let us ask ourselves when we should say that the method
that I intend comes before his mind.
Now  clearly  we  accept  two  different  kinds  of  criteria  for  this:
on the one hand the picture (of whatever kind) that at some  time or
other comes before his mind; on the other, the application which—in
the course of time—he makes of what he imagines.  (And can't it be
clearly seen here that it is absolutely inessential for the picture to exist
in his imagination rather than as a drawing or model in front of him;
or again as  something that he himself constructs as  a model?)
Add links to pdf in preview - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding an email link to a pdf; add hyperlink to pdf
Add links to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlinks to pdf; change link in pdf
5
6e 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
Can there be a collision between picture and application?  There can,
inasmuch as the picture makes us expect a different use, because people
in general apply this picture like this.
I want to say: we have here a normal case, and abnormal cases.
142.  It is  only in  normal  cases that  the  use  of a word  is  clearly
prescribed; we know, are in no doubt, what to say in this or that case.
The  more  abnormal  the  case,  the  more  doubtful  it  becomes  what
we  are  to  say.  And  if things  were  quite  different  from  what  they
actually are——if there were for instance no characteristic expression
of pain,  of fear,  of joy;  if rule  became exception  and  exception  rule;
or if both became phenomena of roughly equal frequency——this would
make our normal language-games lose their point.—The procedure of
putting a lump  of cheese  on  a  balance  and  fixing  the  price  by  the
turn  of the  scale  would  lose  its  point  if it  frequently  happened  for
such  lumps  to  suddenly  grow  or  shrink  for  no  obvious  reason.
This remark will become clearer when  we discuss  such things  as the
relation of expression to feeling, and similar topics.
143.  Let  us  now  examine  the  following  kind  of  language-game:
when A gives an order B has  to write down series of signs according
to a certain formation rule.
The first of these series is meant to be that of the natural numbers in
decimal notation.—How  does  he  get  to  understand  this  notation?—
First of all series of numbers will be written down for him and he will
be required to  copy  them.  (Do not balk  at the  expression "series  of
numbers"; it is not being used wrongly here.)  And here already there
is a normal and an abnormal learner's  reaction.—At first perhaps we
guide his hand in writing out the series o to 9;  but then the possibility
of getting  him  to  understand will depend on his going on to write
it  down  independently.—And  here  we  can  imagine,  e.g.,  that  he
does  copy  the  figures  independently,  but  not  in  the  right  order:
he  writes  sometimes  one  sometimes  another  at  random.  And  then
communication  stops  at that point.—Or  again,  he  makes 'mistakes"
What  we  have  to  mention  in  order  to  explain  the  significance,
I mean the importance, of a concept, are often extremely general facts
of  nature:  such  facts  as  are hardly  ever mentioned  because  of their
great  generality.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
57
e
in  the  order.—The  difference  between  this  and  the  first  case  will  of
course  be  one  of frequency.—Or he makes a systematic  mistake; for
example, he copies every other number, or he copies the series o, i, 2,
3,  4,  5, ....  like this:  i,  o,  3,  2,  5, 4, .....  Here we shall almost be
tempted to say that he has understood wrong.
Notice, however, that there is no sharp distinction between a random
mistake and a systematic one.  That is, between what you are inclined
to  call  "random"  and  what  "systematic".
Perhaps it is possible to wean him from the systematic mistake (as
from a  bad habit).  Or perhaps  one accepts his way of copying  and
tries to teach him ours as an oflfshoot, a variant of his.—And here too
our pupil's capacity to learn may come to an end.
144.  What do I mean when I say "the pupil's capacity to learn may
come to an end here"?  Do  I  say this  from my own  experience?  Of
course  not.  (Even  if I  have had  such  experience.)  Then what am I
doiag  with that  proposition?  Well,  I  should like  you  to  say:  "Yes,
it's true, you can imagine that too, that might happen too!"—But was
I trying to draw someone's attention to the fact that he is capable of
imagining  that?——I wanted  to put that picture before him,  and his
acceptance of the picture consists in his now being inclined to regard a
given case differently: that is, to compare it with this rather than that
set  of pictures.  I  have  changed  his way of looking at things.  (Indian
mathematicians: "Look at this.")
145.  Suppose the pupil now writes the series o to 9 to our satisfac-
tion.—And this will only be the case when he is often successful, not if
he does it right once in a hundred attempts.  Now I continue the series
and draw his attention to the recurrence of the first series in the units;
and then to its recurrence in the tens.  (Which only means that I use
particular emphases, underline figures, write them  one under another
in  such-and-such  ways,  and  similar  things.)—And  now  at  some
point  he  continues  the  series  independently—or  he  does  not.—But
why  do  you  say  that? so   much  is  obvious!—Of  course;  I  only
wished  to  say:  the  effect  of  any  further explanation   depends  on  his
veaction.
Now, however, let us suppose that after some efforts on the teacher's
part he continues the series correctly, that is, as we do it.  So now we
can say he has  mastered  the system.—But how  far need he  continue
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
PDF with a blank page, bookmarks, links, signatures, etc. PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
pdf links; add hyperlink to pdf in preview
C# Image: Tutorial for Document Management Using C#.NET Imaging
navigate viewing document by generating a thumbnail preview. on each part by following the links respectively & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf link to specific page; active links in pdf
5
ge 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
the series for us to have the right to say that?  Clearly you cannot state
a  limit here.
146.  Suppose I now ask: "Has he understood the system when he
continues  the  series  to  the  hundredth  place?"  Or—if  I  should  not
speak  of  'understanding'  in  connection  with  our  primitive  language-
game:  Has  he  got the  system,  if he  continues  the  series  correctly  so
f
ar
?—Perhaps you will say here:  to have got the system (or, again, to
understand it)  can't consist in  continuing the  series  up  to this or that
number: that is only applying one's understanding.  The understanding
itself is a state which is the source of the correct use.
What  is  one  really  thinking  of  here?  Isn't  one  thinking  of  the
derivation  of a series from its algebraic formula?  Or at least of some-
thing  analogous?—But  this  is  where  we  were  before.  The  point  is,
we  can  think  of more  than one  application  of an  algebraic  formula;
and every type of application can in turn be formulated  algebraically;
but naturally this does not get us any further.—The application is still
a criterion of understanding.
147.  "But  how  can it  be?  When I say I understand  the rule  of a
series, I am surely not saying so because I \\zvzfound out that up to now
I have applied the algebraic formula in such-and-such a way!  In my
own  case  at  all  events  I  surely  know  that  I  mean  such-and-such  a
series;  it  doesn't  matter  how  far  I  have  actually  developed  it."—
Your idea, then, is that you know the application of the rule of the
series  quite apart from  remembering actual  applications to  particular
numbers.  And  you  will  perhaps  say:  "Of  course!  For  the  series  is
infinite and the bit of it that I can have developed finite."
148.  But what does this knowledge consist in?  Let me ask: When
do  you  know  that  application?  Always?  day  and  night?  or  only
when  you  are  actually  thinking  of the  rule? do you know it, that is,
in the same way as you know the alphabet and the multiplication table?
Or is what you call "knowledge" a state of consciousness or a process—
say a thought of something, or the like?
149.  If one  says  that  knowing  the  ABC  is  a  state  of  the  mind,
one is thinking of a state of a mental apparatus (perhaps of the brain)
by  means  of which we  explain  the manifestations  of that  knowledge.
Such a state is called a disposition.  But there are objections to speaking
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
59
e
of a state of the mind here, inasmuch as there ought to be two different
criteria for such a state: a knowledge of the construction of the appara-
tus, quite apart from what it does.  (Nothing would be more confusing
here  than  to  use  the  words  "conscious"  and  "unconscious"  for  the
contrast  between  states  of consciousness  and  dispositions.  For  this
pair of terms covers up a grammatical difference.)
150.  The  grammar  of  the  word  "knows"  is  evidently  closely
related  to that of "can",  "is  able to".  But also closely related  to that
of "understands".  ('Mastery' of a technique,)
151.  But  there  is  also this  use  of  the  word  "to  know":  we  say
'"Now  I  know!"—and  similarly  "Now  I  can  do  it!"  and  "Now  I
understand!"
Let us imagine the following example: A writes series of numbers
down;  B  watches  him  and  tries  to  find  a  law  for  the  sequence  of
numbers.  lf*he succeeds he exclaims: "Now I can go on!"——So this
capacity, this understanding, is something that makes its appearance in
a moment.  So let us try and see what it is that makes its appearance
here.—A has written down the numbers  i, 5, u,  19, 29; at this point
B says he knows how to go on.  What happened here?  Various things
may  have happened;  for  example,  while  A  was  slowly putting one
number after another, B was occupied with trying various algebraic
formulae on the numbers which had been written down.  After A had
written the number 19 B tried the formula a
n
— n
2
-f n — i; and the
next number confirmed his hypothesis.
(a) "Understanding a word": a state. But a mental state?—Depres-
sion, excitement, pain, are called mental states. Carry out a grammatical
investigation as follows: we say
"He was depressed the whole day".
"He was in great excitement the whole day".
"He has been in continuous pain since yesterday".—
We  also  say  "Since  yesterday  I  have  understood  this  word".  "Con-
tinuously",  though?—To  be  sure,  one  can  speak  of an  interruption
of understanding. But in what cases? Compare: "When did your pains
get less?" and  "When did you stop understanding that word?"
(b) Suppose it were asked: "When do you know how to play chess?
All the time? or just while you are  making a move?  And  the whole  of
chess  during  each  move?—How  queer  that  knowing  how  to  play
chess should take such a short time, and a game so much longer!
C# Word - Convert Word to PDF in C#.NET
of original Word file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness C# Demo: Convert Word to PDF Document. Add references
clickable links in pdf files; check links in pdf
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to PDF in C#.NET
PowerPoint file and maintains the original text style (including font, size, color, links and boldness C# Demo: Convert PowerPoint to PDF Document. Add references
pdf link to email; add link to pdf
6o« 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
Or again, B does not think of formulae.  He watches A writing his
numbers down with a certain feeling of tension, and all sorts of vague
thoughts go through his head.  Finally he asks  himself:  "What is the
series of differences?"  He finds the series 4, 6, 8, 10 and says: Now I
can go  on.
Or he watches and says "Yes, I know that series"—and continues it,
just as he would have done if A had written down the series i, 3, 5, 7, 9.
—Or he says nothing at all and simply continues the series.  Perhaps
he had what may be called the sensation "that's easy!".  (Such a sensa-
tion  is,  for example,  that of a  light  quick intake  of breath,  as  when
one is  slightly  startled.)
152.  But  are  the  processes  which  I  have  described  here under-
standing!
"B  understands  the  principle  of  the  series"  surely  doesn't  mean
simply:  the  formula  "a
n
— . . . . "  occurs  to  B.  For  it  is  perfectly
imaginable  that  the  formula  should  occur  to  him  and that he  should
nevertheless not understand.  "He understands"  must have more in it
than: the formula occurs to him.  And equally, more than any of those
more or less characteristic accompaniments or manifestations of under-
standing.
153.  We  are  trying  to  get  hold  of the  mental process  of under-
standing which seems to be hidden behind those  coarser and therefore
more  readily  visible  accompaniments.  But  we  do  not  succeed;  or,
rather, it does not get as far as a real attempt.  For even supposing I had
found something that happened  in all those cases of understanding,—
why  should  // be  the  understanding?  And  how  can  the  process  of
understanding  have  been  hidden,  when  I  said  "Now  I  understand"
because I understood?! And if I say it is hidden—then how do I know
what I have to look for?  I am in a muddle.
154.  But wait—if "Now I understand the principle" does not mean
the same as "The formula  ....  occurs to me" (or "I say the formula",
"I  write it  down", etc.)  —does it follow from this  that I employ  the
sentence  "Now  I  understand . . . . . "   or  "Now  I  can  go  on"  as  a
description of a process occurring behind or side by side with that of
saying the formula?
If there has to be anything 'behind the utterance of the formula' it is
particular circumstances', which justify me in saying I can go on—when
the formula occurs to me.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
6ie
Try not  to  think  of understanding  as  a  'mental  process'  at all.—
For that is the expression which confuses you.  But ask yourself: in
what sort of case, in what kind of circumstances, do we say, "Now I
know how to go on," when, that is, the formula has occurred to me?—
In the sense in which there are processes (including mental processes)
which  are  characteristic  of  understanding,  understanding  is  not  a
mental process.
(A pain's growing more and less; the hearing of a tune or a sentence:
these are mental processes.)
155.  Thus  what I wanted  to  say  was:  when  he  suddenly  knew
how  to  go  on,  when  he  understood  the  principle,  then  possibly  he
had a special experience—and if he is asked: "What was it?  What took
place  when  you  suddenly  grasped  the  principle?"  perhaps  he  will
describe it much as we described it above——but for us it is the circum-
stances under which he had such an experience that justify him in
saying in such a case that he understands, that he knows how to go on.
156.  This  will become clearer if we interpolate the consideration
of another word, namely "reading".  First I need to remark that I am
not counting the understanding of what is read as part of 'reading' for
purposes of this investigation: reading is here the activity of rendering
out loud what is written or printed; and also of writing from dictation,
writing out something printed, playing from a score, and  so on.
The use of this word in the ordinary circumstances of our life is of
course extremely familiar to us.  But the part the word plays in our life,
and  therewith  the  language-game in  which  we  employ  it,  would  be
difficult to describe even  in  rough outline.  A  person, let  us  say an
Englishman,  has  received  at  school  or  at  home  one of the  kinds  of
education usual among us, and in the course of it has learned to read
his  native  language.  Later  he  reads  books,  letters,  newspapers,  and
other  things.
Now  what  takes  place  when,  say,  he reads  a newspaper?——His
eye  passes—as  we say—along  the  printed  words,  he  says  them  out
loud—or only to himself; in particular he reads certain words by taking
in their printed  shapes as  wholes;  others  when his eye has  taken in
the first syllables;  others  again he reads  syllable by syllable, and an
occasional  one perhaps  letter by letter.—We  should  also say that he
had  read  a  sentence if he  spoke neither  aloud  nor to  himself during
the  reading but  was afterwards able  to  repeat the  sentence word for
word or nearly so.—He may attend to what he reads, or again—as we
C# PDF: C# Code to Create Mobile PDF Viewer; C#.NET Mobile PDF
In Default.aspx, add a reference to the path in for Windows Forms application, please follow above links respectively. More Tutorials on .NET PDF Document SDK.
add a link to a pdf file; pdf link
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to HTML in C#.NET
The HTML document file, converted by C#.NET PowerPoint to HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and Add references:
adding links to pdf in preview; add links to pdf document
6z" 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
might put it—function as a mere reading-machine: I mean, read aloud
and correctly without attending to what he is reading; perhaps with his
attention on something quite different (so that he is unable to say what
he has been reading if he is asked about it immediately afterwards).
Now compare a beginner with this reader.  The beginner reads the
words by laboriously spelling them  out.—Some  however he guesses
from the  context,  or perhaps he  already partly  knows the passage by
heart.  Then his  teacher  says that he  is  not really reading  the  words
(and in certain cases that he is only pretending to read them).
If we  think  of this  sort  of reading,  the  reading  of a beginner,  and
ask ourselves what reading  consists in, we shall be inclined to say: it is a
special conscious activity of mind.
We also say of the pupil:  "Of course he alone knows if he is really
reading  or merely saying the words  off by heart".  (We  have yet to
discuss  these  propositions:  "He  alone  knows  ....  ".)
But  I  want  to  say:  we  have  to  admit  that—as  far  as  concerns
uttering any one of the printed words—the same thing may take place
in the  consciousness  of the pupil  who  is  'pretending' to  read,  as  in
that of the practised  reader who  is  'reading'  it.  The word  "to  read"
is  applied differently when  we  are  speaking  of the  beginner  and  of the
practised reader.——Now we should of course like to say: What goes
on  in  that  practised  reader  and  in  the  beginner when they utter the
word can't be the  same.  And  if there is  no  difference  in what  they
happen  to  be  conscious  of  there  must  be  one  in  the  unconscious
workings  of their  minds, or, again, in  the brain.—So we should  like
to say: There are at all events two different mechanisms at work here.
And what goes on in them must distinguish reading from not reading.
—But  these  mechanisms  are  only  hypotheses,  models  designed  to
explain, to sum up, what you observe.
157.  Consider the following case.  Human beings or creatures of
some other kind are used by us as reading-machines.  They are trained
for this purpose.  The trainer says of some that they can already read,
of others that they cannot yet do so.  Take the case of a pupil who lias
so far not  taken part  in the training:  if he  is  shewn  a written word
he will sometimes produce some  sort of sound,  and here and  there it
happens  'accidentally'  to  be  roughly  right.  A third  person  hears  this
pupil on such an occasion and says:  "He is reading".  But the teacher
says:  "No,  he  isn't  reading;  that  was  just  an  accident".—But  let  us
suppose  that  this  pupil  continues  to  react  correctly  to  further  words
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I 
63*
that are put before him.  After a while the teacher says: "Now he can
read!"—But  what  of that first word?  Is  the  teacher  to  say:  "I was
wrong,  and he did  read  it"—or:  "He only began  really to  read  later
on"?—When did he begin to read?  Which was the first word that he
read? This question makes no sense here. Unless, indeed, we give a
definition: "The first word that a person 'reads' is the first word of the
first series of 5 o words that he reads correctly" (or something of the sort).
If  on  the  other  hand  we  use  "reading"  to  stand  for  a  certain
experience of transition from marks to spoken sounds, then it certainly
makes sense to speak of the first word that he really read.  Pie can then
say, e.g.  "At this word for the first time I had the feeling:  'now I am
reading'."
Or again, in the different case of a reading machine which trans-
lated marks into sounds, perhaps as a pianola does, it would be possible
to say: "The machine read  only after such-and-such had happened to
it—after such-and-such parts had been connected by wires;  the first
word that it read was ... ." .
But  in  the  case  of  the  living  reading-machine  "reading"  meant
reacting to written signs in  such-and-such ways.  This concept was
therefore quite independent of that of a mental or other mechanism.—
Nor can the teacher here say of the pupil:  "Perhaps he  was  already
reading when he said that word".  For there is no doubt about what
he did.—The change when the pupil began to  read  was a change  in
his behaviour, and it makes no sense here to speak of 'a first  word in
his new state'.
158.  But  isn't  that  only  because  of our  too  slight  acquaintance
with what goes on in the  brain and the nervous  system?  If we had
a more  accurate  knowledge of these  things  we  should  see  what  con-
nexions were established by the training, and then we should be able
to say  when we  looked into his brain:  "Now he has read  this  word,
now the reading connexion has been set  up".——And  it  presumably
must be like that—for otherwise how could we be so sure that there
was such a connexion?  That it is so is presumably a priori—or is it
only probable?  And how probable is it?  Now, ask yourself: what do
you know  about these things?——But if it is a priori, that means that
it is a form of account which is very convincing to us.
159.  But when we think the matter over we are tempted to say:
the  one  real  criterion  for  anybody's reading  is  the  conscious  act  of
reading,  the  act of  reading  the  sounds  off from the  letters.  "A man
C# Word - Convert Word to HTML in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB to HTML converter toolkit SDK, preserves all the original anchors, links, bookmarks and Add references:
add links to pdf; clickable pdf links
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PowerPoint
Conversely, conversion from PDF to PowerPoint (.PPTX) is also split PowerPoint file(s), and add, create, insert including editing PowerPoint url links and quick
pdf link to attached file; add a link to a pdf
64
e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
surely  knows  whether  he  is  reading  or  only  pretending  to  read!"—
Suppose A wants  to make B  believe he  can read  Cyrillic  script.  He
learns a Russian  sentence by heart and says  it while  looking  at  the
printed  words as  if  he  were  reading  them.  Here we shall  certainly
say that A knows he is not reading, and has a sense of just this while
pretending to read.  For there are of course many more or less charac-
teristic sensations in reading a printed sentence; it is not difficult to
call such sensations to mind: think of sensations of hesitating, of look-
ing closer,  of misreading, of words following  on one another more or
less smoothly, and so on.  And equally there are characteristic sensa-
tions  in reciting something  one has learnt by heart.  In  our  example
A will have  none of the sensations  that  are characteristic  of reading,
and  will  perhaps  have  a  set  of sensations  characteristic of cheating.
160.  But  imagine  the  following  case:  We give  someone  who can
read fluently a text that he never saw before.  He reads  it to  us—but
with  the  sensation  of saying  something  he  has  learnt  by  heart  (this
might be the effect of some drug).  Should  we say in such a case that
he  was  not  really  reading  the  passage?  Should  we  here  allow  his
sensations  to  count  as  the  criterion  for  his  reading  or  not  reading?
Or  again:  Suppose  that  a  man  who  is  under  the  influence  of a
certain  drug is  presented with a series  of characters  (which need  not
belong to any  existing alphabet),  fie  utters  words  corresponding  to
the  number of the characters, as if they were  letters, and does  so with
all the outward signs, and  with the sensations,  of reading.  (We have
experiences like this in dreams; after waking up in such a case one says
perhaps: "It seemed to me as if I were reading a script, though it was
not writing at all.")  In such a case some people would be  inclined to
say  the  man  was reading  those  marks.  Others,  that  he  was  not.—
Suppose he has in this way read (or interpreted) a set of five marks as
A B O V E—and now we shew him the same marks in the reverse
order and he reads E VO B A;  and in further tests  he always  retains
the  same  interpretation  of the  marks:  here  we  should  certainly  be
inclined to say he was making up an alphabet for himself ad hoc and
then  reading  accordingly.
161.  And remember too that there is a continuous  series  of tran-
sitional  cases between that in  which a person  repeats  from memory
what he is supposed to be reading, and that in which he spells out every
word  without  being  helped  at  all  by  guessing  from  the  context  or
knowing by heart.
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
6
5
e
Try  this  experiment:  say  the numbers from  i  to  12.  Now look at
the dial of your watch and read  them.—What was  it that  you called
"reading" in the latter case?  That is to say: what did you do, to make
it into reading?
162.  Let  us  trv  the  following  definition:  You  are  reading  when
J
c? 
o
you derive the reproduction from the original.  And by "the original" I
mean the text which you read or copy; the dictation from which you
write; the score from which you play; etc. etc..—Now suppose we have,
for example, taught someone the Cyrillic alphabet, and told him how
to pronounce each letter.  Next we put a  passage before him  and  he
reads it, pronouncing every letter as we have taught him.  In this case
we  shall very likely  say that he  derives  the  sound  of  a  word  from
the  written  pattern  by  the  rule  that  we have  given  him.  And  this
is also a clear case of reading.  (We might say that we had taught him
the  'rule  of the  alphabet'.)
But why do we say that he has derived  the spoken from the printed
words?  Do we know anything more than that we taught him how each
letter  should  be  pronounced,  and  that  he  then  read  the  words  out
loud?  Perhaps our reply will be: the pupil shews that he is using the
rule we have given him to pass from the printed to the spoken words.—
How this can be shewn  becomes clearer if we change our example to
one in which the pupil has to write out the text instead  of reading it
to  us,  has  to  make  the  transition  from  print to  handwriting.  For in
this case we can give him the rule in the form of a table with printed
letters in one column  and  cursive letters in the other.  And he shews
that he is deriving his script from the printed words by consulting the
table.
163.  But suppose that when he did this he always  wrote b  for A,
c for B, 6? for C, and so on, and  a for Z?—Surely we should call this too
a derivation by means of the table.—He is using it now, we might say,
according to the second schema in  §86 instead of the first.
It would still be a perfectly good case of derivation according to the
table,  even  if  it  were  represented  by  a  schema  of  arrows  without
any simple regularity.
Suppose,  however,  that  he  does  not  stick  to  a single  method  of
transcribing,  but alters  his  method  according  to  a simple rule:  if he
has once written n  for A
y
then he writes o  for the next A, p  for the next,
and so on.—-But where is the dividing line between this procedure and
a random one?
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.Word
Conversely, conversion from PDF to Word (.docx) is also and split Word file(s), and add, create, insert document, including editing Word url links and quick
pdf edit hyperlink; add url link to pdf
66« 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
But does this mean that the word "to derive" really has no meaning,
since the meaning seems to disintegrate when we follow it up?
164.  In case (162) the meaning of the word "to derive" stood out
clearly.  But we told ourselves that this was only a quite special case
of deriving; deriving in a quite special garb, which had to be stripped
from it if we wanted  to see the essence of deriving.  So we stripped
those particular coverings off; but then deriving itself disappeared.—
In  order  to  find  the  real  artichoke,  we  divested  it  of its  leaves.  For
certainly  (162)  was  a  special  case  of deriving;  what  is  essential  to
deriving, however, was not hidden beneath the surface of this case, but
his  'surface' was one case out of the family of cases of deriving.
And in the same way we also use the word  "to read" for a family
of cases.  And in different circumstances we apply different criteria for
a person's reading.
165.  But surely—we should like to say—reading is a quite particular
process 1  Read a page of print and you can see that something special
is going on, something highly characteristic.——Well, what does go on
when I read the page? I see printed words and I say words out loud.
But, of course, that is not all, for I might see printed words and say
words out loud and still not be reading.  Even if the words which I say
are those which, going by an existing alphabet, are supposed to be read
off from the printed ones.—And if you say that reading is a particular
experience, then it becomes quite unimportant whether or not you read
according to some generally recognized alphabetical rule.—And what
does  the  characteristic thing  about  the experience of reading consist
in?—Here I should like to say: "The words that 1 utter come  in a special
way."  That is, they do not come as they would if I were for example
making  them  up.—They  come  of themselves.—But  even  that  is  not
enough; for the sounds of words may occur to me w^hile I am looking at
printed  words,  but  that  does  not  mean  that  I  have  read  them.—In
addition I  might say here,  neither do the spoken words  occur to  me
as  if,  say,  something  reminded  me of them.  I should for example not
wish  to  say:  the  printed  word  "nothing"  always  reminds  me  of  the
sound  "nothing"—but  the  spoken  words  as  it  were  slip  in  as  one
The  grammar  of  the  expression  "a  quite  particular"  (atmosphere).
One  says  "This  face  has  a  quite particular  expression,"  and  maybe
looks for words to characterize it.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
67*
reads.  And  if I  so  much  as  look at  a  German  printed  word,  there
occurs a peculiar process, that of hearing the sound inwardly.
1 66.  I  said  that  when  one  reads  the  spoken  words  come  'in  a
special way':  but in  what way?  Isn't this  a  fiction?  Let  us  look  at
individual letters and attend to the way the sound of the letter comes.
Read the letter A. — Now, how did the sound come? — We have no
idea what to say about it. —— Now write a small Roman a. — How
did  the movement  of the hand  come as  you wrote?  Differently from
the way the sound came in the previous experiment? — All I know is,
I looked at the printed letter and wrote the cursive letter. —— Now look
at the mark
an(
^ l
et a
sound occur to you as you do so; utter it.
The sound 'U' occurred to me; but I could not say that there was any
essential difference in the kind of way that sound came.  The difference
lay in the difference of situation.  I had told myself beforehand that I
was  to  let a  sound  occur  to me;  there was a certain tension present
before the  sound  came.  And I  did not say 'U' automatically as I  do
when I  look  at  the  letter U.  Further,  that  mark was not familiar to
me  in the  way the  letters  of the  alphabet  are.  I  looked  at  it rather
intently and with a certain interest in its shape; as I looked I thought
of a reversed sigma.——Imagine having to use this mark regularly as
a letter; so that you got used to uttering a particular sound at the sight
of it, say the sound "sh".  Can we say anything but that after a while
this  sound  comes  automatically when we look at the  mark?  That is
to say: I no longer ask myself on seeing it "What sort of letter is that?"
—nor, of course, do I tell myself "This mark makes me want to utter
the  sound  'sh' ",  nor  yet  "This  mark  somehow  reminds  me  of the
sound 'sh' ".
(Compare with this the idea that memory images are distinguished
from other mental images by some special characteristic.)
167.  Now what is there in the proposition that reading is 'a quite
particular  process'?  It  presumably  means  that  when  we  read one
particular  process  takes  place,  which  we  recognize.—But  suppose
that I  at one  time read a sentence in print and  at another  write it in
Morse  code—is the  mental process  really the same?——On the other
hand,  however,  there is  certainly  some  uniformity  in  the  experience
of reading  a  page  of print.  For  the  process  is  a  uniform  one.  And
it is quite  easy to  understand  that there  is  a difference between  this
process  and  one  of,  say,  letting  words  occur  to  one  at  the  sight  of
arbitrary marks.—For the mere look of a printed line is itself extremely
at the mark
68«
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
characteristic—it presents, that is, a quite special appearance, the letters
all  roughly  the  same  size,  akin  in  shape  too,  and  always  recurring;
most of the words constantly repeated  and enormously familiar to us,
like  well-known  faces.—Think  of  the  uneasiness  we  feel  when  the
spelling of a word is  changed. (And  of the still stronger feelings  that
questions  about  the  spelling  of words  have  aroused.)  Of course,  not
all signs have impressed themselves on us so strongly.  A sign in the
algebra of logic for instance can be replaced by any other one without
exciting a strong reaction in us.—
Remember that the look of a word is familiar to us in the same kind
of way as its sound.
168.  Again, our eye passes over printed lines differently from  the
way  it  passes  over  arbitrary  pothooks  and  flourishes.  (I  am  not
speaking here of what can be established by observing the movement
of the eyes  of a reader.)  The eye passes, one would like to say, with
particular ease, without being held up; and yet it doesn't skid.  And at the
same time involuntary speech goes on in the imagination.  That is how
it  is  when  I  read  German  and  other  languages,  printed  or  written,
and in various styles.—But what in all this  is  essential to reading as
such?  Not any one feature that occurs in all cases of reading.  (Compare
reading ordinary print with reading words which are printed entirely
in capital letters, as solutions of puzzles sometimes are.  How different
it isl—Or reading our script from right to left.)
169.  But  when we  read  don't we feel the word-shapes  somehow
causing our utterance?——Read a sentence.—And now look along the
following line
and say a sentence as you do so.  Can't one feel that in the first case
the utterance  was connected  with  seeing the  signs  and  in  the  second
went on side by side with the seeing without any connexion?
But why do you say that we felt a causal connexion?  Causation is
surely  something established  by  experiments,  by  observing a regular
concomitance  of events  for  example.  So  how  could  I  say  that  I felt
something  which  is  established  by  experiment?  (It  is  indeed  true
that  observation  of  regular  concomitances  is  not  the  only  way  we
establish causation.)  One might rather say,  I  feel that the letters  are
the reason  why  I  read such-and-such.  For if someone asks  me  "Why
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
696
do you read such-and-such?"—I justify my reading by the letters which
are there.
This justification, however, was something that I said,  or thought:
what does it mean to say that I feel it?  I  should like to say:  when I
read  I  feel  a  kind  of influence  of the  letters  working  on  me——but  I
feel  no  influence  from  that  series  of arbitrary flourishes  on  what  I
say.—Let  us  once  more  compare  an  individual  letter  with  such  a
flourish. Should I also  say I feel the influence of "i" when I read it?
It does  of course make a difference whether I say "i"  when I see "i"
or when I see "§".  The difference is, for instance, that when I see the
letter it is automatic for me to hear the sound "i" inwardly, it happens
even  against  my  will;  and  I  pronounce  the  letter  more  effortlessly
when I read it than when I am looking at "§".  That is to say: this is
how  it  is when I make the experiment; but of course it is  not so if I
happen to be looking at the mark "§" and at the same time pronounce
a word in which the sound "i" occurs.
170.  It would never have occurred to us to think that we/<?// the
influence of the letters on us when reading, if we had not compared the
case of letters with that of arbitrary marks.  And  here we are indeed
noticing a difference.  And we interpret it as the difference between being
influenced and not being influenced.
In  particular,  this  interpretation appeals  to  us  especially  when we
make a  point of reading  slowly—perhaps  in  order to  see what does
happen when we read.  When we, so to speak, quite intentionally let
ourselves be guided  by the letters.  But this 'letting myself be guided' in
turn only consists in my looking carefully at the letters—and perhaps
excluding  certain  other  thoughts.
We imagine that a feeling enables us to perceive as it were a con-
necting mechanism between the look  of the word and the sound that
we  utter.  For when I  speak of the  experiences  of being influenced,
of causal connexion, of being guided, that is really meant to imply that
I as it were feel the movement of the lever which connects seeing the
letters with speaking.
171.  I might have used other words to hit off the experience I have
when I read a word.  Thus I might say that the written word intimates
the  sound  to  me.—Or  again,  that when one reads,  letter and  sound
form a unity— as it were an alloy.  (In the same way e.g. the faces of
famous  men  and  the  sound  of their  names  are  fused  together.  This
yoe 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
name strikes me as the only right one for this face.)  When I feel this
unity, I might say, I see or hear the sound in the written word.—
But now just read a few sentences in print as you usually do when
you  are  not  thinking  about  the  concept  of reading;  and  ask  yourself
whether you  had  such  experiences  of unity,  of being influenced  and
the rest,  as  you  read.—Don't say you had  them unconsciously!  Nor
should  we  be  misled  by  the  picture  which  suggests  that  these  phe-
nomena  came  in  sight  'on  closer  inspection'.  If  I  am  supposed  to
describe how an object looks from far off, I don't make the description
more  accurate  by  saying  what  can  be  noticed  about  the  object  on
closer  inspection.
172.  Let  us  consider  the  experience  of  being  guided,  and  ask
ourselves:  what does this experience consist in when for instance our
course is guided?—Imagine the following cases:
You  are  in  a  playing field with your eyes  bandaged,  and  someone
leads  you  by  the  hand,  sometimes  left,  sometimes  right;  you  have
constantly to be ready for the tug of his hand, and must also take care
not to stumble when he gives an unexpected tug.
Or again:  someone leads you by the hand where you are unwilling
to go, by force.
Or:  you  are guided by  a  partner  in  a dance;  you  make  yourself as
receptive  as  possible,  in  order  to  guess  his  intention  and  obey  the
slightest  pressure.
Or:  someone takes  you for a walk; you are having  a conversation;
you go wherever he does.
Or: you walk along a field-track, simply following it.
All these situations are similar to one another; but what is common
to all the experiences?
173.  "But  being  guided  is  surely  a  particular  experience!"—The
answer  to this  is:  you  are now thinking  of a particular experience of
being guided.
If I want to realize the experience of the person in one of the earlier
examples,  whose  writing  is  guided  by the printed  text and the  table,
I imagine 'conscientious' looking-up, and so on.  As I do this I assume
a  particular  expression  of  face  (say  that  of  a  conscientious  book-
keeper). Carefulness is a most essential part of this picture; in another
the exclusion  of every volition of one's own  would be essential.  (But
take  something  normal  people  do  quite  unconcernedly  and  imagine
someone  accompanying  it  with  the  expression—and  why  not  the
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
7
ic
feelings?—of  great  carefulness.—Does  that  mean  he  is  careful?
Imagine a servant dropping the tea-tray and everything on it with all
the  outward  signs  of  carefulness.)  If  I  imagine  such  a  particular
experience, it seems to me to be the experience of being guided (or of
reading).  But  now  I  ask  myself:  what  are  you  doing?—You  are
looking at every letter, you are making this face, you are writing the
letters  with  deliberation  (and  so  on).—So  that  is  the  experience  of
being  guided?——Here  I  should  like to  say:  "No,  it  isn't that;  it is
something more inward, more essential."—It is  as if at first all these
more  or  less  inessential  processes  were  shrouded  in  a  particular
atmosphere, which dissipates when I look closely at them.
174.  Ask yourself how you draw a line parallel to a given one 'with
deliberation'—and  another  time,  with  deliberation,  one  at  an  angle
to it.  What is the experience of deliberation?  Here a particular look,
a  gesture,  at  once  occur  to  you—and  then  you  would  like  to say:
"And it just is a particular inner experience".  (And that is, of course,
to add  nothing).
(This is  connected with the problem of the nature of intention,  of
willing.)
175.  Make some arbitrary doodle on a bit of paper.——And now
make a copy next to it, let yourself be guided by it.——I should like
to say: "Sure enough, I was guided here.  But as for what was charac-
teristic in what happened—if 1 say what happened, I no longer find it
characteristic."
But now  notice this: while  I  am being  guided  everything is  quite
simple, I notice nothing special; but afterwards, when I  ask myself
what it was that happened, it seems to have been something indescrib-
able. Afterwards no description satisfies me. It's as if I couldn't believe
that I merely looked, made such-and-such a face, and drew a line.—
But don't I remember anything else?  No; and yet I feel as if there must
have  been  something  else;  in  particular  when  I  say "guidance
1
'', "/»-
fluence", and other such words to myself. "For surely," I tell myself,
"I  was  being guided."— Only  then  does  the  idea  of  that  ethereal,
intangible influence arise.
176.  When I  look back on the experience I have  the feeling that
what is essential about it is an  'experience of being influenced', of a
connexion—as opposed to any mere simultaneity of phenomena:  but
at the same time I should not be willing to call any experienced phe-
nomenon  the  "experience  of  being  influenced".  (This  contains  the
7
ze 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
germ of the idea that the will is not a phenomenon.") I should like to say
that I  had  experienced  the 'because',  and  yet  I  do  not  want  to  call
any  phenomenon the "experience of the because".
177.  I should like to say: "I experience the because".  Not because
I remember such an experience, but because when I reflect on what I
experience in such a case I look at it through the medium of the concept
'because'  (or 'influence'  or  'cause' or  'connexion').—For of course it
is correct to say I  drew the line under the  influence of the  original:
this, however, does not consist  simply  in my feelings as I drew the
line—under  certain  circumstances,  it  may  consist in  my  drawing  it
parallel to the other—even though this in turn is not in general essential
to being guided.—
178.  We  also  say:  "You  can see   that  I  am  guided  by  it"—and
what do you see, if you see this?
When I say to myself: "But I am  guided"—I make perhaps a move-
ment with my hand, which expresses guiding.—Make such a move-
ment of the hand as if you were guiding someone along, and then ask
yourself what the guiding  character of this movement consisted in.  For
you were not guiding anyone.  But you still want to call the movement
one  of  'guiding'.  This  movement  and  feeling  did  not  contain  the
essence of guiding, but still this word forces itself upon you.  It is just
a single form of guiding which forces the expression on us.
179.  Let us return to our case (151).  It is clear that we should not
say B  had the right  to  say the words  "Now I  know how to  go  on",
just  because  he  thought  of  the  formula—unless  experience  shewed
that there was a connexion between thinking of the formula—saying it,
writing  it  down—and  actually  continuing  the  series.  And  obviously
such  a  connexion  does  exist.—And  now  one  might  think  that  the
sentence  "I  can  go  on"  meant  "I  have  an  experience  which I  know
empirically to lead to the continuation of the series."  But does B mean
that when he says he can go on?  Does that sentence come to his mind,
or is he ready to produce it in explanation of what he meant?
No.  The words  "Now I know how to go on" were correctly  used
when he thought of the formula: that is, given such circumstances as
that he had learnt algebra, had used such formulae  before.—But that
does not mean that his statement is only short for a description of all
the circumstances which constitute the scene for our language-game.—
Think how  we learn  to  use the expressions  "Now I  know how  to go
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
73'
on",  "Now  I  can  go  on"  and  others;  in  what  family  of  language-
games we learn their use.
We can also imagine the case where nothing at all occurred in B's
mind  except  that he  suddenly  said  "Now  I  know  how  to  go  on"—
perhaps with a feeling of relief; and that he did in fact go on working
out  the  series  without  using  the  formula.  And  in  this  case  too we
should say—in certain circumstances—that he did know how to go on.
180. This is how these words are used.  It would be quite misleading,
in  this  last  case,  for  instance,  to  call  the  words  a  "description  of a
mental state".—One might rather call them a "signal";  and  we judge
whether it was rightly employed by what he goes on to do.
181.  In  order  to  understand  this,  we  need  also  to  consider  the
following:  suppose  B  says  he  knows  how  to  go  on—but when  he
wants to go on he hesitates and can't do it: are we to say that he was
wrong when he said he could go on, or rather that he was able to go on
then, only now is not?—Clearly we shall say different things in different
cases.  (Consider both kinds of case.)
182.  The grammar of "to  fit",  "to be able", and  "to  understand".
(Exercises: (i) When is a cylinder C said to fit into a hollow cylinder H?
Only while C is stuck into H?  (2) Sometimes we say that C ceased to
fit into H at such-and-such a time.  What criteria are used in  such a
case for its having happened at that time?  (3) What does one regard as
criteria for a body's having changed its weight at a particular time if it
was not actually on the balance at that time?  (4) Yesterday I knew the
poem by heart; today I no longer know it.  In what kind of case does it
make sense to ask: "When did I stop knowing it?"  (5)  Someone asks
me "Can  you lift this weight?"  I answer "Yes".  Now  he says  "Do
it!"—and I can't.  In what kind of circumstances would it count as a
justification to  say  "When I answered  'yes' I could do it,  only now I
can't"?
The  criteria which  we  accept  for  'fitting',  'being  able  to',  'under-
standing',  are  much  more  complicated  than  might  appear  at first
sight.  That is, the game with  these words,  their employment  in the
linguistic  intercourse  that  is  carried  on  by  their  means,  is  more
involved—the role of these words in our language other—than we are
tempted  to think.
(This  role  is  what  we  need  to  understand  in  order  to  resolve
philosophical  paradoxes.  And  hence  definitions  usually  fail  to
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested