view pdf in windows form c# : Adding hyperlinks to pdf files application software cloud html winforms web page class WittgensteinInvestigations5-part1305

94
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
actually correct.  If the mental image of the time-table could not itself
be tested  for correctness, how could it confirm the correctness of the
first memory?  (As if someone were to buy several copies of the morn-
ing paper to assure himself that what it said was true.)
Looking up a table in the imagination is no more looking up a table
than the image of the result of an imagined experiment is the result of
an experiment.
266.  I  can  look at the clock to see what time it is:  but I can also
look at the dial of a clock in order to guess what time it is; or for the
same purpose move the hand of a clock till its position strikes me as
right.  So the look of a clock may serve to determine the time in more
than one way.  (Looking at the clock in imagination.)
267.  Suppose I  wanted  to justify  the choice of dimensions for a
bridge  which  I  imagine  to  be  building,  by  making  loading  tests  on
the  material of the bridge in my imagination.  This would, of course,
be to imagine what is called justifying the choice of dimensions for a
bridge.  But  should  we  also  call  it justifying  an  imagined choice  of
dimensions?
268.  Why  can't  my  right hand  give  my left hand  money?—My
right hand can put  it into my left hand.  My  right hand can write  a
deed  of gift  and  my  left  hand  a  receipt.—But  the  further  practical
consequences  would  not be  those  of a gift.  When the left hand  has
taken the money from the right, etc., we shall ask: "Well, and what of
it?"  And  the  same  could be  asked  if a  person  had  given  himself a
private definition of a word; I mean, if he has said the word to himself
and at the same time has directed his attention to a sensation.
269.  Let  us  remember  that  there  are  certain  criteria  in  a  man's
behaviour  for  the  fact  that  he  does  not  understand  a  word:  that  it
means  nothing  to him,  that he  can do nothing with it.  And  criteria
for his 'thinking he understands', attaching some meaning to the word,
but not  the right one.  And,  lastly,  criteria for his  understanding the
word right.  In the second case one might speak of a subjective under-
standing.  And  sounds  which  no  one  else  understands  but  which  I
'appear to understand'' might be called a "private language".
270.  Let us now  imagine a use for the entry of the sign  "S" in my
diary.  I discover that whenever I have a particular sensation a mano-
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
95
e
meter shews that my blood-pressure rises.  So  I  shall be able to  say
that my blood-pressure is rising without using any apparatus.  This is
a useful result.  And now it  seems  quite  indifferent whether I have
recognized  the  sensation right  or  not.  Let  us  suppose  I  regularly
identify it wrong, it does not matter in the least.  And that alone shews
that the hypothesis that I make a mistake is mere show.  (We as it were
turned a knob which looked as if it could be used to turn on some part
of the  machine; but it  was  a mere ornament, not  connected  with the
mechanism at all.)
And what is our reason for calling "S" the name of a sensation here?
Perhaps the kind of way this sign is employed in this language-game,—
And why a "particular sensation," that is,  the same one every time?
Well, aren't we supposing that we write "S" every time?
271.  "Imagine a person  whose  memory  could  not retain what the
word  'pain'  meant—so  that  he  constantly  called  different  things  by
that name—but nevertheless used the word in a way fitting in with the
usual symptoms and presuppositions of pain"—in short he uses it as we
all do.  Here I should like to say: a wheel that can  be  turned  though
nothing else moves with it, is not part of the mechanism.
272.  The essential thing about private experience is really not that
each  person  possesses  his  own  exemplar,  but  that  nobody  knows
whether other people also have this or something else.  The assumption
would  thus  be  possible—though  unverifiable—that  one  section  of
mankind had one sensation of red and another section another.
273.  What am I to say about the word "red"?—that it means some-
thing 'confronting us all' and that everyone should really have another
word, besides this one, to mean his own  sensation of red?  Or is it like
this:  the  word  "red"  means  something  know
r
 to  everyone;  and  in
addition, for each person, it means something known only to him?  (Or
perhaps rather:  it refers to something known only to him.)
274.  Of course, saying that  the  word "red"  "refers to" instead  of
"means"  something private does not help us in the least to grasp its
function; but it is the more psychologically apt expression for a par-
ticular experience in doing philosophy.  It is  as if when I uttered  the
word I cast a sidelong glance at the private sensation, as it were in order
to say to myself: I know all right what I mean by it.
Adding hyperlinks to pdf files - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
clickable links in pdf from word; add hyperlink pdf document
Adding hyperlinks to pdf files - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
add hyperlinks pdf file; pdf link open in new window
t;
6e 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
275.  Look  at the blue  of the  sky and  say to  yourself "How blue
the sky is!"—When you do it spontaneously—without philosophical
intentions—the idea never crosses your mind that this impression of
colour belongs only to you.  And you have no hesitation in exclaiming
that  to someone  else.  And  if you point at  anything as  you say  the
words you point at the sky.  I am saying: you have not the feeling of
pointing-into-yourself,  which  often  accompanies  'naming  the  sensa-
tion' when one is thinking about 'private language'.  Nor do you think
that really you ought not to point to the colour with your hand, but
with your attention.  (Consider what it means "to point to something
with  the  attention".)
276.  But don't we at least mean  something quite definite when we
look  at  a  colour  and  name  our  colour-impression?  It  is  as  if  we
detached  the colout-impression   from  the  object,  like  a  membrane.
(This ought to arouse our suspicions.)
277.  But how is even possible for us  to be tempted to think that
we use a word to mean  at one time the colour known to everyone—and
at another the 'visual impression' which I am getting now"?  How can
there be so much as a temptation here?——I don't turn the same kind
of attention on the colour in the two cases.  When I  mean the colour
impression that (as I should like to say) belongs to me alone I immerse
myself  in  the  colour—rather  like  when  I  'cannot  get  my  fill  of  a
colour'.  Hence  it  is  easier  to  produce  this  experience  when  one  is
looking at a bright colour, or at an impressive colour-scheme.
278.  "I know how the colour green looks to me"— surely that makes
sense!—Certainly:  what use of the  proposition are you thinking of?
279.  Imagine someone saying:  "But I know how tall I  am!"  and
laying his hand on top of his head to prove it.
280.  Someone paints a picture in order to shew how he imagines
a theatre scene.  And now I say: "This picture has a double function:
it  informs  others,  as  pictures  or  words  inform——but  for  the  one
who gives the information it is a representation (or piece of informa-
tion?)  of another  kind:  for him  it  is  the  picture  of his  image,  as  it
can't be for anyone else.  To him his private impression of the picture
means what he has imagined, in a sense in which the picture cannot
mean this  to others."—And what right have I to  speak in this  second
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
97
e
case of a representation or piece of information—if these words were
rightly used in the first case?
281.  "But doesn't what you say come to this: that there is no pain,
for example, without pain-behaviour?"— It comes to this: only of a living
human being and what resembles (behaves like) a living human being
can one say: it has sensations; it sees; is blind; hears; is deaf; is conscious
or  unconscious.
282.  "But in a fairy tale the pot too can see and hear!"  (Certainly;
but it can  also talk.)
"But the fairy tale only invents what is not the case: it does not talk
nonsense"—It is not as simple as that. Is it false or nonsensical to say
that a pot talks?  Have we a clear picture of the circumstances in which
we should say of a pot that it talked?  (Even a nonsense-poem is not
nonsense in the same way as the babbling of a child.)
We do indeed say of an inanimate thing that it is in pain: w
r
hen play-
ing with dolls for example.  But this use  of the concept of pain  is  a
secondary one.  Imagine a case  in which people ascribed pain only to
inanimate things; pitied only dolls!  (When children play at trains their
game is connected with their knowledge of trains.  It would neverthe-
less be possible for the children of a tribe unacquainted with trains to
learn this game from others, and to play it without knowing that it was
copied  from  anything.  One  might  say  that  the  game  did  not  make
the same sense to them as to us.)
283.  What gives us so much as the idea  that living beings, things,
can  feel?
Is it  that my  education  has  led me to  it by drawing  my attention
to feelings in myself,  and now I transfer the idea to  objects  outside
myself?  That I recognize that there is something there (in me) which
I can call "pain" without getting into conflict with the way other people
use this word?—I do not transfer my idea to stones, plants, etc.
Couldn't I imagine having frightful pains and turning to stone while
they lasted?  Well, how do I know, if I shut my eyes, whether I have
not turned into a stone?  And if that has happened, in what sense will
the stone have the pains? In what sense will they be ascribable to the
stone?  And why need the pain have a bearer at all here?!
And can one say of the stone that it has a soul and that is what has
the pain?  What has a soul, or pain, to do with a stone?
9
8e 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
Only of what behaves like a human being can one say that it has
pains.
For one has to say it of a body, or, if you like of a soul which some
body has.  And how can a body have a soul?
284.  Look at a stone and imagine it having sensations.—One says
to  oneself:  How  could  one  so  much as  get the  idea  of ascribing  a
sensation to a thing? One might as well ascribe it to a number!—And
now look at a wriggling fly and at once these difficulties vanish and
pain seems able to get a foothold here, where before everything was,
so to speak, too smooth for it.
And so, too, a corpse seems to us quite inaccessible to pain.—Our
attitude to what is alive and to what is dead, is not the same.  All our
reactions are different.—If anyone says:  "That cannot  simply come
from the fact that a living thing moves about in such-and-such a way
and a dead  one not",  then  I want to intimate  to  him  that this  is  a
case  of the  transition  'from quantity to quality'.
285.  Think  of the  recognition  of facial expressions.  Or  of  the
description of facial expressions—which does not consist in giving the
measurements of the facel  Think, too, how one can imitate a man's
face without seeing one's own in  a mirror.
286.  But isn't it absurd to say of a body that it has pain?——And
why does one feel an absurdity in that?  In what sense is it true that
my hand does not feel pain, but I in my hand?
What sort of issue is: Is it the body that feels pain?—How is it to be
decided?  What makes it plausible to  say that it is not the body?—
Well, something like this: if someone has a pain in his hand, then the
hand  does not  say so (unless it writes  it)  and one does not comfort
the hand, but the sufferer: one looks into his face.
287.  How  am I filled with pity for this man?   How does it come
out what the object of my pity is?  (Pity, one may say, is a form of
conviction that someone else is in pain.)
288.  I  turn  to  stone  and my pain goes  on.—Suppose I  were in
error  and  it  was  no  longer pain?—— But  I  can't  be  in  error  here;
it  means  nothing  to  doubt  whether  I  am  in  pain!—That  means:  if
anyone said "I do not know if what I have got is a pain or something
else",  we  should  think  something  like,  he  does  not  know  what  the
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
99
e
English word  "pain" means; and we should explain it to him.—How?
Perhaps by means of gestures, or by pricking him with a pin and saying:
"See, that's what pain is!"  This explanation, like any other, he might
understand right, wrong, or not at all.  And he will shew which he does
by his use of the word, in this as in other cases.
If  he  now  said,  for  example:  "Oh,  I  know  what  'pain'  means;
what I don't know is whether this, that I have now, is pain"—we should
merely shake our heads and be forced to regard his words as a queer
reaction which we have no idea what to do with.  (It would be rather
as if we heard someone say seriously: "I distinctly remember that some
time before I was born I believed .....".)
That  expression  of doubt  has no  place in  the language-game;  but
if we cut out human behaviour, which is the expression of sensation, it
looks as if I might legitimately  begin to doubt afresh.  My temptation to
say that one might take a sensation for something other than what it is
arises  from  this:  if I  assume  the  abrogation of the  normal language-
game with the expression of a sensation, I need a criterion of identity
for the sensation; and then the possibility of error also exists.
289.  "When  I  say  'I  am in  pain' I  am  at  any  rate justified before
myself"—What does that mean? Does it mean: "If someone else could
know what I am calling 'pain', he would admit that I was using the
word  correctly"?
To use a word without a justification does not mean to use it without
right.
290.  What I do is not, of course, to identify my sensation by criteria:
but  to  repeat  an  expression.  But  this  is  not  the end   of  the
language-game:  it is  the  beginning.
But isn't  the  beginning  the sensation—which  I  describe?—Perhaps
this word "describe" tricks us here.  I say "I describe my state of mind"
and "I describe my room".  You need to  call to  mind the differences
between  the language-games.
291.  What  we  call "descriptions"  are  instruments  for  particular
uses.  Think of a  machine-drawing, a cross-section,  an  elevation with
measurements,  which  an  engineer  has  before  him.  Thinking  of  a
description as  a word-picture of the facts has  something misleading
about it: one tends to think only of such pictures as hang on our walls:
which seem simply to portray how a thing looks, what it is like.  (These
pictures are as it were idle.)
IOO
e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
292.  Don't always think that you read off what you say from the
facts; that you portray these in words according to rules.  For even so
you  would  have  to  apply  the  rule  in  the  particular  case  without
guidance.
293.  If I say of myself that it is only from my own case that I know
what the word "pain" means—must I not say the same of other people
too?  And how can I generalize the one case so irresponsibly?
Now someone tells me that he  knows what pain is only from his own
case!——Suppose everyone had a box with something in it: we call it
a "beetle".  No one can look into anyone else's box, and everyone says
he knows what a beetle is only by looking at his beetle.—Here it would
be quite possible for everyone to have something different in his box.
One  might  even  imagine  such  a  thing  constantly  changing.—But
suppose the word  "beetle" had a  use  in these  people's  language?—If
so it would not be used as the name of a thing.  The thing in the box
has  no  place  in  the  language-game  at  all;  not even  as  a something:
for the box might even be empty.—No,  one can 'divide through'  by
the thing in the box; it cancels out, whatever it is.
That  is  to  say:  if we  construe  the  grammar  of the  expression  of
sensation  on the  model of 'object  and  designation'  the  object  drops
out of consideration  as  irrelevant.
294.  If you say he sees  a private picture before him, which he is
describing,  you  have  still  made  an  assumption  about  what  he  has
before him.  And that means that you can describe it or do describe it
more closely.  If you admit that you haven't any notion what kind of
thing it might be that he has  before him—then what  leads  you  into
saying,  in  spite  of that,  that  he  has  something  before him?  Isn't  it
as if I were to say of someone: "He has something.  But I don't know
whether it is money, or debts, or an empty till."
295.  "I know .... only from my own  case"—what kind of proposition
is this meant to be at all?  An experiential one?  No.—A grammatical
one?
Suppose everyone does say about himself that he  knows  what pain
is only from his own pain.—Not that people really say that, or are even
prepared to say it.  But //everybody said it——it might be a kind of
exclamation.  And even if it gives no information, still it is a picture,
and why should we not want to call up such a picture?  Imagine an
allegorical painting take the place of those words.
When we look into ourselves as we do philosophy, we often get to
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I 
101*
see  just  such  a  picture.  A  full-blown  pictorial  representation  of our
grammar.  Not facts; but as it were illustrated turns of speech.
296.  "Yes, but there is something  there all the same accompanying
my cry of pain.  And it is on account of that that I utter it.  And this
something is what is  important—and frightful."—Only whom are we
informing of this?  And on what occasion?
297.  Of course, if water boils in a pot, steam comes out of the pot
and also pictured steam comes out of the pictured pot.  But what if one
insisted  on  saying  that  there  must  also  be  something  boiling  in  the
picture  of the  pot?
298.  The  very fact  that we should  so  much  like  to  say: "This is
the  important  thing"—while  we  point  privately  to  the  sensation—
is enough to shew how much we are inclined to say something which
gives  no  information.
299.  Being unable—when we surrender ourselves to philosophical
thought—to help saying such-and-such; being irresistibly inclined to say
it—does  not  mean  being  forced  into  an assumption,  or  having  an
immediate perception or  knowledge of a  state of affairs.
300.  It is—we  should  like  to  say—not  merely  the  picture  of the
behaviour that plays a part in  the language-game  with the words  "he
is in pain", but also the picture of the pain.  Or, not merely the para-
digm  of the  behaviour,  but  also  that  of  the  pain.—It  is  a  misunder-
standing  to  say  "The  picture  of  pain  enters  into  the  language-game
with  the  word  'pain'."  The  image  of pain  is  not  a  picture  and this
image  is  not  replaceable  in  the  language-game  by  anything  that  we
should  call  a  picture.—The  image  of  pain  certainly  enters  into  the
language game in a sense; only not as a picture.
301.  An image is not a picture, but a picture can correspond to it.
302.  If one  has  to  imagine  someone else's  pain  on  the  model  of
one's own, this  is none too easy a thing to do: for I have to imagine
pain which I do not feel on the model of the pain which I do feel.  That
is, what I have to do is not simply to make a transition in imagination
from one place of pain to another.  As, from pain in the hand to pain
in the arm.  For I am not to imagine that I feel pain in some region of
his body.  (Which would also be possible.)
Pain-behaviour can point to a painful place—but the subject of pain
is  the person who gives it expression.
IO2«
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
303.  "I can only believe that someone else is in pain, but I know  it
if I am."—Yes:  one can  make the decision  to  say  "I  believe  he  is  in
pain" instead of "He is  in pain".  But that  is  all.——What looks  like
an explanation here, or like a statement about a mental process, is in
truth an exchange  of one expression  for another which, while  we  are
doing  philosophy,  seems  the  more appropriate  one.
Just try—in a real case—to  doubt someone else's  fear or pain.
304.  "But you will surely admit that there is a difference between
pain-behaviour accompanied by pain  and  pain-behaviour without any
pain?"—Admit it?  What greater difference could there be?—"And yet
you again and  again reach the conclusion that the sensation itself is  a
nothing"—Not at all. It is not a  something., but not a  nothing either!
The conclusion was  only that a nothing would serve just as well as  a
something about which nothing could be said.  We have only rejected
the grammar which tries to force itself on us here.
The  paradox  disappears  only  if we  make  a radical  break  with  the
idea  that  language  always  functions  in  one  way,  always  serves  the
same purpose: to convey thoughts—which may be about houses, pains,
good and evil, or anything else you please.
305.  "But you surely cannot deny that, for example, in remember-
ing,  an  inner  process  takes  place."—What  gives  the  impression  that
we  want  to  deny  anything?  When  one  says  "Still,  an  inner  process
does  take  place  here"—one  wants  to  go  on:  "After  all,  you see   it."
And  it is  this inner process  that one means by the word  "remember-
ing".—The impression that we wanted to deny something arises from
our setting our faces  against the picture  of the  'inner process'.  What
we deny is  that the picture  of the inner  process gives us  the  correct
idea of the use  of the word  "to remember".  We say that this picture
with its  ramifications stands in  the  way of our  seeing the use of the
word as it is.
306.  Why  should  I  deny  that  there  is  a  mental  process?  But
"There  has  just  taken  place  in  me  the  mental  process  of  remember-
ing . . . ." means nothing more than: "I have just remembered . . . .".
To  deny  the  mental process  would  mean to  deny  the  remembering;
to deny that anyone ever remembers anything.
307.  "Are you  not really  a behaviourist in  disguise?  Aren't you
at  bottom  really  saying  that  everything  except  human  behaviour  is
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I 
103^
a  fiction?"—If  I  do  speak  of a  fiction,  then it is  of  a grammatical
fiction.
308.  How does the philosophical problem about mental processes
and states and about behaviourism arise?——The first step is the one
that  altogether  escapes  notice.  We  talk  of processes  and  states  and
leave  their  nature  undecided.  Sometime  perhaps  we  shall  know
more about them—we think.  But that  is just what commits  us  to  a
particular way of looking at the matter.  For we have a definite concept
of what  it  means  to  learn  to  know  a  process  better.  (The  decisive
movement in the conjuring trick has been made, and it was the very
one  that  we  thought  quite  innocent.)—And  now  the  analogy which
was to make us understand our thoughts falls to pieces.  So we have to
deny the yet uncomprehended process in the yet unexplored medium.
And now it looks as if we had denied mental processes.  And naturally
we don't want to  deny them.
309.  What is your aim in philosophy?—To shew the fly the way out
of the fly-bottle.
310.  I tell someone I am in pain.  His attitude to me will then be
that of belief; disbelief; suspicion; and so on.
Let us assume he  says:  "It's not so bad."—Doesn't that prove that
he believes in something behind the outward expression of pain?——
HJS  attitude is a proof of his attitude.  Imagine not merely the words
"I  am  in  pain"  but  also  the  answer  "It's  not  so  bad"  replaced  by
instinctive noises and gestures.
311.  "What  difference  could  be  greater?"—In  the  case  of pain  I
believe that I  can  give  myself a private exhibition of the difference.
But I can give anyone an exhibition of the difference between a broken
and  an  unbroken  tooth.—But  for  the  private  exhibition  you  don't
have  to  give  yourself actual  pain;  it  is  enough  to imagine  it—for
instance, you screw up your face a bit.  And do you know that what you
are giving  yourself this exhibition of is  pain  and not,  for example, a
facial  expression?  And  how  do  you  know  what  you  are  to  give
yourself an exhibition of before you do it?  This private exhibition is an
illusion.
312.  But again, aren't the cases of the tooth and the pain similar?
For the visual  sensation  in  the  one  corresponds  to the  sensation  of
pain in the other.  1 can exhibit the visual sensation to myself as little
or as well as the sensation of pain.
io4
e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
Let us imagine the following:  The surfaces of the things around us
(stones,  plants,  etc.)  have  patches  and  regions  which  produce  pain
in  our  skin  when  we  touch  them.  (Perhaps  through  the  chemical
composition of these surfaces.  But we need  not know that.)  In this
case we should speak of pain-patches on the leaf of a particular plant
just as at present we speak of red  patches.  I am supposing that it is
useful to us to notice these patches and their shapes; that we can infer
important properties of the objects from them.
313.  I can exhibit pain, as I exhibit  red,  and  as I exhibit straight
and crooked and trees and stones.—That is what we call "exhibiting".
314.  It shews a fundamental misunderstanding, if I am inclined to
study the headache I have now in order to get clear about the philo-
sophical problem of sensation.
315.  Could  someone understand the word  "pain",  who had never
felt  pain?—Is  experience  to  teach  me  whether  this  is  so  or  not?—
And if we say "A man could not imagine pain without having some-
time felt it"—how do we know?  How can it be decided whether it is
true?
316.  In order to get clear about the  meaning of the word  "think"
we watch ourselves while we think; what we observe will be what the
word means I—But this concept is not used like that.  (It would be as
if without  knowing how  to  play  chess,  I  were  to  try and  make  out
what the word  "mate" meant by close observation of the last move of
some game of chess.)
317.  Misleading  parallel:  the  expression  of  pain  is  a  cry—the
expression  of thought,  a  proposition.
As if the purpose  of the proposition were to  convey to  one person
how it is with another:  only, so to speak, in his thinking part and not
in his stomach.
318.  Suppose  we  think  while  we  talk  or  write—I  mean,  as  we
normally do—we shall not in general say that we think quicker than
we  talk;  the  thought  seems not to be separate from the  expression.
On the other hand, however, one does speak of the speed of thought;
of how a thought goes through one's head like lightning; how problems
become  clear to  us in a flash, and  so on.  So  it is natural to ask if
the  same  thing  happens  in  lightning-like  thought—only  extremely
accelerated—as when we talk and 'think while we talk.'  So that in the
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
105*
first case the clockwork runs  down all at once, but in the second  bit
by bit,  braked by the words.
319.  I can see or understand a whole thought in a flash in exactly
the sense in which I can make a note  of it in  a few words  or a few
pencilled  dashes.
What makes this note into an epitome  of this  thought?
320.  The  lightning-like  thought  may  be  connected  with  the
spoken  thought  as  the  algebraic  formula  is  with  the  sequence  of
numbers which I work out from it.
When,  for  example,  I  am  given  an  algebraic  function,  I  am
CERTAIN that I shall be able to work out its values for the arguments
i,  2,  3, ... up  to  10.  This  certainty will  be  called  'well-founded',
for  I  have  learned  to  compute  such  functions,  and  so  on.  In  other
cases no reasons will be given for it—but it will be justified by success.
321.  "What  happens  when  a  man  suddenly  understands?"—The
question is badly framed.  If it is a question about the meaning of the
expression  "sudden  understanding",  the  answer  is  not  to  point  to  a
process that we give this name to.—The question might  mean:  what
are  the tokens  of sudden  understanding;  what  are  its  characteristic
psychical accompaniments?
(There is no ground for assuming that a man feels the facial move-
ments  that go with his expression, for example,  or the  alterations  in
his breathing that are characteristic of some emotion.  Even if he feels
them as soon as his attention is  directed towards  them.)  ((Posture.))
322.  The question what the expression means is not answered by
such a description; and this misleads  us  into  concluding  that under-
standing  is  a  specific  indefinable  experience.  But  we  forget  that
what should interest us  is  the  question:  how  do  we compare  these
experiences; what criterion of identity do we fix for their occurrence?
323.  "Now I know  how  to go  onl" is an exclamation; it  corres-
ponds  to  an  instinctive  sound,  a  glad  start.  Of  course  it  does  not
follow from  my  feeling  that  I  shall  not  find I  am  stuck when  I  do
try to  go on.—Here there  are  cases in which I should  say:  "When I
said  I  knew  how  to  go  on,  I did  know."  One  will  say  that  if,  for
example,  an unforeseen interruption  occurs.  But what is  unforeseen
must not simply be that I get stuck.
io6e 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
We  could  also  imagine  a case  in which  light was  always  seeming
to  dawn  on  someone—he  exclaims  "Now  I  have  it!"  and  then  can
never justify himself in practice.—It might seem to him as  if in the
twinkling of an eye he forgot  again the  meaning  of the picture  that
occurred  to  him.
324.  Would it  be  correct  to  say  that  it is a matter of induction,
and that I am as certain that I shall be able to continue the series, as I
am that this book will drop on the ground when I let it go; and that
I  should  be  no  less  astonished  if  I  suddenly  and  for  no  obvious
reason got stuck in working out the series, than I should be if the book
remained  hanging in  the  air  instead  of falling?—To  that  I  will  reply
that we don't need any grounds for this certainty either.  What could
justify the certainty better than success?
325.  "The certainty that I shall be able to go on after I have had
this experience—seen the formula, for instance,—is simply based on
induction."  What does this  mean?—"The certainty that the fire will
burn  me  is  based  on  induction."  Does  that  mean  that  I  argue  to
myself:  "Fire  has  always  burned  me,  so  it  will  happen  now  too?"
Or is the previous experience the cause of my certainty, not its ground?
Whether  the  earlier experience  is  the  cause  of the  certainty  depends
on the  system of hypotheses,  of natural  laws,  in  which  we are  con-
sidering the  phenomenon  of certainty.
Is our confidence justified?—What people accept as a justification—
is  shewn by how they think and live.
326.  We expect this, and are surprised at that.  But the  chain  of
reasons has an end.
327.  "Can one think without speaking?"—And what is thinking?—
Well, don't you ever think?  Can't you observe yourself and see what
is going on?  It should be quite simple.  You do not have to wait for it
as for an astronomical event and then perhaps make your observation
in a hurry.
328.  Well,  what does  one  include  in  'thinking'?  What  has  one
learnt to use this word for?—If I say I have thought—need I always
be right?—What kind  of mistake  is  there  room for here?  Are there
circumstances in which one would ask: "Was what I was doing then
really thinking; am I not making a mistake?"  Suppose someone takes
a measurement in the middle of a train of thought: has he interrupted
the  thought  if he  says  nothing  to  himself during  the  measuring?
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
107*
329.  When  I  think  in  language,  there  aren't  'meanings'  going
through my mind in addition to the verbal expressions: the language is
itself the  vehicle  of thought.
330.  Is  thinking a kind  of speaking?  One would  like to say it is
what distinguishes  speech with  thought from talking without thinking.
—And  so  it  seems  to  be  an  accompaniment  of speech.  A  process,
which may accompany something else, or can go on by itself.
Say:  "Yes,  this  pen  is  blunt.  Oh well, it'll do."  First,  thinking it;
then without  thought;  then  just  think the thought without the words.
—Well,  while  doing  some writing I  might  test the point  of my  pen,
make a face—and  then  go on  with  a gesture  of resignation.—I might
also act in such a way while taking various measurements that an on-
looker would say I had—without words—thought: If two magnitudes
are  equal  to'a  third,  they  are  equal  to  one  another.—But  what  con-
stitutes  thought  here  is  not  some  process  which  has  to  accompany
the words if they are not to be spoken without thought.
331.  Imagine people  who  could  only think aloud.  (As  there are
people who  can  only read  aloud.)
332.  While  we  sometimes  call  it  "thinking"  to  accompany  a
sentence  by  a  mental  process,  that  accompaniment  is  not  what we
mean by a "thought".——Say a sentence and think it; say it with under-
standing.—And now do not say it, and just do what you accompanied
it with when  you  said it with understanding!—(Sing this  tune with
expression.  And now don't sing  it, but repeat its  expression!—And
here one actually might repeat something.  For example,  motions of
the body, slower and faster breathing, and so on.)
333.  "Only  someone  who  is convinced can  say  that."—How does
the conviction help him when he says it?—Is it somewhere at hand by
the side of the spoken expression?  (Or is it masked by  it, as a soft
sound by a loud one,  so  that  it can,  as  it were,  no longer  be  heard
when one expresses  it out loud?)  What if someone were to say "In
order to  be  able  to  sing  a tune  from memory one  has  to hear it  in
one's mind and sing from that"?
334.  "So  you  really  wanted  to  say . . . ."—We  use  this  phrase
in  order  to  lead  someone  from  one  form  of expression  to  another.
One is tempted to use the following picture: what he really 'wanted to
say', what he 'meant' was already present somewhere in his mind even
joge 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
before  we  gave  it expression.  Various  kinds  of thing  may  persuade
us  to  give  up  one  expression  and  to adopt  another  in its  place.  To
understand  this,  it  is  useful  to  consider  the  relation  in  which  the
solutions of mathematical problems stand to the context and ground of
their  formulation.  The  concept  'trisection  of  the  angle  with  ruler
and compass', when people are trying to do it, and, on the other hand,
when it has been proved  that there is  no such thing.
335.  What  happens  when  we  make  an  effort—say  in  writing  a
letter—to  find  the  right  expression  for  our  thoughts?—This  phrase
compares the process to one of translating  or  describing:  the thoughts
are  already  there  (perhaps  were  there  in  advance)  and  we  merely
look for their expression.  This picture is more  or less appropriate in
different cases.—But can't all sorts of things happen here?—I surrender
to a mood and the expression comes.  Or a  picture occurs to  me and  I
try  to  describe it.  Or  an  English expression  occurs  to  me and  I  try
to  hit  on  the  corresponding  German  one.  Or  I  make  a  gesture,  and
ask myself:  What  words  correspond  to  this  gesture?  And  so  on.
Now  if  it  were  asked:  "Do  you  have  the  thought  before  rinding
the expression?"  what would one  have  to  reply?  And  what,  to  the
question:  "What  did  the  thought  consist  in,  as  it  existed  before  its
expression?"
336.  This  case  is  similar  to  the  one  in  which  someone  imagines
that  one  could not  think  a  sentence  with  the  remarkable  word  order
of German or Latin just as it stands.  One first has to think it, and then
one arranges the words in that queer order.  (A French politician once
wrote  that  it  was  a  peculiarity  of  the  French  language  that  in  it
words  occur  in  the  order  in  which  one  thinks  them.)
337.  But  didn't  I  already  intend  the  whole  construction  of  the
sentence (for example) at its beginning?  So surely it already existed in
my mind before I said it out loud!—If it was in my mind, still it would
not normally be there in some different word order.  But here we are
constructing a misleading picture  of 'intending',  that  is, of the use of
this  word.  An  intention  is  embedded  in  its  situation,  in  human
customs  and institutions.  If the  technique  of the  game  of  chess  did
not exist, I could not intend to play a game of chess.  In so far as I do
intend the construction of a sentence in advance, that is made possible
by the fact that I can speak the language in question.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I 
io
9
«
338.  After all, one  can only say something  if one  has  learned  to
talk.  Therefore in order to want to say something one must also have
mastered  a  language;  and  yet it is  clear  that one  can  want to  speak
without speaking.  Just as one  can want to dance without dancing.
And  when  we think about this,  we grasp  at the image  of dancing,
speaking, etc. .
339.  Thinking is not an incorporeal process  which lends life and
sense  to  speaking,  and  which  it would  be  possible  to  detach  from
speaking, rather as the Devil took the shadow of Schlemiehl from the
ground.——But how "not an incorporeal process"?  Am I acquainted
with  incorporeal  processes,  then,  only thinking  is  not  one  of them?
No; I called the expression "an incorporeal  process" to my aid in  my
embarrassment when I was trying to explain the meaning of the word
"thinking" in a primitive way.
One  might  say  "Thinking is  an incorporeal process",  however,  if
one were using this to  distinguish the grammar  of the  word  "think"
from that of,  say,  the  word  "eat".  Only  that  makes  the  difference
between the meanings look too slight.  (It is like saying: numerals are
actual,  and  numbers  non-actual,  objects.)  An  unsuitable  type  of
expression is a sure means of remaining in a state of confusion.  It as
it  were  bars  the way  out.
340.  One  cannot  guess  how  a  word  functions.  One  has  to look
at its use and learn from that.
But the difficulty is to remove the prejudice which stands in the way
of doing this.  It is not a stupid  prejudice.
341.  Speech with and without thought is to be compared with the
playing of a piece of music with and without thought.
342  William  James,  in  order  to  shew  that  thought  is  possible
without speech,  quotes  the  recollection  of a  deaf-mute,  Mr.  Ballard,
who  wrote  that  in  his  early  youth,  even  before  he  could  speak,  he
had  had  thoughts  about  God  and  the  world.—What  can  he  have
meant?—Ballard  writes:  "It  was  during  those  delightful  rides,  some
two or three  years  before  my initiation  into  the  rudiments  of written
language,  that  I  began  to  ask  myself  the  question:  how  came  the
world into being?"—Are you sure—one would like to ask—that this
is  the  correct  translation  of your  wordless  thought  into  words?  And
why  does  this  question—which  otherwise  seems  not  to  exist—raise
its  head  here?  Do  I  want  to  say  that  the  writer's  memory  deceives
noe 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
him?—I don't even know if I should say that.  These recollections are
a  queer memory  phenomenon,—and  I  do  not  know what conclusions
one can draw from them about the past of the man who recounts them.
343.  The words with which I express my memory are my memory-
reaction.
344.  Would  it  be  imaginable  that  people  should  never  speak  an
audible  language,  but  should  still  say  things  to  themselves  in  the
imagination?
"If people  always  said  things  only  to  themselves,  then  they  would
merely be doing always what as it is they do sometimes."— So it is quite
easy to imagine this: one need only make the easy transition from some
to all.  (Like:  "An infinitely long row of trees is simply one that does
not come to an end.") Our criterion for someone's saying something
to himself is what he tells us and the rest of his behaviour; and we only
say  that  someone  speaks  to  himself if,  in  the  ordinary sense  of the
words,  he can speak.  And  we  do  not  say  it  of  a  parrot;  nor  of  a
gramophone.
345.  "What  sometimes  happens  might  always  happen."—What
kind  of proposition is  that?  It is  like the following:  If "F (0)" makes
sense "(*•).F(*-)"  makes sense.
"If it is  possible for someone to  make a false move in some game,
then  it  might  be  possible  for  everybody  to  make  nothing  but  false
moves in every game."—Thus we are under a temptation to misunder-
stand the  logic  of  our  expressions  here,  to  give  an incorrect account
of the  use  of our  words.
Orders are sometimes not obeyed.  But what  would it be like if no
orders  were ever  obeyed?  The  concept  'order'  would  have  lost  its
purpose.
346.  But  couldn't  we  imagine  God's  suddenly  giving  a  parrot
understanding, and its now saying things to itself?—But here it is an
important fact that I imagined a deity in order to imagine this.
347.  "But  at  least  I  know  from  my  own  case  v/hat it  means  'to
say things to oneself'.  And if I were deprived of the organs of speech,
I could still talk to myself."
If I  know it only from my own case, then I  know only what I call
that, not what anyone else does.
348.  "These deaf-mutes have learned only a gesture-language, but
each  of them  talks  to  himself inwardly  in  a  vocal  language."—Now,
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
don't  you  understand  that?—But  how  do  I  know  whether I  under-
stand it?!—What can I do with this information (if it is such)?  The
whole idea of understanding smells fishy here.  I do not know whether
I am  to  say I  understand  it or  don't  understand it.  I might answer
"It's an English sentence; apparently quite in order—that is, until one
wants to do something with it; it has a connexion with other sentences
which makes it difficult for us to say that nobody really knows what
it  tells  us;  but  everyone  who  has  not  become  calloused  by  doing
philosophy notices that there is something wrong here."
349.  "But  this  supposition  surely  makes  good  sense!"—Yes;  in
ordinary circumstances these words and this picture have an application
with which we are familiar.—But if we suppose a case in which this
application falls  away we become as it  were  conscious for the first
time of the nakedness of the words and the picture.
350.  "But if I suppose that someone has a pain, then I am simply
supposing that he has just the same as I have so  often had."—That
gets us no further.  It is as if I were to say:  "You surely know what
'It is 5  o'clock here' means; so you also know what 'It's  5  o'clock on
the sun' means.  It means simply that it is just the same time there as
it is here when it is 5 o'clock."—The explanation by means of identity
does not work here.  For I know well enough that one can call 5 o'clock
here and  5  o'clock there "the same time", but what I do not know is
in what cases one is to speak of its being the same time here and there.
In exactly the same way it is no explanation to say: the supposition
that he has a pain is simply the supposition that he has the same as I.
For that part of the grammar is quite clear to me: that is, that one will
say that the stove has the same experience as I, //"one says: it is in pain
and I am in pain.
351.  Yet  we  go  on  wanting  to  say:  "Pain  is  pain—whether he
has it,  or I have  it;  and  however I  come to  know whether he has  a
pain  or  not."—-I  might  agree.—And  when  you  ask  me  "Don't you
know,  then,  what I  mean  when I  say that  the  stove  is  in pain?"—I
can reply: These words may lead me to have all sorts of images; but
their usefulness  goes no further.  And I can also imagine something
in connexion with the words: "It was just 5  o'clock in the afternoon
on the  sun"—such as a grandfather clock which points  to  5.—But a
still better example would be that  of the  application  of "above"  and
"below"  to  the  earth.  Here  we  all  have  a  quite  clear  idea  of  what
IIZ
C
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
"above"  and  "below"  mean.  I  see well  enough that I  am  on  top;
the  earth  is  surely  beneath  me!  (And  don't  smile  at  this  example.
We are indeed  all  taught at  school  that  it is  stupid  to talk like that.
But it  is  much easier to  bury  a  problem than  to  solve  it.)  And  it is
only  reflection  that  shews  us  that  in  this  case  "above"  and  "below"
cannot be used in the ordinary way.  (That we might, for instance, say
that the  people  at the antipodes are  'below'  our part of the earth,  but
it must also be recognized as right for them to use the same expression
about us.)
352.  Here  it  happens  that  our  thinking  plays  us  a  queer  trick.
We  want,  that  is,  to  quote  the  law  of excluded  middle  and  to  say:
"Either such  an image is in his  mind,  or  it  is  not;  there  is  no  third
possibility!"—We encounter this queer argument also in other regions
of philosophy.  "In the decimal expansion of TT  either the group "7777"
occurs,  or it  does not—there is  no third  possibility."  That is  to say:
"God  sees—but  we  don't  know."  But  what  does  that  mean?—We
use a picture; the picture of a visible series which one person sees the
whole  of  and  another  not.  The  law  of excluded  middle  says  here:
It  must either  look  like this,  or  like  that.  So it really—and  this  is  a
truism—says nothing at all, but gives us a picture.  And the problem
ought now to be: does reality accord with the picture or not?  And this
picture seems to determine what we have to do, what to look for, and
how—but it does not do so, just because we do not know how it is to
be applied.  Here saying "There is no  third possibility"  or "But there
can't be a third possibility!"—expresses  our inability to turn  our eyes
away  from  this  picture:  a picture  which  looks  as  if it  must  already
contain  both  the  problem  and its  solution,  while  all  the  time  we feel
that it is not so.
Similarly when it is said "Either  he has this  experience,  or  not"—
what primarily occurs to us is a picture which by itself seems to make
the sense of the expressions unmistakable:  "Now you know what is in
question"—we should like to  say.  And that is precisely what it does
not  tell  him.
353.  Asking whether and how a proposition can be verified is only
 particular  way  of  asking  "How  d'you  mean?"  The  answer  is  a
contribution to the grammar of the proposition.
354.  The  fluctuation  in  grammar between  criteria  and  symptoms
makes  it  look as if there  were nothing  at  all but symptoms.  We say,
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I 
u
3
e
for example: "Experience teaches that there is rain when the barometer
falls,  but  it  also  teaches  that  there  is  rain  when  we  have  certain
sensations  of wet and cold,  or such-and-such visual impressions." In
defence  of this  one  says  that  these  sense-impressions  can  deceive  us.
But here one fails to reflect that the fact that the false appearance is
precisely one of rain is founded on a definition.
355.  The  point  here  is  not  that  our  sense-impressions  can  lie,
but  that  we  understand  their language.  (And  this  language  like  any
other  is  founded  on  convention.)
356.  One is inclined to say: "Either it is raining, or it isn't—how I
know,  how  the  information  has  reached  me,  is  another  matter."
But then let us put the question like this:  What do I call  "information
that  it  is  raining"?  (Or  have I  only information  of this  information
too?)  And what gives this  'information' the  character of information
about something?  Doesn't the form of our expression mislead us here?
For isn't it a misleading metaphor to say: "My eyes give me the informa-
tion that there  is a chair over there"?
357.  We  do  not  say  that possibly  a  dog  talks  to  itself.  Is  that
because we are so minutely acquainted with its soul?  Well, one might
say this: If one sees the behaviour of a living thing, one sees its soul.—
But do I also say in my own case that I am saying something to my-
self, because I am behaving in such-and-such a way?—I do not say it
from observation of my behaviour.  But it only makes sense because I do
behave in this way.—Then it is not because I mean  it that it makes sense?
358.  But  isn't it our meaning  it that  gives  sense  to the sentence?
(And here, of course, belongs the fact that one cannot mean a senseless
series  of words.)  And 'meaning it' is something in the sphere  of the
mind.  But it is also something private!  It is the intangible something;
only comparable to consciousness itself.
How could  this  seem  ludicrous?  It is,  as  it were,  a dream of our
language.
359.  Could  a machine think?——Could it be in  pain?—Well,  is
the human body to be called such a machine?  It surely comes as close
as possible to being such a machine.
360.  But  a  machine  surely  cannot  think!—Is  that  an  empirical
statement?  No.  We only say of a human being and what is like one
that  it  thinks.  We  also  say  it  of  dolls  and  no  doubt  of  spirits  too.
Look at the word "to think" as a tool.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested