view pdf winform c# : Change link in pdf SDK control service wpf web page .net dnn WittgensteinInvestigations6-part1306

U4
e
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
361.  The chair is  thinking to itself:  .... .
WHERE?  In  one  of  its  parts?  Or  outside  its  body;  in  the  air
around it?  Or not anywhere  at  all?  But then  what is  the  difference
between  this  chair's  saying  something  to  itself  and  another  one's
doing so, next to it?—But then how is it with man: where does he say
things to  himself?  How  does it  come about that this  question  seems
senseless;  and that no specification of a place  is  necessary  except  just
that  this  man is  saying something to himself?  Whereas the question
where the chair talks to itself seems to demand an answer.—The reason
is:  we  want to  know how   the  chair  is  supposed to  be  like a human
being; whether, for instance, the head is at the top of the back and so on.
What is it like to  say something to  oneself; what happens here?—
How am I to explain it?  Well, only as you might teach someone the
meaning of the expression "to say something to oneself".  And certainly
we  learn  the meaning  of that  as children.—Only no one  is  going to
say  that  the  person who teaches  it to us  tells us  'what  takes  place'.
362.  Rather  it  seems  to  us  as  though in  this  case  the instructor
imparted the meaning to the pupil—without telling him it directly;
but in the end the pupil is  brought to the  point of giving himself the
correct ostensive definition.  And this is where our illusion is.
363.  "But when 1 imagine something, something certainly happensV
Well, something happens—and then I make a noise.  What for?  Pre-
sumably in order to tell what happens.—But how is telling  done? When
are we  said  to tell anything?—What is the language-game  of telling?
I should  like  to  say:  you  regard it  much too  much as  a  matter  of
course  that  one  can  tell anything to anyone.  That is  to  say:  we are
so  much  accustomed  to  communication  through  language,  in  con-
versation, that it looks to us as if the whole point  of communication
lay  in  this:  someone  else  grasps  the  sense  of my  words—which  is
something  mental:  he  as  it  were  takes  it  into  his  own  mind.  If  he
then does  something  further  with  it  as  well,  that  is  no  part  of  the
immediate purpose of language.
One  would  like  to  say  "Telling  brings it about that he knows that
 am in  pain;  it produces  this  mental phenomenon;  everything  else  is
inessential  to  the  telling."  As  for  what  this  queer  phenomenon  of
knowledge  is—there  is  time  enough  for  that.  Mental  processes  just
are  queer.  (It  is  as  if one  said:  "The  clock  tells  us  the  time. What
time is, is not yet settled.  And as for what one tells the time for— that
doesn't come in here.")
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS  I 
ii
5
e
364.  Someone does a sum in his head.  Pie uses the result, let's say,
for building  a bridge  or a  machine.—Are you trying  to  say  that he
has not really arrived at this number by calculation?  That it has, say,
just 'come' to him in the manner of a kind of dream?  There surely must
have been  calculation  going on,  and  there  was.  For he knows  that,
and  how,  he  calculated;  and  the  correct  result  he  got  would  be
inexplicable  without  calculation.——But  what  if  I  said:  "// strikes
him as  if he had calculated. And why should the correct result be
explicable?  Is it not incomprehensible enough,  that without saying a
word,  without  making  a  note,  he  was  able  to  CALCULATE?"—
Is  calculating  in  the  imagination  in  some  sense  less  real  than
calculating  on  paper?  It  is real—calculation-in-the-head.—Is  it  like
calculation on paper?—I don't know whether to call it like.  Is a bit
of white  paper  with black lines  on it  like  a human  body?
365.  Do Adelheid and the Bishop play a real game of chess?—Of
course.  They are not merely pretending—which would also be possible
as part of a play.—But, for example, the game has no beginning!—
Of  course  it  has;  otherwise  it  would  not  be  a  game  of  chess.—
366.  Is a sum in the head less real than a sum on paper?—Perhaps
one is inclined to say some such thing; but one can get oneself to think
the opposite as well by telling oneself: paper, ink, etc. are only logical
constructions  out of our sense-data.
"I  have  done  the  multiplication . .... in  my  head"—do  I  perhaps
not believe  such  a statement?—But  was  it really  a  multiplication?  It
was not  merely 'a'  multiplication, but this one—in the head.  This is
the point at which I go wrong.  For I now want to  say:  it was  some
mental  process corresponding  to  the  multiplication  on  paper.  So  it
would make sense to  say: "This  process  in  the  mind  corresponds  to
this process on paper." And it would then make sense to talk of a
method of projection according to which the image of the sign was a
representation  of the  sign itself.
367.  The  mental  picture  is  the  picture  which  is  described  when
someone  describes  what he  imagines.
368.  I describe a  room to someone,  and  then get  him to paint an
impressionistic picture from this description to shew that he has
understood it.—Now he paints the  chairs which I  described  as green,
dark red; where I said "yellow", he paints blue.—That is the impression
Change link in pdf - insert, remove PDF links in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Free C# example code is offered for users to edit PDF document hyperlink (url), like inserting and deleting
adding a link to a pdf; clickable links in pdf
Change link in pdf - VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Help to Insert a Hyperlink to Specified PDF Document Page
adding links to pdf document; convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks
n6e 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
which he got of that room.  And now I say: "Quite right!  That's what
it's like."
369.  One  would  like  to  ask:  "What  is  it  like—what  happens—
when  one  does  a  sum  in  one's  head?"—And  in  a particular  case  the
answer  may  be  "First  I  add  17  and  18,  then  I  subtract  39 ....  .".
But that is not the answer to our question.  What is called doing sums
in one's head is not explained by such  an answer.
370.  One ought to ask, not what images are or what happens when
one  imagines  anything,  but  how  the  word  "imagination"  is  used.
But that does not mean that I want to talk only about words.  For the
question as to the nature of the imagination is as much about the word
"imagination"  as  my  question  is.  And  I  am  only  saying  that  this
question  is  not  to  be  decided—neither  for  the  person  who  does  the
imagining,  nor for anyone else—by pointing; nor yet by a description
of  any  process.  The  first  question  also  asks  for  a  word  to  be  ex-
plained; but it makes us expect a wrong kind of answer.
371. lELssence is expressed by grammar.
372.  Consider:  "The  only  correlate  in  language  to  an  intrinsic
necessity is an arbitrary rule.  It is the only thing which one can milk
out  of this  intrinsic necessity into a  proposition."
373.  Grammar  tells  what  kind  of object  anything  is.  (Theology
as grammar.)
374.  The great difficulty here is not to represent the matter as if
there were something one couldn't do.  As if there really were an object,
from which I derive its description,  but  I  were  unable  to shew  it to
anyone.———And the best that I can propose is that we should yield
to  the  temptation  to  use  this  picture,  but  then  investigate  how  the
application of the picture goes.
375.  How does one teach anyone to read  to himself?  How does
one know if he can do so?  How does he himself know that he is doing
what is required of him?
376.  When I  say the ABC to myself, what is  the criterion  of my
doing  the  same  as  someone  else  who  silently  repeats  it to  himself?
It might be found that the same thing took place in my larynx and in
his.  (And similarly when we both think of the same thing, wish the
same,  and  so  on.)  But  then  did  we learn  the  use  of the words:  "to
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
1176
say such-and-such to  oneself" by  someone's pointing  to a process  in
the larynx or the brain?  Is it not also perfectly possible that my image
of the sound a  and his correspond to different physiological processes?
The question is: How do we compare images?
377.  Perhaps  a logician will think:  The same  is  the  same—-how
identity is  established  is  a  psychological  question.  (High  is  high—
it is  a matter of psychology  that one sometimes sees,  and sometimes
hears it.)
What  is  the  criterion  for  the  sameness  of two  images?—What  is
the criterion for the redness of an image?  For me, when it is someone
else's image: what he says and does.  For myself, when it is my image:
nothing.  And what goes for "red" also goes for "same".
378.  "Before I judge that two images which I have are the same,
 must recognize  them as  the  same."  And  when that has happened,
how am I to know that the word "same" describes what I recognize?
Only if I can express my recognition in some other way, and  if it is
possible for someone else to teach me that "same" is the correct word
here.
For if I need a justification for using a word, it must also be one for
someone else.
379.  First I am aware  of it as this; and then I  remember what it
is called.—Consider: in what cases is it right to say this?
380.  Flow do I recognize  that  this  is  red?—"I  see that it is this;
and  then  I  know  that  that  is  what  this  is  called."  This?—What?!
What kind of answer to this question makes sense?
(You  keep  on  steering  towards  the  idea  of the  private  ostensive
definition.)
I could not apply any rules to a private transition from what is seen
to words.  Here the rules really would hang in the air; for the institu-
tion of their use is  lacking.
381.  How  do  I  know  that  this  colour  is  red?—It  would  be  an
answer to say:  "I have learnt English".
382.  At  these words  I form this image.  How can \justify this?
Has  anyone  shewn me the  image  of the  colour  blue  and told  me
that this is the image of blue?
What  is  the meaning  of the  words: "This image"?  How  does one
point to an image?  How does one point twice to the same image?
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Add password to PDF. Change PDF original password. Remove password from PDF. Set PDF security level. VB: Change and Update PDF Document Password.
adding links to pdf; add hyperlink to pdf acrobat
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. To C# Sample Code: Change and Update PDF Document Password in C#.NET. In
add hyperlink pdf; add link to pdf acrobat
n8« 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
383.  We  are  not  analysing  a  phenomenon  (e.g.  thought)  but  a
concept (e.g.  that of thinking),  and therefore the use of a word.  So
it may look as if what we were doing were Nominalism.  Nominalists
make the mistake of interpreting all words as names, and so of not really
describing their use,  but  only,  so  to  speak, giving a paper draft on
such a description.
384.  You learned the concept 'pain' when you learned language.
385.  Ask yourself: Would it be  imaginable for someone to learn
to  do  sums  in  his  head without  ever  doing written or oral ones?—
"Learning it" will mean: being made able to do it.  Only the question
arises, what will count as a criterion for being able  to do it?——But
is it  also possible  for some tribe  to  know  only of calculation  in the
head, and of no other kind?  Here one has to ask oneself: "What will
that be like?"—And so  one will have  to depict it as  a limiting case.
And  the question will  then arise whether we  are still willing  to  use
the  concept  of  'calculating  in  the  head'  here—or  whether  in  such
circumstances it has lost its purpose, because the phenomena gravitate
towards another paradigm.
386.  "But why have you so little confidence in yourself?  Ordinarily
you always know well  enough what it is to 'calculate.'  So if you say
you have calculated in imagination, then you will have done so.  If you
had not calculated, you would not have said you had.  Equally, if you
say  that  you  see  something  red  in  imagination,  then  it  will be  red.
You know what 'red' is elsewhere.—And further:  you do not always
rely on the agreement  of other people; for  you  often  report that you
have seen something no one else has."——But I do have confidence in
myself—I say without hesitation that I have done this sum in my head,
have imagined this colour.  The difficulty is not that I doubt whether
I really imagined anything red.  But it is this: that we should be able,
just  like that,  to point out or describe the colour we have imagined,
that  the  projection  of  the  image  into  reality  presents  no  difficulty
at all.  Are they then so alike that one might mix them up?—But I can
also recognize a man  from a  drawing straight  off.—Well, but can I
ask: "What does a correct image of this colour look like?" or "What
sort of thing is it?"; can I learn  this?
(I cannot accept his  testimony because it is  not testimony.  It only
tells me what he is inclined  to say.)
387.  The deep aspect of this matter readily eludes us.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I 
n
9
e
388.  "I  don't  see  anything  violet  here,  but  I  can  shew  it  you  if
you  give  me a paint box."  How  can one know  that  one  can shew it
if . . . ., in other words, that one can recognize it if one sees it?
How do I know from my image>  what  the colour really looks  like?
How do I know that I shall be able to do something? that is, that the
state I am in now is that of being able to do that thing?
389.  "The  image  must  be  more  like  its  object  than  any  picture.
For, however like I make the picture to what it is supposed to repre-
sent,  it can always be the picture of something else as well.  But it is
essential to the image that it is  the image  of this and  of nothing else."
Thus one might come to regard the image as a super-likeness.
390.  Could  one imagine  a stone's  having consciousness?  And  if
anyone can do so—why should that not merely prove that such image-
mongery is  of no interest to us?
391.  I can perhaps even imagine (though it is not easy) that each
of the people whom I see in the street is in frightful pain, but is artfully
concealing it.  And it is important that I have to imagine an artful con-
cealment here.  That I do not simply say to myself:  "Well, his  soul is
in pain: but what has that to do with his body?" or "After all it need
not  shew in his body!"—And if I  imagine  this—what do I  do;  what
do I say to myself; how do I look at the people?  Perhaps I look at one
and think:  "It must be difficult to laugh when one is in  such pain",
and much else of the same kind.  I as it were play a part, act as if the
others  were  in  pain.  When  I  do  this  I  am  said for  example  to  be
imagining  ....
392.  "When I imagine he is in pain, all that really goes on in me
is ...  ."  Then someone else says: "I believe I can imagine it without
thinking '.  .  .  .' " ("I believe I can think without words.")  This leads
to  nothing.  The  analysis  oscillates  between  natural  science  and
grammar.
393.  "When I imagine that someone who is laughing is really in
pain I don't imagine any pain-behaviour, for I  see just the opposite.
So what do  I  imagine?"—I  have  already  said  what.  And  I  do not
necessarily imagine my being in pain.——"But then what is the process
of  imagining  it?"——Where  (outside  philosophy)  do  we  use  the
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; 'create optimizing options TargetResolution = 150.0F 'to change image compression
add links to pdf acrobat; pdf hyperlink
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
3.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 3_optimized.pdf"; // create optimizing TargetResolution = 150F; // to change image compression mode
add links to pdf online; add link to pdf file
laoe 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
words  "I  can  imagine  his  being  in  pain"  or  "I  imagine  that . . . ."
or  "Imagine that .  .  .  ."?
We say, for example, to someone who has to play a theatrical part:
"Here  you  must  imagine  that  this  man  is  in  pain  and is  concealing
it"—and  now  we  give  him no  directions,  do not  tell  him  what  he
is actually   to  do.  For  this  reason  the  suggested  analysis  is  not  to
the  point  either.—We  now  watch  the  actor  who  is  imagining  this
situation.
394.  In what sort of circumstances should we ask anyone:  "What
actually went  on in  you  as you  imagined this?"—And  what  sort of
answer do we expect?
395.  There is a lack of clarity about the role of imaginability in our
investigation.  Namely  about  the  extent  to  which  it  ensures  that  a
proposition makes  sense.
396.  It is no more essential to the understanding of a proposition
that one should imagine anything in connexion with it, than  that  one
should make a sketch from it.
397.  Instead  of "imaginability" one  can also say here: represent-
ability by a particular  method  of representation.  And  such a  repre-
sentation may  indeed  safely point a way to further use of a sentence.
On the other hand a picture may obtrude itself upon us  and  be of no
use at all.
398.  "But when I imagine something, or even actually see objects,
 have got  something  which  my  neighbour has  not."—I  understand
you.  You want to look about you and say: "At any rate only I have
got  THIS."—What are  these  words  for?  They  serve  no  purpose.—
Can one not add:  "There is here no question of a 'seeing'—and there-
fore none of a 'having'—nor of a subject, nor therefore of T either"?
Might I not ask: In what sense have you got what you are talking about
and saying that only you have got it?  Do you possess it?  You do not
even see  it.  Must you not really say that no one has got it?  And this too
is  clear:  if  as  a  matter  of  logic  you  exclude  other people's  having
something, it loses its sense to say that you have it.
But what is the thing you are speaking of?  It is true I said that I
knew  within  myself what  you  meant.  But  that  meant  that  I  knew
how one thinks to conceive this object, to see it, to make one's looking
and pointing mean it.  I know hew one stares ahead and looks  about
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I 
rzie
one in this case—and the rest.  I think we can say: you are talking (if,
for example, you are sitting in a room) of the 'visual room'.  The 'visual
room' is the one that has no owner.  I can as little own it as I can walk
about it, or look at it, or point to it.  Inasmuch as it cannot be Any one
else's it is not mine either.  In other words, it does not belong to me
because I want to use the same form of expression about it as about the
material room in which I sit.  The description of the latter  need  not
mention  an  owner, in fact it need not have any owner.  But then the
visual room cannot have any owner.  "For"—one  might say—"it  has
no master,  outside  or  in."
Think of a picture of a landscape, an imaginary landscape with a
house  in  it.—Someone  asks  "Whose  house  is  that?"—The  answer,
by the way, might be "It belongs to the farmer who is sitting on the
bench in front of it".  But then he cannot for example enter his house.
399.  One  might  also  say:  Surely  the  owner  of  the  visual  room
would have to be the same kind of thing as it is; but he is not to be
found in it, and there is no outside.
400.  The  Visual  room'  seemed  like  a  discovery,  but  what  its
discoverer really found was a new way of speaking, a new comparison;
it might even be called a new sensation.
401.  You have a new conception and interpret it as seeing a new
object.  You  interpret  a  grammatical  movement  made  by  yourself
as a quasi-physical phenomenon which you are observing.  (Think for
example  of the question:  "Are sense-data the material of which  the
universe is made?")
But there is an objection to my saying that you have made a 'gram-
matical' movement.  What you have primarily discovered is a new way
of looking at things.  As if you had invented a new way of painting;
or, again, a new metre, or a new kind of song.—
402.  "It's true I say  'Now I am having such-and-such an image',
but  the  words  'I  am  having'  are  merely  a  sign  to  someone else;  the
description of the image is a complete account of the imagined world."—
You mean: the words "I am having" are like "I say! . . . ."  You are
inclined to say it should really have been expressed differently. Perhaps
simply by making a sign with one's hand and then giving a description.
—When as in this case, we disapprove of the expressions of ordinary
language (which are after all performing their office), we have got a
picture in our heads which conflicts with the picture of our ordinary
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
RasterEdge PDF SDK for .NET package offers robust APIs for editing PDF document hyperlink (url) and quick navigation link in PDF bookmark.
accessible links in pdf; add url pdf
RasterEdge .NET Document Imaging Trial Package Download Link.
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. FREE TRIAL: HOW TO:
convert doc to pdf with hyperlinks; add links to pdf in acrobat
i22« 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
way  of speaking.  Whereas  we  are  tempted  to  say  that  our  way  of
speaking  does  not  describe  the  facts  as  they  really  are.  As  if,  for
example the proposition "he has pains" could be false in some other way
than  by  that  man's not having  pains.  As  if the  form  of expression
were  saying  something  false  even  when  the  proposition faute de
mieux asserted something true.
For this  is  what  disputes  between  Idealists,  Solipsists  and  Realists
look like.  The  one party attack the  normal form  of expression as if
they were attacking a statement; the others defend it, as if they were
stating facts recognized by every reasonable human being.
403.  If I  were  to  reserve  the  word  "pain"  solely for what  I  had
hitherto  called  "my  pain",  and  others  "L.W.'s  pain",  I  should  do
other people no injustice, so long as a notation were provided in which
the  loss  of  the  word  "pain"  in  other  connexions  were  somehow
supplied.  Other  people  would still be  pitied,  treated  by doctors and
so on.  It would, of course, be no  objection to this mode of expression
to say: "But look here, other people have just the same as you!"
But  what should I  gain from this new  kind  of account?  Nothing.
But  after  all  neither  does  the solipsist want any practical  advantage
when he advances  his view!
404.  "When I say 'I am in pain', I do not point to a person who is
in pain, since in a certain sense I have no idea who  is."  And this can be
given a justification.  For the main point is: I did not say that such-and-
such a person was in pain, but  "I am . . . . . "  Now in saying this I
don't name any  person.  Just  as I  don't  name  anyone  when I groan
with  pain.  Though  someone  else  sees  who  is  in  pain  from  the
groaning.
What does it mean to know who  is in pain?  It means, for example,
to know which man in this room is in pain: for instance, that it is the
one who is sitting over there, or the one who is standing in that corner,
the  tall  one  over  there  with  the  fair  hair,  and  so  on.—What  am  I
getting  at?  At  the  fact  that  there  is  a  great  variety  of criteria  for
personal 'identity'''.
Now  which  of  them  determines  my  saying  that  '/'  am  in  pain?
None.
405.  "But  at any rate when  you say 'I am in  pain',  you want to
draw  the  attention  of  others  to  a  particular  person."—The  answer
might be: No, I want to draw their attention to myself.—
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
1236
406.  "But surely what you want to do with  the words 'I am. . . .'
is to distinguish between yourself and other people."—Can this be said
in every case?  Even when I merely groan?  And even if I  do  'want
to  distinguish'  between  myself and  other people—do  I  want  to  dis-
tinguish between the person L.W.  and the person N.N.?
407.  It  would  be  possible  to  imagine  someone  groaning  out:
"Someone  is  in  pain—I  don't  know  who!"—and  our then  hurrying
to help him, the one who groaned.
408.  "But you aren't in  doubt whether it is you or someone else
who  has  the  pain!"—The  proposition  "I  don't  know  whether  I
or someone else is in pain" would be a logical product, and one of its
factors  would  be:  "I  don't  know  whether  I  am  in  pain  or  not"—
and that is not a significant proposition.
409.  Imagine several people standing in a ring, and me among them.
One of us, sometimes  this  one, sometimes  that, is  connected to  the
poles  of an  electrical  machine  without our  being  able  to  see this.  I
observe the faces of the others and try to see which of us has just been
electrified.—Then  I  say:  "Now  I know   who  it  is;  for  it's  myself."
In this sense I could also say: "Now I know who is getting the shocks;
it is myself."  This would be a rather queer way of speaking.—But if I
make the  supposition  that  I  can feel  the  shock even  when  someone
else  is  electrified,  then  the  expression  "Now  I  know  who .  . . ."
becomes quite unsuitable.  It does not belong to this game.
410.  "I" is not the name of a person,  nor "here"  of a  place,  and
"this" is not a name.  But they are connected with names.  Names are
explained by means of them.  It is also true that it is characteristic of
physics not to use these words.
411.  Consider  how  the  following  questions  can  be  applied,  and
how  settled:
(1)  "Are these books my  books?"
(2)  "Is this foot my  foot?"
(3)  "Is this body my body?"
(4)  "Is this sensation my sensation?"
Each of these questions has practical (non-philosophical) applications.
(2) Think of cases in which my foot is anaesthetized or paralysed.
Under  certain circumstances  the  question  could be  settled by deter-
mining whether I can feel pain in this foot.
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Easy to change PDF original password; Options for setting PDF security level; PDF text Support adding and inserting hyperlink (link) to PDF document; Allow to
convert a word document to pdf with hyperlinks; add url link to pdf
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Rotate PDF Page in C#.NET. Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File Page Using C# Programming Language in .NET Application
pdf reader link; add links in pdf
I2
4
«
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
(3)  Here one might be pointing to  a mirror-image.  Under certain
circumstances, however, one might touch a body and ask the question.
In others it means the same as: "Does my body look like that?"
(4)  Which sensation does  one mean by 'this*  one?  That is: how is
one using the demonstrative pronoun here?  Certainly otherwise than
in, say, the first example!  Here confusion occurs because one imagines
that by directing one's attention to a sensation one is pointing to it.
412.  The  feeling  of an  unbridgeable  gulf between  consciousness
and  brain-process:  how  does  it  come  about  that  this  does  not  come
into the considerations of our ordinary life?  This idea of a difference in
kind is accompanied by slight giddiness,—which occurs when we are
performing  a  piece  of  logical  sleight-of-hand.  (The  same  giddiness
attacks us when we think of certain theorems in set theory.)  When does
this feeling occur in the present case?  It is when I, for example, turn
my  attention  in  a particular way on  to  my  own  consciousness,  and,
astonished,  say  to  myself:  THIS  is  supposed  to  be  produced  by  a
process in the  brain!—as it  were clutching  my forehead.—But what
can it mean to speak of "turning my attention on to my own conscious-
ness"?  This  is  surely  the  queerest  thing  there  could  bel  It  was  a
particular  act  of gazing  that  I  called  doing  this.  I  stared  fixedly  in
front of me—but not at any particular point or object.  My eyes were
wide open,  the brows  not contracted  (as they  mostly are  when I am
interested in a particular object).  No such interest preceded this gazing.
My  glance  was  vacant;  or  again like  that  of someone  admiring  the
illumination  of the  sky  and drinking in the light.
Now bear in mind that the proposition which I uttered as a paradox
(THIS  is  produced  by  a  brain-process!)  has  nothing  paradoxical
about it.  I  could have  said  it  in  the course of an  experiment whose
purpose was to shew that an effect of light which I see is produced by
stimulation of a particular part of the brain.—But I did not utter the
sentence in the surroundings in which it would have had an everyday
and  unparadoxical sense.  And  my  attention  was  not  such  as  would
have accorded with making  an experiment.  (If it had been, my look
would  have been intent,  not vacant.)
413.  Here we  have a  case  of introspection,  not  unlike that from
which  William James  got the  idea  that  the  'self'  consisted  mainly  of
'peculiar  motions  in  the  head  and  between  the  head  and  throat'.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I 
125*
And James' introspection shewed, not the meaning of the word "self"
(so far as it means something like "person", "human being", "he him-
self", "I myself"), nor any analysis of such a thing, but the state of a
philosopher's attention when he says  the word  "self" to himself and
tries to analyse its meaning.  (And a good deal could be learned from
this.)
414.  You think that after all you must be weaving a piece of cloth:
because  you are  sitting  at  a  loom—even  if it  is  empty—and  going
through  the  motions  of weaving.
415.  What  we  are  supplying  are  really  remarks  on  the  natural
history of human beings; we are not contributing curiosities however,
but observations which no one has doubted, but which have escaped
remark only because they are always before our eyes.
416.  "Human beings agree in saying that they see, hear, feel, and
so on (even though some are blind and some are deaf).  So they are
their own witnesses  that they have consciousness"—But how strange
this  is!  Whom  do  I  really inform,  if I  say  "I  have  consciousness"?
What is  the  purpose  of saying this  to  myself,  and how can another
person  understand  me?—Now,  expressions  like  "I  see",  "I  hear",
"I  am  conscious"  really have their  uses.  I  tell  a  doctor  "Now I  am
hearing with this ear again", or I tell someone who believes I am in a
faint "I am conscious again", and so on.
417.  Do I observe myself, then, and perceive that I am seeing or
conscious?  And why talk about observation at all?  Why not  simply
say "I perceive I am conscious"?—But what are the words "I perceive"
for here?—why not say  "I  am conscious"?—But don't  the  words  "I
perceive" here shew that I am attending to my consciousness?—which
is  ordinarily not the  case.—If so,  then  the  sentence  "I  perceive  I  am
conscious"  does not say that I am conscious,  but that my attention is
disposed in such-and-such a way.
But isn't it a particular experience  that  occasions  my saying  "I  am
conscious again"?—What experience?  In what situations do we say it?
418.  Is my having consciousness a fact of experience?—
But doesn't  one  say  that a man has  consciousness, and  that a tree
or a stone does not?—What would it be like if it were otherwise?—
Would human beings  all be unconscious?—No; not in the ordinary
sense  of  the  word.  But  I,  for  instance,  should  not  have  con-
sciousness——as I now in fact have it.
n6« 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
419.  In  what  circumstances  shall  I  say  that  a  tribe  has  a chief?
And the chief must surely have consciousness.  Surely we can't have a
chief without  consciousness!
420.  But can't I imagine that the people around me are automata,
lack  consciousness,  even  though  they  behave  in  the  same  way  as
usual?—If I  imagine it now—alone in  my  room—I  see  people  with
fixed looks  (as  in  a  trance)  going  about  their business—the  idea  is
perhaps a little uncanny.  But just try to keep hold of this idea in the
midst  of  your  ordinary  intercourse  with  others,  in  the  street,  say!
Say  to  yourself,  for  example:  "The  children  over  there  are  mere
automata; all their liveliness is mere automatism."  And you will either
find these  words  becoming  quite  meaningless;  or  you  will  produce
in yourself some kind of uncanny feeling, or something of the sort.
Seeing a living human being as an automaton is analogous to seeing
one figure as a limiting case or variant of another; the cross-pieces of a
window as a swastika, for example.
421.  It seems paradoxical to us that we should make such a medley,
mixing  physical  states  and  states  of consciousness up  together  in  a
single report: "He suffered great torments and tossed about restlessly".
It is quite usual; so why do we find it paradoxical?  Because we want
to say that the  sentence deals with both tangibles  and intangibles  at
once.—But  does  it worry  you if I  say:  "These  three struts  give the
building stability"?  Are three and stability tangible?——Look at the
sentence as an instrument, and at its sense as its employment.
422.  What am I believing in when I believe that men have souls?
What  am I  believing in,  when I  believe  that this  substance  contains
two carbon rings?  In both cases there is a picture in the foreground,
but the sense lies far in the background; that is, the application of the
picture is not easy to survey.
423. Certainly all these things happen in you.—And now all I ask
is to understand the expression we use.—The picture is there.  And I
am not disputing its validity in any particular case.—Only I also want
to understand the application of the picture.
424.  The picture is there;  and I do not  dispute  its correctness.  But
•what is its application? Think of the picture of blindness as a darkness
in the soul or in the head of the blind man.
425.  In numberless cases we exert ourselves to find a picture and
once it is found the application as  it were  comes  about  of itself.  In
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I 
i2
7
e
this case we already have a picture which forces itself on us at every
turn,—but does  not  help us  out of the  difficulty,  which only  begins
here.
If I ask, for example: "Plow am I to imagine this mechanism going
into this  box?"—perhaps  a drawing reduced in  scale may serve to
answer  me.  Then I  can be told:  "You see, it goes in  like this";  or
perhaps even:  "Why are you surprised?  See how it goes here; it  is the
same there".  Of course the latter does not explain anything more: it
simply invites me to apply the picture I am given.
426.  A  picture  is  conjured  up  which  seems  to fix the  sense un-
ambiguously. The actual use, compared with that suggested by the
picture, seems like something muddied.  Here again we get the same
thing as in set theory: the form of expression we use seems to have been
designed for a god, who knows what we cannot know; he sees the whole
of each of those infinite series and  he sees into human consciousness.
For us, of course, these forms of expression are like pontificals which
we may put on, but cannot do much with, since we lack the effective
power that would give these vestments meaning and purpose.
In the actual use of expressions we make detours, we go by side-
roads.  We  see  the  straight  highway  before  us,  but  of  course  we
cannot use it, because it is permanently closed.
427.  "While I was speaking to him I did not know what was going
on in his head."  In saying this, one is not thinking of brain-processes,
but  of thought-processes.  The  picture  should  be  taken  seriously.
We should really like to see into his head.  And yet we only mean what
elsewhere we should mean by saying: we should like to know what he
is thinking.  I want to say: we have this vivid picture—and that use,
apparently contradicting the picture, which expresses the psychical.
428.  "This  queer  thing,  thought"—but it  does  not  strike  us  as
queer when we are thinking. Thought does not strike us as mysterious
while we are thinking, but only when we say, as it were retrospectively:
"How was that possible?"  How  was it possible for thought to deal
with the very object itself?   We feel as if by means  of it we had  caught
reality  in  our net.
429.  The agreement, the harmony, of thought and reality consists
in this: if I say falsely that something is red, then, for all that, it isn't red.
iz8e 
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
And when I  want to  explain  the word  "red"  to someone,  in the sen-
tence "That is not red",  I  do it by pointing  to something  red.
430.  "Put a ruler against this body; it does not say that the body is
of such-and-such a length.  Rather is it in itself—I should like to say—
dead,  and  achieves  nothing  of  what  thought  achieves."—It  is  as  if
we had imagined that the essential  thing about a living man  was the
outward form.  Then we made a lump of wood in that form, and were
abashed to see the stupid block, which hadn't even any similarity to a
living  being.
431.  "There  is  a  gulf  between  an  order  and  its  execution.  It
has to be filled by the act of understanding."
"Only  in  the  act  of understanding  is  it  meant  that  we  are  to  do
THIS.  The order—— why, that is  nothing but sounds, ink-marks.—"
432.  Every sign by itself seems  dead. What gives it life?—In use
it is alive.  Is life breathed into it there?—Or is the use  its life?
433.  When we give  an order, it can look as  if the ultimate thing
sought by the order had to  remain  unexpressed,  as  there is always a
gulf between an order and its execution.  Say I want someone to make
a particular movement, say to raise his arm.  To make it quite clear, I
do the movement.  This picture seems unambiguous till we ask: how
does he know that he is to make that movement"?— How does he know at all
what use he is  to make of the signs I give him, whatever they are?—
Perhaps I shall now try to supplement the order by means  of further
signs, by pointing from myself to him, making encouraging gestures,
etc. .  Here it looks as if the order were beginning to stammer.
As if the signs were precariously trying to produce understanding in
us.—But  if we  now  understand  them,  by  what  token  do  we  under-
stand?
434.  The  gesture—we  should  like  to  say—tries  to  portray,  but
cannot do it.
435.  If it is asked: "How do sentences manage to represent?"—the
answer might be:  "Don't you know?  You certainly see it, when you
use them."  For nothing is concealed.
How do sentences do it?-—Don't you know?  For nothing is hidden.
But  given  this  answer:  "But  you  know  how  sentences  do  it,  for
nothing is concealed" one would like to retort "Yes, but it all goes by
so quick, and I should like to see it as it were laid open to view."
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
1296
436.  Here it is easy to get into that dead-end in philosophy, where
one  believes that the  difficulty  of the task consists  in our having to
describe phenomena that are hard to get hold of, the present experience
that slips quickly by, or something of the kind.  Where we find ordinary
language too crude, and it looks as if we were having to do, not with
the phenomena of every-day, but with ones that "easily elude us, and,
in their coming to be and passing away, produce those others  as an
average  effect".  (Augustine:  Manifestissima et usitatissima sunt,  et
eadem rusus nimis latent, et nova est inventio eorum.)
437.  A wish seems already to know what will or would satisfy it;
a proposition,  a  thought,  what  makes  it true—even  when that thing
is not there at all!  Whence this determining  of what is not yet there?
This  despotic demand?  ("The hardness  of the logical must.")
438.  "A  plan  as  such  is  something  unsatisfied."  (Like  a  wish,
an expectation, a suspicion, and so on.)
By this I mean: expectation is unsatisfied, because it is the expectation
of something; belief, opinion, is unsatisfied, because it is the opinion
that  something  is  the  case,  something  real,  something  outside  the
process  of believing.
439.  In what sense can one call wishes, expectations, beliefs,  etc.
"unsatisfied"?  What  is  our  prototype  of  nonsatisfaction?  Is  it  a
hollow  space?  And  would  one  call  that  unsatisfied?  Wouldn't  this
be a metaphor too?—Isn't what we call nonsatisfaction a feeling—say
hunger?
In a particular system of expressions we can describe an object by
means  of the  words  "satisfied"  and  "unsatisfied".  For  example,  if
we lay it down that we call a hollow cylinder an "unsatisfied cylinder"
and the solid cylinder that fills it "its satisfaction".
440.  Saying "I should like an apple" does not  mean:  I  believe  an
apple  will  quell  my  feeling  of nonsatisfaction. This  proposition  is
not an expression of a wish but of nonsatisfaction.
441.  By nature and by a particular training, a particular education,
we  are disposed to give spontaneous  expression to wishes  in certain
circumstances.  (A wish  is,  of course, not such  a 'circumstance'.)  In
this game the question whether I know what I wish before my wish is
t joe
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS I
131*
fulfilled cannot arise at all  And the fact that some event stops my wish-
ing does not mean that it fulfills it.  Perhaps I should not have been
satisfied if my wish had been satisfied.
On  the  other  hand  the word  "wish"  is  also  used  in  this  way:  "I
don't  know  myself  what I  wish for."  ("For wishes  themselves  are a
veil between us and the thing wished for.")
Suppose it were asked "Do I know what I long for before 1 get it?"
If I have learned to talk, then I do know,
442.  I  see someone  pointing  a  gun and  say "I  expect a  report".
The  shot  is  fired.—Well,  that  was  what  you  expected;  so  did  that
report somehow already exist in your  expectation?  Or is  it just that
there is some other kind of agreement between your expectation and
what occurred; that that noise was not contained in your expectation,
and merely accidentally  supervened when the expectation was being
fulfilled?—But no, if the noise had not occurred, my expectation would
not have been fulfilled; the noise fulfilled it; it was not an accompani-
ment of  the fulfilment  like a second guest accompanying  the one I
expected.—Was the thing about the event that was not in the expecta-
tion too an accident, an extra provided by fate?—But then what was
not an extra? Did something of the shot already occur in my expecta-
tion?—Then  what mas  extra?  for  wasn't  I  expecting the whole  shot?
"The report was not so loud as I had expected."—"Then was  there
a louder bang in your expectation?"
443.  "The red which you imagine is surely not the same (not the
same thing) as the red which you see in front of you; so how can you
say that it is what you imagined?"—But haven't we an analogous case
with the propositions "Here is a red patch" and "Here there isn't a
red  patch"?  The  word  "red"  occurs  in  both;  so  this  word  cannot
indicate the presence of something red.
444.  One may have the feeling that in the sentence "I expect he is
coming"  one  is  using  the  words  "he is  coming"  in a different  sense
from the one they have in the assertion "He is coming".  But if it were
so how could I say that my expectation had been fulfilled?  If I wanted
to explain the words "he" and "is coming", say by means of ostensive
definitions,  the same  definitions  of these  words  would  go for both
sentences.
But it might now be asked: what's it: like for him to come?—-The
door  opens, someone walks  in, and so on.—What's it like for me  to
expect  him  to  come?—I  walk  up  and  down  the  room,  look  at  the
clock now  and  then,  and  so  on.—But the one  set  of events  has  not
the smallest  similarity  to  the  other!  So how  can  one  use  the same
words in describing them?—But perhaps I say as I walk up and down:
"I expect he'll  come  in"—Now  there is  a similarity somewhere.  But
of what kind?!
445.  It is  in language  that an expectation and its fulfilment make
contact.
446.  It would be odd to say:  "A  process  looks different when it
happens  from  when  it  doesn't  happen."  Or  "A  red  patch  looks
different  when  it  is  there  from  when  it  isn't  there—but  language
abstracts from  this difference, for it speaks of a red patch whether it
is there or not."
447.  The feeling is as if the negation of a proposition had to make
it true in a certain sense, in order to negate it.
(The  assertion  of the  negative  proposition  contains  the proposition
which is negated, but not the assertion of it.)
448.  "If I say I did not dream last night, still I must know where
to  look  for  a  dream;  that  is,  the  proposition  'I  dreamt',  applied  to
this  actual  situation,  may  be  false,  but  mustn't  be  senseless."—Does
that mean, then, that you did after all feel something,  as it were the
hint of a dream, which made you aw
r
are  of the place which a dream
would have occupied?
Again: if I say  "I have no pain in my arm", does that mean that I
have a shadow of the sensation of pain, which as it were indicates the
place where the pain might be?
In what sense does my present painless state contain the possibility
of pain?
If anyone says: "For the word 'pain' to have a meaning it is necessary
that pain should be recognized as such when it occurs"—-one can reply:
"It  is  not  more  necessary  than  that  the  absence  of  pain  should  be
recognized."
449.  "But mustn't I know what it would be like if I were in pain?"
—We  fail to get  away  from  the idea that using a sentence  involves
imagining something for every word.
We do not realize that we calculate, operate, with words, and in the
course of time translate them sometimes into  one  picture,  sometimes
into another.—It is as  if one were to believe that a written order for a
1 3 2*
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I
cow which someone is to hand over to me always had to be accompanied
by an image of a cow, if the order was not to lose its meaning.
450.  Knowing what someone looks like: being able to call up an
image—but also: being able to mimic his expression.  Need one imagine
it in order to mimic it?  And isn't mimicking it just as good as imagin-
ing it?
451.  Suppose I give someone the order "Imagine a red circle here"
—and now I say: understanding the order means knowing what it is
like  for it to  have  been carried  out—or even:  being able to  imagine
what it is  like  ..... ?
452.  I want to  say:  "If someone could see the mental process  of
expectation, he would necessarily be seeing what was being expected."
—But that is the case: if you see the expression of an expectation, you
see what is being expected.  And in what other way, in what other sense
would it be possible to see it?
453.  Anyone  who  perceived  my  expectation  would  necessarily
have a direct perception of what was being expected.  That is to say, he
would not have to infer it from the process he  perceived!—But to say
that someone perceives an expectation makes no sense.  Unless indeed
it means, for example, that he perceives the expression of an expecta-
tion.  To say of an expectant person that he perceives his expectation
instead of saying that he expects, would be an idiotic distortion of the
expression.
454.  "Everything  is  already  there  in ...  ."  How  does  it  come
carry in it something besides itself? — "No, not the dead line on paper;
only the psychical thing, the meaning, can do that." — That is both
true and false.  The arrow points only in the application that a living
being makes of it.
This pointing is not a hocus-pocus which can be performed only by
the soul.
455.  We want to say: "When we mean something, it's like going
up to someone, it's not having a dead picture (of any kind)."  We go
up  to the  thing we mean.
456.  "When one means something, it is oneself meaning"; so one is
oneself in  motion.  One  is  rushing ahead  and so cannot also observe
oneself rushing ahead.  Indeed not.
PHILOSOPHICAL  INVESTIGATIONS  I 
1330
457.  Yes: meaning something is like going up to someone.
458.  "An order orders its own execution."  So it knows its execu-
tion,  then,  even  before  it  is  there?—But  that  was  a  grammatical
proposition  and  it  means:  If an  order runs  "Do  such-and-such"  then
executing the order is  called "doing such-and-such."
459.  We  say  "The  order  orders this— "  and do  it;  but also  "The
order  orders  this:  I  am to ...  ."  We  translate it at  one  time  into  a
proposition,  at  another  into  a  demonstration,  and  at  another  into
action.
460.  Could the justification of an action as fulfilment of an order
run like this:  "You said 'Bring me a yellow flower', upon which this
one gave me a feeling of satisfaction; that is why I have brought it"?
Wouldn't  one  have  to  reply:  "But  I  didn't  set  you  to  bring  me  the
flower which should give you that sort of feeling after what I said!"?
461.  In  what  sense  does  an  order  anticipate  its  execution?  By
ordering just that which later on is carried out?—But one would have
to  say  "which  later  on  is  carried  out,  or  again  is  not  carried  out."
And  that is  to  say nothing.
"But even if my wish does not determine what  is  going  to be  the
case, still it does so to speak determine  the  theme of a fact, whether
the  fact  fulfils  the  wish  or  not."  We  are—as  it  were—surprised,  not
at anyone's  knowing the future,  but  at  his  being  able  to prophesy  at
all (right or wrong).
As  if the  mere  prophecy,  no  matter  whether  true  or  false,  fore-
shadowed  the  future;  whereas  it  knows  nothing  of  the  future  and
cannot  know less  than nothing.
462.  I  can look  for him when  he  is  not  there,  but not hang him
when he is not there.
One might want to say:  "But he must be somewhere there if I am
looking for him."—Then he must be somewhere there  too if I don't
find him and even if he doesn't exist at all.
463.  "You were looking for him?   You can't even have known if
he was  there!"—But this problem  really  does arise when  one looks
for something in mathematics.  One can ask, for example, how was it
possible so much as to look for the trisection of the angle?
464.  My  aim  is:  to  teach  you  to  pass  from a  piece  of disguised
nonsense to something that is patent nonsense.
points'? Doesn't it seem to
about  that  this  arrow
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested